Monthly Archives: May 2012

John Brummett: President Obama has not been big spender

Dan Mitchell explains in the above video that Europe can grow and prosper, but only if politicians are willing to reduce the burden of government spending and lower tax rates.

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I have a lot of respect for Tea Party heroes like Tim Huelskamp and Justin Amash who are willing to propose deep spending cuts so we can eventually balance our budget. Nevertheless there are some liberals like John Brummett that want us to think that President Obama did right by doing that stimulus spending and he has not been a big spender. I will straighten that out later in this post.

It is a fact that we must balance the budget soon. I do not believe that we can wait to balance the budget at some distant time in the future. The financial markets will not allow us a long time to get our house in order. Look at how things have been going the last four years and no matter how anyone tries to spin it, we are going down the financial drain fast. Dan Mitchell of the Cato Institute showed in an article that I posted earlier about how much spending has exploded the last four years.

John Brummett wrote in the online addition of the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette on May 30, 2012:

Obama did indeed run up the deficit with a stimulus measure to keep the economy from collapsing as he entered office…But in regard to budgets that he actually has proposed as president, beginning with the one for the fiscal year starting nearly a year after his election, Obama has raised spending at a slower rate than Clinton…

Republicans simply are more effective than Democrats at declaring a simple untruth loudly and repetitively through a pliable and powerful echo chamber of talk radio and cable news, thus embedding that untruth beneath the superficial consciousness of people otherwise disengaged.

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Now the truth of the matter is that Obama has spent around 25% of GDP when Clinton and most of the other presidents spent 20% or less. This fact allow disproves Brummett’s assertions listed above.

Dan Mitchell of the Cato Institute sets the record straight concerning Obama’s spending:

Last week, I jumped into the surreal debate about whether Obama has been the most fiscally conservative president in recent history.

I sliced the historical data from the Office of Management and Budget a couple of ways, showing that overall spending has grown at a relatively slow rate during the Obama years. Adjusted for inflation, both total spending and primary spending (total spending minus interest payments) have been restrained.

So does this make Obama a fiscal conservative?

And how can these numbers make sense when the President saddled the nation with the faux stimulus and Obamacare?

Good questions. It turns out that Obama supposed frugality is largely the result of how TARP is measured in the federal budget. To put it simply, TARP pushed spending up in Bush’s final fiscal year (FY2009, which began October 1, 2008) and then repayments from the banks (which count as “negative spending”) artificially reduced spending in subsequent years.

The combination of those two factors made a big difference in the numbers. Here’s another table from my prior post, looking at how the presidents rank when you subtract both defense and the fiscal impact of deposit insurance and TARP.

All of a sudden, Obama drops down to the second-to-last position, sandwiched between two of the worst presidents in American history. Not exactly a ringing endorsement.

But this ranking is incomplete. At that point, I was trying to gauge Obama’s record on domestic spending, and the numbers certainly provide some evidence that he is a stereotypical big-spending liberal.

But the main debate is about which president was the biggest overall spender. So I’ve run through the numbers again, and here’s a new table looking at the rankings based on average annual changes in inflation-adjusted primary spending, minus the distorting impact of deposit insurance and TARP.

Obama is still in the second-to-last position, but spending is increasing by “only” 5.5 percent per year rather than 7.0 percent annually. This is obviously because defense spending is not growing as fast as domestic spending.

Reagan remains in first place, though his score drops now that his defense buildup is part of the calculations. Clinton, conversely, stays in second place but his score jumps because he benefited from the peace dividend after Reagan’s policies led to the collapse of the Soviet Empire.

Let’s now look at these numbers from a policy perspective. Rahn Curve research shows that government is far too big today, so the goal of fiscal policy should be to restrain the burden of government spending relative to economic output.

This means that policy moves in the right direction when government grows more slowly than the private sector, as it did under Reagan and Clinton.

But if government spending is growing faster than the productive sector of the economy, as has been the case during the Bush-Obama years, then a nation eventually will become Greece.

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Future SEC football schedules in discussion

Arkansas and LSU have met as each other's regular season finale since the Hogs joined the SEC for football in 1992.
Image by Mark Wagner
Arkansas and LSU have met as each other’s regular season finale since the Hogs joined the SEC for football in 1992.
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I am for the 6-1-1 format because I really do think that Tennessee and Alabama have a lot of history in that series and so do Auburn and Georgia in their series.

I admit that none of the other schools have a history in the other series. Miss St v. Kentucy and Ole Miss v Vandy and SC v. Texas A&M and Arkansas v. Missouri are not barnburners with a great history.

