Category Archives: Current Events

MUSIC MONDAY George Harrison – All Things Must Pass (SONG)

__

The Beatles – All Things Must Pass (Full Band Demo – 1969)

Uploaded on Jun 16, 2011

The Beatles performing “All Things Must Pass”, the George Harrison classic in 1968 during the Get Back / Let It Be sessions, 1969.

____________

George Harrison – All Things Must Pass (Live – 1997 on VH1 – HQ Audio)

Uploaded on Nov 2, 2011

George Harrison’s legendary impromptu performance of “All Things Must Pass” on VH1 in 1997, George’s last live performance before his death. The audio has been cleaned up and is high quality.

Paul McCartney – All things must pass (Concert For George)(HQ)

George Harrison – All Things Must Pass

All Things Must Pass (song)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
“All Things Must Pass”
ATMP juke.jpg

2001 jukebox single, “My Sweet Lord (2000)“/”All Things Must Pass”
Song by George Harrison from the album All Things Must Pass
Published Harrisongs
Released 27 November 1970
Genre Folk rock
Length 3:47
Label Apple
Writer(s) George Harrison
Producer(s) George Harrison, Phil Spector
All Things Must Pass track listing

All Things Must Pass” is a song by English musician George Harrison, issued in November 1970 as the title track to his triple album of the same name. Billy Preston released the song originally – as “All Things (Must) Pass” – on his Apple Records album Encouraging Words (1970), after the Beatles had rejected it for inclusion on their Let It Be album in January 1969. The composition reflects the influence of the Band‘s sound and communal music-making on Harrison, after he had spent time with the group in Woodstock, New York, in late 1968, while Timothy Leary‘s poem “All Things Pass”, a psychedelic adaptation of the Tao Te Ching, provided inspiration for his song lyrics.

The subject matter deals with the transient nature of human existence, and in Harrison’s All Things Must Pass reading, words and music combine to reflect impressions of optimism against fatalism. On release, together with Barry Feinstein‘s album cover image, commentators viewed the song as a statement on the Beatles’ break-up. Widely regarded as one of Harrison’s finest compositions, its rejection by his former band has provoked comment from biographers and reviewers. Music critic Ian MacDonald described “All Things Must Pass” as “the wisest song never recorded by The Beatles”,[1] while author Simon Leng considers it “perhaps the greatest solo Beatle composition”.[2] The recording was co-produced by Phil Spector in London; it features an orchestral arrangement by John Barham and contributions from musicians such as Ringo Starr, Pete Drake, Bobby Whitlock, Eric Clapton and Klaus Voormann.

Although the Beatles failed to formally record the song, a 1969 solo demo by Harrison appears on their compilation Anthology 3 (1996). An early version from the All Things Must Pass sessions was released on Harrison’s posthumous compilation Early Takes: Volume 1 in 2012. Paul McCartney performed “All Things Must Pass” at the Concert for George tribute in November 2002, a year after Harrison’s death. Jim James, the Waterboys, Klaus Voormann and Yusuf Islam, and Sloan Wainwright are among the other artists who have covered the song.

Background[edit]

The Band in Woodstock in 1969, with Levon Helm (centre) and Robbie Robertson (second from right)

Like his friend Eric Clapton, George Harrison was inspired by Music from Big Pink, the seminal debut album[3] from the Band, the former backing group for Bob Dylan.[4][5] Released in July 1968, Music from Big Pink was partly responsible for Harrison’s return to the guitar, his first instrument,[6] after he had spent two years attempting to master the more complex Indian sitar.[7][8] Harrison duly shared his enthusiasm with the British music press, declaring Big Pinkthe new sound to come from America”, drummer Levon Helm later recalled, thus helping to establish the Band internationally.[9] In appreciation, Robbie Robertson, the Band’s guitarist, extended an invitation to Harrison to stop by in Woodstock, New York, when the opportunity arose.[10]

I respected the Band enormously. All the different guys in the group sang, and Robbie Robertson used to say he was lucky, because he could write songs for a voice like Levon [Helm]’s. What a wise and generous attitude.[11]

– George Harrison to Musician magazine, 1987

Late in 1968, after producing sessions in Los Angeles for a solo album by Apple Records signing Jackie Lomax,[12] Harrison spent Thanksgiving and much of December in upstate New York,[13] where he renewed his friendship with a now semi-retired Dylan and took part in informal jam sessions with the Band.[1][14]According to Helm, they discussed making a possible “fireside jam” album with Clapton and an Apple Films “rock western” called Zachariah, but neither project progressed beyond the planning stage.[9] The bucolic surroundings proved fruitful for Harrison as a songwriter, producing his first collaboration with Dylan, “I’d Have You Anytime“,[15] and leading him to write “All Things Must Pass”.[16][17] He later described the latter song as a “Robbie Robertson–Band type of tune”,[18]and said that he always imagined it being sung by Helm.[19]

Composition[edit]

While discussing “All Things Must Pass” with music journalist Timothy White in 1987, Harrison recalled that his “starting point” for the composition was Robertson’s “The Weight” – a song that had “a religious and a country feeling to it”.[11] Musically, the verses of “All Things Must Pass” are set to a logical climb within the key of E;[20] the brief choruses form a departure from this, with their inclusion of a B minor chord rather than the more expected major voicing. Author Ian Inglis notes that the composition incorporates the same “modes, cadences and suspensions” found in Band songs such as “The Weight” and “The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down“.[21]

For his lyrics, Harrison drew inspiration from “All Things Pass”, a poem published in Timothy Leary‘s 1966 book Psychedelic Prayers after the Tao Te Ching.[16][22][nb 1] In his 1980 autobiography, I Me Mine, Harrison refers to the idea for the song originating from “all kinds of mystics and ex-mystics”, including Leary.[18] Like later Harrison compositions such as “Here Comes the Sun“, “So Sad” and “Blow Away“, the lyrical and emotional content is based around metaphors involving the weather and the cycle of nature.[25] Harrison states in the opening lines of verse one: “Sunrise doesn’t last all morning / A cloudburst doesn’t last all day“.[26]

The Catskill Mountains in upstate New York, surroundings that inspired the music of the Band, and Harrison’s song “All Things Must Pass”

According to Harrison biographer Simon Leng, the lyrics reflect “life’s ephemeral character” and the “transitory” nature of love.[27] Inglis suggests that the song is “[o]stensibly” about “the end of a love affair”.[21] He and theologian Dale Allison note the optimism offered in Harrison’s words,[21][28] since, as Leng puts it, “a new day always dawns.”[27] Although “All Things Must Pass” avoids religiosity, Allison writes that its statement on the “all-inclusive” transience of things in the material world explains why so much of its 1970 parent album, All Things Must Pass, “finds hope and meaning only in God, who does not pass away”.[29] The song’s main message is offered in its middle eight:[30][31]

All things must pass
None of life’s strings can last
So I must be on my way
And face another day.

Ultimately, the cycle of nature offers “consolation”, Leng writes,[30] as further evidenced in the verse-three lines “Now the darkness only stays at night time” and “Daylight is good at arriving at the right time“.[21]

The lyrics underwent some minor changes after Harrison presented the song to the Beatles in January 1969, when they began working at London’s Twickenham Film Studios for the so-called Get Back project (released as the Let It Be album and film).[32] He had initially written the second line of verse two as the more literal “A wind can blow those clouds away“,[33] but bootlegs from the sessions reveal John Lennon suggesting the word “mind” to introduce a bit of “psychedelia” into the song.[34] Similarly, the repeated line “it’s not always gonna be this grey” was originally “It’s not always been this grey” in verses one and two.[35]

Pre-All Things Must Pass recording history[edit]

The Beatles’ Get Back rehearsals[edit]

“All Things Must Pass”
Song by the Beatles from the album Anthology 3
Published Harrisongs
Released 28 October 1996
Recorded 25 February 1969
Abbey Road Studios, London
Genre Folk rock
Length 3:05
Label Apple
Writer(s) George Harrison
Producer(s) George Harrison

In contrast with the creative equality he enjoyed with Dylan and the Band in Woodstock,[36][37] Harrison returned to the Beatles fold and found the same discordant atmosphere that had blighted the White Album sessions in 1968.[5][38] Early on during the Get Back rehearsals – and tellingly, music journalist John Harris notes, before the arrival that day of Lennon and his partner Yoko Ono – Harrison enthused with fellow Beatles Ringo Starr and Paul McCartney about the Band’s camaraderie and group ethos, saying: “They’re just living, and they happen to be a band as well.”[39]

