Monthly Archives: September 2016

Brian Bosworth did a great job at our LITTLE ROCK TOUCHDOWN CLUB!!!

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The Little Rock Touchdown Club Presents Special Guest Brian Bosworth

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Bosworth: ’87 Orange Bowl act ‘selfish’

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By Jeremy Muck

This article was published September 27, 2016 at 2:08 a.m.

Almost 30 years later, Brian Bosworth regrets his actions after his NCAA suspension from the 1987 Orange Bowl.

Bosworth, a two-time All-American linebacker and Butkus Award winner at Oklahoma, was ruled ineligible for the Orange Bowl in Miami against Arkansas after testing positive for steroids.

At the game, in which Oklahoma routed Arkansas 42-8, Bosworth wore a T-shirt that mocked the NCAA, referring to the organization as “National Communists Against Athletes” and had a phrase “Welcome to Russia” on it as well.

Bosworth, now 51, spoke to the Little Rock Touchdown Club on Monday at the Embassy Suites and told the crowd the suspension was all about him, referring to his “Boz” persona in the 1980s.

“It took away immediately everything good that had happened building my relationship with Oklahoma — the school, the coaches, my teammates, the fans — because of a selfish decision,” an emotional Bosworth said. “Sometimes you don’t understand the impact of your decision. You think it’s funny at the time. It’s not that big of a deal, but it was. That one came out across the United States.

“It breaks my heart that I burned that bridge at that time so unnecessarily. It didn’t matter. That game would have come and gone and we would have moved on. It would have been forgotten. But I had to make a big deal out of it because it was about me.”

Bosworth was then dismissed from Oklahoma and declared himself eligible for the NFL supplemental draft and was selected by the Seattle Seahawks in 1987.

One of Bosworth’s career highlights was the Sooners beating Texas in 1985 en route to winning the national championship. It came one year after Oklahoma had tied Texas 15-15, so beating the Longhorns was a big deal for Bosworth, who recalled an interview he had after the 1984 game.

“We got robbed. I was mad,” Bosworth said. “I was dumb in those days. I didn’t know I had to be politically correct. So the guy asked me if I was a Texas boy. I said, ‘No, I’m an Oklahoma boy.’ I don’t like Texas. That burnt orange makes me want to puke. I can’t stand it.”

Bosworth became a born-again Christian in 2013 and said when the Boz became bigger than himself, he had to make a change in his life.

“Everybody’s journey is different, but it’s very unique in the fact that it all ends the same,” Bosworth said. “It all ends with us asking for Jesus Christ to come into our hearts and save us and guide us, to give us the instructions that we need for us to stop fighting ourselves and be better people.”

Bosworth’s NFL career was cut short in 1989 after two seasons because of a shoulder injury. He’s known for one of the most talked-about plays in NFL history when he was run over by Los Angeles Raiders running back Bo Jackson for a touchdown during a Monday night game at Seattle in 1987.

Both Jackson and Bosworth were recently featured in a Kia commercial together depicting the play. Bosworth has come to terms with the play and calls Jackson a friend today.

“He’s a great guy,” Bosworth said. “That’s the thing about the brotherhood of being football players. We can agree to disagree for 60 minutes and hate each other for 60 minutes. Then we can come back afterwards and be great friends because we know the sacrifices that we’re making. We’re pounding our bodies against each other. We’re doing it because of the pride, the loyalty we have to our schools, the colors we’re wearing and the number we have on our chest.”

Sports on 09/27/2016

Print Headline: Bosworth: ’87 Orange Bowl act ‘selfish’

ESPN 30 For 30 Brian and the Boz

 

Brian Bosworth Finds Redemption While Losing ‘The Boz’

Brian Bosworth is arguably college football’s greatest middle linebacker and one of its most talked about players. He thrived as both a hero and a villain while playing at Oklahoma. Brian says, “It was the internal fight between choosing the selfish road instead of the selfless road. I don’t ever want to go back. There was nothing about that place that was good.”

A place that energized an icon, when 20-year old Brian emerged as The Boz – a brash, flamboyant personality with a disposition and defiance that charged his on-field success.

Brian explains, “To me, “The Boz” is the monster on the field. That’s how I identify with him. He is the alter ego of Brian. “The Boz” was my outlet where I could scream as loud as I wanted to, and needed to.”

What fueled the on-field intensity? Brian remembers, “I was out of control inside. I was a cyclone. I took all of my aggressiveness and my loneliness out on that field because I just had it all pent up and I just wanted to let it explode on anybody that was around me.”

Physicality became his trademark. By his junior year, Brian was the face of Sooner Football and winner of the first two Butkus Awards as the nation’s top college linebacker. He remains the only player ever to have won the accolade more than once. Brian recalls,  “Coach Switzer came and screamed in my ear, ‘Brian Bosworth is the best college linebacker in the country.’ Thee defining moment for me! My coaching idol, to respect me on that level was something that I had worked for and dreamed about from the time I was 6 years old.”

Brian grew up spending childhood summers with his grandparents on an Oklahoma farm, in the town of Meeker, Oklahoma — an ironic name – given “The Boz’s” brazen persona.  Brian says, “In Meeker, Oklahoma, are some of the most cherished moments to me, calmness, stability and supportive love. My grandfather was very vital in my work ethic and the character that you must have.”

It gave Brian confidence to confront challenge and instilled a necessary reminder that his refugee was never far away saying, “The world was so big, the farm was so big, the cows were so big, the chores were so enormous. But yet, at the end of the day, they were done. That base was already solid inside me. I just had to rediscover it.”

He’d need to! When summers ended, Brian returned to his parent’s house in Texas, a sharp contrast from what he left behind! Brian describes the difference saying, “I wasn’t getting the same signals. I got chaos. I had, [emotional pause] my father just didn’t have the tools. His toolbox was empty. I didn’t get what a son needs so he knows how to grow up. Instead of a conversation, I get beating, you know, and punishment. But no love, no ‘I’m sorry’. I never got that from him.”

Turmoil followed to the field. When the Sooners won the 1985 national championship, Brian the player and Boz the caricature blurred into an inseparable pair. As the hype grew, Brian was banned by the N-C-Double-A for the 1987 Orange Bowl after failing a steroids test. He carried his feud to the sideline, wearing a T-Shirt with a derogatory phrase on national TV. Brian was dismissed from the team. His college career was finished. Brian acknowledges, “It was the biggest regret. It ruined everything that I had built — all the pride that I brought to Coach Switzer. And I stole their moment so that I could scream at somebody or an institution for what I felt was an injustice. And it was just the wrong place to do it. It was the wrong format. It was the wrong message to send. What I thought was the most important window of my life, which was college football, in Oklahoma — and I ruined my own party.”

Brian earned his degree and was selected by the Seattle Seahawks in the supplemental draft, signing the largest rookie contract at the time. He started in all 24 games he played before a shoulder injury forced him into early retirement.  Brian says, “I wanted to run and die. I went some place and hid and spent the entire decade of the 90’s in just severe pain and I was depressed. I didn’t have any way of looking forward to tomorrow. So I just felt like I have nothing left and there’s no reason to live.”

Desperate, Brian had time to ponder, searching for the source of his rage. There were issues underneath the Boz that fans and spectators saw on the field. How deep did that anger go? Brian explains, “When I’d go on that field I’d just want praise. But at the end of the game I’d never get that – ‘what a great game’, ‘ I’m so proud of you’, you know, this moment is a precious moment. And that’s the thing that really drove me as I got further into my career, its like I’m never going to have a precious moment with my father. I think that’s what I craved and that’s why I lashed out and I think that’s why I rebelled.”

The death of his father was a catalyst in his search for purpose that had roots in a family member’s belief. Brian says, “I had my grandmother who was very faithful to the relationship with Jesus Christ. You know, when you’re a little kid you don’t understand the impact of how that’s going to resonate for the rest of your life. All of my choices were keeping me from human love and from my father’s love. And the only way I’m going to fix that is if I decide to break the chains and get on my knees and finally say ‘I can’t do this by myself and I can’t do it with out you.”

Brian emerged from seclusion as an actor, appearing in several films. He took a role in the faith-based film ‘Revelation Road’ and later in ‘Do You Believe?’, after solidifying his own faith. What does grace and redemption mean to Brian Bosworth?” He says, “Feeling like a failure as a son, as a football player and a failure to the fans. That wasn’t something that I had any ownership of anymore because I gave that to Jesus and He took all that away. This newfound freedom of peace is the gift of being forgiven.”

The linebacker great has uncovered a past to better navigate what’s ahead in this rare odyssey – that’s His! Brian believes, “Once you put yourself in the moral compass of your heart, you create chaos. Jesus Christ is the moral compass of my heart. So every decision I make – give me the instructions that You want me to follow. God, what do you got for me today? What do we get to do today, you know, because it leads me to the One light I want to go home to.”

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The Social Responsibility of Business is to Increase its Profits by Milton Friedman

Free to Choose: Part 1 of 10 The Power of the Market (Featuring Milton Friedman)

Free to Choose Part 2: The Tyranny of Control (Featuring Milton Friedman

Free to Choose Part 4: From Cradle to Grave Featuring Milton Friedman

The Social Responsibility of Business is to Increase its Profits

by Milton FriedmanThe New York Times Magazine, September 13, 1970. Copyright @ 1970 by The New York Times Company.

