Category Archives: Current Events

MUSIC MONDAY “No Time to Die” is a song by American singer and songwriter Billie Eilish. It is the theme song for the upcoming James Bond film of the same name, and was released through Darkroom and Interscope Records on February 13, 2020!

________

NO TIME TO DIE | Final US Trailer

007 : James Bond : Theme

Goldfinger Theme Song – James Bond

Diamonds Are Forever Theme Song – James Bond

Moonraker Theme Song – James Bond

Adele – Skyfall (Lyric Video)

—-

Billie Eilish – No Time To Die

No Time to Die (song)

 
 

No Time to Die” is a song by American singer and songwriter Billie Eilish. It is the theme song for the upcoming James Bond film of the same name, and was released through Darkroom and Interscope Records on February 13, 2020.[1] The song was written by Eilish and her brother Finneas O’Connell, and recorded in a bedroom studio.[2][3] At age 18, Eilish is the youngest artist to have written and recorded a James Bond theme song.[4][5] The song won the Grammy Award for Best Song Written for Visual Media at the 63rd Annual Grammy Awards.

“No Time to Die” debuted at top of the Irish Singles Chart and the UK Singles Chart. It became Eilish’s first number-one single in the UK and made her the first artist born in the 21st century to top the chart. Furthermore, the song became the first James Bondtheme by a female artist to top the UK chart, as well as the second Bond theme overall to top that chart.[6] In the United States, “No Time to Die” debuted and peaked at number 16 on the BillboardHot 100.[7]

 

Background and releaseEdit

In an interview with Zane Lowe for Apple Music, Eilish explained how she was offered to make the next James Bond theme for No Time to Die, with her brother Finneas O’Connell.[8] On December 19, 2019, they flew to London to work with Hans Zimmerand his orchestra.[9] Finneas explained in an interview that he and his sister wrote and recorded the new James Bond theme song in three days while on a tour bus in Texas. While “No Time to Die” was still in production, the siblings met with the producer Barbara Broccoli, after performing a show in Dublin.[10][11] Broccoli had flown to meet Eilish and Finneas.[11] They were given parts of the script and started to create the theme. Finneas had originally tried to write the song on a guitar, but Eilish scrapped the idea.[11] Finneas later found a piano in the green room of a Texas arena and played a riff which would later appear in the song.[11]

Zimmer liked their demo and the trio would eventually meet in person to start recording the song with a 70-person orchestra at George Martin‘s AIR Studios.[11] She concluded saying, “For, like, a month-ish, like, half a month maybe, we were just kind of going back and forth to their team and us about, like, just getting it right and getting it right and getting it right and it went through a lot of different versions and then we got it, like, we all worked really hard, Hans was incredibly—like, easy to work with. It was a really good, collaborative experience.”[9]

 

Composition and lyricsEdit

Musically, “No Time to Die” is an orchestral popballad with R&B influences..[12][13][14][8] The track runs at 74 BPM and is in the key of E minor. It runs at four minutes and two seconds.[15] Eilish’s vocals span E3 to D5, which include a belted B4.[16]According to Roisin O’Connor of The Independent, the song “features classic elements of the most memorable Bond themes including a slow build; a dark, shivery theme; and dramatic orchestration”.[17]Cassie Da Costa of The Daily Beast said the song “begins with moody, atmospheric piano music before Billie’s pop-enunciated alto vibrato creeps in with depressive yet vague observations about love, loss, and violence”.[18] The song features orchestral arrangements by Hans Zimmer as well as Johnny Marr on guitar.[19]

According to Sheldon Pearce of Pitchfork, the lyrics reflect the “betrayal hinted at in the film’s trailer and embody the tension of espionage”.[14] In the chorus of the song, Eilish sings about a lover’s betrayal “Was I stupid to love you?/ Was I reckless to help?/Was it obvious to everybody else/That I’d fallen for a lie?/You were never on my side/Fool me once, fool me twice/Are you death or paradise?/Now you’ll never see me cry/There’s just no time to die.”[20]

 

PromotionEdit

Eilish was announced as the performer of the theme song for the 25th film in the James Bond franchise in January 2020, initially via the franchise’s official Twitter account.[21] Eilish called the opportunity “a huge honor”,[2] and O’Connell said they “feel so so lucky to play a small role in such a legendary franchise”.[2] No Time to Die director Cary Joji Fukunaga described himself as a fan of the duo, and the film’s producers, Michael G. Wilson and Barbara Broccoli, said the song is “impeccably crafted”.[5] At the 92nd Academy Awards, Eilish said the ballad was “written” and “done”.[22]

Eilish performed the song live for the first time at the 2020 Brit Awards on February 18, 2020 alongside Finneas, Zimmer and Marr.[18]

 

Music videoEdit

The official music video for “No Time to Die” was released on October 1, 2020.[23] The video was shot in black-and-white clip and was directed by Daniel Kleinman, who has designed every title sequence for the James Bond series since 1995, except Quantum of Solace in 2008.[23][24][25] In the visual, it shows Eilish singing behind an old-fashioned microphone, as she stares into the camera interspersed with scenes from the film showing James Bond (Daniel Craig) and Madeleine Swann (Léa Seydoux) engaging in a love affair.[23][24][20] Justin Curto, writing for Vulture magazine, mentions the video has “smokey lounge-singer vibes”.[26] Rachel McRady of Entertainment Tonight commented that it was clear that “Madeleine betrays 007 in some way as the video continuously shares shots of the agent looking distrustful as he gazes upon his ladylove”.[23]

 

Critical receptionEdit

Alexis Petridis of The Guardian gave an overall positive review, stating that “No Time to Die” is a “confident”, and “appealing addition to the Bond theme canon.”[27] Chris Willman, writing for Variety, wrote that the track was one of the better James Bond themes to be written in the last 25 to 30 years.[28] Roisin O’Connor of The Independentstated that “‘No Time To Die’ is one of the best Bond theme songs we’ve had in some time.”[29] Alexa Camp of Slant Magazine said, “the lush, darkly cinematic track falls in line with past 007 themes”.[30] Cassie Da Costa of The Daily Beastdescribed the song as “not at the level” of Shirley Bassey‘s “Goldfinger” and Nancy Sinatra‘s “You Only Live Twice“, and said it was certainly not “Eilish’s best, but as of late, the Bond universe has been perfectly satisfied with good enough.”[18]

In June 2020, Billboard ranked “No Time to Die” as the 22nd best song of 2020 so far.[31]

 

Credits and personnelEdit

Credits adapted from Tidal and 007.com.[32][33]

  • Billie Eilish – vocals, songwriting
  • Finneas – production, songwriting, bass, percussion, piano, synthesizer, drum programming, vocal arrangement
  • Stephen Lipson – production, mixing
  • Johnny Marr – guitar
  • Hans Zimmer – orchestral arrangements
  • Matt Dunkley – orchestral arrangements
  • Rob Kinelski – mixing
  • Casey Cuayo – mix engineering
  • Eli Heisler – mix engineering
  • John Greenham – mastering
 

ChartsEdit

 
“No Time to Die”
Billie Eilish - No Time to Die.png
Single by Billie Eilish
Released February 13, 2020
Recorded October 2019
Genre
Length 4:02
Label
Songwriter(s)
Producer(s)
Billie Eilish singles chronology
Everything I Wanted
(2019)
No Time to Die
(2020)
Ilomilo
(2020)
 
James Bond theme singles chronology
Writing’s on the Wall
(2015)
No Time to Die
(2020)
 
Music video
No Time to Die on YouTube
 

——

Sam Smith – Writing’s On The Wall (from Spectre) (Official Video)

 

—-

Thunderball Theme Song – James Bond

 

Nancy Sinatra – You Only Live Twice (HQ)

__

The Man with the Golden Gun Opening Title Sequence

 

—-

The spy who loved me (1977) INTRO HD

Sheena Easton • For Your Eyes Only – James Bond/007

—-

James Bond – Octopussy – Theme Song

A View to a Kill Opening Title Sequence

 –

A-ha • The Living Daylights – James Bond 007

 

LICENCE TO KILL HIGH DEFINITION

 

-—

James Bond – Goldeneye Opening Theme (HQ)

Sheryl Crow – Tomorrow Never Dies

 

Barry, Beatles, Billie: 60 years of Bond tunes

<img class=”i-amphtml-intrinsic-sizer” role=”presentation” src=”data:;base64,” alt=”” aria-hidden=”true” />Barry, Beatles, Billie: 60 years of Bond tunes

 

British actor Daniel Craig poses during a photocall to promote the 24th James Bond film ‘Spectre’ on February 18, 2015 at Rome’s city hall. AFP PHOTO / TIZIANA FABI (Photo by VINCENZO PINTO and TIZIANA FABI / AFP)

Paris, France — Ever since the twanging guitar of John Barry’s theme song first appeared in “Dr No” in 1962, music has been crucial to the James Bond phenomenon.

The songs written for each title sequence have become a way of marking out the evolution of pop music through the past 60 years, from the classics of Shirley Bassey and Paul McCartney to Adele and Billie Eilish.

Nobody remembers Monty

Many assume the original theme was written by John Barry, in part because he became so closely associated with the Bond franchise, composing the soundtrack for 11 of the films.

 

In fact, Barry only arranged and performed the theme tune.

The famous dung-digger-dung-dung line was actually written by theater composer Monty Norman, developed from an unused Indian-themed score he had written for an adaptation of VS Naipaul’s “A House for Mr Biswas.”

It was Barry’s job to jazz it up, adding the blaring horns that made it so dramatic.

While Norman was given a one-off payment of just £250, Barry built a Hollywood career that has included five Oscars and classic soundtracks to “Midnight Cowboy,” “Out of Africa,” and many more.

Golden girl Shirley Bassey

Bassey became almost as closely linked to Bond as Barry — the only singer to deliver three title tracks: “Goldfinger” (1964), “Diamonds are Forever” (1971), and “Moonraker” (1979).

The first two are considered the most memorable in Bond history, the latter less so — Bassey later admitted she hated the “Moonraker” song and only did it as a favor to Barry.

“Goldfinger” made her a star, but the recording sessions were grueling, with Barry insisting that Bassey, then 27, hold the last belting note for seven full seconds.

“I was holding it and holding it — I was looking at John Barry and I was going blue in the face and he’s going — hold it just one more second. When it finished, I nearly passed out,” she later recalled.

 A new Beatles beginning

The first Bond film without Barry on the baton was “Live and Let Die” in 1973.

For this, the producers turned to another famous “B” The Beatles.

The group’s producer George Martin took over composing duties and brought in Paul McCartney and his band Wings for the theme song.

It became another classic and spawned a famous cover by Guns’N’Roses in later years.

From this point on, the Bond title song became its own mini-industry, without the involvement of the composer.

Big pop tie-ins followed, ranging from the not-so-successful (Lulu’s “The Man with the Golden Gun”) to classics like Carly Simon’s “Nobody Does it Better” and Duran Duran’s “A View to a Kill.”

<img class=”i-amphtml-intrinsic-sizer” role=”presentation” src=”data:;base64,” alt=”” aria-hidden=”true” />Barry, Beatles, Billie: 60 years of Bond tunes

FILE PHOTO: Auctioneer specialists hold a rare intact James Bond ‘Thunderball’ (1965) film poster (estimate £8,000-£12,000), featuring two panels of poster illustrations on the left by Frank McCarthy and two on the right by Robert McGinnis, at Ewbank’s Auctioneers, ahead of an upcoming sale, in Woking, Britain, April 7, 2021. REUTERS/Hannah McKay

 

The next generation

After a few desultory outings during the Pierce Brosnan years, the Bond genre got a shot of adrenaline with Adele’s “Skyfall” in 2012, which was the first to win an Oscar for best song.

<img class=”i-amphtml-intrinsic-sizer” role=”presentation” src=”data:;base64,” alt=”” aria-hidden=”true” />Barry, Beatles, Billie: 60 years of Bond tunes

 

Image: Twitter/@007

The following year’s “Writing’s on the Wall” by Sam Smith also won an Oscar, though it got a more mixed critical reception.

The latest incarnation is pop princess Billie Eilish with “No Time to Die,” which she co-wrote with her brother Finneas.

It already has a thumbs-up from the doyenne of the Bond theme world, with Bassey telling The Big Issue: “She did a good job.”

Golden girl Shirley Bassey Bassey became almost as closely linked to Bond as Barry -- the only singer to deliver three title tracks: "Goldfinger" (1964), "Diamonds are Forever" (1971), and "Moonraker" (1979).  The first two are considered the most memorable in Bond history, the latter less so -- Bassey later admitted she hated the "Moonraker" song and only did it as a favor to Barry.

The latest James Bond movie “Skyfall” stars Daniel Craig. 007 boozed so much that in all reality he would have had the tremulous hands of a chronic alcoholic, according to an offbeat study published by the British Medical Journal. PHOTO FROM FACEBOOK.COM/JAMESBONDOO7

Live And Let Die Theme Song – James Bond

 

 

Paul McCartney Uncle Albert Rare Studio Demo

Paul McCartney; Uncle AlbertAdmiral Halsey. (RAM 1971)

Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
“Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey”
Single by Paul and Linda McCartney
from the album Ram
B-side Too Many People
Released 2 August 1971 (US only)
Format 7″
Recorded 6 November 1970
Genre
Length 4:49
Label Apple
Writer(s) Paul and Linda McCartney
Producer(s) Paul and Linda McCartney
Paul and Linda McCartney singles chronology
Another Day
(1971)
Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey
(1971)
The Back Seat of My Car
(1971)
Ram track listing
 

Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey” is a song by Paul and Linda McCartney from the album Ram. Released in the United States as a single on 2 August 1971,[1] but premiering on WLS the previous week (as a “Hit Parade Bound” (HPB)),[2] it reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 on 4 September 1971,[3][4] making it the first of a string of post-Beatles, McCartney-penned singles to top the US pop chart during the 1970s and 1980s. Billboard ranked it number 22 on its Top Pop Singles of 1971 year-end chart.[5]

Elements and interpretation[edit]

https://youtu.be/XI6C7L66zq8
“Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey” is composed of several unfinished song fragments that McCartney stitched together similar to the medleys from the Beatles‘ album Abbey Road.[6] The song is noted for its sound effects, including the sounds of a thunderstorm, with rain, heard between the first and second stanza, the sound of a telephone ringing, and a message machine, heard after the second stanza, and a sound of chirping sea birds and wind by the seashore. Linda’s voice is heard in the harmonies as well as the bridge section of the “Admiral Halsey” portion of the song.

McCartney said “Uncle Albert” was based on his uncle. “He’s someone I recall fondly, and when the song was coming it was like a nostalgia thing.”[7] McCartney also said, “As for Admiral Halsey, he’s one of yours, an American admiral”, referring to Fleet Admiral William “Bull” Halsey (1882–1959).[7] McCartney has described the “Uncle Albert” section of the song as an apology from his generation to the older generation, and Admiral Halsey as an authoritarian figure who ought to be ignored.[8]

Despite the disparate elements that make up the song, author Andrew Grant Jackson discerns a coherent narrative to the lyrics, related to McCartney’s emotions in the aftermath of the Beatles’ breakup.[9] In this interpretation, the song begins with McCartney apologizing to his uncle for getting nothing done, and being easily distracted and perhaps depressed in the lethargic “Uncle Albert” section.[9] Then, after some sound effects reminiscent of “Yellow Submarine,” Admiral Halsey appears to him calling him to action, although McCartney remains more interested in “tea and butter pie.” McCartney stated that he put the butter in the pie so that it would not melt at all.[9] Jackson sees a possible sinister allusion in the use of Admiral Halsey as a character in the song, since Halsey was famous for fighting the Japanese in World War II and claiming that “after the war, the Japanese language will be spoken only in hell,” and McCartney’s ex-Beatle partner John Lennon had recently married a Japanese woman, Yoko Ono.[9] The “hands across the water” section which follows could be taken as evocative of the command “All hands on deck!”, rousing McCartney to action, perhaps to compete with Lennon.[9] The song then ends with the “gypsy” section, in which McCartney resolves to get back on the road and perform his music, now that he was on his own without his former bandmates who no longer wanted to tour.[9]

Reception[edit]

Paul McCartney won the Grammy Award for Best Arrangement Accompanying Vocalists in 1971 for the song.[10][11] The single was certified Gold by the Recording Industry Association of America for sales of over one million copies.[12]

According to Allmusic critic Stewart Mason, fans of Paul McCartney’s music are divided in their opinions of this song.[13] Although some fans praise it as “one of his most playful and inventive songs” others criticize it for being “exactly the kind of cute self-indulgence that they find so annoying about his post-Beatles career.”[13] Mason himself considers it “churlish” to be annoyed by the song, given that song isn’t intended to be completely serious, and praises the “Hands across the water” section as being “lovably giddy.”[13]

On the US charts, the song set a songwriting milestone as the all-time songwriting record (at the time) for the most consecutive calendar years to write a #1 song. This gave McCartney eight consecutive years (starting with “I Want to Hold Your Hand“), leaving behind Lennon with only seven years.

Later release[edit]

“Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey” also appears on Wings Greatest from 1978, even though Ram was not a Wings album, and again on the US version of McCartney’s 1987 compilation, All the Best!, as well as the 2001 compilation Wingspan: Hits and History.

Personnel[edit]

Song uses[edit]

Charts[edit]

Peak positions[edit]

Chart (1971) Position
Australian Kent Music Report[14] 5
Canadian RPM Top 100 Singles[15] 1
Mexican Singles Chart[16] 3
U.S. Billboard Hot 100[4] 1
West German Media Control Singles Chart[17] 30

Year-end charts[edit]

Chart (1971) Position
Canadian RPM Singles Chart[18] 14
U.S. Billboard Top Pop Singles[16] 22

Certifications[edit]

Region Certification
United States (RIAA)[19] Gold

Notes[edit]

  1. Jump up^ McGee 2003, p. 195.
  2. Jump up^ “89WLS Hit Parade”. 1971-08-02. Retrieved 2013-12-21.
  3. Jump up^ Billboard.
  4. ^ Jump up to:a b “Allmusic: Paul McCartney: Charts & Awards”. allmusic.com. Retrieved 2 May 2013.
  5. Jump up^ “Top Pop 100 Singles” Billboard December 25, 1971: TA-36
  6. Jump up^ Blaney, J. (2007). Lennon and McCartney: together alone: a critical discography of their solo work. Jawbone Press. pp. 46, 50. ISBN 978-1-906002-02-2.
  7. ^ Jump up to:a b McGee 2003, p. 196.
  8. Jump up^ Benitez, V.P. (2010). The Words and Music of Paul McCartney: The Solo Years. Praeger. pp. 30–31. ISBN 978-0-313-34969-0.
  9. ^ Jump up to:a b c d e f Jackson, A.G. (2012). Still the Greatest: The Essential Songs of The Beatles’ Solo Careers. Scarecrow Press. ISBN 978-0810882225.
  10. Jump up^ “Past Winners Search”. National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Retrieved 2 May 2014.
  11. Jump up^ “1971 Grammy Awards”.
  12. Jump up^ riaa.com
  13. ^ Jump up to:a b c Mason, S. “Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey”. Allmusic. Retrieved 2013-12-25.
  14. Jump up^ Kent, David (1993). Australian Chart Book 1970–1992. St Ives, NSW: Australian Chart Book. ISBN 0-646-11917-6.
  15. Jump up^ “Top Singles – Volume 16, No. 5”. RPM. 18 September 1971. Retrieved 5 May 2013.
  16. ^ Jump up to:a b Nielsen Business Media, Inc (25 December 1971). Billboard – Talent in Action 1971. Retrieved 1 May 2014.
  17. Jump up^ “Single Search: Paul and Linda McCartney – “Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey”” (in German). Media Control. Retrieved 20 February 2013.
  18. Jump up^ “RPM 100 Top Singles of 1971”. RPM. 8 January 1972. Retrieved 11 March 2014.
  19. Jump up^ “American single certifications – Paul Mc Cartney – Uncle Albert”. Recording Industry Association of America. If necessary, click Advanced, then click Format, then select Single, then click SEARCH

References[edit]

Preceded by
How Can You Mend a Broken Heart” by Bee Gees
Billboard Hot 100 number-one single
4 September 1971 (one week)
Succeeded by
Go Away Little Girl” by Donny Osmond
Preceded by
Sweet Hitch-Hiker” by Creedence Clearwater Revival
Canadian “RPM” Singles Chart number-one single
18 September 1971 – 2 October 1971 (three weeks)
Succeeded by
Maggie May” by Rod Stewart

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Barry, Beatles, Billie: 60 years of Bond tunes 

________

NO TIME TO DIE | Final US Trailer

007 : James Bond : Theme

Goldfinger Theme Song – James Bond

Diamonds Are Forever Theme Song – James Bond

Moonraker Theme Song – James Bond

Adele – Skyfall (Lyric Video)

—-

Billie Eilish – No Time To Die

 

——

Sam Smith – Writing’s On The Wall (from Spectre) (Official Video)

 

—-

Thunderball Theme Song – James Bond

 

Nancy Sinatra – You Only Live Twice (HQ)

__

The Man with the Golden Gun Opening Title Sequence

 

—-

The spy who loved me (1977) INTRO HD

Sheena Easton • For Your Eyes Only – James Bond/007

—-

James Bond – Octopussy – Theme Song

A View to a Kill Opening Title Sequence

 –

A-ha • The Living Daylights – James Bond 007

LICENCE TO KILL HIGH DEFINITION

-—

James Bond – Goldeneye Opening Theme (HQ)

Sheryl Crow – Tomorrow Never Dies

 

Barry, Beatles, Billie: 60 years of Bond tunes

<img class=”i-amphtml-intrinsic-sizer” role=”presentation” src=”data:;base64,” alt=”” aria-hidden=”true” />Barry, Beatles, Billie: 60 years of Bond tunes

 

British actor Daniel Craig poses during a photocall to promote the 24th James Bond film ‘Spectre’ on February 18, 2015 at Rome’s city hall. AFP PHOTO / TIZIANA FABI (Photo by VINCENZO PINTO and TIZIANA FABI / AFP)

Paris, France — Ever since the twanging guitar of John Barry’s theme song first appeared in “Dr No” in 1962, music has been crucial to the James Bond phenomenon.

