On this day in history, August 29, 1966, the Beatles played their last live paid concert

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Why Beatles stopped touring

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The Beatles – Live At Candlestick Park (1966)

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On this day in history, August 29, 1966, the Beatles played their last live paid concert

John, Paul, George and Ringo took to the stage in San Francisco’s Candlestick Park on this day in history

The Beatles came together for their final live performance on this day in history, August 29, 1966.

The concert at Candlestick Park in San Francisco was never announced as the band’s last dance, but there was plenty of speculation that the boys were looking to call it quits, according to The Beatles Bible.

Although the Fab Four made a surprise appearance on the rooftop of the Apple building in London on Jan. 30, 1969, Ringo Starr wrote in an anthology that it was clear the Candlestick Park performance would be the band’s official finale.

“There was a big talk at Candlestick Park that this had got to end,” Starr wrote in the anthology.

“At that San Francisco gig it seemed that this could possibly be the last time, but I never felt 100% certain till we got back to London.”

The Beatles perform "Rain" and "Paperback Writer" on the BBC TV show "Top of the Pops" in London on June 16, 1966.

The Beatles perform “Rain” and “Paperback Writer” on the BBC TV show “Top of the Pops” in London on June 16, 1966. (Mark and Colleen Hayward/Redferns)

Starr revealed that bandmate John Lennon was itching to give up more than the others.

“He said that he’d had enough,” he wrote.

Even though The Beatles have been recognized all over the globe — including in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame — as one of the most influential bands of all time, the group’s final performance was not particularly show-stopping.

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While the park’s capacity was 42,500 people, only 25,000 tickets were sold, according to The Beatles Bible, which left large gaps in seating sections.

The Beatles’ fee to play was about $90,000 — while fans paid $4.50 to $6.50 per ticket.

The Beatles pull up to perform at Candlestick Park in San Francisco on Aug. 29, 1966.

The Beatles pull up to perform at Candlestick Park in San Francisco on Aug. 29, 1966. (Bob Campbell/San Francisco Chronicle via Getty Images)

The show turned out to be a financial loss for promoter Tempo Productions, due to low ticket sales and the arrangement that 15% of sales would go to the city of San Francisco.

Candlestick Park was originally the home of Major League Baseball’s San Francisco Giants.

The stage was located on the field, just behind second base. It stood five feet high.

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The Aug. 29 show began at 8 p.m., starting with supporting acts The Remains, Bobby Hebb, The Cyrkle and the Ronettes.

The show’s emcee, “Emperor” Gene Nelson of KYA 1260 AM radio, described the August night as “cold, foggy and windy” in the book “The Beatles Off the Record” by Keith Badman.

A poster advertising The Beatles' final concert at Candlestick Park in San Francisco, California, on Aug. 29, 1966.

A poster advertising The Beatles’ final concert at Candlestick Park in San Francisco, California, on Aug. 29, 1966. (GAB Archive/Redferns)

“The funniest thing this night was one of the warm-up acts, Bobby Hebb. He stood up on the stage at Candlestick Park, with the fog, and the wind blowing, and he was singing ‘Sunny’!” he said.

Nelson remarked that emceeing the event was difficult, especially since The Beatles were “taking their time” backstage.

“The dressing room was chaos,” he said. “There were loads of people there. The press tried to get passes for their kids and the singer Joan Baez was in there. Any local celebrity, who was in town, was in the dressing room.”

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“They were having a party in there. They were having a perfectly wonderful time, while I was freezing my buns off on second base!”

George Harrison, center, Ringo Starr, partially obscured, and the rest of The Beatles walk onto the infield of San Francisco's Candlestick Park for their last paid public concert on Aug. 29, 1966.

George Harrison, center, Ringo Starr, partially obscured, and the rest of The Beatles walk onto the infield of San Francisco’s Candlestick Park for their last paid public concert on Aug. 29, 1966. (Robert Stinnett/Oakland Tribune; Digital First Media Group/Oakland Tribune via Getty Images)

The band finally hit the stage at 9:27 p.m. and played an 11-song setlist, according to The Beatles Bible.

This included the tracks “Rock and Roll Music,” “She’s a Woman,” “If I Needed Someone,” “Day Tripper,” “Baby’s in Black,” “I Feel Fine,” “Yesterday,” “I Wanna Be Your Man,” “Nowhere Man,” “Paperback Writer” and “Long Tall Sally.”

George Harrison recounted setting up the camera with a “fisheye, wide-angle lens” on top of an amplifier.

As the group realized the performance would be their last, Lennon and McCartney brought a camera on stage to document the moment.

They took pictures of the crowd and of themselves in selfie-style — well ahead of their time.

In “The Beatles Off The Record,” George Harrison recounted setting up the camera with a “fisheye, wide-angle lens” on top of an amplifier.

Police officers clear the field of enthusiastic fans as The Beatles perform at Candlestick Park, San Francisco, California, on Aug. 29, 1966.

Police officers clear the field of enthusiastic fans as The Beatles perform at Candlestick Park, San Francisco, California, on Aug. 29, 1966. (Bettmann/Contributor via Getty Images)

“Ringo came off the drums, and we stood with our backs to the audience and posed for a photograph, because we knew that was the last show,” Harrison said.

McCartney was set on fully memorializing the moment, asking Beatles press officer Tony Barrow to capture the concert on audio cassette.

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“I remember Paul, casually, at the very last minute, saying, ‘Have you got your cassette recorder with you?’ and I said, ‘Yes, of course,’” Barrow said in “The Beatles Off the Record.”

“Paul then said, ‘Tape it, will you? Tape the show,’ which I did.”

Barrow went on to describe the performance as “nothing special” in comparison to other shows, except for some extra musical ad-libs.