I got back to England for Christmas and then … we were to start on the thing which turned into Let It Be. And straight away, again, it was just weird vibes. You know, I found I was starting to be able to enjoy being a musician, but the moment I got back with the Beatles it was just too difficult.[13]

– Harrison to Crawdaddy, 1977

On 2 January, day one of the Twickenham film shoot,[40] Harrison introduced “All Things Must Pass”, and the band worked on the song intermittently over the next four days of filming.[41][42] In the search for a suitable musical arrangement, Harrison stressed his preference for a “feel” akin to the Band, a suggestion that resulted in Lennon switching from guitar to Lowrey organ, a keyboard favoured by the Band’s Garth Hudson.[43] During the Twickenham rehearsals, the Beatles also discussed the idea of Harrison performing “All Things Must Pass” solo for inclusion in the proposed film.[44]

They returned to the song briefly towards the end of January, by which time the project had moved location to their own Apple Studio, in central London[32] – one of Harrison’s conditions for rejoining the Beatles after his temporary walkout on 10 January.[3][45] Although the band gave a fair amount of time to “All Things Must Pass”, it was ultimately pushed aside,[46] just as other Harrison compositions including “Old Brown Shoe“, “Isn’t It a Pity“, “Let It Down” and “I Me Mine” received a lukewarm reception,[47][48] particularly from Lennon.[49][50] David Fricke of Rolling Stone has referred to this period as a “struggle” for Harrison “against the patronizing restrictions of writing within and for the Beatles”.[51] Doug Sulpy and Ray Schweighardt, authors of Get Back: The Unauthorized Chronicle of The Beatles’ Let It Be Disaster, observe that Lennon and McCartney routinely rejected Harrison’s songs, “even though some were far better than their own”.[52]

The Beatles never formally recorded “All Things Must Pass”,[32] and only rehearsal takes circulate on bootleg compilations from the sessions.[53] The Fly on the Wall bonus disc accompanying the McCartney-instigated Let It Be… Naked album (2003) includes a snippet of the Beatles indulging in some Band-like chorusing on the song.[54]

Harrison’s solo demo[edit]

During the Beatles’ Apple Studio session on 28 January,[55] Harrison talked with Lennon and Ono about possibly doing a solo album of his unused songs, in order to “preserve this, the Beatle bit, more”.[56] Lennon offered his support for the idea.[56] While author Bruce Spizer has suggested that Lennon was keen to “spare” the band from having to work on Harrison’s songs,[57] Sulpy and Schweighardt consider that Lennon’s enthusiasm was because such a solo project would allow him and Ono to continue their own recording activities “without causing friction within The Beatles”.[55][nb 2]

On 25 February 1969, his 26th birthday, Harrison entered Abbey Road Studios alone and recorded a demo of the song, along with other recent compositions “Old Brown Shoe” and “Something“.[59][60] With Ken Scott serving as engineer,[1] he recorded two takes of “All Things Must Pass”, adding extra electric guitar onto the second.[32][61] This version was eventually released in 1996 on the Beatles’ outtake collection Anthology 3.[32]

Billy Preston’s version[edit]

“All Things (Must) Pass”
Song by Billy Preston from the album Encouraging Words
Published Harrisongs
Released 11 September 1970 (UK)
9 November 1970 (US)
Genre Soul
Length 3:38
Label Apple
Writer(s) George Harrison
Producer(s) George Harrison, Billy Preston

Soon after Harrison had begun talking publicly about making a solo album, during the final months of 1969,[62][63] he offered “All Things Must Pass”, along with the more recent “My Sweet Lord“, to Billy Preston for the latter’s album Encouraging Words.[64][65] Through Harrison’s invitation,[66] Preston had played keyboards for the Beatles once the Get Back/Let It Be sessions resumed at Apple Studio,[32][67] where the 22-year-old Texan had impressed with his superior musicianship and convivial presence.[68][69] Preston was soon offered a recording deal with Apple Records,[70] Encouraging Words being the second album under the contract.[71][72]

Co-produced by Harrison, Preston’s reading of “All Things Must Pass” betrays an obvious debt to his former mentor, Ray Charles.[73] While Harrison’s later recording is generally viewed as the definitive version,[74] Bruce Eder of AllMusic considers this treatment of the song the superior of the two.[75] Preston’s version appeared in September 1970,[76] five months after the Beatles’ break-up.[77]

All Things Must Pass recording[edit]

While completing his production on Preston’s release,[78] Harrison chose to record the song himself for what became the title track of his post-Beatles solo debut, the triple album All Things Must Pass.[79] In describing “All Things Must Pass” as a “haunting hymn about the mortality of everything”, author Elliot Huntley notes the added poignance in Harrison’s version, due to the death of his mother in July 1970 after a long period of illness.[80]

With Phil Spector as his co-producer, Harrison taped the basic track at Abbey Road Studios between 26 May and early in June.[81] Other participants included Clapton, German bassist Klaus Voormann and Starr, the latter another avowed Band fan.[82] Leng credits the song’s piano part to Bobby Whitlock, who also sang backing vocals with Clapton,[27] his future bandmate in Derek and the Dominos.[83] In his 2010 autobiography, Whitlock states that it was Preston who played the piano on “All Things Must Pass”, while his own contribution was pump organ, or harmonium.[84][nb 3] Although Leng lists both Harrison and Clapton as having played acoustic guitar and Starr and Jim Gordon on drums,[27]according to the personnel that Whitlock offers, neither Clapton nor Gordon played on the song.[87] Among the overdubs on the track, Nashville session musician Pete Drake recorded a pedal-steel guitar part during a brief visit to London,[88] to participate in sessions for Harrison songs such as “Behind That Locked Door” and “I Live for You“.[89][nb 4]

I’d play it to them and they’d say, “Wow, yeah! Great song!” And I’d say, “Really? Do you really like it?” I realised that it was okay …[91]

– Harrison discussing the reception his compositions received during the album sessions

Spector’s erratic behaviour[92] during the All Things Must Pass sessions left Harrison to handle most of the project alone,[93][94] but in August 1970, after receiving a tape of Harrison’s early mixes of the songs, Spector provided him with written feedback and guidance.[27] Spector wrote of “All Things Must Pass”, “This particular song is so good that any honest [vocal] performance by you is acceptable as far as I’m concerned”,[27] but he expressed his disapproval of the horns at the start of the track.[74] In the words of authors Chip Madinger and Mark Easter, “clearer heads prevailed” and Jim Price and Bobby Keys‘ horn parts were retained.[74]

The recording opens with “unvaryingly steady” piano chords, Inglis writes,[21] and what Leng terms “sensitive” string orchestration from John Barham,[27] soon joined by the horns and Drake’s pedal steel.[32] Leng highlights this combination as providing the song with its rising and falling musical moods, implying variously light and darkness;[27] Inglis writes of the musical arrangement mirroring the “competing impressions” of hope and melancholy found in Harrison’s lyrics.[21] True to its Catskill roots, the recording evokes the Band’s “The Weight”[74][95] and their eponymous second album,[96] the tracks on which were similarly inspired by “the beauty of that autumn in Woodstock”, according to Helm.[97][nb 5]

Release and album artwork[edit]

The song’s title and message provided inspiration for Barry Feinstein‘s cover photo for All Things Must Pass

Almost two years after Harrison wrote the song, “All Things Must Pass” was released in November 1970,[48] closing side three of the triple album in its original LP format.[99] Despite its high retail price, All Things Must Pass was a major commercial success,[100][101] comfortably outselling concurrent solo releases by Lennon and McCartney.[94][102][nb 6]

The song’s title was invariably seen as a statement on the demise of the Beatles,[21][104] as commentators viewed the album as Harrison’s liberation from the artistic constraints imposed on him within the band.[105][106] The album’s cover image, showing Harrison seated on his Friar Park lawn surrounded by four reclining garden gnomes – thought to represent the Beatles – was also viewed as reflecting this theme.[107] While commenting that “All Things Must Pass” had “accrue[d] new layers of relevance” during the album’s creation, particularly with the death of Harrison’s mother, former Mojo editor Paul Du Noyer writes: “Nobody in November 1970 could have mistaken the title’s significance … As if to cement the association of ideas, the wry cover picture has George in solitary splendour, surrounded by a quartet of gnomes.”[108] In a 2001 interview, photographer Barry Feinstein admitted that the words “All Things Must Pass” had helped inspire his set-up for the photo, saying: “What else could it be? … [It] was over with The Beatles, right? And that title … Very symbolic.”[104]

Reception and legacy[edit]