The songs written for each title sequence have become a way of marking out the evolution of pop music through the past 60 years, from the classics of Shirley Bassey and Paul McCartney to Adele and Billie Eilish.

Nobody remembers Monty

Many assume the original theme was written by John Barry, in part because he became so closely associated with the Bond franchise, composing the soundtrack for 11 of the films.

 

In fact, Barry only arranged and performed the theme tune.

The famous dung-digger-dung-dung line was actually written by theater composer Monty Norman, developed from an unused Indian-themed score he had written for an adaptation of VS Naipaul’s “A House for Mr Biswas.”

It was Barry’s job to jazz it up, adding the blaring horns that made it so dramatic.

While Norman was given a one-off payment of just £250, Barry built a Hollywood career that has included five Oscars and classic soundtracks to “Midnight Cowboy,” “Out of Africa,” and many more.

Golden girl Shirley Bassey

Bassey became almost as closely linked to Bond as Barry — the only singer to deliver three title tracks: “Goldfinger” (1964), “Diamonds are Forever” (1971), and “Moonraker” (1979).

The first two are considered the most memorable in Bond history, the latter less so — Bassey later admitted she hated the “Moonraker” song and only did it as a favor to Barry.

“Goldfinger” made her a star, but the recording sessions were grueling, with Barry insisting that Bassey, then 27, hold the last belting note for seven full seconds.

“I was holding it and holding it — I was looking at John Barry and I was going blue in the face and he’s going — hold it just one more second. When it finished, I nearly passed out,” she later recalled.

 A new Beatles beginning

The first Bond film without Barry on the baton was “Live and Let Die” in 1973.

For this, the producers turned to another famous “B” The Beatles.

The group’s producer George Martin took over composing duties and brought in Paul McCartney and his band Wings for the theme song.

It became another classic and spawned a famous cover by Guns’N’Roses in later years.

From this point on, the Bond title song became its own mini-industry, without the involvement of the composer.

Big pop tie-ins followed, ranging from the not-so-successful (Lulu’s “The Man with the Golden Gun”) to classics like Carly Simon’s “Nobody Does it Better” and Duran Duran’s “A View to a Kill.”

<img class=”i-amphtml-intrinsic-sizer” role=”presentation” src=”data:;base64,” alt=”” aria-hidden=”true” />Barry, Beatles, Billie: 60 years of Bond tunes

FILE PHOTO: Auctioneer specialists hold a rare intact James Bond ‘Thunderball’ (1965) film poster (estimate £8,000-£12,000), featuring two panels of poster illustrations on the left by Frank McCarthy and two on the right by Robert McGinnis, at Ewbank’s Auctioneers, ahead of an upcoming sale, in Woking, Britain, April 7, 2021. REUTERS/Hannah McKay

 

The next generation

After a few desultory outings during the Pierce Brosnan years, the Bond genre got a shot of adrenaline with Adele’s “Skyfall” in 2012, which was the first to win an Oscar for best song.

<img class=”i-amphtml-intrinsic-sizer” role=”presentation” src=”data:;base64,” alt=”” aria-hidden=”true” />Barry, Beatles, Billie: 60 years of Bond tunes

 

Image: Twitter/@007

The following year’s “Writing’s on the Wall” by Sam Smith also won an Oscar, though it got a more mixed critical reception.

The latest incarnation is pop princess Billie Eilish with “No Time to Die,” which she co-wrote with her brother Finneas.

It already has a thumbs-up from the doyenne of the Bond theme world, with Bassey telling The Big Issue: “She did a good job.”

Golden girl Shirley Bassey Bassey became almost as closely linked to Bond as Barry -- the only singer to deliver three title tracks: "Goldfinger" (1964), "Diamonds are Forever" (1971), and "Moonraker" (1979).  The first two are considered the most memorable in Bond history, the latter less so -- Bassey later admitted she hated the "Moonraker" song and only did it as a favor to Barry.

The latest James Bond movie “Skyfall” stars Daniel Craig. 007 boozed so much that in all reality he would have had the tremulous hands of a chronic alcoholic, according to an offbeat study published by the British Medical Journal. PHOTO FROM FACEBOOK.COM/JAMESBONDOO7

Live And Let Die Theme Song – James Bond

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Paul McCartney Uncle Albert Rare Studio Demo

Paul McCartney; Uncle AlbertAdmiral Halsey. (RAM 1971)

Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
“Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey”
Single by Paul and Linda McCartney
from the album Ram
B-side Too Many People
Released 2 August 1971 (US only)
Format 7″
Recorded 6 November 1970
Genre
Length 4:49
Label Apple
Writer(s) Paul and Linda McCartney
Producer(s) Paul and Linda McCartney
Paul and Linda McCartney singles chronology
Another Day
(1971)
Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey
(1971)
The Back Seat of My Car
(1971)
Ram track listing
 

Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey” is a song by Paul and Linda McCartney from the album Ram. Released in the United States as a single on 2 August 1971,[1] but premiering on WLS the previous week (as a “Hit Parade Bound” (HPB)),[2] it reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 on 4 September 1971,[3][4] making it the first of a string of post-Beatles, McCartney-penned singles to top the US pop chart during the 1970s and 1980s. Billboard ranked it number 22 on its Top Pop Singles of 1971 year-end chart.[5]

Elements and interpretation[edit]

https://youtu.be/XI6C7L66zq8
“Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey” is composed of several unfinished song fragments that McCartney stitched together similar to the medleys from the Beatles‘ album Abbey Road.[6] The song is noted for its sound effects, including the sounds of a thunderstorm, with rain, heard between the first and second stanza, the sound of a telephone ringing, and a message machine, heard after the second stanza, and a sound of chirping sea birds and wind by the seashore. Linda’s voice is heard in the harmonies as well as the bridge section of the “Admiral Halsey” portion of the song.

McCartney said “Uncle Albert” was based on his uncle. “He’s someone I recall fondly, and when the song was coming it was like a nostalgia thing.”[7] McCartney also said, “As for Admiral Halsey, he’s one of yours, an American admiral”, referring to Fleet Admiral William “Bull” Halsey (1882–1959).[7] McCartney has described the “Uncle Albert” section of the song as an apology from his generation to the older generation, and Admiral Halsey as an authoritarian figure who ought to be ignored.[8]

Despite the disparate elements that make up the song, author Andrew Grant Jackson discerns a coherent narrative to the lyrics, related to McCartney’s emotions in the aftermath of the Beatles’ breakup.[9] In this interpretation, the song begins with McCartney apologizing to his uncle for getting nothing done, and being easily distracted and perhaps depressed in the lethargic “Uncle Albert” section.[9] Then, after some sound effects reminiscent of “Yellow Submarine,” Admiral Halsey appears to him calling him to action, although McCartney remains more interested in “tea and butter pie.” McCartney stated that he put the butter in the pie so that it would not melt at all.[9] Jackson sees a possible sinister allusion in the use of Admiral Halsey as a character in the song, since Halsey was famous for fighting the Japanese in World War II and claiming that “after the war, the Japanese language will be spoken only in hell,” and McCartney’s ex-Beatle partner John Lennon had recently married a Japanese woman, Yoko Ono.[9] The “hands across the water” section which follows could be taken as evocative of the command “All hands on deck!”, rousing McCartney to action, perhaps to compete with Lennon.[9] The song then ends with the “gypsy” section, in which McCartney resolves to get back on the road and perform his music, now that he was on his own without his former bandmates who no longer wanted to tour.[9]

Reception[edit]

Paul McCartney won the Grammy Award for Best Arrangement Accompanying Vocalists in 1971 for the song.[10][11] The single was certified Gold by the Recording Industry Association of America for sales of over one million copies.[12]

According to Allmusic critic Stewart Mason, fans of Paul McCartney’s music are divided in their opinions of this song.[13] Although some fans praise it as “one of his most playful and inventive songs” others criticize it for being “exactly the kind of cute self-indulgence that they find so annoying about his post-Beatles career.”[13] Mason himself considers it “churlish” to be annoyed by the song, given that song isn’t intended to be completely serious, and praises the “Hands across the water” section as being “lovably giddy.”[13]

On the US charts, the song set a songwriting milestone as the all-time songwriting record (at the time) for the most consecutive calendar years to write a #1 song. This gave McCartney eight consecutive years (starting with “I Want to Hold Your Hand“), leaving behind Lennon with only seven years.

Later release[edit]

“Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey” also appears on Wings Greatest from 1978, even though Ram was not a Wings album, and again on the US version of McCartney’s 1987 compilation, All the Best!, as well as the 2001 compilation Wingspan: Hits and History.

Personnel[edit]

Song uses[edit]

Charts[edit]

Peak positions[edit]

Chart (1971) Position
Australian Kent Music Report[14] 5
Canadian RPM Top 100 Singles[15] 1
Mexican Singles Chart[16] 3
U.S. Billboard Hot 100[4] 1
West German Media Control Singles Chart[17] 30

Year-end charts[edit]

Chart (1971) Position
Canadian RPM Singles Chart[18] 14
U.S. Billboard Top Pop Singles[16] 22

Certifications[edit]

Region Certification
United States (RIAA)[19] Gold

Notes[edit]

  1. Jump up^ McGee 2003, p. 195.
  2. Jump up^ “89WLS Hit Parade”. 1971-08-02. Retrieved 2013-12-21.
  3. Jump up^ Billboard.
  4. ^ Jump up to:a b “Allmusic: Paul McCartney: Charts & Awards”. allmusic.com. Retrieved 2 May 2013.
  5. Jump up^ “Top Pop 100 Singles” Billboard December 25, 1971: TA-36
  6. Jump up^ Blaney, J. (2007). Lennon and McCartney: together alone: a critical discography of their solo work. Jawbone Press. pp. 46, 50. ISBN 978-1-906002-02-2.
  7. ^ Jump up to:a b McGee 2003, p. 196.
  8. Jump up^ Benitez, V.P. (2010). The Words and Music of Paul McCartney: The Solo Years. Praeger. pp. 30–31. ISBN 978-0-313-34969-0.
  9. ^ Jump up to:a b c d e f Jackson, A.G. (2012). Still the Greatest: The Essential Songs of The Beatles’ Solo Careers. Scarecrow Press. ISBN 978-0810882225.
  10. Jump up^ “Past Winners Search”. National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Retrieved 2 May 2014.
  11. Jump up^ “1971 Grammy Awards”.
  12. Jump up^ riaa.com
  13. ^ Jump up to:a b c Mason, S. “Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey”. Allmusic. Retrieved 2013-12-25.
  14. Jump up^ Kent, David (1993). Australian Chart Book 1970–1992. St Ives, NSW: Australian Chart Book. ISBN 0-646-11917-6.
  15. Jump up^ “Top Singles – Volume 16, No. 5”. RPM. 18 September 1971. Retrieved 5 May 2013.
  16. ^ Jump up to:a b Nielsen Business Media, Inc (25 December 1971). Billboard – Talent in Action 1971. Retrieved 1 May 2014.
  17. Jump up^ “Single Search: Paul and Linda McCartney – “Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey”” (in German). Media Control. Retrieved 20 February 2013.
  18. Jump up^ “RPM 100 Top Singles of 1971”. RPM. 8 January 1972. Retrieved 11 March 2014.
  19. Jump up^ “American single certifications – Paul Mc Cartney – Uncle Albert”. Recording Industry Association of America. If necessary, click Advanced, then click Format, then select Single, then click SEARCH

References[edit]

Preceded by
How Can You Mend a Broken Heart” by Bee Gees
Billboard Hot 100 number-one single
4 September 1971 (one week)
Succeeded by
Go Away Little Girl” by Donny Osmond
Preceded by
Sweet Hitch-Hiker” by Creedence Clearwater Revival
Canadian “RPM” Singles Chart number-one single
18 September 1971 – 2 October 1971 (three weeks)
Succeeded by
Maggie May” by Rod Stewart

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Chris Martin says he’s going through ‘really hard time’ as he comes to terms with religious upbringing 

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‘IT WAS EVIL’

Chris Martin says he’s going through ‘really hard time’ as he comes to terms with religious upbringing

CHRIS Martin has told how his strict religious upbringing has come back to haunt him.

The Coldplay frontman, 44, revealed he thought he had “coped” with his evangelical Christianity but still has mental scars.

<img class="i-amphtml-blurry-placeholder" src="data:;base64,Chris Martin, 44, has revealed he still has mental scars from his evangelical Christian upbringing
Chris Martin, 44, has revealed he still has mental scars from his evangelical Christian upbringingCredit: Getty

Chris said: “I am having such a hard time in my life right now. And part of dealing with that is going back to look at all that stuff.”

He added: “I could not sing Paint It Black by The Stones because I thought it was evil.”

But the dad of two told Howard Stern’s US radio show he still found it tough to discuss.

He said: “Any method of coping is a strength when you develop it, but later in your life it might not necessarily serve you anymore.”

Chris previously admitted moving away from religion, calling himself an “alltheist” as he believed in everything.

These are some of the most popular posts in the last 30 days about the spiritual quest of Chris Martin of Coldplay that can be found on http://www.thedailyhatch.org:

Chris Martin of Coldplay unknowingly lives out his childhood Christian beliefs (Part 3 of notes from June 23, 2012 Dallas Coldplay Concert, Martin left Christianity because of teaching on hell then he writes bestselling song that teaches hell exists) 

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If I see Chris Martin of Coldplay in person what would I say to him? (Part 3)

Insight into what Coldplay meant by “St. Peter won’t call my name” (Series on Coldplay’s spiritual search, Part 3)jh61

Chris Martin revealed in his interview with Howard Stern that he was rasied an evangelical Christian but he has left the church. I believe that many words that he puts in his songs today are generated from the deep seated Christian beliefs from his childhood that find their way out in his songs. His belief in being generous with charities, and the fact Coldplay’s songs  deal so much with death and the search for meaning and purpose of life (similar to Solomon’s search in Ecclesiastes), and  that our actions are being watched, and Chris describes different ways God tries to reveal himself to us, and many songs deal with trying to find a way to an afterlife and heaven, and he stills uses Christian terms like being “blessed” and “grateful.”

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Kevin Kelley could have punted on life but didn’t. A 72-0 loss won’t change his strategy. 

Back in 2003 I had one son playing for the Bryant Hornets Senior High Football team and one son playing for Baptist Prep so I spent my Friday nights between those two schools.

However, in 2003 I remember attending on a Saturday the Hootens Arkansas Double Hitter with the first game between Benton Panthers (our friend Jon Chris Roberts was All-State Panther WR) and Shiloh Christian and the second game between Pulaski Academy (coached by Kevin Kelley) and Springdale (coached by Gus Malzahn) and I remember thinking when Springdale won 63-0 that Kevin Kelly was not ready for the big time, but I was wrong. Back on September 9, 2011, I was attending the Baptist Prep game at Bigelow but I was listening on the radio to the Pulaski Academy at Cabot game and Pulaski got ahead by 4 touchdowns before Cabot ever touched the ball!!!!! Since then I have been able to attend about one Pulaski Academy a year and Coach Kelley has never ceased to amaze me!!! This story below tells the story in a great way. Enjoy!

Kevin Kelley could have punted on life but didn’t. A 72-0 loss won’t change his strategy.

Even in the best of times, some of the doubters mocked Kevin Kelley and liked to tell him that what he was doing would never work. And if it was working, well — it was only a matter of time, they’d say, before he’d be exposed.

Too crazy. Too gimmicky. Too out there. Too this. Too that.

Kelley, 52 and stout, with a linebacker’s build, is the football coach who never punts, except on those very rare occasions when he does. He’s the coach who always goes for two, except when his team is winning by so much that it’d be unsportsmanlike to do so. He’s the coach who pretty much always onside kicks — unless, again, the margin is too wide in his team’s favor. In following these rules — never punt, always go for two, onside kick all the time — Kelley became arguably the most successful high school football coach in America. His teams at Pulaski Academy in Little Rock, Arkansas, won nine state championships.

That’s how he became the head coach at Presbyterian College, which hired Kelley in May, and that’s how Kelley came to find himself on Saturday night in Buies Creek, about 35 miles south of Raleigh, where in the dark humidity of a muggy late-summer night he stood near his team’s buses and tried to find perspective in defeat. Presbyterian had just suffered a 72-0 loss at Campbell and it’d been one of the worst losses Kelley had ever experienced. Now he knew what, or who, was coming: the people who took joy whenever he’d fail, the naysayers who’d never believe.

Hadn’t it always been that way, even when his teams rarely lost?

There was the time several years ago, Kelley remembered Saturday, when one of his Pulaski teams endured a rare defeat, and in those days at Pulaski a loss came along about as often as rain in the desert. At the time Pulaski was in the midst of four consecutive state championships, but the team had lost, for once, and it was like the critics had been waiting for it. As Kelley told it, a woman approached his wife in the bathroom after the game.

“It’s time for you all to leave,” the woman said. “It’s time to play normal football around here.”

If something like that could happen then, in the midst of so much success, Kelley, in his first months at Presbyterian in small-town Clinton, South Carolina, knew what was waiting for him Saturday night. The Blue Hose — that’s the Presbyterian mascot, for the uninitiated — had just lost by about 10 touchdowns, and if the messages streaming into his Twitter DMs and email were any indication, people were already jumping off the bandwagon, if they were ever on it to begin with.

Kelley took a quick look at his phone after the defeat, in part to get it over with and in part because he feels an obligation to accept and even embrace the consequences of his choices. He does not hide from the criticism as much as soak it in, as if its absorption will make that much sweeter the success he believes is inevitable. And besides, if his way had brought him great success and a measure of celebrity — and it has — then he could accept the derision that came with a 72-0 loss, too.

“I’ll listen to the haters,” Kelley said in a matter-of-fact way, resigned to the influx of incoming messages informing him that his strategy is too insane to work in college football, and moments later he walked toward the bus. It was going to be a long ride home, and only three games into his tenure as a college coach he knew some had already written him off — if not before the season than certainly now. Kelley had heard it all before, and had always answered the cries that his strategy would fail with proof that it wouldn’t.

He’d won more than 80 percent of the time in high school. He’d won so much, and in such a unique way, that he had become a panelist at MIT’s sports analytics conferences, and a motivational speaker when a company or business organization wanted the perspective of a disruptor. He’d won so often that he’d earned the admiration of Bill Belichick, whom Kelley and his son counted as a friend.

(Bill Belichick below with Pulaski Academy Grad Hunter Henry)

“He told me and my dad, we were talking to him … he said, ‘Football’s football,’” said Zack Kelley, who’s on his father’s coaching staff. “It’s going to work. It doesn’t matter if it’s high school, college, NFL — he said ‘Football’s football and a good coach is going to make it happen.’”

But now Kevin Kelley had lost like he hadn’t in a long time, and afterward he said he offered his team his apology and told his players that this was his fault, but that there was even a precedent for this.

“I told the guys after the game, in 2003, in the first game of the year, Guz Malzahn was the head coach at Springdale (High School),” Kelley said, referencing the time before Malzahn went on to coach at Auburn before becoming the head coach at UCF. “And his team beat my team 63-0. And that felt very much like this one did.

“And then we went on to win the state championship game that year.”

But that was high school football in Arkansas and this was college football. Lower-level, FCS college football, but Division I, nonetheless. Kelley walked onto the bus and took his seat for the four-hour ride back to Clinton.

“I hope you’ll keep watching the rest of the season,” he said before he did, and whether Presbyterian recovered from this humbling evening or not, its journey during Kelley’s first year promised to be among the most interesting in college football. Could Kelley’s approach be crazy enough to work at a higher level? Or was it just crazy?

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Presbyterian head football coach Kevin Kelly congratulates Campbell running back Michael Jamerson (21) after their victory.r The Presbyterian Blue Hose and the Campbell Fighting Camels met in a non-conference football game in Buies Creek, N.C. on September 18, 2021. Steven Worthy NEWSOBSERVER.COM

HOW KEVIN KELLEY DEVELOPED NO-PUNT STRATEGY

Football is not necessarily a sport known for spawning innovation or risk-taking, and so tied is it to routine and tradition that any change stands out against the familiar. More than a century later, the forward pass remains perhaps the sport’s great invention, football’s version of the lightbulb or printing press — though it’s fair to question why such a simple thing wasn’t obvious from the start.

It’s a sport whose offenses remained mired in a three-yards-and-a-cloud-of-dust mentality for decades and one that, at the highest level, was slow to embrace wide-open offenses until only recently. The most successful football coaches are sometimes described as geniuses, though many of them do things the same way, as if that way is the only acceptable way.

Pretty much always punting on fourth down; pretty much always kicking the extra point; pretty much always kicking off the normal way — which is to say kicking downfield, instead of attempting an onside kick — is just the way the game has been played, and forever. Few coaches have ever routinely done any one of those things differently, let alone all three of them at the same time.