Barrow recorded 30 minutes of the show on one side of the tape, which cut off during the last song, “Long Tall Sally.”

Only two copies were made — one for McCartney and one for Barrow — but bootleg recordings have been widely surfaced since.

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“If you hear a bootleg version of the final concert that finishes during ‘Long Tall Sally,’ it must have come either from Paul’s copy or mine,” Barrow wrote in his book “John, Paul, George, Ringo and Me.”

“But we never did identify the music thief!”

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The Beatles – In my Life

Published on Feb 25, 2011

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Here Comes The Sun – The Beatles Tribute

Not sung by George but good nonetheless!!

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The Beatles – Revolution

Published on Oct 20, 2015

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Wikipedia noted:

It was created by Jann Haworth and Peter Blake, who in 1967 won the Grammy Award for Best Album Cover, Graphic Arts for their work on it. 

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Image result for jann haworth

Actually Jann Haworth reached out to me when she read some of my posts in this series and she rightly noted that she picked out most of the figures on the cover and not the individual Beatles. In fact, many of the artists featured on the cover were friends of hers and I made sure and pointed that out in my posts. However, there were some picks done by the Beatles and some of the picks did reflect the spirit of the 1960’s such as Aldous Huxley who wrote the book The Doors of Perception, which recalls experiences when taking a psychedelic drug; Francis Schaeffer had a lot to say about Huxley and the 1960’s drug movement. In fact, I attempted to base all my posts on Francis Schaeffer’s writings.

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The rock band the DOORS got their name from Huxley’s book.

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Francis Schaeffer’s favorite album was SGT. PEPPER”S and he said of the album “Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band…for a time it became the rallying cry for young people throughout the world. It expressed the essence of their lives, thoughts and their feelings.”  (at the 14 minute point in episode 7 of HOW SHOULD WE THEN LIVE? ) 

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How Should We Then Live – Episode Seven – 07 – Portuguese Subtitles

Francis Schaeffer

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782 × 439Images may be subject to copyright

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FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE PART 202 the BEATLES’ last song FREE AS A BIRD (Featured artist is Susan Weil )

February 15, 2018 – 1:45 am

FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE Part 200 George Harrison song HERE ME LORD (Featured artist is Karl Schmidt-Rottluff )

FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE PART 184 the BEATLES’ song REAL LOVE (Featured artist is David Hammonds )

FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE Part 170 George Harrison and his song MY SWEET LORD (Featured artist is Bruce Herman )

FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE Part 168 George Harrison’s song AWAITING ON YOU ALL Part B (Featured artist is Michelle Mackey )

FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE Part 167 George Harrison’s song AWAITING ON YOU Part A (Artist featured is Paul Martin)

RESPONDING TO HARRY KROTO’S BRILLIANT RENOWNED ACADEMICS!! Part 133 Louise Antony is UMass, Phil Dept, “Atheists if they commit themselves to justice, peace and the relief of suffering can only be doing so out of love for the good. Atheist have the opportunity to practice perfect piety”

FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE Part 166 George Harrison’s song ART OF DYING (Featured artist is Joel Sheesley )

FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE Part 165 George Harrison’s view that many roads lead to Heaven (Featured artist is Tim Lowly)

FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE Part 164 THE BEATLES Edgar Allan Poe (Featured artist is Christopher Wool)

PART 163 BEATLES Breaking down the song LONG AND WINDING ROAD (Featured artist is Charles Lutyens )

FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE PART 162 A look at the BEATLES Breaking down the song ALL WE NEED IS LOVE Part C (Featured artist is Grace Slick)

PART 161 A look at the BEATLES Breaking down the song ALL WE NEED IS LOVE Part B (Featured artist is Francis Hoyland )

FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE PART 160 A look at the BEATLES Breaking down the song ALL WE NEED IS LOVE Part A (Featured artist is Shirazeh Houshiary)

FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE Part 159 BEATLES, Soccer player Albert Stubbins made it on SGT. PEP’S because he was sport hero (Artist featured is Richard Land)

FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE Part 158 THE BEATLES (breaking down the song WHY DON’T WE DO IT IN THE ROAD?) Photographer Bob Gomel featured today!

FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE Part 118 THE BEATLES (Why was Tony Curtis on cover of SGT PEP?) (Feature on artist Jeffrey Gibson )

FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE Part 117 THE BEATLES, Breaking down the song WITHIN YOU WITHOUT YOU Part B (Featured artist is Emma Amos )

Featured artist is  Mark Dion

Mark Dion

Mark Dion was born in New Bedford, Massachusetts, in 1961. He received a BFA (1986) and an honorary doctorate (2003) from the University of Hartford, School of Art, Connecticut. Dion’s work examines the ways in which dominant ideologies and public institutions shape our understanding of history, knowledge, and the natural world. “The job of the artist,” he says, “is to go against the grain of dominant culture, to challenge perception and convention.” Appropriating archaeological and other scientific methods of collecting, ordering, and exhibiting objects, Dion creates works that question the distinctions between “objective” (“rational”) scientific methods and “subjective” (“irrational”) influences.

The artist’s spectacular and often fantastical curiosity cabinets, modeled on Wunderkabinetts of the sixteenth century, exalt atypical orderings of objects and specimens. By locating the roots of environmental politics and public policy in the construction of knowledge about nature, Mark Dion questions the authoritative role of the scientific voice in contemporary society.

He has received numerous awards, including the ninth annual Larry Aldrich Foundation Award (2001). He has had major exhibitions at Miami Art Museum (2006); the Museum of Modern Art, New York (2004); the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, Ridgefield, Connecticut (2003); and Tate Gallery, London (1999). Neukom Vivarium (2006), a permanent outdoor installation and learning lab for the Olympic Sculpture Park, was commissioned by the Seattle Art Museum. Dion lives and works in Pennsylvania.

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