On release, Ben Gerson of Rolling Stone described “All Things Must Pass” as “eloquently hopeful and resigned” while labelling the album “the music of mountain tops and vast horizons”.[109] Beatles Forever author Nicholas Schaffner noted in 1977, with reference to Harrison’s commercial and critical dominance over his former bandmates following the break-up: “The very fact that the Beatles had kept George’s flowering talents so under wraps proved to be his secret weapon.”[110] Schaffner named “All Things Must Pass” and “Beware of Darkness” as the two “most eloquent” songs on All Things Must Pass, “musically as well as lyrically”, with “mysterious, seductive melodies, over which faded strings and horns hover like Blue Jay Way fog”.[111]

Writing for Rolling Stone in 2000, Anthony DeCurtis praised the song for its musical demonstration of “the sweet satisfactions of faith”.[106] On a triple album where “nearly every song is excellent”, AllMusic picks “All Things Must Pass” as one of five standout tracks (or AMG track picks),[112] with Richie Unterberger writing of its autumnal theme: “It’s the kind of song that fits the mood in November, when the trees are getting stripped bare of their leaves, the days are getting shorter and colder, and you have to resign yourself to knowing it’s going to be tougher and tougher in those regards for months, also knowing that those hardships will pass away come springtime.”[113] In his book on Harrison, subtitled A Spiritual Biography, Gary Tillery refers to the song as “magisterial” and a “majestic title track” that “leaves even the shallowest listener contemplative”.[114] Michael Gallucci of Ultimate Classic Rock places “All Things Must Pass” third on his list of Harrison’s best solo songs (behind the two hit singles from All Things Must Pass, “My Sweet Lord” and “What Is Life“), and comments: “The album’s title track takes on more poignancy after Harrison’s death [in 2001], but it’s always been great.”[115] Writing for Rough Guides, Chris Ingham similarly describes the song as “a heart-rending piece of significant prescience which seems to take on more poignancy with every passing year”.[116]

Among Harrison’s biographers, Simon Leng considers “All Things Must Pass” a “classic of Harrison’s lyrical ambiguity, in essence a hopeful song, without sounding so”, with a lyric that “approaches Bob Dylan standard”.[117] Ian Inglis also praises the lyrics, writing: “The song contains some of Harrison’s most insightful and pensive words. ‘Daylight is good at arriving at the right time’ is a fine example of his … ability to position the profound within the commonplace.”[21] Elliot Huntley rates it as one of Harrison’s “most beautiful” songs, “if not the very best”, and suggests that the sentiments behind “All Things Must Pass” would have made it a “fitting conclusion” to the final album recorded by the Beatles, Abbey Road (1969).[80]

Bruce Spizer similarly rates “All Things Must Pass” a highlight of Harrison’s career,[32] while Leng considers it “perhaps the greatest solo Beatle composition” of all.[2] In his book Revolution in the Head, Ian MacDonald describes “All Things Must Pass” as “the wisest song never recorded by The Beatles”.[1] In 2009, The Guardian included the track in its list of “1000 Songs Everyone Must Hear”.[118]

Performance and later releases[edit]

“All Things Must Pass” was not a track that Harrison ever played in concert,[119] although it appeared on his preliminary setlist for the 1971 Concert for Bangladesh shows.[120] He twice performed the song live in front of TV cameras during the final years of his life,[121] beginning with his appearance with Ravi Shankar on VH1‘s Hard Rock Live, filmed in New York on 14 May 1997.[122][123] The pair were on the show to promote their recent collaboration, Chants of India,[123] but at host John Fugelsang‘s urging, Harrison accepted an acoustic guitar and performed a brief rendition of “All Things Must Pass”.[124][125][nb 7] In late 2000, Harrison sang “All Things Must Pass” while again seated on a stool on Friar Park’s main lawn, a performance that was included in the press kit for All Things Must Passs 30th anniversary reissue early the following year.[127][128][nb 8]

Coinciding with this 2001 reissue, the song appeared on a promotional single as the B-side to “My Sweet Lord (2000)“.[130][131] After being omitted from the “cursory” selection of 1970–75 tracks on The Best of George Harrison (1976), Inglis writes, the song appeared on Harrison’s 2009 career-spanning compilation Let It Roll.[132]

In Martin Scorsese‘s 2011 documentary George Harrison: Living in the Material World, “All Things Must Pass” is the first song featured in the movie, played over footage of German air raids over Britain during World War II.[133][134] In November that year, a 1970-recorded demo of the song (featuring just Harrison, Starr and Voormann) appeared on the deluxe edition CD accompanying the British DVD release of the film;[135][136] this CD was subsequently issued worldwide in May 2012 as Early Takes: Volume 1.[137]

Cover versions[edit]

Steve Wood and Daniel May composed music to the 1998 documentary film Everest incorporating melodies from some of George Harrison’s songs, one of which was “All Things Must Pass”.[138] At the Concert for George tribute to Harrison, held at London’s Royal Albert Hall on 29 November 2002, Paul McCartney sang “All Things Must Pass”,[2] backed by a large band that included Preston, Clapton, Voormann and Starr.[139] Leng notes the irony in McCartney performing the song,[2] while Beatles biographer Peter Doggett comments: “it wasn’t hard to imagine Harrison’s cynicism as McCartney led the band into a soulful rendition of ‘All Things Must Pass’ – one of the songs that the other Beatles had refused to take seriously in January 1969.”[140] According to Clapton, author Robert Rodriguez writes, McCartney “was humbled at having to relearn it”.[141]

Several other artists have recorded “All Things Must Pass” in the years since Harrison’s death. In 2003, Bobby Whitlock and his wife, CoCo Carmel, included the song on their acoustic live album Other Assorted Love Songs, Live from Whitney Chapel.[142] Jazz guitarist Joel Harrison covered “All Things Must Pass” on his album Harrison on Harrison: Jazz Explanations of George Harrison, released in October 2005.[143] In 2007, a live version by the Waterboys appeared on their CD single “Everybody Takes a Tumble”,[144]and the following year Sloan Wainwright included a cover of the song on her album Rediscovery.[145]

“All Things Must Pass” was among the Harrison compositions covered by Jim James on his Tribute To EP, recorded in December 2001 but not released until August 2009.[146] Also in 2009, Klaus Voormann released a version of the song on his solo album A Sideman’s Journey,[147] with Yusuf Islam on vocals and acoustic guitar.[148][149]

Personnel[edit]

The musicians who performed on Harrison’s All Things Must Pass version of the song are believed to be as follows:[27]

Notes[edit]

  1. Jump up^ Harrison had already adapted a passage from the Tao Te Ching, a Chinese classic text, in his 1968 B-side for the Beatles, “The Inner Light“.[23] This had come at the suggestion of Cambridge academic Juan Mascaró, who had been moved by Harrison’s lyrics to another of his Indian-inspired compositions, “Within You, Without You“.[24]
  2. Jump up^ By this point, Harrison had already released the largely instrumental soundtrack album Wonderwall Music, which was soon followed by Lennon and Ono’s experimental work Two Virgins.[58]
  3. Jump up^ Alternatively, Harrison said in 1971 that American musician Gary Wright had “played piano on the whole [All Things Must Pass] album”.[85]Leng concedes the difficulty in ascertaining precise musicians’ credits for each track and names Wright and Whitlock as the two “core” keyboard players on the sessions.[86]
  4. Jump up^ Whitlock recalls that originally he had whistled a melody, which Spector recorded onto the basic track, and that this served as a guide for Drake’s contribution.[90]
  5. Jump up^ Leng identifies the Band’s minimalist tradition as a significant influence on other All Things Must Pass songs, particularly “Run of the Mill” and “Behind That Locked Door”.[98]
  6. Jump up^ As of 2011, it remained the most successful album by any of the former Beatles.[103]
  7. Jump up^ Although 150 minutes of Harrison and Shankar’s appearance was filmed, VH1 originally aired only 22 minutes of footage, on 24 July, as George & Ravi – Yin & Yang.[124] Omitted from the broadcast but also performed by Harrison was the Traveling Wilburys tune “If You Belonged to Me” and “Any Road“, a track subsequently released on his posthumous album Brainwashed (2002).[124][126]
  8. Jump up^ On the day after Harrison’s death was publicly announced, the quirky, Terry Gilliam-inspired graphics on Harrison’s website, allthingsmustpass.com, were changed to show just a single gnome and the lyrics to “All Things Must Pass”.[129]

Sources[edit]