Kelley realized he needed to try something new before his first season as the head coach at Pulaski. As he remembers it, “it hit me really hard” that he couldn’t play the game in an ordinary way and expect extraordinary results, and that if he did stick to the routine his teams would never reach their potential. A self-described numbers guy — he studied accounting and briefly considered a career in it — Kelley in the early 2000s encountered a report from a Harvard professor who’d analyzed thousands of football games. One of the takeaways: teams punt way too much.

The rationale was that coaches undervalued possessions, and that simply giving the ball away in the form of a punt was a poor strategic choice. The data suggested that the potential reward of scoring after successful fourth-down conversions was more than worth the risk of failing to convert those fourth downs and giving up field position.

His first season as head coach at Pulaski, Kelley punted 21 or 22 times, he said. He saw a benefit on the field but off of it, too, given that he used less practice time on punting and more on other parts of the game he found more important to winning. A few years later, he watched Moneyball, the film version of the bestselling book by the same name, and became more enamored with data and analytics. He devoured Freakonomics, a book about seeing the world differently, and similar ones by Malcolm Gladwell, including Outliers and David and Goliath, which Kelley cited during a lengthy recent phone interview.

“It’s vastly different than people think,” Kelley said of the Biblical story that for centuries has inspired underdogs to believe that they, too, can defy the odds against a more formidable opponent. Yet Kelley argued, referencing Gladwell’s book, that people have had it all wrong.

“David would have been the favorite if Vegas had a line on David and Goliath fighting,” he said. “Because David was a military guy that was a slingshot specialist that was never going to get into hand-to-hand Goliath. He just wasn’t going to do it.”

Kelley’s approach, then, is something like his version of becoming a slingshot sharpshooter and engaging an opponent from a distance. The never punting, the going for two, the onside kicks — they became his way to tilt the advantage in his teams’ favor. And yet it takes a certain type of individual to be willing to try something that so defies the norm.

He wasn’t born with a natural inclination to embrace risk, Kelley said. He wasn’t a daredevil. Yet as a boy growing up in and around Hot Springs, Arkansas, Kelley found himself in circumstances that required improvisation. He didn’t have it easy, and the consistency that some of his peers could count on — a stable environment at home, for instance — Kelley could not.

“Football probably saved my life,” he said. “I had a bad, movie-like childhood at times. There was some alcoholism, there were things — there were times I didn’t think I wanted to keep going, and I would be in a position where I could have easily ended it. And I wanted to go to football the next day, because I felt like that was something I loved being a part of.”

Kelley’s first job as a teenager involved working atop railroad bridges, dismantling crossties and carrying them with a partner off the bridge. They weighed 200 or 300 pounds each, he said, and it was a narrow walk back to safety and “there were no harnesses, no anything. We might be 150 feet above a creek that was a foot deep, where if you fall off, it’s over with.”

So how risky, really, is not punting or going for two after you’ve done that kind or work? Kelley survived that, and a troubled home that at times in his younger years had him contemplating whether he wanted to keep living. It’s no wonder then, perhaps, that he decided he couldn’t go through life punting — that he was going to take chances. That sometimes it might not work, and that had to be OK because at least he’d given himself what he believed to be the best opportunity.

Presbyterian made it look easy his first two games, both against overmatched schools from lower levels of college football. The Blue Hose ran away from St. Andrews, an NAIA school, and from Fort Lauderdale, which is not an NCAA school but one in the NCCAA (National Christian College Athletic Association). The 2-0 start created a bit of buzz, though Kelley last week acknowledged the reality of the competition.

Still, he argued, what he does would work. It worked in high school and it would work at Presbyterian, which competes in a non-scholarship league with Dayton and Davidson and others, and it would work at a higher level of college and even the NFL.

“I hope since I’m being honest with you, you don’t put this in a context that makes me look like a complete idiot,” Kelley said, before making his case of why his approach could work at any level. “… That all said, I mean, I think that there’s a level of what I’m doing that they would be better off using in the NFL.”

“This is going to sound really, really stupid,” he went on, “especially if we go up there and get killed by Campbell … but I believe you shouldn’t spend nearly as much time on blocking tackling as everybody does.”

By then, last week, ESPN was making plans to send a crew to Presbyterian’s game at Campbell to shoot a segment for GameDay, to air next week. After his team’s loss Saturday night, Kelley recalled the pregame conversation he shared with one of the show’s producers: “Just don’t get beat 72-0.”

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Presbyterian head football coach Kevin Kelly talks with referees before the start of the game with Campbell. The Presbyterian Blue Hose and the Campbell Fighting Camels met in a non-conference football game in Buies Creek, N.C. on September 18, 2021. Steven Worthy NEWSOBSERVER.COM

A RARE PUNT BUT, “WHY NOT PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE?”

Kelley’s team did something Saturday night that none of his teams had done in years. Three years? Four? Kelley’s son, Zack, the receivers coach at Presbyterian, couldn’t remember. All Zack knew was this: “He hates punting.”

When the call to punt came in from the sideline, one thought kept playing over in Zack’s mind.

“I can’t believe it,” he said later, repeating it

Neither, apparently, could the Blue Hose. For even despite the circumstances — the offense faced a 4th-and-20 from its own 4-yard line — the players were so discombobulated by the directive to punt that they didn’t get the play off in time. Delay of game. So now it was 4th and 22 from the 2. Presbyterian lined up in the shotgun and it was a quick kick — only 23 yards, and that was with a generous roll.

“Whenever that happens,” Zack Kelley said of his father being forced to punt, “he’s just completely beat down.”

Zack played wide receiver for his father at Pulaski, his final season in 2015, and during his four years there he could recall only one time when the team punted.

“He called timeout just so he could yell at us, and then go punt,” he said. “And then as a player you feel terrible like, wow — I can’t believe I made him punt. I made that guy punt.’”

There was only that one punt for Presbyterian Saturday night. The Blue Hose often threw an interception or fumbled before it reached fourth down: 10 turnovers in all. True to Kevin Kelley’s form, though, Presbyterian attempted an onside kick to start the second half — its lone kickoff of the game, given it never scored — despite facing a 56-point deficit at the time.

It was long over by then, though there was still another half to play, and it might have been easy for anyone to look at the score and make judgments about Kelley’s system. In reality, though, Campbell, a scholarship team from the Big South Conference, held a significant physical advantage; the Camels simply overpowered the Blue Hose along both lines of scrimmage, and even without all the turnovers Presbyterian likely wouldn’t have had much of a chance.

And yet still, the game took on the feeling of a perverse football experiment. Could a team that plays the game in such an unconventional way find success in college? Could Kelley continue to prove the doubters wrong, as he’d done throughout his 17 years at Pulaski? In many ways, Presbyterian offers the perfect setting for such an experiment. It is the smallest school, by enrollment (a little more than 1,000), of any Division I football-playing school.

It is removed from the glare of any media spotlight. The expectations are low, at least externally.

Yet internally, said Rob Acunto, the Presbyterian athletic director, there’s a mentality of, “just because we are the smallest school in Division I, there’s no reason why we can’t walk with some swagger.”

“And so we never looked at it from the standpoint of, we’re doing things oddly but just saying, you know — why not Presbyterian College?” he said. “We’re small, we may not have the resources other schools do. But what can we do to gain an advantage and be successful? And so Kevin was a good fit for that mentality, which was, ‘Let’s find a way to play with the big boys, so to speak.’ ”

In 2017, Presbyterian began transitioning to non-scholarship football, a move that required a transition from the Big South to the Pioneer League. The school in April fired Kelley’s predecessor, Tommy Spangler, after he won 12 games in four seasons. It will be difficult for the Blue Hose to compete against those schools that offer football scholarships, and the difference — in both size and talent — was noticeable Saturday night.

But, Kelley insisted, “Our team is not 72-0 worse than Campbell.”

“I was,” he said, after a pause.

He knew the defeat, and its margin, would be fodder for the doubters. That people would see the score and say: Yes — told you so. Told you it’d never work beyond high school. But Kelley knows it’s early, yet. He’s only been the head coach at Presbyterian for three full months; he’d only just met about half his players in early August. And besides, he had 17 years of results that his way could work, that it would.

Yes, it’s different now. This isn’t high school anymore. Before he stepped on the bus Saturday night, he acknowledged that there probably isn’t much room for anything in between. He understood that this was either going to be a great success, one that maybe could revolutionize football, or that it would be a colossal failure. No margin. He was OK with that. He’d made his choice long ago, and refused to go through life punting.

This story was originally published September 20, 2021 10:08 AM.

On November 18, 2011 the Arkansas Baptist Eagle football team went to 11-1 for the year with a hard fought 26-6 victory at Camden Harmony Grove. Before this game Barry Groomes of Hootens Arkansas Football picked Camden to win over the eagles because Arkansas Baptist had never won a playoff game on the road. Actually before this year Arkansas Baptist was 3-7 in the playoff with two victories coming in 1998 and one in 2004.

Is the 2011 Eagle team the best ever?

1. The 1998 team featured a huge line with the Witcher brothers (Sam and Ben) in the secordary and the eagles tied Harding and Carlisle for the conference championship. Knocked out of the playoffs by Gus Malzahn’s first state championship team at Shiloh (Gus has won championships at higher levels since, ask Arthur Bennett about that).

2. The 2004 team like the 1998 team also advanced in the playoffs and is the only Arkansas Baptist team to secure sole possession of a conference championship, and it included the most all-conference players (10) in Eagle history on one team.

3. The juniors and seniors on the 2011 team can claim to have more Arkansas Baptist victories in a two year span than any other team (a total of 20 over last two years, the 2003-2004 teams previously held the most).

My final conclusion is very simple: If the 2011 eagles get three victories in the playoffs this year then they have to be considered the best Arkansas Baptist team ever. The problem is they are going up against the Barton Bears who hold more state championships than any other 3A team. We will be pulling for this group of Eagles and we know they can do it.

All State Receiver Greg Bowie catches game winning pass
against Bauxite in the final seconds of the game.

RESPONDING TO HARRY KROTO’S BRILLIANT RENOWNED ACADEMICS!! Part 162B PAUSING to look at the life of John Raymond Smythies (My 11-28-16 email to Dr. Smythies about movie GREATER)

I was saddened to learn of the passing of Dr. John Raymond Smythies on January 28, 2019 in La Jolla, CA,  and I wanted to spend time on several posts concentrating on him.

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Well into his 80’s, John decided to join the world-famous neuroscience team lead by Dr. Ramachandran, in California and remained active until a few months before his demise in January this year. A tribute by Prof. Ashoka, exclusively in Different Truths. 

I have always harboured the belief that psychiatry over the years has lost a large part of its sheen because of its reluctance to encompass the entire scope of the discipline. Many if not most of its dimensions are completely ignored in the training process, which suffocates the specialty to a large extent.

One of the foremost pioneers to challenge this status quo was John Raymond Smythies. As he had deviated from the mainstream, he is not as widely known as his contribution merits.

John was born in Nainital where his father was a philatelist in 1922. His more than fluent Hindi had its provenance to his various interactions with his playmates and father’s colleagues with whom he retained lifelong contact. Following his relocation to the United Kingdom, he completed his medical training in Cambridge and then worked with the Royal Navy in Bermuda, which is where he developed an interest in psychiatry.

But he was very clear that he did not wish to step into his discipline unless he had what he regarded as ‘proper grounding.’ He therefore decided to train as a neuroscientist under the Nobel Laureate, Sir John Eccles. While still a neuroscience researcher, he appreciated the philosophico-anthropological contribution to the understanding of mental health and developed a deep friendship with Aldous Huxley. He then moved to the United States where he formally trained and obtained a masters’ in philosophy and submitted his dissertation to the University of Cambridge, which earned him an M.D.

Only then did he consider himself ready to undergo psychiatric training at the Maudsley Hospital under Sir Aubrey Lewis. He then felt he needed some grounding in biochemistry and worked with John Osmond for two years before taking up a clinical assignment. He spent 12 years in Edinburgh at the Royal Edinburgh Hospital (where I trained).

His orientation quite frequently put him at odds with his colleagues, but he persisted, nevertheless. He noticed that mescaline could produce schizophrenia like symptoms and published a hypothesis that came to be the first biological explanation for schizophrenia and was popularised as ‘transmethylation hypothesis’. This created quite a lot of excitement in those days. But he firmly believed that in order to fully comprehend schizophrenia, one needed a philosophical orientation along with a neurobiological.

He moved to Alabama to take up an endowed chair in psychiatry and remained there for over 20 years continuing with his neurobiological-philosophical research in psychiatric disorders. He was an absolute delight to listen to and a regular at both neuroscience and philosophical conclaves. Well into his 80’s, he decided to join the world-famous neuroscience team lead by Dr. Ramachandran, in California, and remained active until a few months before his demise in January this year.

Somehow the sad news took its time to reach me. There are many, me included, who looked to him for inspiration and were always rewarded with effusive hospitality over meals at his place, where he lived with his Italian wife.

I mourn the passing away of a pioneer. We shall not see the likes of him again!

©Prof. Ashoka Jahnavi Prasad

Ashoka Jahnavi Prasad is a physician /psychiatrist holding doctorates in pharmacology, history and philosophy plus a higher doctorate. He is also a qualified barrister and geneticist. He is a regular columnist in several newspapers, has published over 100 books and has been described by the Cambridge News as the ‘most educationally qualified in the world’.

Email

To John Smythies,  Concerning  my personal interaction with Clinton, election of Trump and a movie recommendation, From Everette Hatcher of Little Rock on 11-28-16

I am currently the JUSTICE OF THE PEACE for District 2 of Saline County which is the 6th largest county in Arkansas and I just finished going through my 3rd election. I won my first election by 4 1/2% and my last two elections by double digit margins in probably the most Democratic leaning district in the whole county even though I am a Republican.

At the age of 21 in January of 1983 I moved from Memphis to Little Rock and I had never seen a politician in person. I suppose it was because Memphis is a large city and I lived in a suburb outside it. However, the first week I was in Little Rock I got to meet Governor Bill Clinton and I ran into both of  our U.S. Senators and our Congressman in downtown Little Rock when I was dropping off a deposit at Worthen Bank and attending a meeting in a small meeting room at the State House Convention Center. In fact, I ran into them again and again often at restaurants, movie theaters and ballgames around town. After a while I didn’t really take notice anymore since it was so common. My uncle explained to me that Little Rock was a capitol city and since we worked downtown we could often run into politicians.

Our plant location was on 300 Industrial Road which is right next to the Arkansas River within a few hundred feet from where the Clinton Library stands today. In 1985 we moved to another part of Little Rock.

A quick couple of stories about my personal interaction with Bill Clinton. One of the first times I spoke with him was at the 1983 ARKANSAS INDEPENDENT GROCERY WHOLESALER MEETING and he came into our meeting tardy because  he said there was a big emergency at the Capitol and that was Hillary wanted a private meeting with him. The amazing thing that day was that I noticed that he personally greeted the dozen or so elderly men that owned these grocery wholesale businesses and called them all by their first names. Since then the Krogers and large supermarkets of the world have completely run these wholesalers out of business in Arkansas.

A year later I was at a relative’s wedding and I was seated on the aisle and when the father of the bride began to escort her down the aisle I noticed that Bill Clinton was in the seat directly behind me. Being a politician he couldn’t resist shaking the father’s hand and Hillary promptly elbowed Bill and his face turned red.  I am sure she has had to elbow him a few times since 1984!!!

I am an evangelical conservative so even though I was very upset that Donald Trump was the Republican Nominee, I did hold my noise and vote for him over Hillary Clinton. However, I DIDN’T HAVE A GOOD EXPLANATION WHY CLINTON LOST UNTIL I READ THESE WORDS A FEW DAYS AGO in the DAILY MAIL:

In the waning days of the presidential campaign, Bill and Hillary Clinton had a knock-down, drag-out fight about her effort to blame FBI Director James Comey for her slump in the polls and looming danger of defeat….[Bill Clinton] got so angry that he threw his phone off the roof of his penthouse apartment and toward the Arkansas River.’

Bill has a luxurious penthouse apartment with an outdoor garden at the Clinton Presidential Library and Museum in Little Rock.

During the campaign, Bill Clinton felt that he was ignored by Hillary’s top advisers when he urged them to make the economy the centerpiece of her campaign. 

He repeatedly urged them to connect with the people who had been left behind by the revolutions in technology and globalization.

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Are you buying Bill’s explanation?

I just saw the movie GREATER about the life of Brandon Burlsworth and there was a secularist farmer played by Nick Searcy that reminded me of you and when the DVD is released on 12-20-16 I would like to send you a free one.

Yesterday while in my  attic  I ran across a cassette tape labeled “April  1999” and it has the recording of my 12 year  old son calling  into a local radio show where he got to talk to Brandon Burlsworth who had just been drafted by the Indianapolis  Colts to play  in the NFL. Just a few days later Burlsworth was on his way to his Harrison, Ark., home from Fayetteville, where he received an SEC West title ring along with the rest of the 1998 Razorbacks on April 28, 1999. Every Wednesday, he returned to take his mom, Barbara, to church. The drive was supposed to take about 90 minutes.

He never made it.

The 22-year-old Burlsworth, who had been drafted by the Colts 11 days earlier after earning first-team All-America honors as a fifth-year senior, was involved in a head-on crash with a tractor-trailer about 15 miles outside Harrison and was killed. He was in the prime of his life and football career, and then he was gone.

One movie reviewer noted: 

There’s a great deal of Christian content in this film. It can perhaps best be summarized by saying that Brandon’s unwavering faith deeply informs everything he does, while his brother’s faltering faith after Brandon’s death is something he grapples with mightily.

Brandon has deep trust in God. At every step along his journey, when naysayers rise up to tell him that he’s being unrealistic, Brandon keeps moving forward in faith. Marty is more pragmatic, asking his brother things like, “You think God would give you D I [Division 1] dreams and a D III (Division III) body?” To Marty, the answer to that rhetorical, spiritual question is self-evident. Brandon, however, soldiers on, refusing to give up. “Have faith, Marty,” he says elsewhere. “This is my road.”

For his part, Marty struggles to cling to his faith in the wake of his brother’s death. That internal battle is depicted in a dramatic way through ongoing dialogue with a doubter named the Farmer. Marty’s trying to summon the courage to go into Brandon’s memorial service at Harrison High School. And the Farmer (played by Nick Searcy), depicted very nearly as a Satan-like tempter, repeatedly delivers soliloquies about the utter foolishness of faith. In one scene, the man (who’s whittling a portrait of Marty into a block of wood, almost as if he’s creating a voodoo doll) says, “Brandon did have faith. He believed if he worked hard and did everything he was supposed to do, God would make everything turn out for the best. Did everything turn out for the best, Marty?”

Elsewhere, the Farmer taunts, “There is no loving God, Marty. That’s ridiculous. There’s just a howling void. And a real man, an honest man, doesn’t get down on his knees to pray to it for his mercy. He stands up to it, and he looks it right in his face and he howls right back.”

But Marty also talks with his godly mother about how to process the randomness of Brandon’s death. She tells him that it’s only random when looked at from an earthly perspective. “If you assume this is all there is, you’d have a point, Marty. But that’s not true. This life is a drop in the ocean. One tick of eternity’s clock, and we’ll all be together again, Marty. And every trouble we had here will recede away like a dream.”

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It has been a pleasure to send you these letters in the past and I hope you take me up on this offer to see this inspirational true story about Brandon Burlsworth who was truly one of the greatest rags to richest stories in sports history. Also I would encourage you to google FRANCIS SCHAEFFER THE PROBLEM OF EVIL.

Sincerely,

Everette Hatcher, cell ph 501-920-5733, P.O. Box 23416, Little Rock, AR 72221, everettehatcher@gmail.com

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Image result for greater movie brandon burlsworth He believed if he worked hard and did everything he was supposed to that God would make everything turn out for the best

Brandon below with his brother Marty and his two nephews

Image result for brandon burlsworth death

XXXXXXXXX

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Image result for mary ann salmon bill clinton

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Linda Bloodworth-Thomason and Harry Thomason with the Clintons in the White House

Image result for bill clinton harry thomason

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Image result for mary ann salmon bill clinton

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Bill was on the phone at his  luxurious penthouse apartment  he keeps at the Clinton Presidential Library in Little Rock

Bill was on the phone at his  luxurious penthouse apartment  he keeps at the Clinton Presidential Library in Little Rock

On November 21, 2014 I received a letter from Nobel Laureate Harry Kroto and it said:

…Please click on this URL http://vimeo.com/26991975

and you will hear what far smarter people than I have to say on this matter. I agree with them.

Harry Kroto

Nick Gathergood, David-Birkett, Harry-Kroto

I have attempted to respond to all of Dr. Kroto’s friends arguments and I have posted my responses one per week for over a year now. Here are some of my earlier posts:

Arif Ahmed, Sir David AttenboroughMark Balaguer, Horace Barlow, Michael BatePatricia ChurchlandAaron CiechanoverNoam Chomsky,Alan DershowitzHubert Dreyfus, Bart Ehrman, Stephan FeuchtwangDavid Friend,  Riccardo GiacconiIvar Giaever , Roy GlauberRebecca GoldsteinDavid J. Gross,  Brian Greene, Susan GreenfieldStephen F Gudeman,  Alan Guth, Jonathan HaidtTheodor W. Hänsch, Brian Harrison,  Hermann HauserRoald Hoffmann,  Bruce HoodHerbert Huppert,  Gareth Stedman Jones, Steve JonesShelly KaganMichio Kaku,  Stuart Kauffman,  Lawrence KraussHarry Kroto, George LakoffElizabeth Loftus,  Alan MacfarlanePeter MillicanMarvin MinskyLeonard Mlodinow,  Yujin NagasawaAlva NoeDouglas Osheroff,  Jonathan Parry,  Saul PerlmutterHerman Philipse,  Carolyn PorcoRobert M. PriceLisa RandallLord Martin Rees,  Oliver Sacks, John SearleMarcus du SautoySimon SchafferJ. L. Schellenberg,   Lee Silver Peter Singer,  Walter Sinnott-ArmstrongRonald de Sousa, Victor StengerBarry Supple,   Leonard Susskind, Raymond TallisNeil deGrasse Tyson,  .Alexander Vilenkin, Sir John WalkerFrank WilczekSteven Weinberg, and  Lewis Wolpert,

In  the second video below in the 95th clip in this series are his words but today I just wanted to pause and look at this life. 