When I hear businessmen speak eloquently about the “social responsibilities of business in a free-enterprise system,” I am reminded of the wonderful line about the Frenchman who discovered at the age of 70 that he had been speaking prose all his life. The businessmen believe that they are defending free en­terprise when they declaim that business is not concerned “merely” with profit but also with promoting desirable “social” ends; that business has a “social conscience” and takes seriously its responsibilities for providing em­ployment, eliminating discrimination, avoid­ing pollution and whatever else may be the catchwords of the contemporary crop of re­formers. In fact they are–or would be if they or anyone else took them seriously–preach­ing pure and unadulterated socialism. Busi­nessmen who talk this way are unwitting pup­pets of the intellectual forces that have been undermining the basis of a free society these past decades.

The discussions of the “social responsibili­ties of business” are notable for their analytical looseness and lack of rigor. What does it mean to say that “business” has responsibilities? Only people can have responsibilities. A corporation is an artificial person and in this sense may have artificial responsibilities, but “business” as a whole cannot be said to have responsibilities, even in this vague sense. The first step toward clarity in examining the doctrine of the social responsibility of business is to ask precisely what it implies for whom.

Presumably, the individuals who are to be responsible are businessmen, which means in­dividual proprietors or corporate executives. Most of the discussion of social responsibility is directed at corporations, so in what follows I shall mostly neglect the individual proprietors and speak of corporate executives.

In a free-enterprise, private-property sys­tem, a corporate executive is an employee of the owners of the business. He has direct re­sponsibility to his employers. That responsi­bility is to conduct the business in accordance with their desires, which generally will be to make as much money as possible while con­forming to the basic rules of the society, both those embodied in law and those embodied in ethical custom. Of course, in some cases his employers may have a different objective. A group of persons might establish a corporation for an eleemosynary purpose–for exam­ple, a hospital or a school. The manager of such a corporation will not have money profit as his objective but the rendering of certain services.

In either case, the key point is that, in his capacity as a corporate executive, the manager is the agent of the individuals who own the corporation or establish the eleemosynary institution, and his primary responsibility is to them.

Needless to say, this does not mean that it is easy to judge how well he is performing his task. But at least the criterion of performance is straightforward, and the persons among whom a voluntary contractual arrangement exists are clearly defined.

Of course, the corporate executive is also a person in his own right. As a person, he may have many other responsibilities that he rec­ognizes or assumes voluntarily–to his family, his conscience, his feelings of charity, his church, his clubs, his city, his country. He ma}. feel impelled by these responsibilities to de­vote part of his income to causes he regards as worthy, to refuse to work for particular corpo­rations, even to leave his job, for example, to join his country’s armed forces. Ifwe wish, we may refer to some of these responsibilities as “social responsibilities.” But in these respects he is acting as a principal, not an agent; he is spending his own money or time or energy, not the money of his employers or the time or energy he has contracted to devote to their purposes. If these are “social responsibili­ties,” they are the social responsibilities of in­dividuals, not of business.

What does it mean to say that the corpo­rate executive has a “social responsibility” in his capacity as businessman? If this statement is not pure rhetoric, it must mean that he is to act in some way that is not in the interest of his employers. For example, that he is to refrain from increasing the price of the product in order to contribute to the social objective of preventing inflation, even though a price in crease would be in the best interests of the corporation. Or that he is to make expendi­tures on reducing pollution beyond the amount that is in the best interests of the cor­poration or that is required by law in order to contribute to the social objective of improving the environment. Or that, at the expense of corporate profits, he is to hire “hardcore” un­employed instead of better qualified available workmen to contribute to the social objective of reducing poverty.

In each of these cases, the corporate exec­utive would be spending someone else’s money for a general social interest. Insofar as his actions in accord with his “social responsi­bility” reduce returns to stockholders, he is spending their money. Insofar as his actions raise the price to customers, he is spending the customers’ money. Insofar as his actions lower the wages of some employees, he is spending their money.

The stockholders or the customers or the employees could separately spend their own money on the particular action if they wished to do so. The executive is exercising a distinct “social responsibility,” rather than serving as an agent of the stockholders or the customers or the employees, only if he spends the money in a different way than they would have spent it.

But if he does this, he is in effect imposing taxes, on the one hand, and deciding how the tax proceeds shall be spent, on the other.

This process raises political questions on two levels: principle and consequences. On the level of political principle, the imposition of taxes and the expenditure of tax proceeds are gov­ernmental functions. We have established elab­orate constitutional, parliamentary and judicial provisions to control these functions, to assure that taxes are imposed so far as possible in ac­cordance with the preferences and desires of the public–after all, “taxation without repre­sentation” was one of the battle cries of the American Revolution. We have a system of checks and balances to separate the legisla­tive function of imposing taxes and enacting expenditures from the executive function of collecting taxes and administering expendi­ture programs and from the judicial function of mediating disputes and interpreting the law.

Here the businessman–self-selected or appointed directly or indirectly by stockhold­ers–is to be simultaneously legislator, execu­tive and, jurist. He is to decide whom to tax by how much and for what purpose, and he is to spend the proceeds–all this guided only by general exhortations from on high to restrain inflation, improve the environment, fight poverty and so on and on.

The whole justification for permitting the corporate executive to be selected by the stockholders is that the executive is an agent serving the interests of his principal. This jus­tification disappears when the corporate ex­ecutive imposes taxes and spends the pro­ceeds for “social” purposes. He becomes in effect a public employee, a civil servant, even though he remains in name an employee of a private enterprise. On grounds of political principle, it is intolerable that such civil ser­vants–insofar as their actions in the name of social responsibility are real and not just win­dow-dressing–should be selected as they are now. If they are to be civil servants, then they must be elected through a political process. If they are to impose taxes and make expendi­tures to foster “social” objectives, then politi­cal machinery must be set up to make the as­sessment of taxes and to determine through a political process the objectives to be served.

This is the basic reason why the doctrine of “social responsibility” involves the acceptance of the socialist view that political mechanisms, not market mechanisms, are the appropriate way to determine the allocation of scarce re­sources to alternative uses.

On the grounds of consequences, can the corporate executive in fact discharge his al­leged “social responsibilities?” On the other hand, suppose he could get away with spending the stockholders’ or customers’ or employees’ money. How is he to know how to spend it? He is told that he must contribute to fighting inflation. How is he to know what ac­tion of his will contribute to that end? He is presumably an expert in running his company–in producing a product or selling it or financing it. But nothing about his selection makes him an expert on inflation. Will his hold­ ing down the price of his product reduce infla­tionary pressure? Or, by leaving more spending power in the hands of his customers, simply divert it elsewhere? Or, by forcing him to produce less because of the lower price, will it simply contribute to shortages? Even if he could an­swer these questions, how much cost is he justi­fied in imposing on his stockholders, customers and employees for this social purpose? What is his appropriate share and what is the appropri­ate share of others?

And, whether he wants to or not, can he get away with spending his stockholders’, cus­tomers’ or employees’ money? Will not the stockholders fire him? (Either the present ones or those who take over when his actions in the name of social responsibility have re­duced the corporation’s profits and the price of its stock.) His customers and his employees can desert him for other producers and em­ployers less scrupulous in exercising their so­cial responsibilities.

This facet of “social responsibility” doc­ trine is brought into sharp relief when the doctrine is used to justify wage restraint by trade unions. The conflict of interest is naked and clear when union officials are asked to subordinate the interest of their members to some more general purpose. If the union offi­cials try to enforce wage restraint, the consequence is likely to be wildcat strikes, rank­-and-file revolts and the emergence of strong competitors for their jobs. We thus have the ironic phenomenon that union leaders–at least in the U.S.–have objected to Govern­ment interference with the market far more consistently and courageously than have business leaders.

The difficulty of exercising “social responsibility” illustrates, of course, the great virtue of private competitive enterprise–it forces people to be responsible for their own actions and makes it difficult for them to “exploit” other people for either selfish or unselfish purposes. They can do good–but only at their own expense.

Many a reader who has followed the argu­ment this far may be tempted to remonstrate that it is all well and good to speak of Government’s having the responsibility to im­pose taxes and determine expenditures for such “social” purposes as controlling pollu­tion or training the hard-core unemployed, but that the problems are too urgent to wait on the slow course of political processes, that the exercise of social responsibility by busi­nessmen is a quicker and surer way to solve pressing current problems.

Aside from the question of fact–I share Adam Smith’s skepticism about the benefits that can be expected from “those who affected to trade for the public good”–this argument must be rejected on grounds of principle. What it amounts to is an assertion that those who favor the taxes and expenditures in question have failed to persuade a majority of their fellow citizens to be of like mind and that they are seeking to attain by undemocratic procedures what they cannot attain by democratic proce­dures. In a free society, it is hard for “evil” people to do “evil,” especially since one man’s good is another’s evil.

I have, for simplicity, concentrated on the special case of the corporate executive, ex­cept only for the brief digression on trade unions. But precisely the same argument ap­plies to the newer phenomenon of calling upon stockholders to require corporations to exercise social responsibility (the recent G.M crusade for example). In most of these cases, what is in effect involved is some stockholders trying to get other stockholders (or customers or employees) to contribute against their will to “social” causes favored by the activists. In­sofar as they succeed, they are again imposing taxes and spending the proceeds.

The situation of the individual proprietor is somewhat different. If he acts to reduce the returns of his enterprise in order to exercise his “social responsibility,” he is spending his own money, not someone else’s. If he wishes to spend his money on such purposes, that is his right, and I cannot see that there is any ob­jection to his doing so. In the process, he, too, may impose costs on employees and cus­tomers. However, because he is far less likely than a large corporation or union to have mo­nopolistic power, any such side effects will tend to be minor.

Of course, in practice the doctrine of social responsibility is frequently a cloak for actions that are justified on other grounds rather than a reason for those actions.