  • Dale C. Allison Jr., The Love There That’s Sleeping: The Art and Spirituality of George Harrison, Continuum (New York, NY, 2006; ISBN 978-0-8264-1917-0).
  • Keith Badman, The Beatles Diary Volume 2: After the Break-Up 1970–2001, Omnibus Press (London, 2001; ISBN 0-7119-8307-0).
  • Harry Castleman & Walter J. Podrazik, All Together Now: The First Complete Beatles Discography 1961–1975, Ballantine Books (New York, NY, 1976; ISBN 0-345-25680-8).
  • Alan Clayson, George Harrison, Sanctuary (London, 2003; ISBN 1-86074-489-3).
  • Peter Doggett, You Never Give Me Your Money: The Beatles After the Breakup, It Books (New York, NY, 2011; ISBN 978-0-06-177418-8).
  • The Editors of Rolling Stone, Harrison, Rolling Stone Press/Simon & Schuster (New York, NY, 2002; ISBN 0-7432-3581-9).
  • Joshua M. Greene, Here Comes the Sun: The Spiritual and Musical Journey of George Harrison, John Wiley & Sons (Hoboken, NJ, 2006; ISBN 978-0-470-12780-3).
  • John Harris, “A Quiet Storm”, Mojo, July 2001, pp. 66–74.
  • George Harrison, I Me Mine, Chronicle Books (San Francisco, CA, 2002; ISBN 0-8118-3793-9).
  • Olivia Harrison, George Harrison: Living in the Material World, Abrams (New York, NY, 2011; ISBN 978-1-4197-0220-4).
  • Levon Helm (with Stephen Davis), This Wheel’s on Fire: Levon Helm and the Story of The Band, A Cappella Books (Chicago, IL, 2000; ISBN 978-1-55652-405-9).
  • Mark Hertsgaard, A Day in the Life: The Music and Artistry of the Beatles, Pan Books (London, 1996; ISBN 0-330-33891-9).
  • Elliot J. Huntley, Mystical One: George Harrison – After the Break-up of the Beatles, Guernica Editions (Toronto, ON, 2006; ISBN 1-55071-197-0).
  • Chris Ingham, The Rough Guide to the Beatles, Rough Guides/Penguin (London, 2006; 2nd edn; ISBN 978-1-84836-525-4).
  • Ian Inglis, The Words and Music of George Harrison, Praeger (Santa Barbara, CA, 2010; ISBN 978-0-313-37532-3).
  • Peter Lavezzoli, The Dawn of Indian Music in the West, Continuum (New York, NY, 2006; ISBN 0-8264-2819-3).
  • Simon Leng, While My Guitar Gently Weeps: The Music of George Harrison, Hal Leonard (Milwaukee, WI, 2006; ISBN 1-4234-0609-5).
  • Ian MacDonald, Revolution in the Head: The Beatles’ Records and the Sixties, Pimlico (London, 1998; ISBN 0-7126-6697-4).
  • Chip Madinger & Mark Easter, Eight Arms to Hold You: The Solo Beatles Compendium, 44.1 Productions (Chesterfield, MO, 2000; ISBN 0-615-11724-4).
  • Barry Miles, The Beatles Diary Volume 1: The Beatles Years, Omnibus Press (London, 2001; ISBN 0-7119-8308-9).
  • Mojo: The Beatles’ Final Years Special Edition, Emap (London, 2003).
  • Robert Rodriguez, Fab Four FAQ 2.0: The Beatles’ Solo Years, 1970–1980, Backbeat Books (Milwaukee, WI, 2010; ISBN 978-1-4165-9093-4).
  • Nicholas Schaffner, The Beatles Forever, McGraw-Hill (New York, NY, 1978; ISBN 0-07-055087-5).
  • Bruce Spizer, The Beatles Solo on Apple Records, 498 Productions (New Orleans, LA, 2005; ISBN 0-9662649-5-9).
  • Doug Sulpy & Ray Schweighardt, Get Back: The Unauthorized Chronicle of The Beatles’ Let It Be Disaster, St. Martin’s Griffin (New York, 1997; ISBN 0-312-19981-3).
  • Gary Tillery, Working Class Mystic: A Spiritual Biography of George Harrison, Quest Books (Wheaton, IL, 2011; ISBN 978-0-8356-0900-5).
  • Bobby Whitlock (with Marc Roberty), Bobby Whitlock: A Rock ‘n’ Roll Autobiography, McFarland (Jefferson, NC, 2010; ISBN 978-0-7864-6190-5).
  • Bob Woffinden, The Beatles Apart, Proteus (London, 1981; ISBN 0-906071-89-5).
  • Kenneth Womack, The Beatles Encyclopedia: Everything Fab Four, ABC-CLIO (Santa Barbara, CA, 2014; ISBN 978-0-313-39171-2).

External links[edit]

Related posts:

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 8 Blue & Lonesome is the album any Rolling Stones fan would have wished for – review Neil McCormick, music critic

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 8 Rolling Stones – Hoo Doo Blues Blue & Lonesome is the album any Rolling Stones fan would have wished for – review 9 Comments Evergreen: The Rolling Stones perform in Cuba earlier this year CREDIT: REX FEATURES Neil McCormick, music critic 22 NOVEMBER 2016 • 12:19PM The Rolling […]

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 7 The Rolling Stones Alexis Petridis’s album of the week The Rolling Stones: Blue & Lonesome review – more alive than they’ve sounded for years

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 7 Rolling Stones – Everybody Knows About My Good Thing The Rolling Stones Alexis Petridis’s album of the week The Rolling Stones: Blue & Lonesome review – more alive than they’ve sounded for years 4/5stars Mick Jagger’s voice and harmonica drive an album of blues covers that returns […]

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 6 Music Review: ‘Blue & Lonesome’ by the Rolling Stones By Gregory Katz | AP November 29

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 6 Rolling Stones – Just Like I Treat You   Music Review: ‘Blue & Lonesome’ by the Rolling Stones By Gregory Katz | AP November 29 The Rolling Stones, “Blue & Lonesome” (Interscope) It shouldn’t be a surprise, really, but still it’s a bit startling to hear just how well […]

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 5 Review: The Rolling Stones make blues magic on ‘Blue & Lonesome’ Maeve McDermott , USATODAY6:07 p.m. EST November 30, 2016

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 5 Rolling Stones – Everybody Knows About My Good Thing Review: The Rolling Stones make blues magic on ‘Blue & Lonesome’ Maeve McDermott , USATODAY6:07 p.m. EST November 30, 2016 (Photo: Frazer Harrison, Getty Images) Before the Rolling Stones were rock icons, before its members turned into sex […]

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 4 Rolling Stones, ‘Blue & Lonesome’: Album Review By Michael Gallucci November 30, 2016 1:34 PM

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 4 Rolling Stones – Little Rain       Rolling Stones, ‘Blue & Lonesome’: Album Review By Michael Gallucci November 30, 2016 1:34 PM Read More: Rolling Stones, ‘Blue & Lonesome’: Album Review | http://ultimateclassicrock.com/rolling-stones-blue-lonesome-review/?trackback=tsmclip The Rolling Stones were never really a thinking band. A shrewd one, for sure, […]

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 3 Rolling Stones – ‘Blue & Lonesome’ Review Barry Nicolson 12:52 pm – Dec 2, 2016

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 3 The Rolling Stones Mick Jagger chats about new album “Blue & Lonesome” on BBC Breakfast 02 Dec 2016 Rolling Stones – I Gotta Go     Rolling Stones – ‘Blue & Lonesome’ Review Barry Nicolson 12:52 pm – Dec 2, 2016 57shares The Stones sound their youngest […]

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 2 Review The Rolling Stones’ new blues album is an amplified death wheeze. And it rules

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 1 Review: The Rolling Stones Reinvigorate the Blues on ‘Blue and Lonesome’ Our take on rock legends’ first LP since 2005

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 1 The Rolling Stones – Ride ‘Em On Down Published on Dec 1, 2016 Taken from Blue & Lonesome, the brand new album out now. Buy it at http://www.rollingstones.com/blueandl…. Directed by François Rousselet http://www.riffrafffilms.tv/video/dir… Produced by Natalie Arnett Riff Raff Films http://www.riffrafffilms.tv http://www.rollingstones.com/http://www.facebook.com/therollingstones http://twitter.com/RollingStoneshttp://www.rollingstones.com/newsletter Rolling Stones […]

MUSIC MONDAY Karen Carpenter’s tragic story

_____________ Carpenters Close To You Karen Carpenter’s tragic story Karen Carpenter’s velvet voice charmed millions in the 70s… but behind the wholesome image she was in turmoil. Desperate to look slim on stage – and above all desperate to please the domineering mother who preferred her brother – she became the first celebrity victim of […]

MUSIC MONDAY The Carpenters!!!