I do think that new series like that could turn into great series. For instance, Arkansas is next door to Missouri and could turn into an intense rivalry. In fact, maybe that should be played the last week of the year since the LSU v Arkansas game is no longer going to be the last week of the year after this year according to Arkansas Sports 360.

Scheduling is hot topic at SEC meet

by David Paschall

With two days down and two days remaining at the Southeastern Conference spring meetings, the future football scheduling format continues to be passionately debated.

The only certainty is that Steve Spurrier’s proposal that only division games determine division winners is out.

SEC commissioner Mike Slive described the 6-1-1 model, in which each team plays its six divisional opponents, a permanent foe from the opposite division and a rotating foe from the opposite division, as “the leader in the clubhouse.” LSU officials, however, would like to end their annual matchup against Florida and believe a 6-2 model would be more balanced and would enhance the frequency in which teams from the opposite sides would play.

“Mississippi State is going to play Kentucky every year, and I think that is disproportionate,” Tigers coach Les Miles told reporters Wednesday at the gathering in Destin, Fla. “I’m not for Auburn playing Georgia every year. Again, it’s disproportionate. I think there should be an opportunity to see a greater segment of the conference.”

Said LSU athletic director Joe Alleva: “It’s not because I’m opposed to playing Florida. I just think it creates a competitive inequity. In my opinion, people are voting for their own self-interests, not what is best for the whole league.”

Adopting a 6-2 model would eliminate Alabama playing Tennessee and Auburn playing Georgia on an annual basis. There has been discussion of those four schools using a 6-1-1 format and the other 10 teams going with a 6-2.

“We have looked at that, and there is some real complexities with that,” Slive said. “That is a nice solution if it was available, but like everything else, every time we do something it raises another set of issues, and you have got to balance those against the issues raised by another format.”

Coaches voiced their concerns to their athletic directors Wednesday, and the athletic directors are scheduled to make their recommendation to school presidents Friday.

The league’s basketball counterparts have had a much easier time, proposing an 18-game schedule in which each team would play the other 13 teams at least once. There would be one permanent home-and-home series annually, while the remaining four games would rotate among the other 12 teams.

Among the permanent basketball rivalries would be Tennessee-Vanderbilt, Florida-Kentucky, Alabama-Auburn and Georgia-South Carolina, so Kentucky and Tennessee no longer would play twice in most years.

Contact David Paschall at dpaschall@timesfreepress.com or 423-757-6524.

Top football stadiums in the country (Part 9)

South Carolina D vs Arkansas O 2011

Tennessee ’86 Sugar Bowl Memories by Russ Finley

Uploaded by on Dec 12, 2009

All video footage is copyright of WATE-TV6 and the University of Tennessee, but legally reproduced here in conjunction with Fair Use laws.

Vols feature (1986 win over Miami 35-7 in the USF&G Sugar Bowl) Russ Finley and Russ Hollingsworth

Here is a list of the top football stadiums in the country.

Power Ranking All 124 College Football Stadiums  

By Alex Callos

(Featured Columnist) on April 19, 2012 

When it comes to college football stadiums, for some teams, it is simply not fair. Home-field advantage is a big thing in college football, and some teams have it way more than others.

There are 124 FBS college football teams, and when it comes to the stadiums they play in, they are obviously not all created equal.

There is a monumental difference from the top teams on the list to the bottom teams on the list. Either way, here it is: a complete ranking of the college football stadiums 1-124.

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When I think of South Carolina it makes me think of how good they were last year and still everyone overlooked them. Did you know that #9 South Carolina came into Fayetteville last year to play the #7 Razorbacks but since #1 v #2 were playing at the same time in Alabama that night nobody talked about the Razorback victory.

Tennessee’s coach Johnny Major got his coaching start at Arkansas and he led Tennessee back into the top 10 in 1985 with a 35-7 Sugar Bowl victory over top ranked Miami.

64. Sun Life Stadium: Miami (FL) Hurricanes
Sunlifestadiummiami_display_image

Sun Life Stadium is probably more widely known as being home to the Miami Dolphins, and also the Orange Bowl.

The Miami Hurricanes also call this place home. It has been around since 1987 and seats 76,500.

The atmosphere here is average as best, and the stadium is kind of located in a not-so-great residential area.

Still, this is Miami, so the weather is nice, and the place can get loud at times.

 

63. Memorial Stadium: Illinois Fighting Illini

Memorial_stadium_2008_display_image

Memorial Stadium is another of those old facilities with bleacher seating.

It was built in 1923 and seats 62,872. The Fighting Illini have not been too good in recent years, but the stadium is usually packed with a sea of orange.