To illustrate, it may well be in the long run interest of a corporation that is a major employer in a small community to devote resources to providing amenities to that community or to improving its government. That may make it easier to attract desirable employees, it may reduce the wage bill or lessen losses from pilferage and sabotage or have other worthwhile effects. Or it may be that, given the laws about the deductibility of corporate charitable contributions, the stockholders can contribute more to chari­ties they favor by having the corporation make the gift than by doing it themselves, since they can in that way contribute an amount that would otherwise have been paid as corporate taxes.

In each of these–and many similar–cases, there is a strong temptation to rationalize these actions as an exercise of “social responsibility.” In the present climate of opinion, with its wide spread aversion to “capitalism,” “profits,” the “soulless corporation” and so on, this is one way for a corporation to generate goodwill as a by-product of expenditures that are entirely justified in its own self-interest.

It would be inconsistent of me to call on corporate executives to refrain from this hyp­ocritical window-dressing because it harms the foundations of a free society. That would be to call on them to exercise a “social re­sponsibility”! If our institutions, and the atti­tudes of the public make it in their self-inter­est to cloak their actions in this way, I cannot summon much indignation to denounce them. At the same time, I can express admiration for those individual proprietors or owners of closely held corporations or stockholders of more broadly held corporations who disdain such tactics as approaching fraud.

Whether blameworthy or not, the use of the cloak of social responsibility, and the nonsense spoken in its name by influential and presti­gious businessmen, does clearly harm the foun­dations of a free society. I have been impressed time and again by the schizophrenic character of many businessmen. They are capable of being extremely farsighted and clearheaded in matters that are internal to their businesses. They are incredibly shortsighted and muddle­headed in matters that are outside their businesses but affect the possible survival of busi­ness in general. This shortsightedness is strikingly exemplified in the calls from many businessmen for wage and price guidelines or controls or income policies. There is nothing that could do more in a brief period to destroy a market system and replace it by a centrally con­trolled system than effective governmental con­trol of prices and wages.

The shortsightedness is also exemplified in speeches by businessmen on social respon­sibility. This may gain them kudos in the short run. But it helps to strengthen the already too prevalent view that the pursuit of profits is wicked and immoral and must be curbed and controlled by external forces. Once this view is adopted, the external forces that curb the market will not be the social consciences, however highly developed, of the pontificating executives; it will be the iron fist of Government bureaucrats. Here, as with price and wage controls, businessmen seem to me to reveal a suicidal impulse.

The political principle that underlies the market mechanism is unanimity. In an ideal free market resting on private property, no individual can coerce any other, all coopera­tion is voluntary, all parties to such coopera­tion benefit or they need not participate. There are no values, no “social” responsibilities in any sense other than the shared values and responsibilities of individuals. Society is a collection of individuals and of the various groups they voluntarily form.

The political principle that underlies the political mechanism is conformity. The indi­vidual must serve a more general social inter­est–whether that be determined by a church or a dictator or a majority. The individual may have a vote and say in what is to be done, but if he is overruled, he must conform. It is appropriate for some to require others to contribute to a general social purpose whether they wish to or not.

Unfortunately, unanimity is not always feasi­ble. There are some respects in which conformity appears unavoidable, so I do not see how one can avoid the use of the political mecha­nism altogether.

But the doctrine of “social responsibility” taken seriously would extend the scope of the political mechanism to every human activity. It does not differ in philosophy from the most explicitly collectivist doctrine. It differs only by professing to believe that collectivist ends can be attained without collectivist means. That is why, in my book Capitalism and Freedom, I have called it a “fundamentally subversive doctrine” in a free society, and have said that in such a society, “there is one and only one social responsibility of business–to use it resources and engage in activities designed to increase its profits so long as it stays within the rules of the game, which is to say, engages in open and free competition without deception or fraud.”

Free to Choose Part 5: Created Equal Featuring Milton Friedman

Free to Choose Part 6: What’s Wrong With Our Schools Featuring Milton Friedman

Free to Choose Part 7: Who Protects the Consumer Featuring Milton Friedman

Free to Choose Part 8: Who Protects the Worker Featuring Milton Friedman

Free to Choose Part 10: How to Stay Free Featuring Milton Friedman

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_ Milton Friedman on Immigration Part 2 Milton Friedman – Illegal Immigration – PT 1 Milton Friedman – Illegal Immigration – PT 2 _- Immigration and the Welfare State April 4, 2010 by Dan Mitchell My previous post dealing with whether citizenship should be automatic for babies born to illegals generated a lot of commentary, so […]

FRIEDMAN FRIDAY Milton Friedman on Immigration Part 1

_ Milton Friedman – Illegal Immigration – PT 1 Milton Friedman – Illegal Immigration – PT 2 Milton Friedman stated , “you can’t have free immigration and a welfare state.” Below Dan Mitchell links back to this quote in one of his earlier posts: A Plan for Open Borders that Anti-Amnesty Folks Can Support August 18, […]

Milton Friedman on Immigration Part 2

_ Milton Friedman on Immigration Part 2 Milton Friedman – Illegal Immigration – PT 1 Milton Friedman – Illegal Immigration – PT 2   _- Immigration and the Welfare State April 4, 2010 by Dan Mitchell My previous post dealing with whether citizenship should be automatic for babies born to illegals generated a lot of commentary, […]

Milton Friedman on Immigration Part 1

_   Milton Friedman – Illegal Immigration – PT 1 Milton Friedman – Illegal Immigration – PT 2   Milton Friedman stated , “you can’t have free immigration and a welfare state.” Below Dan Mitchell links back to this quote in one of his earlier posts: A Plan for Open Borders that Anti-Amnesty Folks Can Support […]

FRIEDMAN FRIDAY Milton Friedman and Dan Mitchell on the Post Office!!!

Milton Friedman and Dan Mitchell on the Post Office!!! Ep. 10 – How to Stay Free [3/7]. Milton Friedman’s Free to Choose (1980) Pat Brennan became something of a celebrity in 1978 because she was delivering mail in competition with the United States Post Office. With her husband she set up business in a basement […]

Movie review of movie GREATER about the life of Brandon Burlsworth

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Greater

MPAA Rating: PG for thematic elements, some language and smoking.
not reviewed
Add to your list?
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Moviemaking Quality:
Primary Audience:
Adults Teens Family
Genre:
Christian Sports Biography Family
Length:
2 hr. 10 min.
Year of Release:
2016
USA Release:
August 26, 2016 (wide)
Featuring: Christopher Severio … Brandon Burlsworth
Neal McDonough … Marty Burlsworth
Leslie Easterbrook … Barbara
Michael Parks … Leo
Nick Searcy … The Farmer
Quinton Aaron … Coach Aaron
Connor Antico … Clint Stoerner
Eric Arnold … Razorbacks fan
Tammy Barr … Ashley
Texas Battle … Anthony Lucas
more »
Director: David Hunt
Producer: Greater Productions
Brian Reindl
David Eric Chapman
Neal McDonough
Tim Duff
Distributor: Hammond Entertainment

“The incredible true story of the greatest walk-on in the history of college football”

Copyrighted, Hammond Entertainment

Here’s what the distributor says about their film: “Brandon Burlsworth is perhaps the greatest walk-on in the history of college football. Brandon dreamed of playing for the Arkansas Razorbacks, but was told he wasn’t good enough to play Division I ball. Undeterred, Brandon took a risk and walked on in 1994. Written off by fellow teammates and coaches, Brandon displayed dogged determination in the face of staggering odds. The awkward kid who once was an embarrassment to his teammates and an annoyance to his coaches, ended up becoming the most respected player in the history of the program, changing the lives of all he touched.

Brandon Burlsworth never cursed, drank or smoked, and he returned home every weekend of his college career to see his mother and attend church with his family. This was a guy who did everything ‘right.’

On April 28, 1999, on a lonely Arkansas highway, a wreck claimed the life of a young man who was bound for glory in the NFL. Brandon Burlsworth, widely considered the greatest walk-on in the history of college football, was a man of hard work, integrity, and commitment, who took no short cuts in life. He was a shining example of a fleeting life lived well. Burlsworth’s astonishing physical, mental, and spiritual gifts made him the kind of player that opponents are afraid to line up against. An almost unreal blend of power and speed, Brandon wanted to be the best.

He was.

Brandon was not born with the athletic gifts that are normally required to reach the elite levels of football. Though he desperately wanted to fulfill his dream of playing Division 1 ball, nobody would give him a chance and he failed to receive any D-1 scholarship offers. Risking everything to walk-on at the University of Arkansas, Burlsworth worked harder than anybody else, on or off the field. He would eventually become the first Razorback to earn a master’s degree while playing football, achieved first-team All-American honors, and in 1999 was drafted by the Indianapolis Colts and expected to be a first-year starter and anchor the Colts’ line for the next dozen years.

Brandon’s trademark black glasses has inspired children for over 15 years to live by Brandon’s motto, ‘Do things the right way.’ Since his passing, the University of Arkansas has honored the Burls’ Kids, a non profit charity, at an Arkansas Razorback home football game.”

Related book: Through the Eyes of a Champion – The Brandon Burlsworth Story by Jeff Kinley (New Leaf Press: 1 September 2001)

 

Brandon Burlsworth

 

Uploaded on Aug 31, 2011

Brandon was a walk on turned All American at the University of Arkansas. He was drafted by the Indianapolis Colts and 11 days later was tragically killed in a car accident. The Brandon Burlsworth Foundation was founded in his name and has several programs: The Burls Kids program takes underprivileged children to all Arkansas Razorback and Indianapolis Colts home games. The BBF in partnership with Walmart provides eye care to 14,000 pre-K thru 12th grade students whose working families are trying, but still cannot afford extras like eye care and do not qualify for state funded programs. We hold football camps each year in Harrison and Little Rock and we have several football scholarship and awards including the Burlsworth Trophy, a national award given out to the most outstanding Division One college football player who began his career as a walk-on.