Quote from Dr. John Raymond Smythies

I would like to describe how mescaline works. These hallucination drugs have a very specific action in two ways. Number 1 they produce fantastic visual hallucinations. These are described by the people who have them (most of them are down to earth scientists such as MacDonald Critchley) as being more beautiful than anything they have ever seen in normal art. Some of these people have the sort of experience as union with God, mystical experiences and so on.

50 Renowned Academics Speaking About God (Part 1)

Another 50 Renowned Academics Speaking About God (Part 2)

A Further 50 Renowned Academics Speaking About God (Part 3)

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Related posts:

FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE Part 53 THE BEATLES (Part E, Stg. Pepper’s and John Lennon’s search in 1967 for truth was through drugs, money, laughter, etc & similar to King Solomon’s, LOTS OF PICTURES OF JOHN AND CYNTHIA) (Feature on artist Yoko Ono)

The John Lennon and the Beatles really were on a long search for meaning and fulfillment in their lives  just like King Solomon did in the Book of Ecclesiastes. Solomon looked into learning (1:12-18, 2:12-17), laughter, ladies, luxuries, and liquor (2:1-2, 8, 10, 11), and labor (2:4-6, 18-20). He fount that without God in the picture all […]

FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE Part 52 THE BEATLES (Part D, There is evidence that the Beatles may have been exposed to Francis Schaeffer!!!) (Feature on artist Anna Margaret Rose Freeman )

______________   George Harrison Swears & Insults Paul and Yoko Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds- The Beatles The Beatles:   I have dedicated several posts to this series on the Beatles and I don’t know when this series will end because Francis Schaeffer spent a lot of time listening to the Beatles and talking […]

FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE Part 51 THE BEATLES (Part C, List of those on cover of Stg.Pepper’s ) (Feature on artist Raqib Shaw )

  The Beatles in a press conference after their Return from the USA Uploaded on Nov 29, 2010 The Beatles in a press conference after their Return from the USA. The Beatles:   I have dedicated several posts to this series on the Beatles and I don’t know when this series will end because Francis […]

FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE Part 50 THE BEATLES (Part B, The Psychedelic Music of the Beatles) (Feature on artist Peter Blake )

__________________   Beatles 1966 Last interview I have dedicated several posts to this series on the Beatles and I don’t know when this series will end because Francis Schaeffer spent a lot of time listening to the Beatles and talking and writing about them and their impact on the culture of the 1960’s. In this […]

FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE Part 49 THE BEATLES (Part A, The Meaning of Stg. Pepper’s Cover) (Feature on artist Mika Tajima)

_______________ The Beatles documentary || A Long and Winding Road || Episode 5 (This video discusses Stg. Pepper’s creation I have dedicated several posts to this series on the Beatles and I don’t know when this series will end because Francis Schaeffer spent a lot of time listening to the Beatles and talking and writing about […]

FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE PART 48 “BLOW UP” by Michelangelo Antonioni makes Philosophic Statement (Feature on artist Nancy Holt)

_______________ Francis Schaeffer pictured below: _____________________ I have included the 27 minute  episode THE AGE OF NONREASON by Francis Schaeffer. In that video Schaeffer noted,  ” Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band…for a time it became the rallying cry for young people throughout the world. It expressed the essence of their lives, thoughts and their feelings.” How Should […]

FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE Part 47 Woody Allen and Professor Levy and the death of “Optimistic Humanism” from the movie CRIMES AND MISDEMEANORS Plus Charles Darwin’s comments too!!! (Feature on artist Rodney Graham)

Crimes and Misdemeanors: A Discussion: Part 1 ___________________________________ Today I will answer the simple question: IS IT POSSIBLE TO BE AN OPTIMISTIC SECULAR HUMANIST THAT DOES NOT BELIEVE IN GOD OR AN AFTERLIFE? This question has been around for a long time and you can go back to the 19th century and read this same […]

FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE PART 46 Friedrich Nietzsche (Featured artist is Thomas Schütte)

____________________________________ Francis Schaeffer pictured below: __________ Francis Schaeffer has written extensively on art and culture spanning the last 2000years and here are some posts I have done on this subject before : Francis Schaeffer’s “How should we then live?” Video and outline of episode 10 “Final Choices” , episode 9 “The Age of Personal Peace and Affluence”, episode 8 […]

FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE Part 45 Woody Allen “Reason is Dead” (Feature on artists Allora & Calzadilla )

Love and Death [Woody Allen] – What if there is no God? [PL] ___________ _______________ How Should We then Live Episode 7 small (Age of Nonreason) #02 How Should We Then Live? (Promo Clip) Dr. Francis Schaeffer 10 Worldview and Truth Two Minute Warning: How Then Should We Live?: Francis Schaeffer at 100 Francis Schaeffer […]

FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE Part 44 The Book of Genesis (Featured artist is Trey McCarley )

___________________________________ Francis Schaeffer pictured below: ____________________________ Francis Schaeffer “BASIS FOR HUMAN DIGNITY” Whatever…HTTHR Dr. Francis schaeffer – The flow of Materialism(from Part 4 of Whatever happened to human race?) Dr. Francis Schaeffer – The Biblical flow of Truth & History (intro) Francis Schaeffer – The Biblical Flow of History & Truth (1) Dr. Francis Schaeffer […]

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Norm MacDonald Dies at 61: Why He Once Said, ‘I Don’t Think the Bible Jokes Are Brave at All’ 

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09-14-2021
Peter Power/The Canadian Press via AP
Peter Power/The Canadian Press via AP

Famous comedian Norm Macdonald, who described himself as a Christian, passed away unexpectedly Tuesday after a nine-year battle with cancer.

Lori Jo Hoekstra, a friend of the 61-year-old celebrity, said the comedian “had been fighting cancer for nearly a decade but was determined to keep his struggle away from his family, friends, and fans,” according to the New York Post.

“He was most proud of his comedy,” she said. “He never wanted the diagnosis to affect the way the audience or any of his loved ones saw him. Norm was a pure comic. He once wrote that ‘a joke should catch someone by surprise, it should never pander.’ He certainly never pandered. Norm will be missed terribly.”

In addition to his famous role as anchor of the “Weekend Update” on “SNL,” Macdonald wrote for the erstwhile comedy “Roseanne” and appeared on “The Drew Carey Show.” He also brought his signature brand of comedy to multiple movies.

Macdonald made headlines a few years ago when he drew the ire of leftists on social media for tweeting about Christianity. In a tweet he later deleted, Macdonald wrote, “The Enlightenment turned us away from truth and toward a darkling weakening horizon, sad and gray to see. The afterglow of Christianity is near gone now, and a Stygian silence lurks in wait.”

The comedian’s tweet, posted in 2018, was a reference to the 18th-century cultural shift away from the imitation and depiction of the sacred to a focus on self-indulgence and decadence. From then, people began favoring secular reasoning and science above spirituality.

That was not the only time Macdonald had taken up for Christianity.

In 2015, when he served as a judge on NBC’s “Last Comic Standing,” Macdonald schooled a contestant for mocking Christianity during his routine.

Fellow judge Roseanne Barr told comedian Harrison Greenbaum his jokes about the Bible were “brave,” an assertion with which Macdonald staunchly disagreed.

“I don’t think the Bible jokes are brave at all,” he said at the time. “If you think you’re gonna take on an entire religion, you should maybe know what you’re talking about.”

He went on to tell Greenbaum that, if he’s going to reference the “Harry Potter” novels, he should know author J.K. Rowling once said the novels were inspired by Christianity.

Macdonald later told The Hollywood Reporter he didn’t care for Greenbaum’s “smugness” and didn’t think it was courageous to mock Christianity in this day and age. Instead, he argued, it would be “brave” to say, “Jesus Christ is our Lord and Savior.”

Two years before that, while talking with the late interviewer Larry King, Macdonald described himself as a Christian, quipping that he knew it wasn’t “a stylish thing to say.”

“What people don’t understand about faith is that you have to choose it,” he told King. “They think that you believe it. But you have to choose it. … There’s a lot of things, I have faith, but I don’t really believe in DNA. If I was on a jury, and a guy was — his DNA was on a cigarette, I’d go, ‘I don’t know what DNA is.’”

“I don’t have faith in science,” he continued. “Haven’t scientists always been wrong? Like, they used to think the sun went around the earth. … Back then, everybody at that time thought that guy was smart. Why at this time do we think the earth goes around the sun?”

In 2017, he tweeted this on Reformation Day, “Scripture. Faith. Grace. Christ, Glory of God. Smart man says nothing is a miracle. I say everything is.”

In a separate interview with King, however, Macdonald suggested he felt more at home in Judaism, telling the anchor he was “on a spiritual journey.”

“I believe there’s a God, but I’m unsure of His nature,” he said in the updated interview. “So I consult a rabbi often because they’re the people that know the Bible the best. … I’ve had more time with Judaism than with any other religion.”

EDITOR’S NOTE: In reporting about steps that high-profile individuals may be taking to seek God or start a relationship with Him, CBN does not endorse past or current behavior that may not line up with the Word of God. As we report positive developments in celebrities’ spiritual journeys, we encourage our readers to pray for anyone and everyone in the news, that the fruit of God would grow in all of our lives.

***As the number of voices facing big-tech censorship continues to grow, please sign up for Faithwire’s daily newsletter and download the CBN News app to stay up-to-date with the latest news from a distinctly Christian perspective.***

MUSIC MONDAY “Foreigner Top 10 Songs” Part 1

Top 10 Foreigner Songs

Mick Jones
Elsa, Getty Images

Read More: Top 10 Foreigner Songs | http://ultimateclassicrock.com/top-10-foreigner-songs/?trackback=tsmclip

Foreigner‘s lone remaining founding member, guitarist Mick Jones, has been at the helm of the legendary American rock group since 1976. But if you’ve seen the band lately, it seems like they’re just getting started, with Jones putting together a turbo-charged version of the group, which has been fronted by Kelly Hansen since 2005. But even though 2009’s Can’t Slow Down proved that they still had the goods to make a damn fine Foreigner album, it’s their chart-reigning period from 1977-84 with Lou Gramm as the lead singer, that make up the songs on our list of the Top 10 Foreigner Songs.

10

‘Night Life’

From: ‘4’ (1981)

Our list of the Top 10 Foreigner Songs begins with this album track, which drew simple inspiration from the hookers that were hanging out outside New York’s Electric Lady studios where the band was hard at work on ‘4.” Hearing Lou Gramm singing about getting “caught up in the action” suggests that some members of the band just might have taken advantage of “those bad girls hanging around.”

‘Blue Morning, Blue Day’

From: ‘Double Vision’ (1978)

The tangled relationship depicted in “Blue Morning, Blue Day” is very clearly reaching its breaking point and Gramm delivers the final kiss-off to his apparently soon to be ex-lover, telling her “Well, honey don’t telephone / ‘Cause I won’t be alone / I need someone to make me feel better.” Or to put it another way, here’s a quarter, call someone who cares.

‘Head Games’

From: ‘Head Games’ (1979)

“Head Games” remains as one of the best lasting artifacts of the Jones/Gramm partnership, a song that can usually be found in the second slot of Foreigner’s modern-day setlist. A soaring opening riff from Jones leads into urgent lyrical communication from Gramm, who struggles to figure out and face the true mental reality of his fractious relationship.

Foreigner’s Lou Gramm; Christianity & Adversity

Let’s talk about the conversion of a rockstar. Lou Gramm spent 26 years as the front man of the famous rock band “Foreigner”. He is the voice behind the great classics “I wanna know what love is” (1984) and “Waiting for a girl like you” (1981), two of the most succesful singles in the 80’s, which respectively ranked the #1 and #2 in the chart music position all around the world.

But there’s more than meets the eye, and not everyhting was sucess for this amazing singer. As years went by, his life would experince ups and downs, but more deeply than many of us. It’s so true that in his life “there’s been heartache and pain“, but there’s also been hope and faith that he eventually found in Christianity.

This time, I’m sharing the transcription of a conversation that Scott Ross from CBN held in an interview with Lou Gramm, in which he shares the experiences that changed him radically. He openly talks about his struggles, and he speaks sincerely about his feelings, telling us how he got this new faith that helped him to overcame the most difficult and troubled times of his life.
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Scott: At a point of your life, when you were extremely succesful, did you bind to the whole rock n’roll scene… you know, sex, drugs and rock n’roll? Were you living that stuff?
Lou Gramm: Yes, I was… all of it. Thought I grew up in a good solid family background, I honestly felt that drugs and alcohol were changing me into a person ― or had changed me into a person ― that I didn’t recognize anymore”.
Scott: How did that happen?
Lou Gramm: “I think it was more like when I came to New York. It was prevalent. And most of the guys of the band kept different hours. I was used to be operating in the morning and in bed by midnight. When we would record, a lot of times we would begin recording at about 5 or near 6 pm, and work until 4 or 5 of the next morning. At that time my sensibilities were not clear anymore, and just would begin to… be one of the guys.”
Scott: How were you feeling?
Lou Gramm: “I could feel myself changing inside in a negative way. It was just party after party and it became very habitual. When I tried to stop, I was very surprised that what was fun before, became something that I absolutely needed, and at that point I knew that it was way past the recreational and I began to really dislike the person that I had become.” 
 
Scott: Did you had all the trappings of success and what you wanted?
Lou Gramm: “What I thought I needed. And I needed more of the same.”
Scott: More success?
Lou Gramm: “And everyhting I was in.”
 
Scott: So how did you finally realize that this reality wasn’t really for you…?

Foreigner performed in the Madison Square Garden,
at the Atlantic Records 40th Anniversary
a 13-hours New York concert on May 14, 1988.
Lou: “I think it was a night after we had played in Madison Square Garden and I lived about sixty miles at north in Manhattan and I was not in the condition to drive myself home.
Scott: You were high?

Lou [nodding his head]: “At the end of an afterparty, after a showparty, and I knew my wife and children would be expecting me, but, at number one, I could’t drive myself, nor did I wanna have them see me like that. So I stayed the night in Manhattan and grappled with the person I had become.” 
Scott: What did you see?
 
Lou: “Something that I didn’t like, I didn’t like and didn’t respect and I saw the possibility of my own demise. It was in this huge, posh hotel room that I got down on my knees asking for God’s help to heal me and help me to get rid myself of this horrible addiction. I just started praying, because I knew there wasn’t anybody in the world that could help me.” 
Scott: Did you know how to pray?
 
Lou: “I think I just started talking to God, it wasn’t necessary a prayer in a pre-fabicated form. It was a conversation.” 
Scott: Saying…?
Lou Gramm: “That I didn’t want to be in this position and that I really believed that that lifestyle had the better of me and that I couldn’t walk away from it on my own, that I needed it, more than it needed me; and I prayed for the strenght and the sense to break the chains.”
The Hazelden Foundation in Minessota
Scott: What happened?
Lou: “The next morning I called a place that a friend have told me about, called ‘Hazelden’ in Minnesota, and went to rehab. I didn’t know for what was it but it was a good facility and there was a pastor as part of the rehab to re-connect with God. That’s where I became a Christian. I received Jesus that moment.”
Scott: Did you prayed, “Jesus Christ, come into my life”?
Lou: “Yes, I was asked if I was sure about it. I definitely did it because that’s what I wanted for a long time and it was an option that He was offering to me.”
Scott: Did you tell your bandmates?
Lou: “Not right away, but when I returned in the next tour months later, nothing in the band had changed. They said they were all thrilled that I had cleaned myself up. After a show, as usual, we were driving on the bus to the next city, and the cocaine lines and the joints came out, and I let them know that I wouldn’t be doing that with them anymore.”
Scott: And the response was?
Lou: “ ‘What in the world’s wrong with you?’
Scott: About your relationship with Jesus, how did your bandmates received that?
 
Lou: “Most of them were pretty angry, because making the desition changed me from the old. It kept for, I’m saying, about another seven or eight years, but there were more and more breaks between tours and the next album, in which I was heavily involved in the melody and the lyrics, started having inferences to God.”
 
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In 1990, Lou had departed from the band (which is one of the “breaks between” tours he talks about). Later he rejoined and in the next Foreigner album, “Mr. Moonlight”, he clearly expressed some glimpses of a new faith who was putting down roots in his music composition:
An excerpt from the song “I Keep Hoping“:

“Now I make my new beginnings

 I’ll start again at any cost
 I’ve learned a lot from losing you
 But I’ve got nothing if I’m lost
 
 And I keep hoping 
and I still believe in love
 If I wait long enough, 
I know I’ll be strong enough
 Yeah, I keep hoping,
I believe in faith and trust
 I’m gonna find a way
there are better days still ahead of us
 I keep hoping
 
 Now this candle burns low it won’t last through the night
 But I’ve found peace and I know it’s all right
 I try to understand what’s been missing in my life
 Between the darkness and the daylight. . .
I keep hoping, hoping and praying
 And I still believe in love
 I keep hoping, I keep hoping, hey hey hey
 I keep hoping”
An excerpt from the song “Rain” :
 Tell me why, oh why?
 Why don’t you open up your heart?
 Let the light from inside
 Show us who you are
An excerpt from the song “Until The End Of Time” :
“When I was young and the world belonged to me
 I thought that love meant pain and jealousy
 It was a cross on my shoulder
 Oh Lord, now I feel so much older
An excerpt from the song “Real World” :
“In the world we were born into, we’re alone, ooh
 And it brings me to my knees our father lay me down to sleep
 Father please, pray the Lord my soul to keep
 Keep us in the real world, keep us in the real world”
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Scott: “Did the song ‘I wanna know what love is‘ take a new meaning for you?
 
Lou: Totally. We had a young girl who was a singer, and whenever we would have shows coming up, we would have at end of each show about one week, and she would find a real talented and soulfull choir; and when we would perform alive, the choir would come on stage and sing that song with us. And it would bring the house down every time. 
 
They were always Christian choirs, baptist, sometimes white, sometimes black, sometimes mixed, but the point is that they would sing the song with a soulfull feeling, to me there was no doubt what the song was about. 
 
I remember when we were recording the song a friend of Mick Jones came in, and he was a representative for a small gospel group of New Jersey. He suggested that we should use a choir for that song, and suggested a choir that he was involved in, the ‘New Jersey Mass Choir‘. They came in, and before they sang, they made a big circle and hold their hands and said the Lord’s prayer while we were in the control room. When they started singing, it was just changed!, it changed the meaning of the song. The song was big enough in its lyrics, that when the choir was put on it, kind of got a double meaning, so that it could be about a person and his God, you know.”
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Just after collaborating in Petra’s album “Petra Praise 2: We Need Jesus”, in 1997, some juncture hit when Gramm was diagnosed with a rare type of brain tumor called a “craniopharyngioma”. Fortunately, it was benign, but the complex surgery to remove it actually threatened, not only the singer’s career, but his very life as well.
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Scott: What were the first signs of your tumor?
Lou: “I got intense headaches when I would wake up in the morning. I didn’t know why that was coming. Also I would call my mom and dad who have had the same phone number over 20 years and I couldn’t remember the last four numbers. That started to really scare me. I would see people at the grocery store who I had known for 10 or 15 years and couldn’t remember their name. The doctor recommended that I would go for an MRI [Magnetic resonance imaging], and they found a tumor in the frontal lobe of my brain about the size of an egg that had tentacles wrapped around my optic nerve and my pituitary glandand. They determined that it had been growing in me since birth. I thought I was in a bad dream, really. I just couldn’t figure out”
Scott: Was it operable?
Lou: “Some told that it was so big that they knew they couldn’t operate, other said that it’d be extremely difficult and they didn’t hope a lot of hope of success. I went back to home, thinking that I was going to die. 
One night I was watching a segment about a doctor in Boston, who is provider of laser surgery that he was using to operate brain tumors that were considered “inappropriate”. They gave a phone number, and I was on the phone early the next morning, I talked to his assistant and told her what my prognostic was and she told me that there was a cancellation on Thursday and that I should come to Boston that very day. It was Tuesday.”
Scott: They didn’t give you so much time to think a lot…
Lou: “And I did. Thursday morning about 4:30 am, they were wheeling me into the operating room and they had the drip in my to put me under. I was praying to God that if He wanted to take me, I was ready. I didn’t pray for Him to let me live; I prayed that He may do His will. The operation took 19 hours but the tumor was successfully removed. I was very happy to be alive.”
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The operation’s effects and the heavy medication caused Lou’s weight to balloon from 145
pounds to 260 in a year. He would lose his train of thought, fall asleep in the middle of conversations and get aptia. He had three car crashes after falling asleep at the wheel.
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Scott: How long did it take you to get back on stage?
Lou: “The operation was in April and I was performing in August. I shouldn’t have been anywhere near a stage, however, I was told by management that Foreigner had commitments and that I needed to get on the road. I knew it was way to early. I couldn’t remember the words to any of the songs. They all had to be written down in big marker pens and taped to the floor because I couldn’t figured out all the words, I lost key words. When the band would take the stage, I could see people gone and the reviews were like ‘what happened to Lou?, it’s like he’s taking too much pasta’”
Scott: In the middle of all that, was there desilutionment?
Lou: “A little bit. I thought that when the operation was over, there would be a recovering, but it took at least 4 and half or 5 years to start feeling any better. I felt that God was testing me. At 2001 and 2002 , I would wake up in the morning feeling more tired that I went to bed at night.”
Scott: What happened to the marriage?
Lou: “Over. Lost. She told I wasn’t the man she fell in love with. When the mariage ended and we went to court, it was really obvious that I was uncapable of seeing my two little twins much, cause I could barely take care of myself.”
Scott: What happened to your brothers and friends?
Lou: “My brothers and friends were good, I had a lot of people visiting me and helping me, cooking for me as a child in bed.” 
Scott: When did it change?
 