The surrounding area is great, but everything inside is average and on the lower end of the scale as far as Big Ten goes.

 

62. Raymond James Stadium: South Florida Bulls

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Raymond James Stadium is an excellent place to watch and NFL game. As far as college goes, though, it is average.

Built in 1998 for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, this stadium is very new compared to other college fields.

It seats 66,321, and there is not a bad seat in the house. It has an open feel to it so visitors can enjoy the nice Tampa weather.

Overall, not a bad place; just not with as much of a college atmosphere as other stadiums.

 

61. Floyd Casey Stadium: Baylor Bears

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Floyd Casey Stadium was built in 1950 with a seating capacity of 50,000.

Perhaps the best aspect about the older stadium is the fans. They fill up the place and bring quite an atmosphere to the stadium.

It has been renovated multiple times, as recently as 2004, and that is keeping it up to date and in the middle of this list.

 

60. Romney Stadium: Utah State Aggies

Romneystadium_display_image

Built in 1968, this stadium only has a seating capacity of 25,513, but what sets this stadium apart from many others is the beautiful surrounding area.

There are mountains in the background, making this a perfect place to come for a late-afternoon game as the sun sets.

The atmosphere inside is not bad as well, and the isolated town of Logan makes for a nice place to watch a game.

 

59. Gerald J. Ford Stadium: SMU Mustangs

Ford-stadium-aerial_12

This horseshoe shaped stadium was built in 2000 with a seating capacity of 32,000.

The stadium is actually located right in downtown Dallas and has the atmosphere of a more eastern campus than those in the south.

One of the standout aspects of this stadium is the SMU band known as the “Hub of SMU Spirit.”

 

58. BB&T Field: Wake Forest Demon Deacons

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There are not a lot of tiny stadiums in the country with an atmosphere quite like the 31,500-seat BB&T Stadium.

Even though it is small in size, with such an excellent atmosphere, this stadium built in 1968 cracks the top 60 on the list.

All of the features of the stadium are updated, and it has a newer feel even though it is nearly 50 years old.

Certainly one of the most unique in the ACC.

 

57. Falcon Stadium: Air Force Falcons

Falcon-stadium-400_original_display_image

Even though it may not look like it, this stadium seats 46,692. It was built in 1962 and has the most amazing backdrop of any college football stadium.

While Utah State has quite a background outside of their stadium, the Rocky Mountains surrounding Falcon Stadium are simply superb.

The stadium is 6,620 feet above sea-level, making it the second-highest of all the stadiums. There is a lot to see in and around the stadium here that makes the experience something to remember.

 

56. Folsom Field: Colorado Buffaloes

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Located in the middle of the beautiful campus of Colorado, Folsom Stadium is one of the older facilities in the country, having been around since 1924. 

It seats 53,750 and has gone through a few improvements and expansions over the years, allowing it to stay updated.

There are big-screen televisions on each end of the field, something a lot of stadiums do not have. A six-story press box has also recently been added.

 

55. Williams-Brice Stadium: South Carolina Gamecocks

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Williams-Brice Stadium is one of the larger stadiums in the country, with a seating capacity of 80,250. Built in 1934, it is also relatively old as far as stadiums are concerned.

There is a lot to experience here outside of the stadium before, during and after the game.

As one of the 20 largest stadiums in the country, this place can get a little loud, and while it is not one of the top stadiums in the SEC, there is a lot here to enjoy on a Saturday afternoon.

Hank Hanegraaff on the issue of abortion (Part 4)

Church History & Abortion

Uploaded by on Sep 30, 2010

This 10.5 minute Power Point presentation gives statements from Church leaders (early and late) regarding the Christian Church’s opposition to abortion.

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I am hopeful that we will have some pro-life judges appointed in the future. Without that happening then abortion will continue to go up at a rapid pace.

Should abortions be permitted in the case of rape or incest?

 

When the subject of abortion comes up, rape and incest are often used as an emotional appeal designed to deflect serious consideration of the pro-life position: “How can anyone deny a hurting woman safe medical care and freedom from the terror of rape or incest by forcing her to maintain a pregnancy resulting from the cruel and criminal invasion of her body?” The emotion of the argument often precludes serious examination of its merits.

First, it is important to note that the incidence of pregnancy as a result of rape is rare, with studies estimating that approximately 1 percent to 4.7 percent of rapes result in pregnancy. Thus lobbying for abortion on the basis of rape and incest is like lobbying for the removal of red lights because you might have to run one in order to rescue someone who is about to commit suicide. Even if we had legislation restricting abortion for all reasons other than rape or incest, we would save the vast majority of the 1.8 million preborn babies who die annually in the United States through abortion.