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FRIEDMAN FRIDAY Milton Friedman and Dan Mitchell look at the economics of medical care!!

Milton Friedman on Medical Care (Full Lecture)

Way back in 2009, some folks on the left shared a chart showing that national expenditures on healthcare compared to life expectancy.

This comparison was not favorable to the United States, which easily spent the most money but didn’t have concomitantly impressive life expectancy.

At the very least, people looking at the chart were supposed to conclude that other nations had better healthcare systems.

And since the chart circulated while Obamacare was being debated, supporters of that initiative clearly wanted people to believe that the U.S. somehow could get better results at lower cost if the government played a bigger role in the healthcare sector.

There were all sorts of reasons to think that chart was misleading (higher average incomes in the United States, more obesity in the United States, different demographics in the United States, etc), but my main gripe was that the chart was being used to advance the cause of bigger government when it actually showed – at least in part – the consequences of government intervention.

The real problem, I argued, was third-party payer. Thanks to programs such asMedicare and Medicaid, government already was paying for nearly 50 percent of all heath spending in the United States (indeed, the U.S. has more government spending for health programs than some nations with single-payer systems!).

But that’s just party of the story. Thanks to a loophole in the tax code for fringe benefits (a.k.a., the healthcare exclusion), there’s a huge incentive for both employers and employees to provide compensation in the form of very generous health insurance policies. And this means a big chunk of health spending is paid by insurance companies.

The combination of these direct and indirect government policies is that consumers pay very little for their healthcare. Or, to be more precise, they may pay a lot in terms of taxes and foregone cash compensation, but their direct out-of-pocket expenditures are relatively modest.

And this is why I said the national health spending vs life expectancy chart was far less important than a chart I put together showing the relentless expansion of third-party payer. And the reason this chart is so important is that it helps to explain why healthcare costs are so high and why there’s so much inefficiency in the health sector.

Simply stated, doctors, hospitals, and other providers have very little market-based incentive to control costs and be efficient because they know that the overwhelming majority of consumers won’t care because they are buying care with other people’s money.

To get this point across, I sometimes ask audiences how their behavior would change if I told them I would pay 89 percent of their dinner bill on Friday night. Would they be more likely to eat at McDonald’s or a fancy steakhouse? The answer is obvious (or should be obvious) since they are in box 2 of Milton Friedman’s matrix.

So why, then, would anybody think that Obamacare – a program that was designed to expand third-party payer – was going to control costs?

Though I guess it doesn’t matter what anybody thought at the time. The sad reality is that Obamacare was enacted. The President famously promised healthcare would be more affordable under his new system, both for consumers and for taxpayers.

So what happened?

Well, the law’s clearly been bad news for taxpayers.

But let’s focus today on households, which haveborne the brunt of the President’s bad policies. The Wall Street Journal had a report a few days ago about what’s been happening to the spending patterns of middle-class households.

The numbers are rather grim, at least for those who thought Obamacare would control health costs.

A June Brookings Institution study found middle-income households now devote the largest share of their spending to health care, 8.9%… By 2014, middle-income households’ health-care spending was 25% higher than what they were spending before the recession that began in 2007, even as spending fell for other “basic needs” such as food, housing, clothing and transportation, according to an analysis for The Wall Street Journal by Brookings senior fellow Diane Schanzenbach. …Workers aren’t the only ones feeling the pain of rising health-care costs. Employers still typically pay roughly 80% of individual health-insurance premiums… In 2015, 8% of Americans’ household spending went toward health care, up from 5.8% in 2007, according to the Labor Department.

Here’s a chart from the story. It looks at data from 2007-2014, so it surely wouldn’t be fair to say Obamacare caused all the increase. But it would be fair to say that the law hasn’t delivered on the empty promise of lower costs.

Let’s close with a few important observations.

First, there’s a very strong case to repeal Obamacare, but nobody should be under the illusion that this will solve the myriad problems in the health sector. It would be a good start, but never forget that the third-party payer problem existed before Obamacare.

Second, undoing third-party payer will be like putting toothpaste back in a tube. Even though there are some powerful examples of how healthcare costs are constrained when genuine market forces are allowed to operate, consumers will be very worried about shifting to a system where they pay directly for a greater share of their healthcare costs.

Third, there’s one part of Obamacare that shouldn’t be repealed. The so-called Cadillac Tax may not be the right way to deal with the distorting impact of the healthcare exclusion, but it’s better than nothing.

Actually, we could add one final observation since the Obama era will soon be ending. When historians write about his presidency, will his main legacy be the Obamacare failure? Or will they focus more on the failed stimulus? Or maybe the economic stagnation that was caused by his policies?

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  Michael Cannon observed, “The centerpiece of Rubio’s proposal… If you purchase a government-approved health plan, you could save, for example, $2,000 on your taxes. If you don’t, you pay that $2,000 to the government. That is exactly how Obamacare’s individual mandate works.” The Obama-Rubio “Healthcare Mandate” Controversy March 2, 2016 by Dan Mitchell My colleague […]

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Review of CAFE SOCIETY by A.O. Scott has best line in film: “I accept death, but under protest,” Dad says. “Protest to who?” Mom responds!

I have posted so many reviews on Woody Allen’s latest movie CAFE SOCIETY and I even posted an open letter I wrote to Woody Allen about the film. A serious theme of the afterlife is brought up in this film too. Some reviewers liked the film and the lavish surroundings in it and some did not. Below is another review. The review of CAFE SOCIETY by A.O. Scott has best line in film: “I accept death, but under protest,” Dad says. “Protest to who?” Mom responds!

Woody Allen got this idea from one of favorite Ingmar Bergman’s movies THE SEVENTH SEAL.

Woody Allen once said:

I’ve made perfectly decent films, but not (1963), not The Seventh Seal (1957) (“The Seventh Seal”), The 400 Blows (1959) (“The 400 Blows”) or L’avventura (1960) – ones that to me really proclaim cinema as art, on the highest level. If I was the teacher, I’d give myself a B.

Andrew Welch commented on some of Woody Allen’s influences in his article Looking at the (sometimes skewed) morality of Woody Allen’s best films:

In the late ’60s, Woody Allen left the world of stand-up comedy behind for the movies. Since then, he’s become one of American cinema’s most celebrated filmmakers. Sure, he’s had his stinkers and his private life hasn’t been without controversy. But he’s also crafted some of Hollywood’s most thought-provoking comedies. Philosophical, self-deprecating and always more than a tad pessimistic, Allen adds another title to his oeuvre this Friday with Midnight in Paris. Whether it will be remembered as one of his greatest or another flop is too early to say, but its release gives us a chance to look back at some of his most indispensable works.

Love and Death (1975)

Allen’s Love and Death owes a lot to Tolstoy’s War and Peace and the films of Swedish director Ingmar Bergman. Death himself even makes an appearance, recalling the existential dread of Bergman’s The Seventh Seal. But despite the movie’s many highbrow allusions, Allen is more concerned with simply having a good time. Gags and one-liners abound, making it, if not a comic masterpiece, a pretty good way to spend an hour and a half.

Woody Allen on Ingmar Bergman (1/2)

Monday, July 30, 2007

Ingmar Bergman Slips Into the Darkness…

I will never forget the chess match with death in Ingmar Bergman’s movie The Seventh Seal. I watched it many years ago, and then again just a year ago. It’s bleak, nihilistic atmosphere proved a foil for my theistic worldview. I remember thinking, if there is no God, then life looks like a Bergman movie, and religious people are “heroic” quixotic individuals sparring with windmills. (Watch the chess match here.)
Ingmar Bergman died today at the age of 89.
One report today writes: “When the news broke that Ingmar Bergman had died on the lonely and windswept island of Faro, off the coast of Sweden, it seemed like an appropriately tragic spot. Bergman spent a lifetime creating lonely and windswept movies: a cinema of inner life in which man was tormented by his relationship with women and with God.”
In his autobiography Bergman wrote, re. God: “I have struggled all my life with a tormented and joyless relationship with God. Faith and lack of faith, punishment, grace and rejection, all were real to me, all were imperative. My prayers stank of anguish, entreaty, trust, loathing and despair. God spoke, God said nothing. Do not turn from Thy face. The lost hours of that operation provided me with a calming message. You were born without purpose, you live without meaning, living is its own meaning. When you die, you are extinguished. From being you will be transformed to non-being. A god does not necessarily dwell among our capricious atoms. This insight has brought with it a certain security that has resolutely eliminated anguish and tumult, though on the other hand I have never denied my second (or first) life, that of the spirit.”
Bergman was married five times and had many sexual liaisons with the leading actresses in his films. He is considered to be one of the greatest, if not even the greatest, film-maker of all time. When I read of his death today I experienced a sense of loss, like the loss of an old friend. I found, in his films, an authentic representation of his experience of the non-response of God to his searching and prayers. I don’t personally affirm his conclusions, but I do find his work valuable, especially when I hear “atheists” joyfully declare God’s non-existence.