Lou: “About 2002, I just noticed that litle by little my conciousness and my thoughts were coming to me more naturally and I was feeling better. I was told that maybe my creativity would have been damaged by the operation, but I realized that I was still able to create and compose music.”
 
Lou’s faith in God, not only has endured after his battle with the brain tumour and his troubled times;
It also has kept him hopeful, and it has been growing as a mustard tree,
even to the extent that he has decided to dedicate an essential part of his carreer
to compose praises to The Lord
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Lou remained with Foreigner for years, but he finally parted ways in 2003. Since leaving Foreigner, Gramm’s health would continue to improve. He has lost half the weight he gained after the operation, and in 2009, he decided to start a new Christian musical project called “The Lou Gramm Band”.
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Scott: Tell us about “The Lou Gramm Band
Lou: “I had thought a lot about making a Christian rock album, not a trade back to payback the Lord for letting me live, but I have a God-given talent, and I felt and wanted to honour Him by using it for Him. 
 
Right before my dad passed away in 2002, he had just got the three Gramm brothers in the room, and said that it was mom’s and his hope that someday the boys would do something together. 
 
https://youtube.googleapis.com/v/HzACd1AFhX8&source=udsEven though my brothers and my friends believe in God they were not sure about what I wanted to do. But they jumped on board and as soon as we started writing songs and they heard the lyrics and the powerful music, they were moved. They really loved it now.”
 
Scott: So Lou Gramm is back!?
Lou: “Yes.”
Scott: With the Lou Graham Brothers together?
Lou: “You better believe it.”

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During the late and early decade 2000, Lou has been performing Foreigner songs with his new band.
Though it has not became famous in the market due to the lack of advertising, his Christian music album remains as one of the most powerful testimonies of his commitment and faith.
The God-given talent of this rock-legend is very strong and alive, and his music continues to be promising. With electric guitars, rhythmic drumming, fresh melodies, complex guitar solos, keyboard accompaniment, soothing backing vocals, and sense of conviction in the high-pitched voice behind; the songs in the album “The Lou Gramma Band” is conveys high-quality music, great compositions, and powerful Christian messages. Take the lyrics of this, his latest album, into account:
In “You Saved Me“, Lou recapitulates the moment of his conversion:
With my feet firmly planted on the shores of sin
I was lost, and afraid
For into the sorrow I was livin’ in
I felt down, and I prayed
I found trouble, and sorrow
had taken hold on me
Trouble and anguish
Please deliver me!
YOU saved me!
I was all alone, and the time was right
YOU saved me!
Shine the light of the day in the darkest night
YOU saved me!
I was all alone, and the time was right
YOU saved me!
I can close my eyes, but I still see the light
Free ourselves from who we are
I can’t do it alone
I let you know how I feel
I never lose heart
I pray for, my Lord, to give me hope 
Cos’ dark days and winding roads
It’s all I’ve known
YOU saved me!
I was all alone, and the time was right
YOU saved me!
Shine the light of the day in the darkest night
YOU saved me!
I was all alone, and the time was right
YOU saved me!
I can close my eyes, but I still see the light
and when I lost myself
You took my hand
I found trouble, and sorrow
had taken hold on me
Trouble, and anguish
Please, deliver me!
I live by my faith
my faith
Now I call upon my Lord
To save me
To save me”
In “Willing To Forgive”  (a powerful, precious and inspiring song!), Lou celebrates God’s forviness:
“Called me out from my darkness, to learn the secrets of my soul
Uncertain of my first step, I’ve gotta search until I know
 
In my desperation, it’s the life that I have lived
I can feel my vindication, but You’re willing to forgive!
 
You’re willing to forgive! 
You’re willing to forgive! 
You’re willing to forgive! 
 
Rise up and follow, my faith is not in vain!
In my time of reflection, please be standing in the rain
 
You give understanding!
And I get what I deserve!
Oh LORD!
It’s YOU!
that I serve!
 
You’re willing to forgive! 
You’re willing to forgive! 
You’re willing to forgive! 
In “I Wanna Testify”, Lou raises up his voice saying that “he just want to testify” what God’s love has made in his life:
“Friends, inquisitive friends, are asking what’s come over me
 A change, there’s been a change, it‘s so plain for everyone to see
 
 Love won’t get on me and it took me by surprise
 Happiness is all around me
 You can even see it in my eyes, 
yeah, yeah, yeah
 
 I just wanna testify what Your love has done for me!
 I just wanna testify what Your love has done for me,
 yeah, yeah, yeah!
 
 It might be… a mighty long way 
mighty long way, a mighty long way
 
 Once I was a halo man, and with your lonely heart it dwell
 The love came sneaking up on me, and brought a light to an empty shell
 
 Well, I heard so many times before that love can’t be so bad
 I just got to tell you now!
 That it’s the best LOVE I’ve ever had, 
hey, yeah, yeah!
 
I just wanna testify what Your love has done for me!
I just wanna testify what Your love has done for me!
 yeah, yeah, yeah!
 
hmmm… Precious!
 sure been precious to me!
hhhhmmm… Precious! 
sure been precious to me,
yeah, yeah, yeah!
 
 I just wanna testify what Your love has done for me!
 I just wanna testify what Your love has done for me!
 yeah, yeah, yeah!
In “Made to be broken” (a very vigorous song), Lou declares
“I’m a man with a mission, in the very heart of darkness
at the edge of existance…

I’ve got a heart, that’s made to be broken
The harder I try, to hold on to my Lord
Oh yeah!…

You gave me resistance…
Can we still make from his to be

at the edge of existance…

I’ve got a heart, that’s made to be broken
The harder I try, to hold on to my Lord

I’ve got a heart, that’s made to be broken
The harder I try, to hold on to my Lord

I cast all my chains
until nothing remains
Only my Faith in You Lord
Now You know where I’ve been

Lost in the every end
But it’s all in Your hands, my Lord…”
The album also includes an excellent and sweet version of Billy Preston’s “That’s The Way God Planned It“, in which Lou sings at the top of his lungs and with a strong voice:
Why can’t we be humble, like the good Lord said?
 He promised to exalt us! for love is the way!
 
 How men be so greedy when there’s so much left?
 All things are God given! and they all have been blessed!
 
 That’s the way!
God planned it!
 That’s the way!
God wants it to be!
Didn’t He?
 
 Well, that’s the way!
God planned it
 That’s the way!
God wants it to be!
for you and me!
 Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah!
 
Let not your heart be troubled,
 Let mourning sobbing cease;
Learn to help one another!
 And live in perfect peace!
 
 If we just be humble, like the Good Lord said!
 He promised to exalt us, for LOVE is the way!
 
That’s the way!
God planned it!
 That’s the way!
God wants it to be!
doesn’t He?
 
 You better believe me!: that’s the way!
God planned it!
 That’s the way!
God wants it to be,
for you and me
 
that’s the way, all right, 
come on! come on! come on!
 
I hope you get this message! 
and where you won’t others will
 You don’t understand me, but I’ll love you still!
 
 That’s the way!
God planned it!
 That’s the way!
God wants it to be!
 You better believe me!: that’s the way!
God planned it!
 That’s the way!
God wants it to be!
In “Baptized by Fire” (a very rockish song), Lou sings:
“All the things I cannot see, when no one is watching me
I caught site Heaven, 
and the streets of Gold

It’s gonna take some time, it won’t happen over night;
but the hearts of darkness, will appear in plain sight, plain sight!
The voice of my prayers…!
He can hear me anywhere!

Baptized by fire,
caught up on this high wire
Now feel my blood run cold,
Oh Lord heal my wounded soul!

There will be no dispair!
He can hear me anywhere!”
In “Redeemer” (another rockish song)
I don’t look at things the way I used to
 My whole desires have lost their gains
 Through the doorway of love
 There’s a threshold of pain
 
Redeemer, gotta get it in the light
 Redeemer, now You better put yourself in the fight”
In “Rattle Yer Bones”, he shouts:
“Something’s missing in our day
I’ve got a heart and a spirit
The circumstances out of control
I was a fugitive, a vagabond,
and I walked this salty earth
I’m not a held slave of this world
I’ve got to get the strength that I need
 
Rattle Yer Bones
Walk on stone
 
I‘ve been redeemed,
this new life in me
and you will see The Truth
when You look in His eyes
 
Rattle Yer Bones
Walk on stone…
Rattle Yer Bones
Seven times a day
 
In “Single Vision”, Lou call his nation to turn to God again:
“Is the way of this cold world
I keep my distance
and the days full of darkness
I give my resistance
 
Any kept secret, will come to light
Just because I feel it, It don’t make it right
But I know who’ll be there!
 
In the light of a single vision
One nation under God
In the light of a single vision
In the visible,
Our country will have gone
Turn my eyes from the darkness
and those that seek my soul
Let, my Lord, mighty Truth
Shine, light, more than than gold
 
In my desperation, and the end of my pride
even if it’s painful, it’s always on my side
And I know You’ll be there
In the light of a single vision
One nation under God
In the light of a single vision
In the visible, 
Our country will have gone…
 
Don’t take our Lord from the classrooms
Please let us say our prayers of thanks
And when we pledge to our country
I know that without Him
we will never be free
 
In the light of a single vision
One nation under God
In the light of a single vision
In the visible,
Our country will have gone
 

In the track “Our Lord Never Fails“, Lou sings about God’s fidelity:

“Our Lord never fails,
He heals the broken hearted
Our Lord never fails
now that’s His only way 
Our Lord never fails,
He’s Truth and He’s wisdom,
Our Lord never fails
Lights up our darkest day
 
My heart is wounded withn me,
Love is just beyond my reach
I come out from the darkness
I hear the words that You teach
 
Our Lord never fails,
He heals the broken hearted
Our Lord never fails
now that’s His only way 
Our Lord never fails,
He’s Truth and He’s wisdom,
Our Lord never fails
Lights up our darkest day
 
Our Lord never fails,
He will liberate your soul
Our Lord never fails
If you walk by faith alone,
Our Lord never fails
He’s got this single vision,
Our Lord never fails
Our Lord never fails
 
Lou composed a hard-rock worship song called “So Great!”:
SO great, SO great, is Our LORD!
SO great, SO great, is Our LORD!
 
The fire in my heart, is already kindled and burning
I take hold of His words, that God sends me,
His truth and His mercy!
 
SO great, SO great, is Our LORD!
SO great, SO great, is Our LORD!
(My faith is my Lord)
 
When there is no way, to satisfy the longing of my soul
Well, it’s then that I pray to my Lord
my rock and my fortress!
 
Well I’ve made my decision
And that’s all I need!
(Just then, after a guitar solo in the same song,
a chorus of children voices retake verses from Foreigner’s song “Real World“):
…lay me down to sleep
I pray the Lord my soul to keep
and If I die before I wakeI pray The LORD my soul to take
I pray The LORD my soul to take!
 
SO great, SO great! SO great is Our LORD!
SO great, SO great! SO great is Our LORD!
My LORD!…”
In an interview on july 2013, Lou remembers the time where he passed through health problem. He reflects and says it was a nightmare, but one that “I guess it was in God’s time that he was gonna bring me some glimpse of normalcy and little peace in my llife, you know, and the fog did lifted and I started thinking a lot clear and I actually that I was getting better. ” He discusses how it was an honor to be inducted to the “Songwriters Hall of Fame” in 2013, and the possibility of performing again together with Mick Jones; something that –at this time– have already happened a couple of times. Wearing a cross on his neck, he told with a smile that he is now on his third marriage and his wife is expecting.
May God bless Lou and his family,
We love you much Lou!

Read More: Top 10 Foreigner Songs | http://ultimateclassicrock.com/top-10-foreigner-songs/?trackback=tsmclip

Read More: Top 10 Foreigner Songs | http://ultimateclassicrock.com/top-10-foreigner-songs/?trackback=tsmclip

Read More: Top 10 Foreigner Songs | http://ultimateclassicrock.com/top-10-foreigner-songs/?trackback=tsmclip

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I was saddened to learn of the passing of Dr. John Raymond Smythies on January 28, 2019 in La Jolla, CA,  and I wanted to spend time on several posts concentrating on him.

April 9, 2015

John Raymond Smythies, Center for Brain and Cognition,
La Jolla, CA 92093-0109

Dear Dr. Smythies,

I just can’t get over the fact that you knew Aldous Huxley and Carl Gustav Jung. These are two men that had major impacts on 20th century culture and thinking. I would love to know if you had any more stories to tell about these too intellectuals. I quote both of these men later in this letter.  Also did you ever get a chance to meet Bertrand Russell? 

As you can tell from reading this letter I am an evangelical Christian and I have made it a hobby of mine to correspond with scientists or academics like yourself over the last 25 years. Some of those who corresponded back with me have been  Ernest Mayr (1904-2005), George Wald (1906-1997), Carl Sagan (1934-1996),  Robert Shapiro (1935-2011), Nicolaas Bloembergen (1920-),  Brian Charlesworth (1945-),  Francisco J. Ayala (1934-) Elliott Sober (1948-), Kevin Padian (1951-), Matt Cartmill (1943-) , Milton Fingerman (1928-), John J. Shea (1969-), , Michael A. Crawford (1938-), Paul Kurtz (1925-2012), Sol Gordon (1923-2008), Albert Ellis (1913-2007), Barbara Marie Tabler (1915-1996), Renate Vambery (1916-2005), Archie J. Bahm (1907-1996), Aron S “Gil” Martin ( 1910-1997), Matthew I. Spetter (1921-2012), H. J. Eysenck (1916-1997), Robert L. Erdmann (1929-2006), Mary Morain (1911-1999), Lloyd Morain (1917-2010),  Warren Allen Smith (1921-), Bette Chambers (1930-),  Gordon Stein (1941-1996) , Milton Friedman (1912-2006), John Hospers (1918-2011), Michael Martin (1932-), John R. Cole  (1942-),   Wolf Roder,  Susan Blackmore (1951-),  Christopher C. French (1956-)  Walter R. Rowe Thomas Gilovich (1954-), Paul QuinceyHarry Kroto (1939-), Marty E. Martin (1928-), Richard Rubenstein (1924-), James Terry McCollum (1936-), Edward O. WIlson (1929-), Lewis Wolpert (1929), Gerald Holton (1922-), Martin Rees (1942-), Alan Macfarlane (1941-),  Roald Hoffmann (1937-), Herbert Kroemer (1928-), Thomas H. Jukes (1906-1999), Glenn BranchGeoff Harcourt (1931-) and  Ray T. Cragun (1976-). I would consider it an honor to add you to this very distinguished list. 

I really enjoyed watching your comments You Tube from the 2007 BEYOND BELIEF CONFERENCE and that got me started reading your material.  I wanted to discuss the views of you and Charles Darwin. 

TWO THINGS MADE ME THINK OF YOU RECENTLY. On April 5, 2015 at the Fellowship Bible Church Easter morning service in Little Rock, Arkansas our pastor Mark Henry described DOUBTING THOMAS and that description made me think of you.  Moreover, your skeptical view towards  Christianity reminds me of CHARLES DARWIN’S growing doubts throughout his life on these same theological issues such as skepticism in reaction to the claims of the Bible!!!

I’m an evangelical Christian and you are a secularist but I am sure we can both agree with the apostle Paul when he said in First Corinthians 15 that if Christ did not rise from the dead then Christians are to be most pited!!!! I attended Easter services this week and this issue came up and Mark Henry asserted that there is plenty of evidence that indicates that the Bible is historically accurate. Did you know that CHARLES DARWIN thought about this very subject quite a lot?

I just finished reading the online addition of the book Darwin, Francis ed. 1892. Charles Darwin: his life told in an autobiographical chapter, and in a selected series of his published letters [abridged edition]. London: John Murray. There are several points that Charles Darwin makes in this book that were very wise, honest, logical, shocking and some that were not so wise. The Christian Philosopher Francis Schaeffer once said of Darwin’s writings, “Darwin in his autobiography and in his letters showed that all through his life he never really came to a quietness concerning the possibility that chance really explained the situation of the biological world. You will find there is much material on this [from Darwin] extended over many manufacturers years that constantly he was wrestling with this problem.”

In your article in 2008 “The Fight for the Truth” in the JOURNAL OF SCIENTIFIC EXPLORATION you noted:

 Scientism leads to nihilism, with which Western culture, in its politics, art and literature, philosophy and everyday life, is currently awash… Richard Dawkins (2006) makes great play in his recent book The God Delusion of what he calls the appalling propensity of religious people to base their ideas on dogma rather than on the evidence. Well, many do, but this reads strange in a book bursting at the seams with its own dogmas, its uncritical acceptance of metaphysical theories such as Identity Theory, its refusal to take note of the relevant evidence from parapsychology, and its special pleading with regard to the views of Darwin and Wallace on genocide (see Smythies, 2007, for details). For example, Dawkins states that he knows that this life is the only life we have. How could he possibly know that? In these discussions I am reminded of some tadpoles in a muddy pond complaining that they cannot understand the special theory of relativity.

I think that you see from what I say later in this letter that I totally agree with your statement that “Scientism leads to Nihilism.” This is quite evident to me and many others also. Your next point was concerning the evidence that is out there that both religious people and atheists have to wrestle with. I think you will be surprised how much wrestled with this evidence and how he never really was at people with the idea that time and chance had created such a place as earth.

The fact that were associated with Aldous Huxley leads me to believe you are a DOUBTING THOMAS type. YOU MAY FIND IT INTERESTING THAT CHARLES DARWIN WAS ALSO INTERESTED IN THE HISTORICAL ASPECT OF THE BIBLE. When I read the book  Charles Darwin: his life told in an autobiographical chapter, and in a selected series of his published letters, I also read  a commentary on it by Francis Schaeffer and I wanted to both  quote some of Charles Darwin’s own words to you and then include the comments of Francis Schaeffer on those words. I have also enclosed a CD with two messages from Adrian Rogers and Bill Elliff concerning Darwinism.

Darwin, C. R. to Doedes, N. D.2 Apr 1873

“It is impossible to answer your question briefly; and I am not sure that I could do so, even if I wrote at some length. But I may say that the impossibility of conceiving that this grand and wondrous universe, with our conscious selves, arose through chance, seems to me the chief argument for the existence of God; but whether this is an argument of real value, I have never been able to decide…Nor can I overlook the difficulty from the immense amount of suffering through the world. I am aware that if we admit a First Cause, the mind still craves to know whence it came, and how it arose.”

Francis Schaeffer noted:

What he is saying is if you say there is a first cause, then the mind says, “Where did this come from?” I think this is a bit old fashioned, with some of the modern thinkers, this would not have carry as much weight today as it did when Darwin expressed it. Jean Paul Sartre said it as well as anyone could possibly say it. The philosophic problem is that something is there and not nothing being there. No one has the luxury of beginning with nothing. Nobody I have ever read has put forth that everything came from nothing. I have never met such a person in all my reading,or all my discussion. If you are going to begin with nothing being there, it has to be nothing nothing, and it can’t be something nothing. When someone says they believe nothing is there, in reality they have already built in something there. The only question is do you begin with an impersonal something or a personal something. All human thought is shut up to these two possibilities. Either you begin with an impersonal and then have Darwin’s own dilemma which impersonal plus chance, now he didn’t bring in the amount of time that modern man would though. Modern man has brought in huge amounts of time into the equation as though that would make a difference because I have said many times that time can’t make a qualitative difference but only a quantitative difference. The dilemma is it is either God or chance. Now you find this intriguing thing in Darwin’s own situation, he can’t understand how chance could have produced these two great factors of the universe and its form and the mannishness of man.

From Charles Darwin, Autobiography (1876), in The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin, ed. Francis Darwin, vol. 1 (London: John Murray, 1888), pp. 307 to 313.

“Another source of conviction in the existence of God, connected with the reason and not with the feelings, impresses me as having much more weight. This follows from the extreme difficulty or rather impossibility of conceiving this immense and wonderful universe, including man with his capacity of looking far backwards and far into futurity, as the result of blind chance or necessity. When thus reflecting, I feel compelled to look to a First Cause having an intelligent mind in some degree analogous to that of man; and I deserve to be called a Theist. This conclusion was strong in my mind about the time, as far as I can remember, when I wrote the Origin of Species, and it is since that time that it has very gradually, with many fluctuations, become weaker. But then arises the doubt…”

Francis Schaeffer commented:

On the basis of his reason he has to say there must be an intelligent mind, someone analogous to man. You couldn’t describe the God of the Bible better. That is man is made in God’s image  and therefore, you know a great deal about God when you know something about man. What he is really saying here is that everything in my experience tells me it must be so, and my mind demands it is so. Not just these feelings he talked about earlier but his MIND demands it is so, but now how does he counter this? How does he escape this? Here is how he does it!!!

Charles Darwin went on to observe:  —can the mind of man, which has, as I fully believe, been developed from a mind as low as that possessed by the lowest animals, be trusted when it draws such grand conclusions?”