carpenters -We’ve Only Just Begun The Carpenters – Yesterday Once More (INCLUDES LYRICS) The Carpenters – There’s a kind of hush The Carpenters – Greatest Hits Related posts: MUSIC MONDAY Paul McCartney Mull Of Kintyre November 13, 2016 – 10:29 am Paul McCartney Mull Of Kintyre-Original Video-HQ Uploaded on Nov 25, 2011 Paul McCartney Mull Of […]

__

MUSIC MONDAY George Harrison – Behind That Locked Door

__

Behind That Locked Door – Olivia Newton-John (1973)

Behind That Locked Door (George Harrison) – Emotional Version by Norah Jones Live on Conan

George Harrison – Behind That Locked Door – Lyrics

Behind That Locked Door

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
“Behind That Locked Door”
Song by George Harrison from the album All Things Must Pass
Published Harrisongs
Released 27 November 1970
Genre Folk rock, country
Length 3:05
Label Apple
Writer(s) George Harrison
Producer(s) George Harrison, Phil Spector
All Things Must Pass track listing

Behind That Locked Door” is a song by English musician George Harrison, released on his 1970 triple album All Things Must Pass. Harrison wrote the song in August 1969 as a message of encouragement to Bob Dylan, who was making a highly publicised comeback to the concert stage, accompanied by the Band, with a headlining performance at the Isle of Wight Festival. “Behind That Locked Door” is a rare Harrison composition in the country music genre and the second song dealing with the friendship between himself and Dylan, after their 1968 collaboration “I’d Have You Anytime“. Its lyrics address Dylan’s elusive nature, and reflect the high regard in which Harrison held the American singer’s work. The same reluctance on Dylan’s part to re-engage with a concert audience led to him retreating again from live performance until August 1971, when he responded to Harrison’s request to play at the Concert for Bangladesh.

Harrison recorded “Behind That Locked Door” in London early in the summer of 1970, shortly after taking part in a session for Dylan’s New Morning album in New York. Co-produced by Phil Spector, the recording features a prominent contribution from Nashville pedal steel virtuoso Pete Drake, and twin keyboard parts from Gary Wright and Billy Preston in the tradition of the Band, whose sound influenced Harrison’s arrangement. With its understated performance, the track is a comparatively rare departure from the big production commonly associated with All Things Must Pass. On release, Alan Smith of the NME described the song as “a tremendous piece of country-meets-Hawaii” and recommended that it be sent to country singer Slim Whitman “without further delay”.[1]

An alternate take of “Behind That Locked Door” appears on the 2012 Harrison compilation Early Takes: Volume 1. Olivia Newton-John, Jim James, the Felice Brothers and Norah Jones are among the artists who have covered the song.

Background[edit]

In mid August 1969, Bob Dylan had confounded the media’s expectations by shunning the Woodstock Festival, an event he had helped to inspire.[2][3] Instead, after three years in virtual seclusion with his family, Dylan decided to make his comeback a fortnight after Woodstock, by headlining the Isle of Wight Festival at Wootton, just off the south coast of England.[4][5] Now a popular act in their own right, the Band agreed to back Dylan for the performance,[6] just as they had (as the Hawks) on his controversial 1966 world tour.[7]In a repeat of his UK concerts from 1966, leading figures in the English music scene began to gather on the island to show their support for Dylan,[8][9] the singer widely considered “the minstrel to a generation”.[10]

Alone among the many celebrity guests,[nb 1] George Harrison had spent time with Dylan during his period away from the limelight, in Bearsville, near Woodstock.[11][12] In between promoting Radha Krishna Temple (London)‘s debut single on Apple Records, his own production of “Hare Krishna Mantra“,[13] Harrison and wife Pattie Boyd stayed with Dylan’s family at Forelands Farm, near Bembridge, during the week preceding the festival.[14] The two musicians strengthened the bond they had established in upstate New York[15]and were heard performing near-perfect impersonations of the Everly Brothers in the farmhouse.[16][nb 2]

Festival poster, showing an image of Dylan circa 1966

In addition to a crowd estimated at 200,000,[18] a group of 300 American journalists descended on the Isle of Wight, adding unwelcome pressure on Dylan.[14] In the days leading up to his performance on Sunday, 31 August, the British press dubbed the event “D Day”, in reference to the Allies’ invasion of German-occupied France in June 1944;[19] in the words of music journalist John Harris, “Dylan’s show had by now been inflated into the gig of the decade.”[20] As a further impediment to Dylan’s planned comeback, audiences in 1969 expected to hear the rock music associated with his and the Hawks’ 1965–66 tours,[21] a style that he had abandoned with his recent country album, Nashville Skyline.[22]This contrast was encouraged by the organisers’ promotional campaign for the event,[23] particularly in the design for the official festival posters.[24] Referring to Dylan’s more conservative 1969 image, author Clinton Heylin writes: “There was little doubt that this was a different Dylan, even if the graphic on the fluttering posters advertising the festival was a stark black-and-white shot of a beshaded Dylan in classic ’66 pose.”[24] The arrival of Harrison’s fellow Beatles John Lennon and Ringo Starr, on Saturday, 30 August, added to the heightened speculation that one or more members of the band might make a guest appearance with Dylan the following evening.[25][26][nb 3]

Harrison gifted Dylan his vintage Gibson J-200 acoustic guitar before the show[28] and was then taken aback that Dylan arranged for “Hare Krishna Mantra” to be played over the PA minutes before he and the Band went on stage.[29]Mukunda Goswami, one of the six pioneer devotees who founded the Hare Krishna movement‘s London temple and played on the recording,[30][31] has identified this exposure as reflective of how the ancient Maha Mantra “penetrated British society” as a result of the Harrison-produced single.[32] Harrison watched Dylan’s performance from the VIP enclosure,[33] an experience that informed the lyrics to a new composition, “Behind That Locked Door”.[34]

Composition[edit]

I don’t mean to embarrass Bob or anything like that, but he’s said and done more, I think, than the lot of show business put together. You can take just one tune [of his] from back in the Sixties and it’s more meaningful than twenty or thirty years of what everybody else said …[35]

– George Harrison, commenting on the songs of Bob Dylan

John Harris describes “Behind That Locked Door” as a “sweet acknowledgement of Dylan’s shyness”.[20] According to Harrison’s recollection in a December 2000 interview for Billboard magazine, he began writing the song the night before Dylan played.[36] Further to the statement of friendship in their 1968 collaboration “I’d Have You Anytime[37] – which Harrison began as a way of getting Dylan to let down his guard and “Let me in here[38] – in “Behind That Locked Door”, he urges Dylan to confide in a friend and “let out your heart“.[39]

Author Ian Inglis notes the Isle of Wight performance as having been a “hugely important and anxious occasion” for Dylan and views Harrison’s opening verse as a “personal plea” for him to “pull out of his depression, to face the world again, and to look to the future”. After asking “Why are you still crying?“, Harrison assures Dylan that “The love you are blessed with / This world’s waiting for …[40]

In the second verse,[41] Harrison sings of how he values Dylan’s friendship, together with “the tales you have told me / From the things that you saw“.[5] For much of his career, Harrison repeatedly identified Dylan as one of his biggest musical influences,[42] along with Ravi Shankar.[35] To Inglis, these verse-two lines reflect the level of Harrison’s respect for his work, since “while millions of others may look to the Beatles for guidance, he looks to Dylan”.[42][nb 4]

Bob Dylan and the Band on stage in 1974, the year Harrison faced criticism for his own change of musical direction

Harrison musical biographer Simon Leng observes that, in the “counseling” Harrison gives Dylan in “Behind That Locked Door”, he anticipates his own “slough of despond” during 1973–75.[46] This self-styled “naughty period” of Harrison’s coincided with the failure of his marriage to Boyd and a fall from grace with music critics following his 1974 “Dark Horse Tour[47] – a tour on which, similar to Dylan in 1969, Harrison defied public expectation and attempted to break from his Beatle past.[48] In the final verse to “Behind That Locked Door”,[41] he asks for Dylan’s support in such a scenario:[42]

And if ever my love goes
If I’m rich or I’m poor
Come and let out my heart, please, please
From behind that locked door.