Woody Allen on Ingmar Bergman (2/2)

The Seventh Seal (1/3) (Det sjunde inseglet) – Breaking Down Bergman – Episode #17

Published on Apr 24, 2012

“Like” us on Facebook and join the forum discussion! http://www.facebook.com/breakingdownf…

Ingmar Bergman’s most recognized (and likely most parodied) film is broken down into three parts for this discussion. In part one, hosts David Friend and Sonia Strimban look at the origins of the film, setting the scene for the debates that follow in the two subsequent videos, which are linked.

All related clips and images are copyrighted and property of their respective owners.

Friend and Strimban are watching the career of the Swedish director from his first film to his last, in order, and discussing their observations. Visit the main channel for more details.

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The Seventh Seal (2/3) (Det sjunde inseglet) – Breaking Down Bergman – Episode #17 Part 2

Published on Apr 30, 2012

“Like” us on Facebook and join the forum discussion! http://www.facebook.com/breakingdownf…

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The Seventh Seal (3/3) (Det sjunde inseglet) – Breaking Down Bergman – Episode #17 Part 3

Published on May 8, 2012

“Like” us on Facebook and join the forum discussion! http://www.facebook.com/breakingdownf…

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Woody Allen on Ingmar Bergman and the death.

Published on Sep 1, 2012

From Ingmar Bergmans Video.Broadcasted on SVT (Swedish Television) aug 2012.

Café Society Official International Trailer #1 (2016) – Jesse Eisenberg, Kristen Stewart Movie HD

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Review: ‘Café Society’ Isn’t Woody Allen’s Worst Movie

CAFÉ SOCIETY

  • Directed by Woody Allen
  • Comedy, Drama, Romance
  • PG-13
  • 1h 36m
Photo

Kristen Stewart and Jesse Eisenberg in Woody Allen’s “Café Society.” CreditSabrina Lantos/Gravier Productions

“Café Society,” Woody Allen’s new movie, comes wrapped in a double layer of nostalgia. Set in the 1930s, partly in Los Angeles, its script compulsively mentions Hollywood stars of the era. Joan Blondell! Robert Taylor! Barbara Stanwyck! Cagney and Crawford! Astaire and Rogers! Their names ring out like answers to trivia questions nobody had thought to ask.

At a recent New York critics’ screening, one fellow a few rows behind me chuckled at every name. I don’t think because the allusions were especially funny — the sentence “Adolphe Menjou is threatening to walk off the set” is not exactly a gut-buster, even in context — but because they signified a cultural awareness that the laugher in the dark wanted the rest of us to know he shared. And also perhaps because the dropped names stood in for jokes that the modern audience is too ignorant to get and that Mr. Allen has grown too lazy to make. He can gaze back fondly at the fast-receding golden age of Depression-era popular culture, and the rest of us can wistfully recall a time when he was able to spin those memories into better films than this one.

There’s no point in growing misty-eyed. “Café Society” is not “Radio Days”or “Bullets Over Broadway.” We can live with that. I’m happy to report that it’s not “The Curse of the Jade Scorpion” or “Magic in the Moonlight,”either. Which is to say that it’s neither another example of bad, late Woody Allen nor much in the way of a return to form. It is, overall, an amusing little picture, with some inspired moments and some sour notes, a handful of interesting performances and the hint, now and then, of an idea.

 

Video

Trailer: ‘Café Society’

By AMAZON STUDIOS on Publish DateJuly 13, 2016. Photo by Amazon Studios. Watch in Times Video »

Like most of Mr. Allen’s recent work, this movie takes place within the hermetically enclosed universe of its maker’s long-established preoccupations. Rather than find fresh themes or problems, he likes to rearrange the old ones into a newish pattern, emphasizing some elements and letting others drift into the background. Here the dominant conceit is Mr. Allen’s well-documented ambivalence about California and the industry that has often seemed ambivalent about him. He loves movies, but Hollywood, with its shallowness and gossip, has always repelled him.

But with the help of his gifted collaborators, the production designer Santo Loquasto and the cinematographer Vittorio Storaro, he bathes “the film colony” in golden light and swathes its denizens in lovely period clothes. He sends an ambitious Bronx boy, Bobby Dorfman (Jesse Eisenberg), out West to seek his fortune. At first cold-shouldered by his Uncle Phil (Steve Carell), a powerful agent, Bobby is eventually taken under Phil’s wing and plunged into a swirl of parties and power lunches. He’s suitably intoxicated by his new surroundings.

Photo

Corey Stoll in “Café Society.”CreditSabrina Lantos/Gravier Productions

“I’ve never mixed Champagne with bagels and lox,” he says.

“Welcome to Hollywood,” someone replies.

That’s not a bad line, and there are some other pretty good ones sprinkled throughout the sprawling script. Bobby’s bickering parents, played by Jeannie Berlin and Ken Stott, supply a few Yiddish-inflected laughs, as well as the requisite touch of metaphysical fatalism. (“I accept death, but under protest,” Dad says. “Protest to who?” Mom responds. Also not a bad line.) The ensemble is larger and the story looser than in Mr. Allen’s last few movies, making room for Corey Stoll’s relaxed turn as Bobby’s charismatic gangster brother and Parker Posey and Paul Schneider’s intriguing double act as a cynical and apparently happily married pair of bicoastal sophisticates.

Photo

Blake Lively in “Café Society.”CreditSabrina Lantos/Gravier Productions

The axis on which everything turns is an old-fashioned love triangle that includes, of course, the passion of an older man for a younger woman. It turns out that Bobby and Phil are both in love with a transplanted Nebraskan called Vonnie (short for Veronica), who is Phil’s secretary.Kristen Stewart’s performance in the role, which blends gravity and lightness, glamour and its opposite, is certainly the best part of “Café Society,” but it also exposes just how thin and tired the rest of the movie is.

Mr. Allen’s literal voice, which supplies narration, sounds unusually sluggish and weary. The same is true of his voice as a writer and director. For every snappy scene or exchange there are three or four that feel baggy and half-written. We are treated to one survey of the clientele at the swanky Manhattan nightclub that is Bobby’s post-Hollywood professional perch and then, a while later, to another. We wander into jazz clubs and dining rooms and seem unsure of why we’ve come. Blake Lively, wandering into the movie’s second half as a second Veronica, seems to feel the same way. The movie seems much longer than its 96 minutes.

Photo

Steve Carell in “Café Society.”CreditSabrina Lantos/Gravier Productions

Every once in a while we hear or see something that makes us cringe a little: a harsh, unfunny encounter between Bobby and a prostitute shortly after his arrival in Los Angeles; an anecdote about Errol Flynn’s sexual interest in underage girls. It’s hard to say if Mr. Allen is testing the audience’s tolerance or trolling our sensitivities, or for that matter if he’s just blithely carrying on as he always has, oblivious to changing mores or the vicissitudes of his own reputation.

257COMMENTS

It doesn’t really matter because “Café Society” ultimately poses no interesting questions about its maker or its characters. The movie most closely resembles the kind of Hollywood product for which its deepest nostalgia is reserved. It’s a pop-culture throwaway, a charming bit of trivia, the punch line to a half-forgotten joke.

“Café Society” is rated PG-13 (Parents strongly cautioned). Surprisingly bloody murders and surprisingly bloodless romance. Running time: 1 hour 36 minutes.

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FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE PART 131 Part C Ellsworth Kelly (Featured artist is Janet Fish )

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I featured the artwork of Ellsworth Kelly on my blog both on November 23, 2015 and December 17, 2015. Also I mailed him a letter on November 23, 2015, but I never heard back from him.  Unfortunately he died on December 27, 2015 at the age of 92.

 

 

 

Who were the artists who influenced Ellsworth Kelly?

ARTISTS

Paul Cézanne
Paul Klee
Pablo Picasso
Constantin Brancusi
Hans Arp

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Let me tell you what  Wasily Kandinsky (who was seen in the film THE LONGEST RIDE) and Paul Klee were attempting to do. They wanted to make a connection with art and find a word of direction from art for their lives. They were secular men so they were not looking for any spiritual direction from a personal God. However, the Bible clearly notes that God exists and we all know He is there. Romans Chapter one asserts, “For that which is KNOWN about God is EVIDENT to them and MADE PLAIN IN THEIR INNER CONSCIOUSNESS, because God  has SHOWN IT TO THEM…” (Romans 1:19).

Every person has this inner conscious that is screaming at them that God exists and that is why so many of the sensitive men involved in art have been looking for a message to break forth. Here we see something similar with the life and quest of the artist Paul Klee. I read on January 15, 2007 the blog post “Strolling Through Modern Art,” and I wanted to share a portion of that post:

This particular drawing came to mind while I was looking at the Art Institute of Chicago’s website and I came across some artwork by Joan Miro, who is exhibited at AIC. Vee Mack’s drawings generally demonstrate better draughtsmanship than this drawing displays but I thought that the concept was amusing and the implied commentary worth considering. Are you a fan of Joan Miro, Piet Mondrian, Paul Klee, Jackson Pollock, Willem De Kooning and Vasily Kandinsky?What does this elderly gentleman think of his stroll through the paramecium of the artworld? Francis Schaeffer noted in “The God Who is There” that Paul Klee and similar artists, introduced the idea of artwork generated in a manner similar to how a Ouija Board generates words from outside the artist’s conscious intent. Schaeffer observed that Klee “hopes that somehow art will find a meaning, not because there is a spirit there to guide the hand, but because through it the universe will speak even though it is impersonal in its basic structure.” [page 90] Why would an impersonal universe have something to say? What does meaninglessness have to communicate? Schaeffer explains that “these men will not accept the only explanation which can fit the facts of their own experience, they have become metaphysical magicians. No one has presented an idea, let alone demonstrated it to be feasible, to explain how the impersonal beginning, plus time, plus chance, can give personality . . . As a result, either the thinker must say man is dead, because personality is a mirage; or else he must hang his reason on a hook outside the door and cross the threshold into the leap of faith which is the new level of despair.” [page 115]Vee Mack’s sketch demonstrates the paradox of an average man viewing images, which represent the nonsense of Dadaism and chaos. It is the overeducated who will look at something that is inherently meaningless and try to find deep meaning in it, while the average man sees it and observes with reasonable common sense that this or that is an absurd waste of time.By the way, while it may appear as though I am favoring one artist for these posts, I am not receiving the variety of artwork that I had hoped for from other artists and I happen to have ample access to much of Vee Mack’s unpublished portfolio. Therefore, until I receive other artwork, I will have to rely on what I have on hand.