Furthermore, one does not obviate the real pain of rape or incest by compounding it with the murder of an innocent preborn child. Two wrongs do not make a right. The very thing that makes rape evil also makes abortion evil. In both cases, an innocent human being is brutally dehumanized.

In both cases, an innocent human being is brutally dehumanized. Finally, the real question is whether abortion is the murder of an innocent human being. If so, abortion should be avoided at all costs. In an age of scientific enlightenment we now know that the embryo even at its earliest stages fulfills the criteria needed to establish the existence of biological life (including metabolism, development, the ability to react to stimuli, and cell reproduction); that a zygote is a living human being as demonstrated by its distinct genetic code; and that human personhood does not depend on size, location, or level of dependence. Thus, abortion should be avoided even in cases of rape and incest.

For further study, see Hank Hanegraaff, “Annihilating Abortion Arguments,” available through the Christian Research Institute (CRI) at http://www.equip.org.

Proverbs 17:15:
“Acquitting the guilty and condemning the innocent-the LORD detests them both.”

Open letter to President Obama (Part 85)

President Obama c/o The White House
1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW
Washington, DC 20500

Dear Mr. President,

I know that you receive 20,000 letters a day and that you actually read 10 of them every day. I really do respect you for trying to get a pulse on what is going on out here.

It seems that government was in control of the desert then we would have a shortage of sand as Milton Friedman used to quip.

You Keep Using the Word ‘Affordable.’ I Do Not Think It Means What You Think It Means.

Posted by Michael F. Cannon

The federal government gave a $10 million “affordability” prize to a giant corporation for manufacturing a $50 lightbulb. The Washington Post:

The U.S. government last year announced a $10 million award…for any manufacturer that could create a “green” but affordable light bulb.

Energy Secretary Steven Chu said the prize would spur industry to offer the costly bulbs…at prices “affordable for American families.”…

Now the winning bulb is on the market.

The price is $50.

Retailers said the bulb, made by Philips, is likely to be too pricey to have broad appeal. Similar LED bulbs are less than half the cost.

This is the same federal government that refers to ObamaCare, which costs more than $6 trillion, as the “Affordable Care Act.”

Thank you so much for your time. I know how valuable it is. I also appreciate the fine family that you have and your commitment as a father and a husband.

Sincerely,

Everette Hatcher III, 13900 Cottontail Lane, Alexander, AR 72002, ph 501-920-5733, lowcostsqueegees@yahoo.com

Religious Liberty: Obamacare’s First Casualty

Uploaded by on Feb 22, 2012

http://blog.heritage.org/2012/02/22/morning-bell-religious-liberty-under-attack/ | The controversy over the Obama Administration’s anti-conscience mandate and the fight for religious liberty only serves to highlight the inherent flaws in Obamacare. This conflict is a natural result of the centralization laid out under Obamacare and will only continue until the law is repealed in full.

Dear Senator Pryor, why not pass the Balance Budget Amendment? ( “Thirsty Thursday”, Open letter to Senator Pryor)

Dear Senator Pryor,

Why not pass the Balanced  Budget amendment? As you know that federal deficit is at all time high (1.6 trillion deficit with revenues of 2.2 trillion and spending at 3.8 trillion).

On my blog www.HaltingArkansasLiberalswithTruth.com I took you at your word and sent you over 100 emails with specific spending cut ideas. However, I did not see any of them in the recent debt deal that Congress adopted. Now I am trying another approach. Every week from now on I will send you an email explaining different reasons why we need the Balanced Budget Amendment. It will appear on my blog on “Thirsty Thursday” because the government is always thirsty for more money to spend.

Marco Rubio is one of your fellow citizens and he noted:

A balanced budget amendment would be a necessary step in reversing Washington’s tax-borrow-spend mantra. It would force Congress to balance its budget each year – not allow it to pass our problems on to the next generation any longer.

The Balanced Budget Amendment is the only thing I can think of that would force Washington to cut spending. We have only a handful of balanced budgets in the last 60 years, so obviously what we are doing is not working. We are passing along this debt to the next generation.

Thank you for this opportunity to share my ideas with you.

Sincerely,

Everette Hatcher, lowcostsqueegees@yahoo.com

 In my two short months in office, it has become clear to me that the spending problem in Washington is far worse than many of us feared. For years, politicians have blindly poured more and more borrowed money into ineffective government programs, leaving us with trillion dollar deficits and a crippling debt burden that threatens prosperity and economic growth.