Francis Schaeffer asserted:

So he says my mind can only come to one conclusion, and that is there is a mind behind it all. However, the doubt comes because his mind has come from the lowest form of earthworm, so how can I trust my mind. But this is a joker isn’t it?  Then how can you trust his mind to support such a theory as this? He proved too much. The fact that Darwin found it necessary to take such an escape shows the tremendous weight of Romans 1, that the only escape he can make is to say how can I trust my mind when I come from the lowest animal the earthworm? Obviously think of the grandeur of his concept, I don’t think it is true, but the grandeur of his concept, so what you find is that Darwin is presenting something here that is wrong I feel, but it is not nothing. It is a tremendously grand concept that he has put forward. So he is accepting the dictates of his mind to put forth a grand concept which he later can’t accept in this basic area with his reason, but he rejects what he could accept with his reason on this escape. It really doesn’t make sense. This is a tremendous demonstration of the weakness of his own position.

Darwin also noted, “I cannot pretend to throw the least light on such abstruse problems. The mystery of the beginning of all things is insoluble by us, and I for one must be content to remain an Agnostic.”

Francis Schaeffer remarked:

What a stupid reply and I didn’t say wicked. It just seems to me that here is 2 plus 2 equals 36 at this particular place.

Darwin, C. R. to Graham, William 3 July 1881

Nevertheless you have expressed my inward conviction, though far more vividly and clearly than I could have done, that the Universe is not the result of chance.* But then with me the horrid doubt always arises whether the convictions of man’s mind, which has been developed from the mind of the lower animals, are of any value or at all trustworthy. Would any one trust in the convictions of a monkey’s mind, if there are any convictions in such a mind?

Francis Schaeffer observed:

Can you feel this man? He is in real agony. You can feel the whole of modern man in this tension with Darwin. My mind can’t accept that ultimate of chance, that the universe is a result of chance. He has said 3 or 4 times now that he can’t accept that it all happened by chance and then he will write someone else and say something different. How does he say this (about the mind of a monkey) and then put forth this grand theory? Wrong theory I feel but great just the same. Grand in the same way as when I look at many of the paintings today and I differ with their message but you must say the mark of the mannishness of man are one those paintings titanic-ally even though the message is wrong and this is the same with Darwin.  But how can he say you can’t think, you come from a monkey’s mind, and you can’t trust a monkey’s mind, and you can’t trust a monkey’s conviction, so how can you trust me? Trust me here, but not there is what Darwin is saying. In other words it is very selective. 

Now we are down to the last year of Darwin’s life.

* The Duke of Argyll (Good Words, April 1885, p. 244) has recorded a few words on this subject, spoken by my father in the last year of his life. “. . . in the course of that conversation I said to Mr. Darwin, with reference to some of his own remarkable works on the Fertilisation of Orchids, and upon The Earthworms,and various other observations he made of the wonderful contrivances for certain purposes in nature—I said it was impossible to look at these without seeing that they were the effect and the expression of mind. I shall never forget Mr. Darwin’s answer. He looked at me very hard and said, ‘Well, that often comes over me with overwhelming force; but at other times,’ and he shook his head vaguely, adding, ‘it seems to go away.'”

Francis Schaeffer summarized :

And this is the great Darwin, and it makes you cry inside. This is the great Darwin and he ends as a man in total tension.

Darwin, C. R. to Doedes, N. D.2 Apr 1873

“It is impossible to answer your question briefly; and I am not sure that I could do so, even if I wrote at some length. But I may say that the impossibility of conceiving that this grand and wondrous universe, with our conscious selves, arose through chance, seems to me the chief argument for the existence of God; but whether this is an argument of real value, I have never been able to decide.”

Francis Schaeffer observed:

So he sees here exactly the same that I would labor and what Paul gives in Romans chapter one, and that is first this tremendous universe [and it’s form] and the second thing, the mannishness of man and the concept of this arising from chance is very difficult for him to come to accept and he is forced to leap into this, his own kind of Kierkegaardian leap, but he is forced to leap into this because of his presuppositions but when in reality the real world troubles him. He sees there is no third alternative. If you do not have the existence of God then you only have chance. In my own lectures I am constantly pointing out there are only two possibilities, either a personal God or this concept of the impersonal plus time plus chance and Darwin understood this . You will notice that he divides it into the same exact two points that Paul does in Romans chapter one into and that Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961) will in the problem of existence, the external universe, and man and his consciousness. Paul points out there are these two steps that man is confronted with, what I would call two things in the real world. The universe and it’s form and I usually quote Jean Paul Sartre here, and Sartre says the basic philosophic problem is that something is there rather than nothing is there and I then I add at the point the very thing that Darwin feels and that is it isn’t a bare universe that is out there, it is an universe in a specific form. I always bring in Einstein and the uniformity of the form of the universe and that it is constructed as a well formulated word puzzle or you have Carl Gustav Jung who says two things cut across a man’s will that he can not truly be autonomous, the external world and what Carl Gustav Jung would call his “collected unconsciousness.” It is the thing that churns up out of man, the mannishness of man. Darwin understood way back here this is a real problem. So he says “the impossibility of conceiving that this grand and wondrous  universe,” part one, the real world, the external universe, and part two “with our conscious selves arose through chance” and then he goes on and says this is not “an argument of real value.” This only thing he has to put in its place is his faith in his own theory.

Francis Schaeffer noted that in Darwin’s 1876 Autobiography that Darwin he is going to set forth two arguments for God in this and again you will find when he comes to the end of this that he is in tremendous tension. Darwin wrote, 

At the present day the most usual argument for the existence of an intelligent God is drawn from the deep inward conviction and feelings which are experienced by most persons.Formerly I was led by feelings such as those just referred to (although I do not think that the religious sentiment was ever strongly developed in me), to the firm conviction of the existence of God and of the immortality of the soul. In my Journal I wrote that whilst standing in the midst of the grandeur of a Brazilian forest, ‘it is not possible to give an adequate idea of the higher feelings of wonder, admiration, and devotion which fill and elevate the mind.’ I well remember my conviction that there is more in man than the mere breath of his body; but now the grandest scenes would not cause any such convictions and feelings to rise in my mind. It may be truly said that I am like a man who has become colour-blind.

Francis Schaeffer remarked:

Now Darwin says when I look back and when I look at nature I came to the conclusion that man can not be just a fly! But now Darwin has moved from being a younger man to an older man and he has allowed his presuppositions to enter in to block his logic. These things at the end of his life he had no intellectual answer for. To block them out in favor of his theory. Remember the letter of his that said he had lost all aesthetic senses when he had got older and he had become a clod himself. Now interesting he says just the same thing, but not in relation to the arts, namely music, pictures, etc, but to nature itself. Darwin said, “But now the grandest scenes would not cause any such convictions  and feelings to rise in my mind. It may be truly said that I am like a man who has become colour-blind…” So now you see that Darwin’s presuppositions have not only robbed him of the beauty of man’s creation in art, but now the universe. He can’t look at it now and see the beauty. The reason he can’t see the beauty is for a very, very , very simple reason: THE BEAUTY DRIVES HIM TO DISTRACTION. THIS IS WHERE MODERN MAN IS AND IT IS HELL. The art is hell because it reminds him of man and how great man is, and where does it fit in his system? It doesn’t. When he looks at nature and it’s beauty he is driven to the same distraction and so consequently you find what has built up inside him is a real death, not  only the beauty of the artistic but the beauty of nature. He has no answer in his logic and he is left in tension.  He dies and has become less than human because these two great things (such as any kind of art and the beauty of  nature) that would make him human  stand against his theory.

________________________

DO THESE WORDS OF DARWIN APPLY TO YOU TODAY? “I am like a man who has become colour-blind.” 

Adrian Rogers in his message on Darwinism on the CD I sent you noted:

One of the most important questions to face our generation is this: “Are human beings simply the product of millions of years of mindless, evolutionary mutations and adaptations, or are we the creation of an infinitely wise, powerful, and loving God?”

The answer to that question is critical. Why? Because it determines your attitude toward God in heaven and mankind on earth. The debate over human origin is one of the most critical issues of our times.

It’s hard to measure the enormous damage inflicted by Darwinian evolution, the teaching that life arose from a spontaneous spark in a pond of primordial ooze. The amazing thing is that influential scientists themselves are now denying Darwin’s theory as impossible. Yet its destructive effects remain.

For instance, if man is an accident of nature, then there is no fixed standard of right and wrong. So what the Bible calls sexual perversion is now a “lifestyle.” And a human life can be readily destroyed, whether in the womb or partially delivered.

Worst of all, evolution has helped destroy belief in God for millions. Denying biblical creation, evolutionists have “changed the truth of God into a lie” (Romans 1:25).

Should we be surprised that euthanasia is gaining widespread acceptance in our society or that the tide of abortion cannot be turned?  Is it any wonder that sexual perversion is received as a valid alternative lifestyle? We have taught our children that they are just another species of animal – and they are finally beginning to act like animals! And our children and grandchildren are still being fed this lie today.

THE DECEIT OF EVOLUTION

What is behind this whole idea of evolution? Why is it such an emotional issue?  Why can’t the world simply agree that there is no creation without a Creator, and out of nothing, nothing comes?

Humanist Aldous Huxley expressed the answer to those questions in his book, Ends and Means. Huxley said he and his contemporaries did not want government or morality. So they chose evolution in order to shut the mouths of those who believe in special creation.

For more than 100 years, the evolutionists have succeeded in convincing people that evolution is the only logical, scientific, and intelligent theory of human origin.

But this campaign has been carried out amid deceit and slight of hand on the part of many evolutionists. We’ve all seen the creative drawings of supposed ancestors of mankind, built on a few teeth or a piece of a skull. And the fossil hoaxes perpetrated over the last century are well known.

No wonder in his book Darwinism: The Refutation of a Myth, the Swedish embryologist, Soren Lovtrup, suggests that he believes that some day Darwinism “will be ranked the greatest deceit in the history of science.”

THREE TELLING ARGUMENTS AGAINST EVOLUTION

1. The fossil record. Not only is the so-called missing link still missing, all of the transitional life forms so crucial to evolutionary theory are missing from the fossil record. There are thousands of missing links, not one!

2. The second law of thermodynamics. This law states that energy is winding down and that matter left to itself tends toward chaos and randomness, not greater organization and complexity. Evolution demands exactly the opposite process, which is observed nowhere in nature.

3. The origin of life. Evolution offers no answers to the origin of life. It simply pushes the question farther back in time, back to some primordial event in space or an act of spontaneous generation in which life simply sprang from nothing.

____________

As a secularist you believe that it is sad indeed that millions of Christians are hoping for heaven but no heaven is waiting for them. Paul took a close look at this issue too. I Corinthians 15 asserts:

12 But if it is preached that Christ has been raised from the dead, how can some of you say that there is no resurrection of the dead? 13 If there is no resurrection of the dead, then not even Christ has been raised. 14 And if Christ has not been raised, our preaching is useless and so is your faith. 15 More than that, we are then found to be false witnesses about God, for we have testified about God that he raised Christ from the dead. But he did not raise him if in fact the dead are not raised. 16 For if the dead are not raised, then Christ has not been raised either. 17 And if Christ has not been raised, your faith is futile; you are still in your sins. 18 Then those also who have fallen asleep in Christ are lost. 19 If only for this life we have hope in Christ, we are of all people most to be pitied.

I sent you a CD that starts off with the song DUST IN THE WIND by Kerry Livgren of the group KANSAS which was a hit song in 1978 when it rose to #6 on the charts because so many people connected with the message of the song. It included these words, “All we do, crumbles to the ground though we refuse to see, Dust in the Wind, All we are is dust in the wind, Don’t hang on, Nothing lasts forever but the Earth and Sky, It slips away, And all your money won’t another minute buy.”

Kerry Livgren himself said that he wrote the song because he saw where man was without a personal God in the picture. Solomon pointed out in the Book of Ecclesiastes that those who believe that God doesn’t exist must accept three things. FIRST, death is the end and SECOND, chance and time are the only guiding forces in this life.  FINALLY, power reigns in this life and the scales are never balanced. The Christian can  face death and also confront the world knowing that it is not determined by chance and time alone and finally there is a judge who will balance the scales.

Both Kerry Livgren and the bass player Dave Hope of Kansas became Christians eventually. Kerry Livgren first tried Eastern Religions and Dave Hope had to come out of a heavy drug addiction. I was shocked and elated to see their personal testimony on The 700 Club in 1981 and that same  interview can be seen on You Tube today. Livgren lives in Topeka, Kansas today where he teaches “Diggers,” a Sunday school class at Topeka Bible ChurchDAVE HOPE is the head of Worship, Evangelism and Outreach at Immanuel Anglican Church in Destin, Florida.

The answer to find meaning in life is found in putting your faith and trust in Jesus Christ. The Bible is true from cover to cover and can be trusted.

Thank you again for your time and I know how busy you are.

Everette Hatcher, everettehatcher@gmail.com, http://www.thedailyhatch.org, cell ph 501-920-5733, Box 23416, LittleRock, AR 72221, United States

_______________________________________

Is the Bible historically accurate? Here are some of the posts I have done in the past on the subject: 1. The Babylonian Chronicleof Nebuchadnezzars Siege of Jerusalem2. Hezekiah’s Siloam Tunnel Inscription. 3. Taylor Prism (Sennacherib Hexagonal Prism)4. Biblical Cities Attested Archaeologically. 5. The Discovery of the Hittites6.Shishak Smiting His Captives7. Moabite Stone8Black Obelisk of Shalmaneser III9A Verification of places in Gospel of John and Book of Acts., 9B Discovery of Ebla Tablets10. Cyrus Cylinder11. Puru “The lot of Yahali” 9th Century B.C.E.12. The Uzziah Tablet Inscription13. The Pilate Inscription14. Caiaphas Ossuary14 B Pontius Pilate Part 214c. Three greatest American Archaeologists moved to accept Bible’s accuracy through archaeology.

You can hear DAVE HOPE and Kerry Livgren’s stories from this youtube link:

(part 1 ten minutes)

(part 2 ten minutes)

Kansas – Dust in the Wind (Official Video)

Uploaded on Nov 7, 2009

Pre-Order Miracles Out of Nowhere now at http://www.miraclesoutofnowhere.com

About the film:
In 1973, six guys in a local band from America’s heartland began a journey that surpassed even their own wildest expectations, by achieving worldwide superstardom… watch the story unfold as the incredible story of the band KANSAS is told for the first time in the DVD Miracles Out of Nowhere.

_____________________________

Adrian Rogers on Darwinism

John Raymond Smythies

John Raymond Smythies (30 November 1922 – 28 January 2019) was a British neuropsychiatrist, neuroscientist and neurophilosopher.

BiographyEdit

Smythies was born on 30 November 1922 in Nainital, United Provinces, British India, where his father, Evelyn Arthur Smythies, a philatelist, was employed by the Department of Forests. His brother Bertram Evelyn (“Bill”) Smythies became an ornithologist. His cousins on the Smythies side include Yorick Smythies,[1] Richard Dawkins (a first cousin once removed)[2], Graham Greene and Christopher Isherwood.[citation needed]

In 1932 Smythies enrolled at Cheltenham College Junior School, transferred to Rugby School in 1936, and thence to Christ’s College, Cambridge, in 1940 (18) and to University College Hospital, London in 1942 where he studied medicine (19). He graduated M.B., B.Chir. (Cantab) in 1945. After two years as a Surgeon-Lieutenant in the R.N.V.R. as ship’s doctor on H.M.S. Porlock Bay based in Bermuda, he completed his basic medical postgraduate training at Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Cambridge, before selecting neuropsychiatry for a speciality. Two weeks into his first psychiatric residency at St. George’s Hospital, London (20), noting the close chemical relation between the psychotomimetic drug mescaline and the neurotransmitter catecholamines, he suggested that schizophrenia might be caused by some abnormality in catecholamine metabolism that produced a mescaline-like substance in the brain. In collaboration with the organic chemist John Harley-Mason and Humphry Osmond his psychiatric colleague at St. George’s, he developed this idea, into the first specific biochemical theory of schizophrenia—the transmethylation hypothesis (5).

Inspired by the fact that mescaline produces such remarkable effects on all human mental faculties and by the interdisciplinary work of Albert Schweitzer, in the same year Smythies decided to tackle the mind-brain problem in a systematic way i.e. by undertaking a rigorous training in neuroscience, experimental psychology and philosophy. So first he worked for one year as a resident in the EEG Department at the National Hospital, Queen Square, London (21). He then took an M.Sc. degree in neuroanatomy, philosophy and cultural anthropology with the neuroanatomist William C. Gibson at the University of British Columbia (22). The neuroanatomical research involved was a study of the synaptic structure in human cortex as revealed by silver staining and was awarded a post-graduate M.D degree by Cambridge (23). His teacher in philosophy was the distinguished American philosopher Avrum Stroll, who became a lifelong mentor and friend. This was followed during the tenure of a Nuffield Fellowship by six months with the Nobel Laureate Sir John Eccles in neurophysiology and 18 months at the Psychological Laboratory in Cambridge with Oliver Zangwillstudying the stroboscopic patterns (the complex geometrical hallucinations induced by looking at a flickering light). This work has been extensively reviewed by John Geiger (24). Then Smythies worked a further two years in neuropharmacology with Harold E. Himwich in Galesburg, Illinois and with Hudson Hoagland at the Worcester Foundation, before returning to London where he completed his formal clinical psychiatric training with Sir Aubrey Lewis at the Maudsley Hospital (25). He then joined the Faculty of the University of Edinburgh for twelve years, first as senior lecturer then reader (26), before being invited to a personal chair at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, funded by the Ireland family, where he stayed for eighteen years (27).

In 1956 Smythies published his first book “Analysis of Perception” (28) on the mind-brain problem in which he presented a new theory — extended materialism — based on an analysis of fundamental flaws in the current orthodox theory (mind-brain identity) and previous work by Joseph Priestley, C.D. Broad, H.H. Price and Bertrand Russell. A second book “The Walls of Plato’s Cave” followed in 1994 (17) on the same topic. This book was reviewed by Robert Almader (29) who said: “This is certainly one of the four or five most arresting and compelling books written on the nature of consciousness, the mind-brain problem, and human personality.” The theory extends our concepts of consciousness and analyses possible geometrical and topological relations between phenomenal space and physical space linked to brane theory in physics. Recently the distinguished British physicist Bernard Carr (30), following a different line of research, has presented a very similar theory as the basis for a necessary new paradigm shift in cosmology. In 1998 wrote “Every person’s guide to Antioxidants” (37). Smythies gives an account of his work on synaptic plasticity in his book “The Dynamic Neuron” (2002) (8).

Smythies has served as president of the International Society of Psychoneuroendocrinology from 1970 to 1974 (31), consultant to the World Health Organization from 1963 to 1968 (32), and editor of the International Review of Neurobiologyfrom 1958 to 1991. He was elected a member of the Athenaeum in 1968 (33). He has published over 200 scientific papers and 16 books.

He has made extensive contributions to knowledge in a number of fields including the neurochemistry of schizophrenia (5,6) and the neuropharmacology of psychedelic drugs (7); the functional neuroanatomyof synapses with particular regard to the role of synaptic plasticity, endocytosis and redox factors (8,9); the role in the brain of orthoquinone metabolites of catecholamines (10); the role of virtual reality mechanisms in visual perception (11) and, in particular, theories of brain-consciousness relations (12–17). Smythies has held positions as the Charles Byron Ireland Professor Emeritus of Psychiatric Research at the University of AlabamaMedical Center at Birmingham, visiting scholar at the Center for Brain and Cognition, University of California, San Diego, and senior research fellow at the Institute of Neurology, University College London.

At the start of his book on the effects of mescaline, The Doors of Perception, the author Aldous Huxleycredits Smythies with having inspired him to take the substance.

For the last two decades of his life, Smythies worked with Professor Ramachandran’s Center for Brain and Cognition at UCSD, latterly on the function of the claustrum as well as the epigenetics of neurocomputation, exosomes and telocytes (37–54).

Personal life and deathEdit

On 2 December 1950 Smythies married Vanna Gattorno of Trieste, Italy. John and Vanna published their joint autobiography “Two Coins in the Fountain” in 2006 (34). Smythies is also the author of a book of poems entitled “Poems from the Edge of Time” (35), and a satirical play “The Trial of God” (36). He died in January 2019 at the age of 96.[3][4]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Smythies, J. R. (1994). “Alas, poor Yorick”. Nature. 371 (6497): 470. doi:10.1038/371470d0. ISSN 1476-4687. … my cousin Yorick Smythies …
  2. ^ Dawkins, Richard, 1941-. An Appetite For Wonder : The Making of a Scientist : A Memoir (PDF). London. p. 12. ISBN 9780552779050. OCLC 870425057. Olive and Evelyn’s eldest son, my father’s taciturn first cousin Bertram (‘Billy’) Smythies, was also in the forest service […] Bertram’s younger brother John Smythies departed from family tradition and became a distinguished neuroscientist and authority on schizophrenia and psychedelic drugs, living in California, where he is credited with inspiring Aldous Huxley to take mescaline and cleanse his ‘doors of perception’. […] Yorick Smythies, another first cousin of my father, was a devoted amanuensis of the philosopher Wittgenstein.
  3. ^ John Raymond Smythies, a Pioneer in Psychiatry, Passed Away – a Tribute
  4. ^ McGeoch, Paul D.; Ramachandran, V. S. (26 April 2019). “John Raymond Smythies”. BMJ. 365: l1873. doi:10.1136/bmj.l1873. ISSN 0959-8138.