How Should We Then Live – Episode 8 – The Age of Fragmentation

 

Posted by at 4:35 PM
Paul Klee
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Michael Gaumnitz : Paul Klee The Silence of the Angel (2005)

Published on Aug 17, 2013

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Art This Week-At the Blanton Museum of Art-Ellsworth Kelly Symposium, Part 2-Austin

Image result for ellsworth kelly influences

Ellsworth Kelly’s “Color Panels for a Large Wall” at the National Gallery of Art in Washington in 2003. (Evan Vucci/AP)

Art This Week-At the Blanton Museum of Art-Ellsworth Kelly Symposium, Part 3-Questions

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Featured artist is Janet Fish

Kalamazoo Institute of Arts – Art Byte – Janet Fish

Janet Fish

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Janet Fish
Born May 18, 1938 (age 78)
Boston, Massachusetts
Nationality American
Education Smith College, The Skowhegan School of Art, Yale University School of Art and Architecture
Known for Still life paintings; art instructor at the School of Visual Arts, Parsons The New School for Design,Syracuse University, and theUniversity of Chicago
Movement Realist

Black Bowl Red Scarf by Janet Fish

Janet Fish (born May 18, 1938) is a contemporary American realist artist. She paints still life paintings, some of light bouncing off reflective surfaces, such as plastic wrap containing solid objects and empty or partially filled glassware.[1]

Background and education[edit]

Janet Isobel Fish[2] was born on May 18, 1938 (age 78) in Boston, Massachusetts,[3] and was raised in Bermuda, where her family moved when she was ten years old.[3] She came from a very artistic family. Her father was professor of art history Peter Stuyvesant and her mother was sculptor and potter Florence Whistler Fish.[4] Her sister, Alida, is a photographer.[5] Her grandfather, whose studio was in Bermuda, was American Impressionist painter Clark Voorhees.[6] Another member of her family also named Clark Voorhees was her uncle,[4] a wood carver[7] whose wife was a painter.[8]

Fish knew from a young age that she wanted to pursue the visual arts.[3] She said, “I came from a family of artists, and I always made art and knew I wanted to be an artist.”[9] Fish was talented in ceramics, and had her mother’s kiln available. She initially intended to be a sculptor.[3] As a teenager, Fish had a job helping out in the studio of sculptor Byllee Lang.[10]

She attended Smith College, in Northampton, Massachusetts, concentrating on sculpture and printmaking.[11] She studied under George Cohn, Leonard Baskin, and Mervin Jules.[7]She spent one of her summers studying at the Art Students League of New York, including a painting class led by Stephen Greene.[12] Fish received a Bachelor of Arts from Smith in 1960.[10] This was followed by a summer residency at The Skowhegan School of Art in Skowhegan, Maine in 1961.[3]

She enrolled at the Yale University School of Art and Architecture in New Haven, Connecticut, attending from 1960 to 1963.[13] There she changed her focus from sculpture to painting.[4] Her instructor for an introductory painting class was Alex Katz, who encouraged students to explore the shows in New York galleries. Fish got a sense of the direction of that art world.[7] During that period, art schools tended to favor the teaching ofAbstract Expressionism,[14] and at first Fish followed along, painting in that style. She soon abandoned it, noting that “Abstract Expressionism didn’t mean anything to me. It was a set of rules.”[4]

Her fellow Yale students included Chuck Close, Richard Serra, Brice Marden, Nancy Graves, Sylvia[13] and Robert Mangold, and Rackstraw Downes. She was awarded her Bachelor of Fine Arts,[10] and in 1963 became one of the first women to earn a Master of Fine Arts from Yale’s School of Art and Architecture.[4]

Life and work[edit]

After graduating, Fish spent a year in Philadelphia,[12] then she took up residence in SoHo, where she and Louise Nevelson became friends.[10]

Fish largely rejected the Abstract Expressionism endorsed by her Yale instructors, feeling “totally disconnected” from it and desiring instead the “physical presence of objects”; but some of its very general principles, such as the boldness and smooth, flowing brushstrokes, may have influenced her figurative work.[3] Her work, although Realist, may include abstract forms.[1]

In 1967 she enjoyed her first solo show, at Rutherford, New Jersey‘s Fairleigh Dickinson University. The exhibit included detailed paintings of vegetables and fruits. Her first New York exhibition followed two years after.[3]

Fish is known for her large, bold Realist still lifes, especially the way she paints everyday items such as clear glassware partially filled with water, concentrating on the shapes of the objects and the play of light off of their surfaces.[3]

She is interested in painting light and a concept she has on occasion called “packaging.” For instance, if she paints a jar of pickles, the jar becomes “packaging,” and this can translate into a searching for the light that describes the jar, and a subsequent translation into color. She created still life paintings of grocery store products packaged in cellophane. She said that the “plastic wrap catches the light and creates fascinating reflections”.[3]

Among her other favorite subjects are everyday objects, especially various kinds of clear glassware, either empty or partially filled with liquids such as water, liquor, or vinegar. Examples range from glasses, bottles, goblets, and jars[3] to a fishbowl filled with water and a goldfish.[15][16] Other subjects include teacups,[3] flower bouquets, textiles with interesting patterns,[14] goldfish, vegetables,[17] and mirrored surfaces.[1] Even though she was painting still lifes, she sometimes included human figures,[4] such as a girl performing cartwheels or a boy with his dog splashing in the water.[18]

Fish’s work has been characterized as photorealist and has also been associated with new realism.[19] She does not consider herself a photorealist; elements such as her composition and use of color demonstrate that her artistic point of view is that of a painter rather than a photographer.[11]

A writer for The New York Times said that Fish’s “ambitious still life painting helped resuscitate realism in the 1970’s” and that her work depicting everyday objects imbued them with a “bold optical and painterly energy”.[20]Critic Vincent Katz concurs, stating that Fish’s career “can be summed up as the revitalization of the still-life genre, no mean feat when one considers that still life has often been considered the lowest type of objective painting”.[6]

She has been an art instructor at the School of Visual Arts and Parsons The New School for Design (both in New York City), Syracuse University (Syracuse, New York), and the University of Chicago.[17]

Fish had two short-lived marriages, which she claims were unsuccessful at least partly due to her high ambitions and her reluctance to be a “good conventional housewife”.[3] She resides, and paints, in her SoHo, New York City loft and her Vermont farmhouse[11] in Middletown Springs.[21]

Recognition[edit]

In an interview, American painter Eric Fischl spoke of his admiration for Janet Fish: “She’s one of the most interesting realists of her generation. Her work is a touchstone, and tremendously influential. Anyone who deals with domestic still life has to go through her, she’s very important.”[22]

Fish has been honored with various awards and fellowships, including:

about the author

Kevin J. Kelley

Kevin J. Kelley

Kevin J. Kelley is a contributing writer for Seven Days, Vermont Business Magazine and the daily Nation of Kenya. He is an adjunct professor of journalism at Saint Michael’s College.

Still Lively 

Eyewitness: Janet Fish

click to enlargeeyewitness_32.jpg

Janet Fish is known for her wildly colorful paintings of jars, decorative glassware, patterned textiles and floral bouquets, often all on the same canvas. “So,” she is asked by a visitor to her Middletown Springs farm, “was it the 17th-century Dutch still-life painters who influenced your work?”

No, Fish replies. It was the 1950s abstract expressionists.

Fish’s unexpected answer offers deep insight into her art. “I use objects as a way of organizing colors and shapes,” she explains.

Her work can also be seen as a meditation on the properties of light, with vessels and their contents serving as vectors or filters for luminescence. Fish strives, she says, to imbue her still-life works with movement — an aim that her gestural brushwork helps her to achieve.

“You also fill the frame, Janet,” Fish’s husband, painter Charles Parness, calls from another room. “The big scale is like the abstract expressionists — that and the shallow space.”

Although everything in Fish’s paintings is readily recognizable, the odd juxtapositions and the pulsating colors create what critic and artist Robert Berlind has described as “a hallucinatory experience of the everyday.” Crowded canvases filled with bright reds, deep blues, sunny yellows and watery greens give the work a cheerful quality, which is in keeping with the painter’s personality.

Arthritis of the back and hips keeps Fish, 74, in a wheelchair much of the time. But physical limitations and their attendant frustrations haven’t dimmed her broad smile or abraded her aristocratic good looks. With a freckled face topped by straight white hair, Fish presents a striking preview of what Meryl Streep could look like a decade hence.

Fish hasn’t been painting much this summer, she says apologetically, adding that she still manages to work while seated on a high stool. In the spacious studio she shares with Parness, a half-completed composition rests on an easel in the area illuminated by morning light; pencil sketches are all that can be seen on a canvas in a corner that catches the afternoon light.