In the Florida House of Representatives, where a balanced budget is a requirement, we had to make the tough choices to cut spending where necessary because it was required by state law. By no means was this an easy process, but it was our duty as elected officials to be accountable to our constituents and to future generations of Floridians. In Washington, a balanced budget amendment is not just a fiscally-responsible proposal, it’s a necessary step to curb politicians’ decades-long penchant for overspending.

Several senators have proposed balanced budget amendments that ensure Congress will not spend a penny more than we take in, while setting a high hurdle for future tax hikes. I am a co-sponsor of two balanced budget amendments, since it is clear that these measures would go a long way to reversing the spending gusher we’ve seen from Washington in recent years.

During my Senate campaign, while surrounded by the employees of Jacksonville’s Meridian Technologies, I proposed 12 simple ways to cut spending in Washington. That company, founded 13 years ago, has grown into a 200-employee, high-tech business, and the ideas I proposed would help ensure that similar companies have the opportunity to start or expand just like Meridian did.

To be clear, our unsustainable debt and deficits are threatening companies like Meridian and impeding job creation. In addition to proposing a balanced budget amendment, I recommended canceling unspent “stimulus” funds, banning all earmarks and returning discretionary spending to 2008 levels.

Fortunately, some of my ideas have found their way to the Senate chamber. The first bill I co-sponsored in the Senate was to repeal ObamaCare, the costly overhaul of our nation’s health care system that destroys jobs and impedes our economic recovery. Democratic leaders in the Senate have expressed their willingness to ban earmarks for two years after the Senate Republican conference adopted a moratorium. I have also co-sponsored the REINS Act, a common-sense measure that would increase accountability and transparency in our outdated and burdensome regulatory process. These bills, along with a balanced budget amendment, would help get our country back on a sustainable path and provide certainty to job creators.

While Republicans are proposing a variety of ideas to rein in Washington’s out-of-control spending, unfortunately, President Obama’s budget for the upcoming fiscal year proposes to spend $46 trillion, and even in its best year, the deficit would remain above $600 billion. Worst of all, the President’s budget completely avoids addressing the biggest drivers of our long-term debt – Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid.

Rather than tackle these tough, serious issues, President Obama is proposing a litany of tax hikes on small businesses and entrepreneurs, to the tune of more than $1.6 trillion. These tax increases destroy jobs, make us less competitive internationally and hurt our efforts to grow the economy and get our fiscal house in order.

A balanced budget amendment would be a necessary step in reversing Washington’s tax-borrow-spend mantra. It would force Congress to balance its budget each year – not allow it to pass our problems on to the next generation any longer.

Marco Rubio

Marco Rubio, a Republican, is a U.S. senator from Florida and former speaker of the Florida House of Representatives.

Should the 10 Commandments be banned from public life?(Part 1, David Barton’s Affidavit in support on 10 Commandments)

 

I read back on Dec 8, 2011 that Tony Perkins, president of Family Research Council, a social conservative advocacy organization, said in 2011 that President Obama has been “hostile” and “disdainful” toward Christianity. Rick Perry actually said President Obama had a war on religion. One of the most basic things that our founding fathers did is base our laws on the ten commandments. At the Supreme Court there is one depiction showing Moses sitting, holding two blank stone tablets. There is one depiction showing Moses standing holding one stone tablet. There are two stone tablets depicted with Roman Numbers I-X carved in the oak doors

David Barton has studied the history of the founding of our country for many years and I wanted to share a portion of adocument he wrote concerning the 10 Commandments:

David Barton – 01/03/2001
(View the footnoted version on Liberty Council’s website)

UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT

EASTERN DISTRICT OF KENTUCKY

LONDON DIVISION


SARAH DOE and THOMAS DOE, on behalf

of themselves and their minor child, JAN DOE

Plaintiffs,

v Civil Action No. 99-508

HARLAN COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT;

DON MUSSELMAN, in his official capacity

as Superintendent of the Harlan Country

School District,

Defendents.

______________________________________________

AFFIDAVIT OF DAVID BARTON IN SUPPORT OF DEFENDANTS’ OPPOSITION TO PLAINTIFFS’ MOTION FOR CONTEMPT, OR, IN THE ALTERNATIVE, FOR SUPPLEMENTAL PRELIMINARY INJUNCTION

STATE OF TEXAS

COUNTY OF PARKER

Upon being duly sworn by the undersigned officer empowered to administer and attest to oaths, the Affiant, David Barton, testifies as follows:

1. I am a recognized authority in American history, particularly concerning the Colonial, Revolutionary, and Federal Eras.