1. Smythies J.R. Schizophrenia: Chemistry, Metabolism and Treatment. Springfield, Illinois, Charles C. Thomas, 1963.

2. Smythies J.R (with H.E. Himwich and S.S. Kety, editors) Amines and Schizophrenia. New York, Pergamon Press. 1966.

3. Smythies J.R. Biological Psychiatry. London, Heinemann, 1968. German edition, 1971.

4. Smythies J.R and Corbett L.C. Psychiatry for Students of Medicine. London, Heinemann, 1976. Spanish edition, 1984.

5. Smythies J.R & Osmond H. (1952) Schizophrenia. A New Approach. J Ment Sci., pp. 98, 309–316.

6. Smythies J. (Editor) Schizophrenia. A disorder of synaptic plasticity. Special volume (59) in The International Review of Neurobiology, San Diego, Elsevier, 2004.

7. Smythies J. R. “Hallucinogenic Drugs”, Chapter 18 in Modern Trends in Neurology, Dennis Williams, editor. 3rd edition. London, Butterworth, 1962.

8. Smythies J. R. The Dynamic Neuron. Cambridge MA., MIT Press, 2002.

9. Smythies J. The Neuromodulators. International Review of Neurobiology, San Diego, Elsevier, 2005.

10. Smythies J. R. The role of free radicals in the brain in health and disease in relation to synaptic plasticity. In: Free Radicals in Brain Pathophysiology. (G. Poli, E. Cadenas & L. Packer, eds.) New York, Dekker.

11. Smythies J. 2009, “Philosophy, perception, and neuroscience” Perception, pp. 38, 638–651.

12. Smythies J.R. Brain and Mind, London, Routledge & Kegan Paul, editor and contributor of essay “The representative theory of perception”, 1965.

13. Smythies J. R. The Neurological Foundations of Psychiatry. Oxford, Blackwell. 1966.

14. Smythies J. Science and ESP. London, Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1967.

15. Smythies J.R. (with Arthur Koestler, editors). Beyond Reductionism. London, Macmillan, 1969.

16. Smythies J. Brain Mechanisms and Behaviour. Oxford, Blackwell, 1970. Japanese edition, 1973.

17. Smythies J. The Walls of Plato’s Cave. Aldershot, Avebury Press, 1994.

18. Records of Christs’s College, Cambridge.

19. Records of University College Hospital, London.

20. Records of St. George’s Hospital, London

21. Records of the National Hospital, Queen Square, London.

22. Records of the University of British Columbia.

23. Smythies J. R., Gibson W.C., & Purkis V.A. (1957) The distribution and morphology of boutons termineaux in the human cerebrum. J Comp Neur., pp. 108, 175.

24. Geiger, John. Chapel of Extreme Experience. Toronto, Gutter Press, 2002. pp. 27–45.

25. Records of the Institute of Psychiatry, University of London.

26. Records of the University of Edinburgh.

27. Records of the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

28. Smythies, J. R. Analysis of Perception. London, Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1956.

29. Almader, R. (1997) Journal for Scientific Exploration, pp. 10, 314–318.

30. Carr, B. (2008) “Worlds apart?” Proc.Soc.Psychical Research, pp. 59, 1–96.

31. Records of the International Society for Neuropsychopharmacology.

32. Records of the World Health Organization.

33. Records of the Athanaenum Club, Pall Mall, London.

34. Smythies J. & Smythies V. Two Coins in the Fountain. (joint autobiography). Amazon.com (Booksurge) 2006.

35. Smythies J. Poems from the Edge of Time. Pulborough, Ellis, 2002.

36. Smythies J. The Trial of God. (satirical play) Amazon.com (Booksurge) 2006.

37. Smythies J. Every Person’s Guide to Antioxidants. Rutgers University Press 1998.

38. Smythies JR. The Dynamic Neuron. Cambridge MA. MIT Press, 2002.

39. Smythies, J., Edelstein, L., Ramachandran, V. The Claustrum: Structural, Functional and Clinical Neuroscience. San Diego. Academic Press (Elsevier). 2014.

40. Smythies J, Edelstein L, Ramachandran V. (2012) Hypotheses relating to the function of the claustrum. Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience. 2012;6:53. doi: 10.3389/fnint.2012.00053. Epub 2012 Aug 2.

41 Smythies J, Edelstein L. (2013) Transsynaptic modality codes in the brain: possible involvement of synchronized spike timing, microRNAs, exosomes and epigenetic processes. Frontiers in Intregrative Neuroscience. 2012;6:126. doi: 10.3389/fnint.2012.00126. Epub 2013 Jan 4.

42. Smythies J. (2013) Schizophrenia: one coat of many colors. Frontiers in Psychiatry, 27 May 2013 | doi: 10.3389/fpsyt.2013.00043.

43. Edelstein L, Smythies J. (2013) Spike dynamic and epigenetic malfunctions in epilepsy: a tale of two codes. Frontiers in Epilepsy: 27 May 2013. doi: 10.3389/fneur.2013.00063.

44. Smythies J. Edelstein L. (2013) Interactions between the spike code and the epigenetic codeduring information processing in the brain. Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience. 8 July doi: 10.3389/fnmol.2013.00017

45. Smythies J, Edelstein L. (2013) Telocytes, exosomes, gap junctions and the cytoskeleton: the makings of a primitive nervous system? Front. Cell. Neurosci. | doi: 10.3389/fncel.2013.00278.

46. Smythies J, Edelstein L, Ramachandran V (2014). Hypotheses relating to the function of the claustrum II: instructional oscillations and dendritic integration. Front. Integr. Neurosci. 8:7. doi: 10.3389/fnint.2014.00007.

47. Smythies J, Edelstein L. (2013) Hypotheses concerning how Otx2 makes its incredible journey: a hitchhiker on the road to Rome. Front. Mol. Neurosci. 6, 55. doi: 10.3389/fnmol.2013.00055. eCollection 2013.

48. Edelstein L, Fuxe K and Smythies J (2014). Life without glutamate: the epigenetic effects of glutamate deletion. Front. Mol. Neurosci. 7:14. doi: 10.3389/fnmol.2014.00014.

49. Smythies LE, Smythies JR. (2014) Exosomes in the gut. Front Immunol. 2014 Mar 17;5:104. eCollection 2014.

50. Edelstein L, Smythies J (2014). Epigenetic aspects of telocytes/cordocytes: jacks of all trades, masters of most. Front Cell. Neurosci. 8:32. doi: 10.3389/fncel.2014.00032.

51. Edelstein L, Smythies J. (2014) The role of telocytes in morphogenetic bioelectrical signaling: once more unto the breach. Front Mol Neurosci. 2014 May 13;7:41. doi: 10.3389/fnmol.2014.00041. eCollection 2014.

52. Smythies J, Edelstein L. (2014) The desferrioxamine-prochlorperazine coma—clue to the role of dopamine-iron recycling in the synthesis of hydrogen peroxide in the brain. Front.Mol.Neurosci.

53. Smythies J, Edelstein L, Ramachandran V. (2014) Molecular mechanisms for the inheritance of acquired characteristics-exosomes, microRNA shuttling, fear and stress: Lamarck resurrected? Front. Genet. 2014 May 15;5:133. doi: 10.3389/fgene.2014.00133. eCollection 2014.

54. Edelstein L, Smythies J. The role of epigenetic-related codes in neurocomputation: dynamic hardware in the brain. in Edelstein L, Smythies J, Noble D. (Editors) Epigenetic information-processing mechanisms in the brain. Phil.Trans.R.Soc.B. Theme Issue vol. 369, No. 1652, 26 September 2014.

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On November 21, 2014 I received a letter from Nobel Laureate Harry Kroto and it said:

…Please click on this URL http://vimeo.com/26991975

and you will hear what far smarter people than I have to say on this matter. I agree with them.

Harry Kroto

Nick Gathergood, David-Birkett, Harry-Kroto

I have attempted to respond to all of Dr. Kroto’s friends arguments and I have posted my responses one per week for over a year now. Here are some of my earlier posts:

Arif Ahmed, Sir David AttenboroughMark Balaguer, Horace Barlow, Michael BatePatricia ChurchlandAaron CiechanoverNoam Chomsky,Alan DershowitzHubert Dreyfus, Bart Ehrman, Stephan FeuchtwangDavid Friend,  Riccardo GiacconiIvar Giaever , Roy GlauberRebecca GoldsteinDavid J. Gross,  Brian Greene, Susan GreenfieldStephen F Gudeman,  Alan Guth, Jonathan HaidtTheodor W. Hänsch, Brian Harrison,  Hermann HauserRoald Hoffmann,  Bruce HoodHerbert Huppert,  Gareth Stedman Jones, Steve JonesShelly KaganMichio Kaku,  Stuart Kauffman,  Lawrence KraussHarry Kroto, George LakoffElizabeth Loftus,  Alan MacfarlanePeter MillicanMarvin MinskyLeonard Mlodinow,  Yujin NagasawaAlva NoeDouglas Osheroff,  Jonathan Parry,  Saul PerlmutterHerman Philipse,  Carolyn PorcoRobert M. PriceLisa RandallLord Martin Rees,  Oliver Sacks, John SearleMarcus du SautoySimon SchafferJ. L. Schellenberg,   Lee Silver Peter Singer,  Walter Sinnott-ArmstrongRonald de Sousa, Victor StengerBarry Supple,   Leonard Susskind, Raymond TallisNeil deGrasse Tyson,  .Alexander Vilenkin, Sir John WalkerFrank WilczekSteven Weinberg, and  Lewis Wolpert,

In  the second video below in the 95th clip in this series are his words but today I just wanted to pause and look at this life. 

Quote from Dr. John Raymond Smythies

I would like to describe how mescaline works. These hallucination drugs have a very specific action in two ways. Number 1 they produce fantastic visual hallucinations. These are described by the people who have them (most of them are down to earth scientists such as MacDonald Critchley) as being more beautiful than anything they have ever seen in normal art. Some of these people have the sort of experience as union with God, mystical experiences and so on.

50 Renowned Academics Speaking About God (Part 1)

Another 50 Renowned Academics Speaking About God (Part 2)

A Further 50 Renowned Academics Speaking About God (Part 3)

__

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FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE PART 48 “BLOW UP” by Michelangelo Antonioni makes Philosophic Statement (Feature on artist Nancy Holt)

_______________ Francis Schaeffer pictured below: _____________________ I have included the 27 minute  episode THE AGE OF NONREASON by Francis Schaeffer. In that video Schaeffer noted,  ” Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band…for a time it became the rallying cry for young people throughout the world. It expressed the essence of their lives, thoughts and their feelings.” How Should […]

FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE Part 47 Woody Allen and Professor Levy and the death of “Optimistic Humanism” from the movie CRIMES AND MISDEMEANORS Plus Charles Darwin’s comments too!!! (Feature on artist Rodney Graham)

Crimes and Misdemeanors: A Discussion: Part 1 ___________________________________ Today I will answer the simple question: IS IT POSSIBLE TO BE AN OPTIMISTIC SECULAR HUMANIST THAT DOES NOT BELIEVE IN GOD OR AN AFTERLIFE? This question has been around for a long time and you can go back to the 19th century and read this same […]

FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE PART 46 Friedrich Nietzsche (Featured artist is Thomas Schütte)

____________________________________ Francis Schaeffer pictured below: __________ Francis Schaeffer has written extensively on art and culture spanning the last 2000years and here are some posts I have done on this subject before : Francis Schaeffer’s “How should we then live?” Video and outline of episode 10 “Final Choices” , episode 9 “The Age of Personal Peace and Affluence”, episode 8 […]

FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE Part 45 Woody Allen “Reason is Dead” (Feature on artists Allora & Calzadilla )

Love and Death [Woody Allen] – What if there is no God? [PL] ___________ _______________ How Should We then Live Episode 7 small (Age of Nonreason) #02 How Should We Then Live? (Promo Clip) Dr. Francis Schaeffer 10 Worldview and Truth Two Minute Warning: How Then Should We Live?: Francis Schaeffer at 100 Francis Schaeffer […]

FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE Part 44 The Book of Genesis (Featured artist is Trey McCarley )

___________________________________ Francis Schaeffer pictured below: ____________________________ Francis Schaeffer “BASIS FOR HUMAN DIGNITY” Whatever…HTTHR Dr. Francis schaeffer – The flow of Materialism(from Part 4 of Whatever happened to human race?) Dr. Francis Schaeffer – The Biblical flow of Truth & History (intro) Francis Schaeffer – The Biblical Flow of History & Truth (1) Dr. Francis Schaeffer […]

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RECOGNIZING ADRIAN ROGER’S 90th BIRTHDAY Part  4 Two of the most popular posts by Adrian Rogers on alcohol on www.thedailyhatch.org

I have posted on the subject of alcohol and the sermons by Adrian Rogers before but the last 30 days two of my most popular posts have been Family friend killed by drunk driver!,

and Adrian Rogers and John MacArthur on wisdom from Proverbs on alcohol . Below are some of the links to past posts concerning Rogers’ sermons.

Leadership Crisis in America

90 years ago today on September 12, 1931, Adrian Rogers was born and I wanted to celebrate today by repeating one of my favorite posts from Adrian Rogers messages! In the 1970’s and 1980’s I was a member of Bellevue Baptist in Memphis where Adrian Rogers was pastor and was a student at ECS from the 5th grade to the 12th grade where I was introduced to the books and films of Francis Schaeffer. During this time I was amazed at how many prominent figures in the world found their way into the works of both Adrian Rogers and Francis Schaeffer and I wondered what it would be like if these individuals were exposed to the Bible and the gospel. Therefore, over 20 years ago I began sending the messages of Adrian Rogers and portions of the works of Francis Schaeffer to many of the secular figures that they mentioned in their works.

Picture of Adrian Rogers above from 1970’s while pastor of Bellevue Baptist of Memphis, and president of Southern Baptist Convention. (Little known fact, Rogers was the starting quarterback his senior year of the Palm Beach High School football team that won the state title and a hero to a 7th grader at the same school named Burt Reynolds.)

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I have a lot of respect for the teachings of Adrian Rogers and I have posted many of his videos over and over and over  before. He has taken up many issues such as alcohol, drunk driving, evolution,  character,  9/11, profanity confronting atheists (like Antony Flew, , Carl Sagan),   and he has impacted millions of lives throughout this country through his Love Worth Finding tv  and radio ministry.

Related posts:

Part 4 Adrian Rogers on Proverbs “How To Be The Father Of A Wise Child” (video too)

Picture of Adrian Rogers above from 1970′s while pastor of Bellevue Baptist of Memphis, and president of Southern Baptist Convention. (Little known fact, Rogers was the starting quarterback his senior year of the Palm Beach High School football team that won the state title and a hero to a 7th grader at the same school named […]

Part 3 Adrian Rogers on Proverbs “How To Be The Father Of A Wise Child” (video too)

I have been reading Proverbs almost every day for many years with my family in the evening and there is lots of wisdom in it. Take a look at the third part of this message from Adrian Rogers. How to Be the Father of a Wise Child Another great sermon outline from Adrian Rogers. Adrian Rogers […]

Part 2 Adrian Rogers on Proverbs “How To Be The Father Of A Wise Child” (video too)

I have been reading Proverbs almost every day for many years with my family in the evening and there is lots of wisdom in it. Take a look at the second part of this message from Adrian Rogers. How to Be the Father of a Wise Child Another great sermon outline from Adrian Rogers. Adrian Rogers […]

Part 1 Adrian Rogers on Proverbs “How To Be The Father Of A Wise Child” (video too)

Picture of Adrian Rogers above from 1970′s while pastor of Bellevue Baptist of Memphis, and president of Southern Baptist Convention. (Little known fact, Rogers was the starting quarterback his senior year of the Palm Beach High School football team that won the state title and a hero to a 7th grader at the same school named […]

What Adrian Rogers said to pro-abortion activist at the U.S. Senate in the 1990′s

Leadership Crisis in America Published on Jul 11, 2012 Picture of Adrian Rogers above from 1970′s while pastor of Bellevue Baptist of Memphis, and president of Southern Baptist Convention. (Little known fact, Rogers was the starting quarterback his senior year of the Palm Beach High School football team that won the state title and a hero […]

John McArthur and Adrian Rogers on Proverbs and Alcohol (Eddie Sutton and Ryan Dunn used as examples)

Same old story it seems. Kentucky pulls out another close victory over the Vols. This is not the only story I am talking about today. Kentucky’s Alex Poythress (22) shoots between Tennessee’s Josh Richardson, left, and Yemi Makanjuola during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game at Rupp Arena in Lexington, Ky., Tuesday, […]

The Life and Ministry of Adrian Rogers (Part 3)

7 years ago on November 15, 2005 Adrian Rogers passed away. This is a series of posts about the life and ministry of Adrian Rogers. Adrian Rogers Memorial – Come To Jesus Uploaded by jonwhisner on Jan 20, 2011 This video is from Adrian Roger’s Memorial Service held at Bellevue Baptist Church in Memphis, TN in […]

Adrian Rogers and John MacArthur on wisdom from Proverbs on alcohol

(My pastor growing up was Adrian Rogers and he died 7 years ago today. He would have been 82 if he was still living. ) I love the Book of Proverbs and every day I read one chapter of Proverbs. Since there are 31 chapters, I start the 1st of ever month and read chapter […]

Adrian Rogers on evolution

  Picture of Adrian Rogers above from 1970′s while pastor of Bellevue Baptist of Memphis, and president of Southern Baptist Convention. (Little known fact, Rogers was the starting quarterback his senior year of the Palm Beach High School football team that won the state title and a hero to a 7th grader at the same school […]

The Life and Ministry of Adrian Rogers (Part 2)

7 years ago on November 15, 2005 Adrian Rogers passed away. This is a series of posts about the life and ministry of Adrian Rogers. Adrian Rogers Memorial – Come To Jesus Uploaded by jonwhisner on Jan 20, 2011 This video is from Adrian Roger’s Memorial Service held at Bellevue Baptist Church in Memphis, TN in […]

The Life and Ministry of Adrian Rogers (Part 1)

7 years ago on November 15, 2005 Adrian Rogers passed away. This is a series of posts about the life and ministry of Adrian Rogers. Adrian Rogers Memorial – Come To Jesus Uploaded by jonwhisner on Jan 20, 2011 This video is from Adrian Roger’s Memorial Service held at Bellevue Baptist Church in Memphis, TN in […]

Terri Blackstock’s husband led to Christ while listening to Adrian Rogers on AFR

Picture of Adrian Rogers above from 1970′s while pastor of Bellevue Baptist of Memphis, and president of Southern Baptist Convention. (Little known fact, Rogers was the starting quarterback his senior year of the Palm Beach High School football team that won the state title and a hero to a 7th grader at the same school named […]

THREE TELLING ARGUMENTS AGAINST EVOLUTION by Adrian Rogers (Part 1 of series on Evolution)

THREE TELLING ARGUMENTS AGAINST EVOLUTION by Adrian Rogers (Part 1 of series on Evolution) The Long War against God-Henry Morris, part 1 of 6 Uploaded by FLIPWORLDUPSIDEDOWN3 on Aug 30, 2010 http://www.icr.org/ http://store.icr.org/prodinfo.asp?number=BLOWA2 http://store.icr.org/prodinfo.asp?number=BLOWASG http://www.fliptheworldupsidedown.com/blog _____________________________________ I got this from a blogger in April of 2008 concerning candidate Obama’s view on evolution: Q: York County was recently […]

Adrian Rogers’ sermon on Clinton in 98 applies to Newt in 2012

It pays to remember history. Today I am going to go through some of it and give an outline and quotes from the great Southern Baptist leader Adrian Rogers (1931-2005). Max Brantley of the Arkansas Times started this morning off with some comedy: From pro golfer John Daly’s Twitter account following last night’s Republican debate, […]

A response to 9/11 by Adrian Rogers jh54

  Picture of Adrian Rogers above from 1970′s while pastor of Bellevue Baptist of Memphis, and president of Southern Baptist Convention. (Little known fact, Rogers was the starting quarterback his senior year of the Palm Beach High School football team that won the state title and a hero to a 7th grader at the same school […]

 