Still lifes have been the focus of Fish’s career, which began on Manhattan’s Lower East Side in the early ‘60s. The New York art world still revolved, in those years and for many to come, around the abstract eruptions of Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, Robert Motherwell and other artists who became certified culture heroes. Working in an untrendy genre has presented some challenges, Fish acknowledges. “I can’t get into the ultrafashionable galleries,” she says. “But I’ve never had trouble getting into good galleries.”

Fish had a show this past winter at Chelsea gallery DC Moore that included a couple of works featuring children and adults. And, in one amusing piece, a monkey who is exiting stage left after having knocked over a vase and other items in the tabletop scene. The figures are rendered as expertly as the objects. The show drew an admiring review from the online magazine Artcritical, which described Fish as “a meticulous, if organic, art director.”

A New York Times critic has credited Fish with having “helped resuscitate realism in the 1970s.” But the strongest appreciation of her work may come from her contemporaries, or younger artists she has inspired. “Her work is a touchstone and tremendously influential,” said Eric Fischl, a painter of darkly realistic tableaux, in an interview published earlier this year. “Anyone who deals with domestic still life has to go through her. She’s very important.”

The scion of an artistic family that included the American impressionist Clark Greenwood Voorhees, Fish spent most of her childhood in Bermuda. Asked why her palette has such a summery aura, Fish responds, “It’s always summery in Bermuda.”

She earned an undergraduate degree from Smith College and an MFA from Yale. A remarkable collection of future art stars were attending Yale in those years. Monumentalist sculptor Richard Serra was studying there at the same time as Fish, as were photorealist portrait painter Chuck Close, calligraphy-inspired minimalist Brice Marden and painter-filmmaker-sculptor Nancy Graves.

After graduate school, Fish began showing large paintings of vegetables at an artists’ cooperative gallery called Ours in lower Manhattan’s SoHo district. But, as often occurs with ventures of that sort, conflicts among the participants led to the gallery’s quick demise. Fish and Parness were also pioneers in the conversion of disused SoHo warehouses into living-space lofts. The couple still maintains a place there, but it goes unused much of the year.

SoHo is now a carnival of consumption, Parness complains. A specialist in weirdly funny self-portraits, he lives with Fish on their 120-acre hill farm about eight months of the year. It’s a lovely, comfortable setting, complete with a stocked koi pond, a free-range herd of heifers soon to become beef and a rambunctious Labradoodle named Bella.

There’s also that bespoke studio any artist would envy. It contains shelves of glassware that Fish has picked up at lawn sales and auctions for prices ranging from 50 cents to $500. She arranges these objects into groupings that she then renders as still lifes. “I like to have something tangible in front of me,” Fish explains. She says she paints only what she sees and not “what a camera sees.”

As her frequent local foraging suggests, Fish claims residency in Vermont, not New York; she has taught at the Vermont Studio Center in Johnson. Even so, she cautions, “I’m not trying to paint Vermont. I’m obviously here, though, and what I see out my window might get into my paintings — the landscape, the colors, the light.”

Vermont’s light, which she describes as blue and green, is very different from New York City’s, which is more beige, Fish notes. “Light matters a lot to me,” she says.

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The artwork of Ellsworth Kelly

__ Ellsworth Kelly Ellsworth Kelly Featured artist today is Ellsworth Kelly Interview with Visual Artist Ellsworth Kelly at Art Basel Uploaded on Jun 4, 2008http://www.vernissage.tv | In honor of Ellsworth Kelly’s 85th birthday, Matthew Marks Gallery presents a one-person exhibition by the artist at Art 39 Basel. On display at the gallery’s booth at […]

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Review from LA Times by Noel Murray, August 24, 2016 Football drama ‘Greater’ is an appealing underdog saga

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Razorbacks Remember Legend With Award

Uploaded on Aug 23, 2010

The Brandon Burlsworth Award will honor the former hog’s memory and help walk on hogs succeed.

Review from LA Times by  Noel Murray, August 24, 2016

Football drama ‘Greater’ is an appealing underdog saga

Noel Murray

The true story of the late Arkansas Razorbacks football hero Brandon Burlsworth is an underdog saga to rival “Rudy,” and while the modest Burlsworth biopic “Greater” doesn’t have that film’s inspirational spark, the indie drama is just sweet enough and slick enough to appeal to pigskin fans and Christian family audiences.

A fine cast helps. Neal McDonough (who also co-produced) plays Brandon’s older brother Marty, who raises him in lieu of their absentee alcoholic father (the always-excellent Michael Parks). Nick Searcy plays a mysterious figure Marty talks to about God during Brandon’s funeral, as the film’s framing device.

See the most-read stories in Entertainment this hour »

Star Christopher Severio gives a solid performance, if not up to the level of his more accomplished cast mates. The bigger problem though is that writer Brian Reindl and director David Hunt hit all the predictable beats too hard as Brandon overcomes his many doubters to become an All-American.

Still, Hunt and his crew also give “Greater” a polished look. And Burlsworth’s story is undeniably touching — and even a little unusual, since it’s not about some phenom, but instead salutes a hefty lineman who studied hard, followed his faith and became a role model to future Razorbacks.

The movie’s length is excessive and its arc over-familiar, but for those who don’t mind a little sap — or a lot — “Greater” is effective. Even Texas Longhorns might leave shouting, “Woo Pig Sooie.”

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‘Greater’

MPAA rating: PG, for thematic elements, some language and smoking.

Running time: 2 hours, 10 minutes.

Playing: In general release

 

 

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Greater: Official Trailer – Old #2

Brandon Burlsworth

Uploaded on Aug 31, 2011

Brandon was a walk on turned All American at the University of Arkansas. He was drafted by the Indianapolis Colts and 11 days later was tragically killed in a car accident. The Brandon Burlsworth Foundation was founded in his name and has several programs: The Burls Kids program takes underprivileged children to all Arkansas Razorback and Indianapolis Colts home games. The BBF in partnership with Walmart provides eye care to 14,000 pre-K thru 12th grade students whose working families are trying, but still cannot afford extras like eye care and do not qualify for state funded programs. We hold football camps each year in Harrison and Little Rock and we have several football scholarship and awards including the Burlsworth Trophy, a national award given out to the most outstanding Division One college football player who began his career as a walk-on.

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WOODY WEDNESDAY Café Society review – Woody Allen on nostalgic form 3/5stars Wendy Ide Sunday 4 September 2016 03.00 EDT

I have posted so many reviews on Woody Allen’s latest movie CAFE SOCIETY and I even posted an open letter I wrote to Woody Allen about the film. A serious theme of the afterlife is brought up in this film too. Some reviewers liked the film and the lavish surroundings in it and some did not. Below is another review.

Café Society review – Woody Allen on nostalgic form

3/5stars

Jesse Eisenberg is suitably jittery as the director’s alter ego, but it’s Kristen Stewart’s naturalism that carries the movie

Jesse Eisenberg in Café Society.
‘A disconcertingly accurate channelling of the director’: Jesse Eisenberg in Café Society. Photograph: Sabrina Lantos/Warner Bros

From the reassuring chug of Woody Allen’s trademark trad jazz score toJesse Eisenberg’s disconcertingly accurate channelling of the director’s jittery introspection, this handsome, nostalgia-sodden romance feels rather familiar. But just when you are about to dismiss the picture as pure cappuccino froth, the bittersweet bite kicks in. It’s not in the same league as Allen’s finest work, but nor is it a honking misfire like Magic in the Moonlight.

Eisenberg plays Bobby Dorfman, the son of a Bronx jeweller who decides to try his luck in Hollywood. His one industry connection, his uncle Phil (Steve Carell), is a high-powered agent who takes a liking to his nephew. It’s through Uncle Phil that Bobby meets Vonnie (Kristen Stewart), Phil’s secretary. Bobby is smitten, but Vonnie tactfully keeps him at arm’s length until, dumped by her boyfriend, she turns to him for comfort. The 1930s setting – Hollywood and New York are sketched with crisp, immaculately tailored art deco lines – is one of the film’s main assets. Allen increasingly seems more at ease with a story that pays tribute to a past era of cinema than one that is wholly contemporary. Another plus is Stewart, whose low-key naturalism draws us in and brings Vonnie to the very heart of the film. However, in contrast to the effortlessly elegant backdrop, a Bronx-accented narration is gratingly crude and unnecessary – like dipping a donut into a perfectly mixed martini.

Café Society Official International Trailer #1 (2016) – Jesse Eisenberg, Kristen Stewart Movie HD

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22 Quotes to Celebrate Milton Friedman Day Samantha Reinis / @samantha_reinis / August 01, 2015

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Free to Choose: Part 1 of 10 The Power of the Market (Featuring Milton Friedman)

Free to Choose Part 2: The Tyranny of Control (Featuring Milton Friedman

Conservative economist Milton Friedman would have been 103 years old if he were still living today. He won a Nobel Prize for his work in economics and served as an advisor to President Nixon. (Photo: Everett Collection/Newscom)

July 31 is known as a day to honor conservative economist Milton Friedman, as he would have been 103 years old if he were still living today.

Friedman was awarded the Nobel Prize for his work in economics, specifically for “his achievements in the field of consumption analysis, monetary history and theory, and for his demonstration of the complexity of stabilization policy.”

He served as an advisor to President Nixon in the White House and was the president of the American Economic Association before becoming a senior research fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. Friedman was known for his defense of the free market and call for school choice through a voucher programs.

To honor this great man, here are 22 of his most notable quotes regarding the economy, government, and life.