2. I personally own a vast collection of thousands of documents of American history predating 1812, including handwritten works of the signers of the Declaration and the Constitution.

3. As a result of my expertise, I work as a consultant to national history textbook publishers and have been appointed by the State Boards of Education in States such as California and Texas to help write the American history and government standards for students in those States. Additionally, I consult with Governors and State Boards of Education in several other States and have testified in numerous State Legislatures on American history.

4. I am the recipient of several national and international awards, including the George Washington Honor Medal, the Daughters of the American Revolution Medal of Honor, Who’s Who in America (1997, 1999), Who’s Who in the World (1996, 1999), Who’s Who in American Education (1996, 1997), International Who’s Who of Professionals (1996), Two Thousand Notable American Men Hall of Fame (1995), Who’s Who in the South and Southwest (1995, 1999), Who’s Who Among Outstanding Americans (1994), Outstanding Young Men in America (1990), and numerous other awards.

5. I have also written and published numbers of books and articles on American history and its related issues. (Original Intent, 1996;Bulletproof George Washington, 1990; Ethics: An Early American Handbook, 1999; Lives of the Signers of the Declaration of Independence, 1995, and many others).

6. I offer the following opinion regarding whether the Ten Commandments are a historical document in America’s civil and judicial history based upon my expertise and study in the areas of American history and the forces and ideas that formed the basis for our system of laws and government.

INTRODUCTION

7. Opponents to the public display of the Ten Commandments offer several grounds for their objections, including that there is no “˜standard version’ of the Ten Commandments”; that there is not agreement on exactly what constitutes the Ten Commandments“; and that “the Ten Commandments are not a “˜secular’ moral code that everyone can agree on” and therefore are not appropriate to be included in a display of documents that have helped shape America’s history. In fact, these groups warn that if the Decalog [sic] was publicly displayed“it “could create religious friction, leading to feelings of anger and of marginalization“ and that these emotions are precisely the root causes of the Columbine High School tragedy.“

8. The Decalogue addresses what were long considered to be man’s vertical and horizontal duties. Noah Webster, the man personally responsible for Art. I, Sec. 8, ¶ 8, of the U. S. Constitution, explained two centuries ago:

The duties of men are summarily comprised in the Ten Commandments, consisting of two tables; one comprehending the duties which we owe immediately to God-the other, the duties we owe to our fellow men.

9. Modern critics, while conceding “six or five Commandments are moral and ethical rules governing behavior,” also point out that because the remaining “four of the Ten Commandments are specifically religious in nature,” that this fact alone should disqualify their display. They assert that only one of the two “tablets” of the Ten Commandments is appropriate for public display.

10. In an effort to substantiate this position historically, critics often point to the Rhode Island Colony under Roger Williams and its lack of civil laws on the first four commandments to “prove” that American society was traditionally governed without the first “tablet.” However, they fail to mention that the Rhode Island Colony was the only one of the thirteen colonies that did not have civil laws derived from the first four divine laws -the so-called first “tablet.” Significantly, every other early American colony incorporated the entire Decalogue into its own civil code of laws.

11. This affidavit will demonstrate that, historically speaking, neither courts nor civil officers were confused or distracted by the so-called “various versions” of the Decalogue and that each of the Ten Commandments became deeply embedded in both American law and jurisprudence. This affidavit will establish that a contemporary display of the Ten Commandments is the display of a legal and historical document that dramatically impacted American law and culture with a force similar only to that of the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights.

Loretta Ross’ son: A case for pro-life position

Superbowl commercial with Tim Tebow and Mom.

In Little Rock on January 21, 2012 in front of 100 pro-choice advocates met next to the Capitol to hear Loretta Ross speak. In that talk she pointed out something about her own experience. (Below is from another speech in which she recounts some of the same details.)

Loretta Ross: Frankly, I’m a woman who at 14, became pregnant through incest. It was not voluntary at all, OK? At the time my son was born, and I had to carry that pregnancy to term, because it was pre-Roe. 1969. I had the option of giving my child up for adoption. I found I couldn’t do it. I took one look at his face and I couldn’t do it. So I ended up parenting that kid and I’m glad I had him. I’m glad I parented him. but at the same time, anyone who acts like it’s just so easy to carry a child to term, give birth and them just hand the baby over to somebody else obviously has never done it. And the women I’ve talked to who have done it, often regret having done it. Even more so than the so-called women who regret having abortions. So it’s a scheme designed to make black women feel guilty, it builds on the fantasy of adoption being easy and it ignores the fact that something like 4 out of 5 children in adoption agencies that are hard to place are African-American.