Musically, the song is set in a slow, country-waltz time signature[49] with, as Leng observes, melody and lyrics working “in tandem”.[46] Within each couplet, a rising musical figure presents the “problem” (“Why are you still crying?“), while the second line consists of a “falling melodic consolation” (“Your pain is now through“).[46] In his 1980 autobiography, Harrison offers little comment about “Behind That Locked Door”, aside from identifying the inspiration behind the song and admitting: “It was a good excuse to do a country tune with pedal steel guitar.”[34]

Aftermath to the Isle of Wight Festival[edit]

Dylan’s set at the festival was roundly viewed as anticlimactic,[50][51] if not a “Midnight Flop!”, in the opinion of one British tabloid.[52] Having recently told Rolling Stone editor Jann Wenner that he would return to touring that autumn, Dylan abandoned the idea and also cancelled the proposed live album from his Isle of Wight performance.[53][nb 5] Showing support for Dylan in the fallout from his comeback, in a late 1969 interview Harrison included the American singer in his personal list of essential contemporary rock artists, saying: “The Beatles, [the] Stones, Bob Dylan, Eric Clapton and Delaney & Bonnie, and that’s it. Who needs anything else?”[55]

Inglis highlights “Behind That Locked Door” as an example of how Harrison’s songwriting reflects his “fondness” for family and close friends.[56] Dylan’s reluctance to perform live again was only broken by his friendship with Harrison,[57][58] when the latter persuaded him to play at the Concert for Bangladesh shows in New York in August 1971.[59] Although Dylan had been noncommittal about playing at that event until the last minute,[60][61] a mutual friend of his and Harrison’s, journalist Al Aronowitz, had assured Boyd, “Bob wouldn’t let George down”;[62] another performer at the shows, drummer Jim Keltner, has said that Dylan felt a special closeness towards Harrison as a result of the Concert for Bangladesh.[63] Four years later, while Harrison was dejected following what author Elliot Huntley terms the “tsunami of bile that the Dark Horse album had unleashed”,[64] he spent considerable time with Dylan in Los Angeles.[65][66][nb 6] According to Mukunda Goswami, speaking in a 1982 interview with Harrison, Dylan became a regular visitor to the Los Angeles Radha Krishna temple and embraced the practice of chanting.[70]

Recording[edit]

Following the Beatles’ break-up in April 1970, and shortly before beginning work on All Things Must Pass, Harrison participated in a recording session in New York for Dylan’s New Morning album.[15][71] Among the many tracks they played were “Working on the Guru”,[72] Dylan’s “gentle prod” at Harrison’s association with the Hare Krishna movement, Harris writes,[20] and “If Not for You“, a new Dylan song that Harrison decided to cover on his own album.[73] Dylan also supplied him with a phone number for Pete Drake,[74]the Nashville-based pedal-steel guitarist and record producer whose work had graced “Lay Lady Lay” and other songs on Nashville Skyline.[75][76] Harrison later praised Drake’s pedal steel playing as “the bagpipes of country & western music“.[36]

Working at Abbey Road Studios in London with co-producer Phil Spector,[77] Harrison recorded “Behind That Locked Door” during the first batch of sessions for All Things Must Pass, between late May and early June 1970.[78] Drake’s pedal steel features strongly on the recording,[79] providing a commentary to Harrison’s vocal in the verses, as well as a mid-song solo,[80] supported by Hammond organ from Billy Preston, and Gary Wright on piano.[76] The arrangement for “Behind That Locked Door” reflects the enduring influence of the Band’s sound on Harrison[46] – through the use of two keyboard players, acoustic guitars, and a restrained backing from the rhythm section, comprising Klaus Voormann on bass and, in Huntley’s description, Alan White‘s “shuffle beat” drums.[80] For some years after the song’s release, rumours claimed that it was the Band themselves backing Harrison on the track.[78]

Leng credits all three acoustic guitar parts to Harrison,[46] although other sources suggest that Peter Frampton may have participated at the session.[76] Harrison also overdubbed all the backing vocals (credited on the album to “the George O’Hara-Smith Singers”),[81] a feat much admired by Spector, who has noted Harrison’s willingness to “experiment upon experiment” with his harmony singing on All Things Must Pass.[82]

Release and reception[edit]

“Behind That Locked Door” was released as the third track on side two of Harrison’s All Things Must Pass triple album,[83] in November 1970.[84] Ian Inglis writes of its position in the track order: “In the middle of an album whose songs sweep across the grand themes of history, religion, love, sex, and death, [‘Behind That Locked Door’] is a surprising and touching gesture of simple friendship from one man to another.”[42] The release followed speculation in the music press regarding the Dylan–Harrison joint session in May,[85] and conversely, the critics’ lambasting of Dylan’s Self Portrait double album, released in June 1970.[86] In his review of All Things Must Pass, the NMEs Alan Smith declared “Behind That Locked Door” a “standout” and “a tremendous piece of country-meets-Hawaii, which should be sent to Slim Whitman without further delay”.[1] Less impressed, Ben Gerson of Rolling Stone dismissed the song as “an inexplicable bit of C&W schlock”, although he conceded that it had a “lovely, lilting background vocal”.[87] Later in the 1970s, Beatles Forever author Nicholas Schaffner highlighted “Behind That Locked Door” and the other Dylan-influenced songs on All Things Must Pass as being “far more intimate, both musically and lyrically, than the rest of the album”.[88]

He was a giant, a great soul, with all the humanity, all the wit and humor, all the wisdom, the spirituality, the common sense of a man and compassion for people. He inspired love and had the strength of a hundred men … The world is a profoundly emptier place without him.[89]

– Dylan’s tribute to Harrison, following the latter’s death in November 2001

Reviewers and biographers in the 21st century invariably recognise its place among Bob Dylan’s work on his John Wesley Harding (1967) and Nashville Skyline albums.[46][49][76] Writing in Goldmine magazine in 2002, Dave Thompson remarked: “indeed, this tribute to Dylan’s famous reticence sounds so close to a lost Zim original that His Bobness’ own ‘Baby, Stop Crying‘ (from 1978’s Street Legal) is all but reduced to tributary status itself in comparison.”[90]

Alan Clayson approves of the more “understated production aesthetic” next to what he views as an at-times “bloated” sound found elsewhere on All Things Must Pass.[49] Simon Leng also acknowledges Harrison’s success in “temper[ing] Phil Spector’s taste for the extreme” and describes “Behind That Locked Door” as one of its composer’s “more attractive” songs, with a fine lead vocal.[46] “[It] is refreshing to hear Harrison singing about another’s pain,” Leng adds, “suggesting that, unlike some of his contemporaries, he was able to displace himself as the center of his universe for a moment or two at least.”[91] In his book Phil Spector: Out of His Head, Richard Williams identifies “Behind That Locked Door” as an example of “how sympathetic to the performer” Spector could be as a producer, in this case, by giving the recording a “mellow, autumnal mix” that “beautifully display[s]” Drake’s pedal steel.[92]

Elliot Huntley writes that the track provides a showcase for Harrison’s “melodic flair”, as well as a reason to wonder why the ex-Beatle did not record more songs in the country-music genre, since “certainly he seems perfectly at home in these comfortable surroundings”.[80] Huntley speculates on the “interesting” possibility of a whole LP side of similar “ersatz country and western” tracks, as the Rolling Stones would do on their Exile on Main St. double album in 1972.[93] Harrison biographer Joshua Greene describes the song as a celebration of “love’s victory over pain”.[94]

Alternative version[edit]

In November 2011, an early take of “Behind That Locked Door”, featuring Harrison’s vocal backed by just two acoustic guitars and Drake’s pedal steel, was included in the British deluxe-edition CD/DVD release of Martin Scorsese‘s Living in the Material World documentary.[95][96] This version appeared worldwide on the Early Takes: Volume 1 compilation in May 2012.[97] Giles Martin, who went through Harrison’s musical archive at Friar Park while compiling the album, notes the “folk-tinged spoken word quality” of Harrison’s singing on this take, an example of “a kind of conversational intimacy” that he brought to his recordings.[98]

Rolling Stone critic David Fricke describes this version of the song as a “sweet Nashville reading”.[99] Andy Gill of The Independent finds it a “[p]articularly engaging” inclusion on a compilation that allows “the sweeter side of George Harrison’s character to shine unencumbered by studio blandishments”.[100]

Cover versions[edit]

Among the country artists who have covered the song, Olivia Newton-John released a version on her Olivia album in 1972.[101][102] Drake himself recorded “Behind That Locked Door”, as well as Harrison’s “Isn’t It a Pity” and “Something“, although the recordings remained unissued until the release of the Pete Drake album, nine years after his death in July 1988.[103] Christian alt rock band the Choir covered the song on their 1989 album Wide-Eyed Wonder.[104]

Following Harrison’s death in November 2001, Jim James recorded “Behind That Locked Door” for what became a six-song Harrison covers EP, released as Tribute To in August 2009.[105] Tying in with the release of Scorsese’s George Harrison: Living in the Material World, a version by the Felice Brothers appeared on the multi-artist tribute Harrison Covered,[106][107] a CD accompanying the November 2011 issue of Mojo magazine.[108]