  1. If you put the federal government in charge of the Sahara Desert, in 5 years there’d be a shortage of sand.”
  2. “The great achievements of civilization have not come from government bureaus. Einstein didn’t construct his theory under order from a bureaucrat. Henry Ford didn’t revolutionize the automobile industry that way.”
  3. “Governments never learn. Only people learn.”
  4. “Many people want the government to protect the consumer. A much more urgent problem is to protect the consumer from the government.”
  5. “One of the great mistakes is to judge policies and programs by their intentions rather than their results.”
  6. “There is no such thing as a free lunch.”
  7. “I am in favor of cutting taxes under any circumstance and for any excuse, for any reason, whenever it’s possible.”
  8. “A society that puts equality before freedom will get neither. A society that puts freedom before equality will get a high degree of both.”
  9. “If all we want are jobs, we can create any number—for example, have people dig holes and then fill them up again, or perform other useless tasks. Work is sometimes its own reward. Mostly, however, it is the price we pay to get the things we want. Our real objective is not just jobs but productive jobs—jobs that will mean more goods and services to consume.”
  10. “The most important single central fact about a free market is that no exchange takes place unless both parties benefit.”
  11. “When everybody owns something, nobody owns it, and nobody has a direct interest in maintaining or improving its condition. That is why buildings in the Soviet Union—like public housing in the United States—look decrepit within a year or two of their construction.”
  12. “Hell hath no fury like a bureaucrat scorned.”
  13. “The lack of balance in governmental activity reflects primarily the failure to separate sharply the question what activities it is appropriate for government to finance from the question what activities it is appropriate for government to administer—a distinction that is important in other areas of government activity as well.”
  14. “Nothing is so permanent as a temporary government program.”
  15. “Is there some society you know that doesn’t run on greed? You think Russia doesn’t run on greed? You think China doesn’t run on greed? What is greed? Of course, none of us are greedy, it’s only the other fellow who’s greedy.”
  16. “I think the government solution to a problem is usually as bad as the problem and very often makes the problem worse.”
  17. “The Great Depression, like most other periods of severe unemployment, was produced by government mismanagement rather than by any inherent instability of the private economy.”
  18. “Underlying most arguments against the free market is a lack of belief in freedom itself.”
  19. “I think that the Internet is going to be one of the major forces for reducing the role of government.”
  20. Concentrated power is not rendered harmless by the good intentions of those who create it.”
  21. “Inflation is taxation without legislation.”
  22. “Nobody spends somebody else’s money as carefully as he spends his own. Nobody uses somebody else’s resources as carefully as he uses his own. So if you want efficiency and effectiveness, if you want knowledge to be properly utilized, you have to do it through the means of private property.”

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By the playbook: Film about former Razorback Burlsworth scores with authenticity By Philip Martin This article was published August 26, 2016 at 5:45 a.m.

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Razorbacks Remember Legend With Award

Uploaded on Aug 23, 2010

The Brandon Burlsworth Award will honor the former hog’s memory and help walk on hogs succeed.

By the playbook: Film about former Razorback Burlsworth scores with authenticity

4

Greater

86 Cast: Christopher Severio, Neal McDonough, Michael Parks, Leslie Easterbrook, Nick Searcy, Fredric Lehne, M.C. Gainey, Ed Lowry, David Bazzel

Director: David Hunt

Rating: PG, for thematic elements, some language and smoking

Running time: 130 minutes

By Philip Martin

This article was published August 26, 2016 at 5:45 a.m.

actor-christopher-severio-portrays-brandon-burlsworth-in-greater-which-opens-friday-nationwide

Actor Christopher Severio portrays Brandon Burlsworth in “Greater,” which opens Friday nationwide.

Greater tells the story of University of Arkansas standout Brandon Burlsworth, who is touted in the film’s promotional materials as “the greatest walk-on in college football history.” He may well have been.

After redshirting his first year, he not only won a scholarship but became the Razorbacks’ starting right guard, and in his senior year, an All-American. He was drafted in the third round by the Indianapolis Colts. And had he lived, there’s no reason to believe he wouldn’t have started for the Colts his rookie year. He probably would have enjoyed a relatively long and lucrative career in the National Football League.

By all accounts, Burlsworth was an unfailingly polite, possibly obsessive-compulsive young man possessed of remarkable character and dignity. He was a hard worker, the antithesis of the stereotype of the entitled star athlete. He was the first Razorback player to earn a master’s degree (in business administration) before playing in his final game for the university. He had a deep and abiding Christian faith.

But in what would seem like a heavy-handed plot twist had it appeared in a young adult novel, Burlsworth died before he could play a single professional football game. Just 11 days after being drafted by the Colts, on April 28, 1999, a Wednesday afternoon, Burlsworth was returning to his hometown of Harrison after working out in the Razorbacks’ facility in Fayetteville. Near Alpena, on a relatively flat stretch of U.S. 412, his car clipped an oncoming 18-wheeler, then swerved and crashed head-on into a second truck. He was on his way to take his mother to church.

If you live in Arkansas, you probably know all this. If you don’t, you might be skeptical that anyone could be quite as earnest and decent as Burlsworth was. Maybe the unlikeliest thing about the film is how little truth it seems to change for dramatic purposes. While there is some compression of events and a brother (Grady Burlsworth) largely elided from the story, some of what seems Hollywooded up actually happened. Brandon’s mother, Barbara (Leslie Easterbrook), really was in the habit of telling her son to watch out for “big ol’ trucks” whenever he embarked on a journey. Brandon’s teammates really did drive him crazy by messing with the pens he’d laid out just so on his desk.

What’s most admirable about Greater is that, although it belongs to that class of films that is marketed (and sometimes dismissed) as “faith-based,” is that it insists on a certain humanity for the lineman. As in life, this Burlsworth isn’t perfect. We first meet him as a preteen (played by Ethan Waller), a junk-food loving football fan with no perceptible athletic talent — a slow, soft fat kid. (In real life, Burlsworth was a late bloomer. He didn’t develop into a star until his junior year at Harrison High. At the NFL combine in February 1999 he’d run 40 yards in 4.88 seconds, best among offensive linemen, and bench-pressed 225 pounds 28 times. And though he weighed 308 pounds and was just shy of 6 feet, 4 inches, he could dunk a basketball with two hands from a standing start. He wasn’t without God-given talent.)

As a film, Greater shares with its subject a certain straight-down-the-middle conventionality. Fayetteville-based producer Brian Reindl, a first-time filmmaker who worked 11 years on this project, seemed determined not to make a mistake. Director David Hunt similarly plays it safe, and even cinematographer Gabe Mayhan — who has demonstrated an extraordinary eye on other projects (including Josh Miller and Miles Miller’s All the Birds Have Flown South) — seems content to default to Hallmark Hall of Fame tastefulness. The football action scenes are especially well done. Lots of local faces pop up in small roles. The result is a fine, old-fashioned movie that hits all the expected beats and will no doubt be well received by people familiar with Burlsworth’s story.

But it’s not an adventurous film, and one might have hoped for a bit more nuance in the Brandon character (played as a young man with a certain appropriate stolidity by Louisiana actor Christopher Severio). Brandon’s good and humble and perhaps a little too naive — the only scene in the movie that feels false is his reaction to a few sips of alcohol his mischievous teammates slip him — but not particularly interesting. He believes what his mama, his coaches and his pastor tell him. He doesn’t need to see the big picture.

The filmmakers have enough sense to provide us with an alternate to this limited carrier of our empathy by framing the story through the eyes of Marty Burlsworth, Brandon’s much older brother. Marty, played by veteran character actor Neal McDonough (probably best known for his portrayal of super-villain Damien Darhkin the DC Comics-derived series Arrow, Flash and Legends of Tomorrow, though he also had a memorable arc as a bad guy on the 2012 season of Justified), is a fairly complex figure who undergoes an understandable crisis of faith after the death of his younger brother. Forcing the events of the film through the prism of Marty gives the movie whatever dramatic tension it achieves. (While McDonough seems too old to play a character who, in the movie’s earliest set scenes, is in his mid-to late-20s, he does some subtle work in what is by design not a terribly nuanced picture.)

In the film’s biggest departure from verisimilitudinous story-telling, a tempter figure, The Farmer (played by Justified veteran Nick Searcy), is introduced to call Marty’s attention to the random cruelty present in the universe. While it’s not the most original trope, it’s a lot of fun to watch these actors act.

In the end, Greater is not a movie for people who look to movies for something more than uplift or assurance, but that’s all right. It does no disservice to the memory of a young man who died before he should have, and it’s unlikely anyone will argue that it presents a false picture of Brandon Burlsworth. If it inspires people, especially young people, to do right and work hard, then it has accomplished more than a lot of more artfully conceived and daring movies.

MovieStyle on 08/26/2016

Print Headline: By the playbook; Film about former Razorback Burlsworth scores with authenticity

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Greater: Official Trailer – Old #2

Brandon Burlsworth

Uploaded on Aug 31, 2011

Brandon was a walk on turned All American at the University of Arkansas. He was drafted by the Indianapolis Colts and 11 days later was tragically killed in a car accident. The Brandon Burlsworth Foundation was founded in his name and has several programs: The Burls Kids program takes underprivileged children to all Arkansas Razorback and Indianapolis Colts home games. The BBF in partnership with Walmart provides eye care to 14,000 pre-K thru 12th grade students whose working families are trying, but still cannot afford extras like eye care and do not qualify for state funded programs. We hold football camps each year in Harrison and Little Rock and we have several football scholarship and awards including the Burlsworth Trophy, a national award given out to the most outstanding Division One college football player who began his career as a walk-on.

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