Notice her words: “I took one look at his face and I couldn’t do it. So I ended up parenting that kid and I’m glad I had him. I’m glad I parented him.”

Let me share a similar story. I used to write letters to the editor a whole lot back in the 1990’s.  I am pro-life and many times my letters would discuss current political debates, and I got to know several names of people that would often write in response letters to my published letters. One of those individuals was a Dr. William F. Harrison from Fayetteville. Later I found out from reading an article by David Sanders that Dr. Harrison was an abortionist. Dr Harrison died from leukemia on September 24, 2010. Here is a post from Jason Tolbert from July of 2010:

KFSM in Fayetteville is reporting that abortist William Harrison is closing the doors to his abortion clinic in nothwest Arkansas for health reasons. In an ABC News story a few year ago, Harrison said he had performed over 10,000 abortions and was comfortable with the taking of life.

I now write a column for Stephen Media in a spot once held by conservative David J. Sanders who is currently running for the Arkansas House of Representatives.  Sanders shadowed Harrison in his abortion clinic and wrote of series of columns on the experience.  I think these are prehaps Sanders’ best work…

Harrison is sure that what he does is right, but he confessed to the enormous costs that come in his line of work. There were threats against his wife and children and staff. He commented that if he “had known” everything – the threats, the risks – that would take place over the years, he might not have decided to provide abortions.

Some years ago, a 16-year-old daughter of a close friend of the family had gotten pregnant. “Their Baptist minister had advised her parents that she shouldn’t have an abortion and that (if she did) she would regret it the rest of her life. But had I had the choice, at the time, I would have advised (the mother of the teenager) to have that child aborted,” he said as he stared at his desktop.

“Well, she had her baby. She’s as smart as a whip,” he said. Now, years later, that baby is grown and about to finish her doctorate at the University of California at San Francisco.

I asked him if that sent chills up his spine. His response: “Absolutely.”

Austerity not practiced in Britain yet

Uploaded by on Feb 26, 2012

I wish we would put in real spending cuts in the USA instead of fake ones like the ones in the United Kingdom.

Looking at ‘Austerity’ in Britain

Posted by Juan Carlos Hidalgo

I’m going to jump into the debate about austerity in Europe because it is being closely followed in Latin America, and many people are drawing the wrong conclusions about how austerity is strangling the European economies. But first, we have to be clear about what we mean by “austerity.”

As the debate between Veronique de Rugy of the Mercatus Center and Ryan Avent at The Economist shows, there are different definitions of austerity. The term could mean fiscal consolidation only by spending cuts. It could mean a mixture of spending cuts and tax increases (the so called “balanced approach”), and it could even be just tax increases. So when people blame “austerity” for Europe’s economic malaise, we could be talking about a very different set of policies in each country.

Let’s look at Britain, which just entered into a double dip recession because of, according to Paul Krugman, “the evident failure” of austerity policies. If we look at spending levels in the UK both in nominal and real terms, we can clearly see that despite the announcement of deep cuts, government spending continues to rise:


Source: European Commission, Economic and Financial Affairs.

It’s clear that, at least in nominal terms, the rate of growth of spending has declined, but that hardly constitutes brutal cuts as Krugman and others want us to believe. If we look at total government spending as a percentage of the economy, Britain reached a peak in 2009 at 51.5%, and that came down to 49.9% in 2011. Can anyone seriously argue that Britain is in a recession because of that tiny drop in spending as a share of the economy?

Now, let’s remember that the Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition government that came to power in May 2010 adopted what The Economist hailed as a balanced approach of fiscal consolidation based on £1 of tax increases for £3 of spending cuts. To be fair, the British magazine also said that if economic recovery proved hard to achieve, the government should consider a reprieve in tax increases, but not on spending cuts. We all know that the tax increases already took place (the VAT rate went up from 17.5% to 20%, for example). But as we can see, spending cuts haven’t taken place at all. Thus, austerity in Britain consists only of tax increases.

It’s hard to estimate the impact of tax increases on the British economy. Certainly the economic turmoil in Continental Europe has played a role in taking the U.K. into a second recession. But those who claim that “austerity” is responsible for Britain’s economic malaise should be honest and acknowledge that by austerity they mean only tax increases, not spending cuts.

President Obama praises Pat Summitt

I have tried my best to point out President Obama’s political and economic shortcomings but I have to give him credit for doing this today.