Singer Norah Jones performed “Behind That Locked Door” on the TBS television show Conan on 25 September 2014.[109] Her appearance was part of the show’s “George Harrison Week”,[110] celebrating the release of the Harrison box set The Apple Years 1968–75.[111]

Personnel[edit]

The musicians who performed on “Behind That Locked Door” are believed to be as follows:[46]

Notes[edit]

  1. Jump up^ Bill Wyman lists Rolling Stone bandmates Keith Richards and Charlie Watts among the rock musicians attending the festival, along with Liz Taylor, Richard Burton, Jane Fonda, Roger Vadim and Donald Cammell from the world of film, and leading figures in the Chelsea arts community such as John Dunbar, Michael Cooper and Robert Fraser.[8]
  2. Jump up^ To the surprise of the two Apple employees who brought them, Harrison had to organise to have a set of harmonicas delivered to the farm by helicopter, since Dylan had forgotten to bring any of his own.[17]
  3. Jump up^ According to festival co-promoter Ricki Farr, an “amazing” all-star jam did take place that weekend – featuring Dylan, Harrison, Lennon, Starr, Eric Clapton, Ginger Baker and Jackie Lomax – but only at the farmhouse, on Sunday afternoon.[25] Some members, if not all five, of the Band also took part in this session.[27]
  4. Jump up^ Even during what biographer Howard Sounes terms Dylan’s “creative nadir” of the late 1980s,[43] Harrison told Rolling Stone that “Five hundred years from now, looking back in history, I think he will still be the man.”[44] In 1988, Harrison voiced the opinion that their first album together as the Traveling Wilburys had to be a positive thing if it did nothing else but get Dylan interested in songwriting again.[45]
  5. Jump up^ Among other projects that Dylan had considered earlier that summer, according to engineer and producer Glyn Johns‘ recollection in his book Sound Man (2014), Dylan had hoped to record an album with the Beatles and the Rolling Stones. While Harrison and Keith Richards thought the idea was “fantastic”, Johns writes, Paul McCartney and Mick Jagger “said absolutely not”.[54]
  6. Jump up^ In a radio interview for WNEW-FM in April 1975,[67] Harrison likened the critical backlash he had just received to occasions when Rolling Stone and other music publications had “tried to murder” Dylan’s reputation.[68][69]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jump up to:a b Alan Smith, “George Harrison: All Things Must Pass (Apple)”, NME, 5 December 1970, p. 2; available at Rock’s Backpages (subscription required; retrieved 24 May 2013).
  2. Jump up^ Sounes, pp. 248–51.
  3. Jump up^ Heylin, pp. 306–07.
  4. Jump up^ Sounes, pp. 250–51.
  5. ^ Jump up to:a b Clayson, p. 273.
  6. Jump up^ Helm, p. 198.
  7. Jump up^ Tillery, p. 114.
  8. ^ Jump up to:a b Wyman, p. 342.
  9. Jump up^ Helm, p. 201.
  10. Jump up^ Clayson, p. 274.
  11. Jump up^ Clayson, pp. 242−43.
  12. Jump up^ Leng, pp. 51–52.
  13. Jump up^ Miles, p. 351.
  14. ^ Jump up to:a b Sounes, p. 251.
  15. ^ Jump up to:a b The Editors of Rolling Stone, p. 179.
  16. Jump up^ Harris, p. 68.
  17. Jump up^ O’Dell, pp. 83–85.
  18. Jump up^ Helm, p. 200.
  19. Jump up^ “The Isle of Wight festivals 1968–1970; Bob Dylan 1969”, ukrockfestivals.com (retrieved 19 February 2013).
  20. ^ Jump up to:a b c Harris, p. 72.
  21. Jump up^ Helm, p. 199.
  22. Jump up^ Heylin, pp. 301–02.
  23. Jump up^ Sounes, pp. 251–52.
  24. ^ Jump up to:a b Heylin, p. 307.
  25. ^ Jump up to:a b Harris, p. 69.
  26. Jump up^ Stephen Stafford, “Why the Beatles never played the Isle of Wight”, BBC Hampshire & Isle of Wight, 15 June 2010 (retrieved 24 May 2013).
  27. Jump up^ Sounes, p. 252.
  28. Jump up^ Olivia Harrison, pp. 202–03.
  29. Jump up^ Clayson, pp. 273–74.
  30. Jump up^ Dwyer & Cole, pp. 30–31.
  31. Jump up^ Greene, pp. 103, 106, 143–44.
  32. Jump up^ Olivia Harrison, p. 236.
  33. Jump up^ O’Dell, p. 87.
  34. ^ Jump up to:a b George Harrison, p. 206.
  35. ^ Jump up to:a b Olivia Harrison, p. 202.
  36. ^ Jump up to:a b Timothy White, “George Harrison: ‘All Things’ In Good Time”, billboard.com, 8 January 2001 (retrieved 3 June 2014).
  37. Jump up^ Huntley, pp. 53, 56.
  38. Jump up^ Timothy White, “George Harrison – Reconsidered”, Musician, November 1987, pp. 62, 65.
  39. Jump up^ Leng, pp. 89, 284.
  40. Jump up^ Inglis, pp. 26–27.
  41. ^ Jump up to:a b George Harrison, p. 205.
  42. ^ Jump up to:a b c d Inglis, p. 27.
  43. Jump up^ Sounes, p. 384.
  44. Jump up^ The Editors of Rolling Stone, p. 146.
  45. Jump up^ Clayson, p. 423.
  46. ^ Jump up to:a b c d e f g h Leng, p. 89.
  47. Jump up^ Tillery, p. 116.
  48. Jump up^ The Editors of Rolling Stone, pp. 128–29.
  49. ^ Jump up to:a b c Clayson, pp. 296–97.
  50. Jump up^ Sounes, pp. 252–53.
  51. Jump up^ Heylin, pp. 308, 310.
  52. Jump up^ Clayson, p. 309.
  53. Jump up^ Heylin, pp. 302, 309.
  54. Jump up^ David Greene, “Bob Dylan Wanted to Make an Album With the Beatles and Rolling Stones”, rollingstone.com, 7 November 2014 (retrieved 9 November 2014).
  55. Jump up^ Clayson, p. 277.
  56. Jump up^ Inglis, p. 141.
  57. Jump up^ Leng, p. 120.
  58. Jump up^ O’Dell, p. 199.
  59. Jump up^ Lavezzoli, pp. 189, 192–93.
  60. Jump up^ Heylin, p. 329.
  61. Jump up^ Greene, pp. 191–92.
  62. Jump up^ O’Dell, pp. 198–99.
  63. Jump up^ Lavezzoli, pp. 192, 203.
  64. Jump up^ Huntley, p. 114.
  65. Jump up^ Badman, p. 164.
  66. Jump up^ Ray Coleman, “Dark Horse”, Melody Maker, 6 September 1975, p. 28.
  67. Jump up^ Badman, p. 158.
  68. Jump up^ “No Clear Blue Skies”, Contra Band Music, 2 November 2012 (retrieved 22 May 2013).
  69. Jump up^ “George Harrison – Interview (1975)”, Paste (retrieved 12 November 2016); event occurs between 46:40 and 47:24.
  70. Jump up^ Chant and Be Happy, p. 35.
  71. Jump up^ Badman, p. 7.
  72. Jump up^ Heylin, p. 318.
  73. Jump up^ Madinger & Easter, pp. 424–25.
  74. Jump up^ Schaffner, p. 140.
  75. Jump up^ Clayson, p. 297.
  76. ^ Jump up to:a b c d Spizer, p. 223.
  77. Jump up^ Badman, p. 10.
  78. ^ Jump up to:a b Madinger & Easter, p. 429.
  79. Jump up^ Williams, p. 154.
  80. ^ Jump up to:a b c Huntley, p. 56.
  81. Jump up^ Spizer, p. 212.
  82. Jump up^ Olivia Harrison, p. 282.
  83. Jump up^ Spizer, p. 220.
  84. Jump up^ Castleman & Podrazik, p. 94.
  85. Jump up^ The Editors of Rolling Stone, pp. 179–80.
  86. Jump up^ Sounes, p. 260.
  87. Jump up^ Ben Gerson, “George Harrison All Things Must Pass, Rolling Stone, 21 January 1971, p. 46 (retrieved 24 May 2013).
  88. Jump up^ Schaffner, p. 142.
  89. Jump up^ The Editors of Rolling Stone, p. 221.
  90. Jump up^ Dave Thompson, “The Music of George Harrison: An album-by-album guide”, Goldmine, 25 January 2002, p. 15.
  91. Jump up^ Leng, pp. 89–90.
  92. Jump up^ Williams, pp. 153, 154.
  93. Jump up^ Huntley, p. 57.
  94. Jump up^ Greene, p. 181.
  95. Jump up^ Steve Leggett, “George Harrison George Harrison: Living in the Material World (Video), AllMusic (retrieved 26 September 2014).
  96. Jump up^ Joe Marchese, “Behind That Locked Door: George Harrison Demos Surface on ‘Early Takes Volume 1′”, The Second Disc, 23 March 2012 (retrieved 26 September 2014).
  97. Jump up^ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, “George Harrison: Early Takes, Vol. 1, AllMusic (retrieved 15 September 2012).
  98. Jump up^ Terry Staunton, “Giles Martin on George Harrison’s Early Takes, track-by-track”, MusicRadar, 18 May 2012 (retrieved 9 November 2014).
  99. Jump up^ David Fricke, “George Harrison, Early Takes Volume 1”, Rolling Stone, 23 May 2012 (retrieved 21 February 2013).
  100. Jump up^ Andy Gill, “Album: George Harrison, Early Takes Volume 1 (Universal)”, independent.co.uk, 5 May 2012 (retrieved 12 November 2016).
  101. Jump up^ “Albums: Olivia, onlyolivia.com (retrieved 9 October 2012).
  102. Jump up^ “Behind That Locked Door”, wer-singt.de (retrieved 9 October 2012).
  103. Jump up^ Talevski, pp. 107–08.
  104. Jump up^ Mark W.B. Allender, “The Choir Wide-Eyed Wonder, AllMusic (retrieved 21 February 2013).
  105. Jump up^ Andrew Leahey, “Yim Yames Tribute To, AllMusic (retrieved 20 August 2012).
  106. Jump up^ Michael Simmons, “Cry for a Shadow”, Mojo, November 2011, p. 86.
  107. Jump up^ Harrison Covered, Second Hand Songs (retrieved 16 September 2012).
  108. Jump up^ “MOJO Issue 216 / November 2011”, mojo4music.com (retrieved 30 October 2013).
  109. Jump up^ “Norah Jones ‘Behind That Locked Door’ 09/25/14 – CONAN on TBS”, Conan/Team Coco on YouTube, 25 September 2014 (retrieved 26 September 2014).
  110. Jump up^ Erin Strecker, “Paul Simon Performs ‘Here Comes The Sun’ for George Harrison Week on ‘Conan'”, billboard.com, 24 September 2014 (retrieved 25 September 2014).
  111. Jump up^ Ben Kaye, “Beck kicks off Conan’s week-long George Harrison tribute with ‘Wah-Wah’ – Watch”, Consequence of Sound, 23 September 2014 (retrieved 25 September 2014).