Here are other blog posts that have got lots of hits in the last 30 days:
Origin of Hatfield-McCoy feud may have been a fight over a pig
Jim Kelly’s wife Jill and her Christian Testimony (Part 1)
Review of the movie “Mud” which was made in Arkansas
Comparison of crime data and concealed carry gun laws between Houston and Chicago (includes funny gun control posters)
What do the locals think of the Hatfield-McCoy tv series?
Did you know that Peyton and Ashley Manning had kids?
Milton Friedman’s religious views
Former Vol and Knoxville radio personality’s DUI charge and why I don’t drink
Louis Zamperini: American Hero part 3
What was D Day really like for those soldiers who took the beach?
“Payday Someday” by Robert G. Lee (Part 1 of transcript and video)
Who is Jessica Dorrell? (with pictures)
Some say Steve Jobs was an atheist jh42
Joplin Tornado hits gas station, video during tornado and aftermath
Great, great, granddaughter of Devil Anse Hatfield said he came to Christ
Hitler’s last few hours before entering hell (never before released photos)
Bobby Petrino had other girlfriends besides Jessica Dorrell? UPDATED
Tim Tebow being persecuted for his Christian faith?
About
The Characters referenced in Woody Allen’s “Midnight in Paris” (Part 17, J. M. W. Turner)
Gun control can cost lives!!!!!
The Characters referenced in Woody Allen’s “Midnight in Paris” (Part 8, Henri Toulouse Lautrec)
Pictures and videos of 5 presidents together at one time
Christopher Hitchens’ view on abortion may surprise you
Peyton Manning speaking in Little Rock on June 1, 2013
Was George Washington our best president?
The characters referenced in Woody Allen’s movie “Midnight in Paris” (Part 25, T.S.Elliot)
Picasso painting “The acrobat” in Woody Allen movie “Midnight in Paris”
Dying laughing at Obamacare
Peyton and Ashley Manning show off their baby boy
Did Steve Jobs help people even though he did not give away a lot of money?
Milton Friedman videos and transcripts Part 8
The characters referenced in Woody Allen’s “Midnight in Paris” (Part 16, Josephine Baker)
The Characters referenced in Woody Allen’s “Midnight in Paris” (Part 6 Gertrude Stein)
Thomas Cullen Davis guilty or innocent?
Best Storm Chaser videos of Joplin Tornado May 22, 2011
D Day was 68 years ago, Joe Speaks of Arkansas was captured twice during the European battles
The Characters referenced in Woody Allen’s “Midnight in Paris” (Part 27, Man Ray)
The characters referenced in Woody Allen’s movie “Midnight in Paris” (Part 31, Jean Cocteau)
The Characters referenced in Woody Allen’s “Midnight in Paris” (Part 1 William Faulkner)
The characters referenced in Woody Allen’s movie “Midnight in Paris” (Part 30, Albert Camus)
Little Jimmy Dickens: The oldest living member of the original Grand Ole Opry
Discussion of Woody Allen’s 1989 movie “Crimes and Misdemeanors” (Part 1)
What the Sam Hill is going on? (Phrase came out of Hatfield-McCoy feud)
Matt Jones speaks at Little Rock Touchdown Club Part 2
The Welfare trap can be destroyed by Milton Friedman’s negative income tax
More about the historical characters mentioned in the movie “Lincoln” by Steven Spielberg (Part 2) (Pictures of historical figures)
Dan Mitchell, Ron Paul, and Milton Friedman on Immigration Debate (includes editorial cartoon)
D-Day Landings,”Saving Private Ryan” most frightening and realistic 15 minutes ever
Famous Arkansas murder trials
IRS cartoons from Dan Mitchell’s blog
Tell the 48 million food stamps users to eat more broccoli!!!!
Arkansas connection to the Hatfield McCoy feud!!!!
Oldest person in the world cursed? Jeanne Calment wasn’t, she lived to 122 yrs and told of meeting Van Gogh
John Calipari’s religious views
What Adrian Rogers said to pro-abortion activist at the U.S. Senate in the 1990′s
The Characters referenced in Woody Allen’s “Midnight in Paris” (Part 7 Paul Gauguin)
We know the IRS commissioner wasn’t telling the truth in March 2012, when he testified: “There’s absolutely no targeting.”
Senator Pryor asks for Spending Cut Suggestions! Here are a few!(Part 20)(The Conspirator, Part 19, Lewis Powell Part B)
MUSIC MONDAY: Lou Graham knows what love is
The Life and Ministry of Adrian Rogers (Part 1)
War Hero Joe Speaks and D Day pictures
Meaning of the song “Up on Cripple Creek”
Bill Clinton has a great appreciation for Mel Brooks’ movies like I do!!!
Pictures of Tornado damage May 24, 2011 Oklahoma, Arkansas Kansas
John MacArthur: Fulfilled prophecy in the Bible? (Ezekiel 26-28 and the story of Tyre, video clips)
People in the Johnny Cash video “God’s Gonna Cut You Down”
Misquotes, Fake Quotes, and Disputed Quotes of the Founders
Evie
The characters referenced in Woody Allen’s movie “Midnight in Paris” (Part 36, Alice B. Toklas, Woody Allen on the meaning of life)
Medicaid mistake in Arkansas
Funny cartoon from Dan Mitchell’s blog on Greece
Review and trailer of the movie “Safe Haven”
Ronald Wilson Reagan Part 22
Discussion on Equality from Milton Friedman and Bradley Gitz
The Characters referenced in Woody Allen’s “Midnight in Paris” (Part 18, Claude Monet)
Atheists confronted: How I confronted Carl Sagan the year before he died jh47
People hated tax collectors like Zacchaeus 2000 years ago and they hate them today too!!!
John MacArthur on Proverbs (Part 4) “Bad company corrupts…”
Gael Monfils “Tennis Tuesday”
Matt Chandler:Journey with Christ through hardship of brain cancer (Part 2)
Pictures of aftermath of Springfield, Mass Tornado
Listing of transcripts and videos of Free to Choose by Milton Friedman: Episode “Created Equal” on www.theDailyHatch.org
Videos and Pictures of Explosion at Boston Marathon 2013 and JFK Library
Pictures in happier times of Arnold Schwarzenegger and Maria Shriver
Reason’s Peter Suderman highlights six reasons why states should refuse to implement any part of ObamaCare
Louis Zamperini: Great American War Hero gave good interview to Jay Leno on Tonight Show last night
Michael Cannon on Obamacare (editorial cartoons on Judge Roberts and Obamacare)
Video clips and pictures from the new film “42″ and documentary of Jackie Robinson
“Woody Wednesday” Discussion of Woody Allen’s 1989 movie “Crimes and Misdemeanors” (Part 3)
The Characters referenced in Woody Allen’s “Midnight in Paris” (Part 4 Ernest Hemingway)
Is the Bible historically accurate?(Part 14B)(The Conspirator Part 5)
David and Hope Solo
Paul Dexter Williams died from asphyxiation police said
Did Hitler go to hell?
Peyton Manning and wife did not want to leave Indy (Part 2)
Did David Barton fabricate quotes and attribute them to the founding fathers?
Gary Thain of Uriah Heep is a member of the “27 Club” (Part 7)
Founders Fathers were against welfare state
The characters referenced in Woody Allen’s movie “Midnight in Paris” (Part 32, Jean-Paul Sartre)
Bielema says his staff has great recruiting abilities
Bob Costas needs to think gun control logic through
Last hours of Marilyn Monroe’s life indicates she committed suicide because of unhappiness (Marilyn part 2)
Cartoons from Dan Mitchell’s blog that demonstrate what Obama is doing to our economy Part 1
Who is Jessica Dorrell’s future husband Josh Morgan?
Rogelio Baena learned last week he was not boy’s father, but Arnold Schwarzenegger was
Pictures of Dexter Williams
Steve Jobs left conservative Lutheran upbringing behind
Johnny Cash a Christian?
Laffer curve hits tax hikers pretty hard (includes cartoon)
Tim and Elisabeth Hasselbeck: Christians in a secular world (Part 2)
The characters referenced in Woody Allen’s movie “Midnight in Paris” (Part 24, Djuna Barnes)
Peyton Manning and wife did not want to leave Indy (Part 1)
We could put in a flat tax and it would enable us to cut billions out of the IRS budget!!!!
Quotes from Milton Friedman (part 3)
Skillet is a Christian Heavy Metal Band from Memphis Part 2
Alice Cooper is a Christian
Carl Sagan versus RC Sproul
Milton Friedman videos and transcripts Part 4
Why are we subsidizing the security of wealthy allies?
Little Rock native David Hodges has song used in “Safe Haven” trailer

18 States Passed Election Reforms This Year. Here’s What They Did. 

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Atlanta voters line up Dec. 14 for the first day of early voting outside a polling station at the High Museum of Art in the runoff elections for two U.S. Senate seats. (Photo: Jessica McGowan/Getty Images)

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott this week capped off a year of major election reforms across America by signing hotly debated legislation after a prolonged drama that saw Democratic legislators flee the state in a bid to prevent its passage.

Texas, with its Republican governor, is among at least 18 states to enact election reform measures this year, including bills to require voter ID, curb the controversial practice of ballot harvesting, and remove the dead and other ineligible voters from registration rolls.

Organizations that tallied the election changes include the National Conference of State Legislatures, a nonpartisan group representing state lawmakers, and the Brennan Center for Justice, a liberal group opposed to voter ID laws and the upkeep of voter registration.

“State legislatures finally realized in many states that these holes and vulnerabilities that existed in the system for quite a while need to be fixed,” Hans von Spakovsky, a former member of the Federal Election Commission, told The Daily Signal.

“States like Texas, Georgia, Florida, and other places actually passed some good reforms to fix it,” von Spakovsky said.

Now manager of the Election Law Reform Initiative at The Heritage Foundation, parent organization of The Daily Signal, von Spakovsky noted that many of the state election reforms prevailed despite misleading political attacks.

“[Lawmakers have] done it in the face of totally unfair and outrageous criticism of them, basically saying all kinds of lies about what they were doing,” von Spakovsky, also a member of President Donald Trump’s Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity, said.

The Brennan Center, which is affiliated with the New York University School of Law, characterized the new state laws as “restrictive” measures that would “suppress” voting.

The group announced a lawsuit against the state of Texas, claiming that the objective of the legislation known as SB 1 “is not to prevent voter fraud; it is to retain power in the face of a changing and expanding electorate.”

The 18 revised state election laws could be the most such successful bills since 14 states passed election measures 10 years ago, the Brennan Center said, noting: “The United States is on track to far exceed its most recent period of significant voter suppression—2011.”

Most of the new laws, however, allow more early voting and are less restrictive than election laws in New York, where the Brennan Center is based, von Spakovsky said.

Kansas and Kentucky are the only states with Democratic governors to enact major election reforms, although Nevada saw passage of a modest new law. The Kansas law came only after a veto override.

In most states that acted, a clear partisan divide opened over election reforms, with Republicans backing them and Democrats opposed.

“I think it’s a hopeful sign because I think it finally, maybe, will show that many of the opponents in the political ranks are realizing that the lies they are telling about voter ID aren’t working,” von Spakovsky said of states with Democratic governors.

“Given that the American people overwhelmingly support [voter] ID, that they better finally get onboard and go with what the American people think is a good idea,” he said.

Here is an overview of state election reforms passed so far this year:

Alabama

A new Alabama law prohibits curbside voting and requires that applications for absentee ballots be received no less than 10 days before Election Day.

Arkansas

A new Arkansas law requires voters who cast provisional ballots to show ID by noon on the Monday after Election Day. These voters previously had only to sign a sworn statement.

A separate law puts stricter limits on ballot harvesting, the practice in which political operatives distribute and collect large quantities of absentee ballots. It also prohibits election officials from distributing unsolicited applications for absentee ballots.

Arizona

One new Arizona law requires the secretary of state to compare death records with a statewide voter registration database. Another law enhances the security of voting machines.

The Grand Canyon State also joined a trend among states by banning private money to pay for election administration. The move largely was in response to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s donating $350 million to election offices across the United States last year.

Another new Arizona law will remove the names of inactive voters from an early-voting list if they have not voted in two consecutive election cycles. And a fourth law requires voters to sign the envelope in which they submit an absentee ballot.

Florida

A new Florida law restricts ballot harvesting byallowing someone to collect absentee ballots from immediate family members, but no more than two ballots from others.

Besides banning private funding of election administration, the law requires voters to request an absentee ballot in order to receive one. It also increases security for ballot drop boxes, which debuted in the 2020 election because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Georgia

A Georgia law, among the most controversial in prompting protests, requires voter ID to cast an absentee ballot. Opponents falsely claimed the restriction amounted to “Jim Crow 2.0.”

The law establishes guidelines for ballot drop boxes, aims to shorten lines at polling places, and gives a State Election Board more oversight over county election administration.

The measure also prohibits political operatives from offering food, bottled water, or anything of value within 150 feet of polls. Only New York and Montana have similar provisions related to offering food and water in voting lines.

Idaho

Idaho is among states that responded to Zuckerberg’s big spending on election administration through the left-leaning Center for Tech and Civic Life, which distributed the money.

The Idaho Legislature passed and Gov. Brad Little, a Republican, signed SB 1168, which requires that all state elections be funded only by appropriations from federal, state, or local government entities.

Indiana

Indiana’s SB 398 prohibits local election jurisdictions from accepting or spending funds that come from private donors for the purpose of running elections. In response to the Zuckerberg donations, the new law specifies only federal, state, and local government money may be used to administer elections.

“A number of states banned private funding of election officials, election offices, which I think was something that happened in the last election [and was] unprecedented—“Zuckerbucks”—[and] raised enormous conflicts of interest and ethical problems for election officials,” von Spakovsky said.

“They have now banned that, which is a good thing,” he added. “No private party, no political candidate, should be able to give money to local election offices in a way that might influence and manipulate the outcome of the election.”

Iowa

A new law in Iowa, a battleground state in recent presidential elections, requires absentee ballots to arrive at election offices by the close of Election Day to be counted.

The measure also allows fewer early-voting days, dropping the total from 29 to 20.

Kansas

A new law in Kansas curbs ballot harvesting by limiting to 10 the number of ballots one person may return to an election office.

The Republican-controlled Legislature voted in May to override a veto of the measure by Gov. Laura Kelly, a Democrat.

Kentucky

Kentucky’s new law increases security for absentee ballots and requires a paper trail for voting machines. It also sets up an online portal for absentee ballot requests and adds three days to in-person early voting, up from the previous 19-day limit.

Gov. Andy Beshear, a Democrat, signed HB 574, which was passed by the Republican-controlled General Assembly.

Louisiana

Louisiana’s new law, known as HB 167, establishes a procedure for election officials to remove dead voters from registration rolls within 30 days of receipt of a death certificate.

Montana

One new Montana law requires voters at the polls to present either a state driver’s license, a tribal photo identification card, a state ID card number, or a military ID.

Other new laws in Montana close voter registration at noon the day before an election, restrict paid ballot collectors, and allow local election officials to reduce hours at polling locations with fewer than 400 registered voters who will cast ballots in person, as long as other polling places are open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Nevada

A measure signed into law by Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak, a Democrat, increases the maximum size of an election precinct from 3,000 to 5,000 registered voters.

New Hampshire

A new law in New Hampshire, the only New England state to pass election reforms this year, requires the secretary of state to provide information on matches of death records against voter checklists.

Another law requires that those who register to vote on Election Day by using a voter affidavit or sworn statement must also have a photo taken beforehand. The Brennan Center claims the measure is among those that “restricts access to vote.”

Oklahoma

A new law in Oklahoma sets a 30-day limit for a county election board to remove dead voters from its registration list. Another law both expands early in-person voting and requires applications for absentee ballots to be received no later than 5 p.m. on the third Monday preceding an election.

A third Oklahoma law allows the State Election Board to participate in multistate organizations that maintain voter lists, such as the nonprofit Electronic Registration Information Center.

Texas

The new Texas law extends early voting hours, prohibits election clerks from mailing out an application for an absentee ballot unless a voter requests one, and bans “drive-through” voting. The measure also requires voter ID for mail-in ballots and safeguards for poll watchers.

The law also requires the Texas secretary of state to use specifics on a driver’s license to “verify the accuracy of citizenship status information previously provided on voter registration applications.”

Utah

Utah’s new law, known as HB 12, requires that the names of dead voters be removed from rolls and assigns the state’s lieutenant governor to enforce it.

The Brennan Center described the law and others removing dead people from voter rolls as a “purge.”

Wyoming

A new Wyoming law requires voters to show ID to vote in person. Acceptable forms of identification include a driver’s license, a state or tribal ID, a passport, a military ID, or one from a Wyoming public school, university, or community college.

Have an opinion about this article? To sound off, please email letters@DailySignal.com and we’ll consider publishing your edited remarks in our regular “We Hear You” feature. Remember to include the URL or headline of the article plus your name and town and/or state.

7 Ways the 2005 Carter-Baker Report Could Have Averted Problems With 2020 Election

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Joe Manchin “Why I Won’t Support Spending Another $3.5 Trillion” BUT WILL HE GIVE IN TO PRESSURE FROM DEMOCRATIC LEADERSHIP?

I personally think there is about a 80% chance ultimately Joe Manchin will support some kind of compromise bill the Democrats come up with, but I do like a lot of what he is saying now:

Why I Won’t Support Spending Another $3.5 Trillion

Amid inflation, debt and the inevitability of future crises, Congress needs to take a strategic pause.

PHOTO: GETTY IMAGES

The nation faces an unprecedented array of challenges and will inevitably encounter additional crises in the future. Yet some in Congress have a strange belief there is an infinite supply of money to deal with any current or future crisis, and that spending trillions upon trillions will have no negative consequence for the future. I disagree.

An overheating economy has imposed a costly “inflation tax” on every middle- and working-class American. At $28.7 trillion and growing, the nation’s debt has reached record levels. Over the past 18 months, we’ve spent more than $5 trillion responding to the coronavirus pandemic. Now Democratic congressional leaders propose to pass the largest single spending bill in history with no regard to rising inflation, crippling debt or the inevitability of future crises. Ignoring the fiscal consequences of our policy choices will create a disastrous future for the next generation of Americans.

Those who believe such concerns are overstated should ask themselves: What do we do if the pandemic gets worse under the next viral mutation? What do we do if there is a financial crisis like the one that led to the Great Recession? What if we face a terrorist attack or major international conflict? How will America respond to such crises if we needlessly spend trillions of dollars today?

Instead of rushing to spend trillions on new government programs and additional stimulus funding, Congress should hit a strategic pause on the budget-reconciliation legislation. A pause is warranted because it will provide more clarity on the trajectory of the pandemic, and it will allow us to determine whether inflation is transitory or not. While some have suggested this reconciliation legislation must be passed now, I believe that making budgetary decisions under artificial political deadlines never leads to good policy or sound decisions. I have always said if I can’t explain it, I can’t vote for it, and I can’t explain why my Democratic colleagues are rushing to spend $3.5 trillion.

Another reason to pause: We must allow for a complete reporting and analysis of the implications a multitrillion-dollar bill will have for this generation and the next. Such a strategic pause will allow every member of Congress to use the transparent committee process to debate: What should we fund, and what can we simply not afford?

I, for one, won’t support a $3.5 trillion bill, or anywhere near that level of additional spending, without greater clarity about why Congress chooses to ignore the serious effects inflation and debt have on existing government programs. This is even more important now as the Social Security and Medicare Trustees have sounded the alarmthat these life-saving programs will be insolvent and benefits could start to be reduced as soon as 2026 for Medicare and 2033, a year earlier than previously projected, for Social Security.

Establishing an artificial $3.5 trillion spending number and then reverse-engineering the partisan social priorities that should be funded isn’t how you make good policy. Undoubtedly some will argue that bold social-policy action must be taken now. While I share the belief that we should help those who need it the most, we must also be honest about the present economic reality.

Inflation continues to rise and is bleeding the value of Americans’ wages and income. More than 10.1 million jobs remain open. Our economy, as the Biden administration has correctly pointed out, has reached record levels of quarterly growth. This positive economic reality makes clear that the purpose of the proposed $3.5 trillion in new spending isn’t to solve urgent problems, but to re-envision America’s social policies. While my fellow Democrats will disagree, I believe that spending trillions more dollars not only ignores present economic reality, but makes it certain that America will be fiscally weakened when it faces a future recession or national emergency.

In 2017, my Republican friends used the privileged legislative procedure of budget reconciliation to rush through a partisan tax bill that added more than $1 trillion to the national debt and put investors ahead of workers. Then, Democrats rightfully criticized this budgetary tactic. Now, my Democratic friends want to use this same budgetary tactic to push through sweeping legislation to make “historic investments.” Respectfully, it was wrong when the Republicans did it, and it is wrong now. If we want to invest in America, a goal I support, then let’s take the time to get it right and determine what is absolutely necessary.

Many in Washington have convinced themselves we can add trillions of dollars more to our nearly $29 trillion national debt with no repercussions. Regardless of political party, elected leaders are sent to Washington to make tough decisions and not simply go along to get along.

For those who will dismiss my unwillingness to support a $3.5 trillion bill as political posturing, I hope they heed the powerful words of Adm. Mike Mullen, a former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, who called debt the biggest threat to national security. His comments echoed the fear and concern I’ve heard from many economic experts I’ve personally met with.

At a time of intense political and policy divisions, it would serve us well to remember that members of Congress swear allegiance to this nation and fidelity to its Constitution, not to a political party. By placing a strategic pause on this budgetary proposal, by significantly reducing the size of any possible reconciliation bill to only what America can afford and needs to spend, we can and will build a better and stronger nation for all our families.

Mr. Manchin, a Democrat, is a U.S. senator from West Virginia.

Free To Choose – Milton Friedman on The Welfare System (1978) | Thomas S…

National Debt Set to Skyrocket

Everyone wants to know more about the budget and here is some key information with a chart from the Heritage Foundation and a video from the Cato Institute.

In the past, wars and the Great Depression contributed to rapid but temporary increases in the national debt. Over the next few decades, runaway spending on MedicareMedicaid, and Social Security will drive the debt to unsustainable levels.

PERCENTAGE OF GDP

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National Debt Set to Skyrocket

Source: Heritage Foundation calculations based on data from the U.S. Department of the Treasury, Institute for the Measurement of Worth, Congressional Budget Office, and White House Office of Management and Budget.

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In Depth

  • Policy Papers for Researchers

  • Technical Notes

    The charts in this book are based primarily on data available as of March 2011 from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and the Congressional Budget Office (CBO). The charts using OMB data display the historical growth of the federal government to 2010 while the charts using CBO data display both historical and projected growth from as early as 1940 to 2084. Projections based on OMB data are taken from the White House Fiscal Year 2012 budget. The charts provide data on an annual basis except… Read More

  • Authors

    Emily GoffResearch Assistant
    Thomas A. Roe Institute for Economic Policy StudiesKathryn NixPolicy Analyst
    Center for Health Policy StudiesJohn FlemingSenior Data Graphics Editor