President Barack Obama awards Pat Summitt, former women's college basketball head coach, the Presidential Medal of Freedom in the East Room of the White House, Tuesday, May 29, 2012, in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Photo by AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster

President Barack Obama awards Pat Summitt, former women’s college basketball head coach, the Presidential Medal of Freedom in the East Room of the White House, Tuesday, May 29, 2012, in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Obama hails Pat Summitt as role model in medal ceremony

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama paid tribute today to former Tennessee Lady Vols Coach Pat Summitt, presenting her with the nation’s highest civilian honor, the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

At a White House ceremony this afternoon, Obama reflected on Summitt’s legendary career at Tennessee, her status as a role model to the young women she coached, and her tenacity in confronting the health problem that led to her retirement last spring.

“Anyone feeling sorry for Pat will find themselves on the receiving end of that famous glare,” Obama said.

Summitt was among more than a dozen political and cultural legends to receive the medal. The award is given to individuals “who have made especially meritorious contributions to the security or national interests of the United States, to world peace, or to cultural or other significant public or private endeavors.”

Tennessee head coach Pat Summitt raises her arm in celebration, after Tennessee defeated Stanford 64-48 for the NCAA National Championship at the St. Pete Time's Forum in Tampa, FL on April 8, 2008.<br /><br />
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<p>Photo by <a title=Saul Young

Tennessee head coach Pat Summitt raises her arm in celebration, after Tennessee defeated Stanford 64-48 for the NCAA National Championship at the St. Pete Time’s Forum in Tampa, FL on April 8, 2008.

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Summitt, 59, stepped down as the University of Tennessee women’s head basketball coach in April, just eight months after disclosing that she has been diagnosed with early-onset dementia, Alzheimer’s type.

Her remarkable, 38-year career included 1,098 victories and eight national championships. She was named NCAA Coach of the Year eight times and has been a member of the Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame since 1999. She now holds the position of head coach emeritus at UT.

Besides Summitt, others receiving the Presidential Medal of Freedom include former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright; singer and songwriter Bob Dylan; astronaut John Glenn; novelist Toni Morrison; Israeli President Shimon Peres; and retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens.

Tennessee coach Pat Summitt, left, shakes hand with Connecticut coach Geno Auriemma before an NCAA college basketball game in Knoxville, Tenn., on Jan. 7, 2006. Tennessee won, 89-80.

Photo by Wade Payne

Tennessee coach Pat Summitt, left, shakes hand with Connecticut coach Geno Auriemma before an NCAA college basketball game in Knoxville, Tenn., on Jan. 7, 2006. Tennessee won, 89-80.

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More details as they develop online and in Wednesday’s News Sentinel.

Tennessee's coach Pat Summitt, left, reacts with her team as they pull ahead in the final minutes against Connecticut to win 68-67, in Hartford, Conn., Saturday, January, 8, 2005.

Photo by Steve Miller, Associated Press

Tennessee’s coach Pat Summitt, left, reacts with her team as they pull ahead in the final minutes against Connecticut to win 68-67, in Hartford, Conn., Saturday, January, 8, 2005.

President Barack Obama looks to Pat Summitt, former women's college basketball head coach, as he awards her the Presidential Medal of Freedom in the East Room of the White House, Tuesday, May 29, 2012, in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

AP

President Barack Obama looks to Pat Summitt, former women’s college basketball head coach, as he awards her the Presidential Medal of Freedom in the East Room of the White House, Tuesday, May 29, 2012, in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

President Barack Obama awards the Medal of Freedom to former basketball coach Pat Summitt during a ceremony in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, May 29, 2012. The Medal of Freedom is the nation's highest civilian honor. It's presented to individuals who have made especially meritorious contributions to the national interests of the United States, to world peace or to other significant endeavors. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

AP

President Barack Obama awards the Medal of Freedom to former basketball coach Pat Summitt during a ceremony in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, May 29, 2012. The Medal of Freedom is the nation’s highest civilian honor. It’s presented to individuals who have made especially meritorious contributions to the national interests of the United States, to world peace or to other significant endeavors. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

Pat Summitt, former women's college basketball head coach, talks with Bob Dylan after they received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in the East Room of the White House, Tuesday, May 29, 2012, in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

AP

Pat Summitt, former women’s college basketball head coach, talks with Bob Dylan after they received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in the East Room of the White House, Tuesday, May 29, 2012, in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Pat Summitt, former women's college basketball head coach, looks on as musician Bob Dylan, right, and former Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens shake hands after they received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in the East Room of the White House, Tuesday, May 29, 2012, in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

AP

Pat Summitt, former women’s college basketball head coach, looks on as musician Bob Dylan, right, and former Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens shake hands after they received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in the East Room of the White House, Tuesday, May 29, 2012, in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)