Sources[edit]

  • Keith Badman, The Beatles Diary Volume 2: After the Break-Up 1970–2001, Omnibus Press (London, 2001; ISBN 0-7119-8307-0).
  • Harry Castleman & Walter J. Podrazik, All Together Now: The First Complete Beatles Discography 1961–1975, Ballantine Books (New York, NY, 1976; ISBN 0-345-25680-8).
  • Chant and Be Happy: The Power of Mantra Meditation, Bhaktivedanta Book Trust (Los Angeles, CA, 1997; ISBN 978-0-89213-118-1).
  • Alan Clayson, George Harrison, Sanctuary (London, 2003; ISBN 1-86074-489-3).
  • Graham Dwyer & Richard J. Cole (eds), The Hare Krishna Movement: Forty Years of Chant and Change, I.B. Tauris (London, 2007; ISBN 1-84511-407-8).
  • The Editors of Rolling Stone, Harrison, Rolling Stone Press/Simon & Schuster (New York, NY, 2002; ISBN 0-7432-3581-9).
  • Joshua M. Greene, Here Comes the Sun: The Spiritual and Musical Journey of George Harrison, John Wiley & Sons (Hoboken, NJ, 2006; ISBN 978-0-470-12780-3).
  • John Harris, “A Quiet Storm”, Mojo, July 2001, pp. 66–74.
  • George Harrison, I Me Mine, Chronicle Books (San Francisco, CA, 2002; ISBN 0-8118-3793-9).
  • Olivia Harrison, George Harrison: Living in the Material World, Abrams (New York, NY, 2011; ISBN 978-1-4197-0220-4).
  • Levon Helm with Stephen Davis, This Wheel’s on Fire: Levon Helm and the Story of The Band, A Cappella Books (Chicago, IL, 2000; ISBN 978-1-55652-405-9).
  • Clinton Heylin, Bob Dylan: Behind the Shades (20th Anniversary Edition), Faber and Faber (London, 2011; ISBN 978-0-571-27240-2).
  • Elliot J. Huntley, Mystical One: George Harrison – After the Break-up of the Beatles, Guernica Editions (Toronto, ON, 2006; ISBN 1-55071-197-0).
  • Ian Inglis, The Words and Music of George Harrison, Praeger (Santa Barbara, CA, 2010; ISBN 978-0-313-37532-3).
  • Peter Lavezzoli, The Dawn of Indian Music in the West, Continuum (New York, NY, 2006; ISBN 0-8264-2819-3).
  • Simon Leng, While My Guitar Gently Weeps: The Music of George Harrison, Hal Leonard (Milwaukee, WI, 2006; ISBN 1-4234-0609-5).
  • Chip Madinger & Mark Easter, Eight Arms to Hold You: The Solo Beatles Compendium, 44.1 Productions (Chesterfield, MO, 2000; ISBN 0-615-11724-4).
  • Barry Miles, The Beatles Diary Volume 1: The Beatles Years, Omnibus Press (London, 2001; ISBN 0-7119-8308-9).
  • Chris O’Dell with Katherine Ketcham, Miss O’Dell: My Hard Days and Long Nights with The Beatles, The Stones, Bob Dylan, Eric Clapton, and the Women They Loved, Touchstone (New York, NY, 2009; ISBN 978-1-4165-9093-4).
  • Nicholas Schaffner, The Beatles Forever, McGraw-Hill (New York, NY, 1978; ISBN 0-07-055087-5).
  • Howard Sounes, Down the Highway: The Life of Bob Dylan, Doubleday (London, 2001; ISBN 0-385-60125-5).
  • Bruce Spizer, The Beatles Solo on Apple Records, 498 Productions (New Orleans, LA, 2005; ISBN 0-9662649-5-9).
  • Nick Talevski, The Encyclopedia of Rock Obituaries, Omnibus Press (London, 1999; ISBN 0-7119-7548-5).
  • Gary Tillery, Working Class Mystic: A Spiritual Biography of George Harrison, Quest Books (Wheaton, IL, 2011; ISBN 978-0-8356-0900-5).
  • Richard Williams, Phil Spector: Out of His Head, Omnibus Press (London, 2003; ISBN 978-0-7119-9864-3).
  • Bill Wyman, Rolling with the Stones, Dorling Kindersley (London, 2002; ISBN 0-7513-4646-2).

External links[edit]

Related posts:

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 8 Blue & Lonesome is the album any Rolling Stones fan would have wished for – review Neil McCormick, music critic

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 8 Rolling Stones – Hoo Doo Blues Blue & Lonesome is the album any Rolling Stones fan would have wished for – review 9 Comments Evergreen: The Rolling Stones perform in Cuba earlier this year CREDIT: REX FEATURES Neil McCormick, music critic 22 NOVEMBER 2016 • 12:19PM The Rolling […]

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 7 The Rolling Stones Alexis Petridis’s album of the week The Rolling Stones: Blue & Lonesome review – more alive than they’ve sounded for years

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 7 Rolling Stones – Everybody Knows About My Good Thing The Rolling Stones Alexis Petridis’s album of the week The Rolling Stones: Blue & Lonesome review – more alive than they’ve sounded for years 4/5stars Mick Jagger’s voice and harmonica drive an album of blues covers that returns […]

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 6 Music Review: ‘Blue & Lonesome’ by the Rolling Stones By Gregory Katz | AP November 29

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 6 Rolling Stones – Just Like I Treat You   Music Review: ‘Blue & Lonesome’ by the Rolling Stones By Gregory Katz | AP November 29 The Rolling Stones, “Blue & Lonesome” (Interscope) It shouldn’t be a surprise, really, but still it’s a bit startling to hear just how well […]

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 5 Review: The Rolling Stones make blues magic on ‘Blue & Lonesome’ Maeve McDermott , USATODAY6:07 p.m. EST November 30, 2016

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 5 Rolling Stones – Everybody Knows About My Good Thing Review: The Rolling Stones make blues magic on ‘Blue & Lonesome’ Maeve McDermott , USATODAY6:07 p.m. EST November 30, 2016 (Photo: Frazer Harrison, Getty Images) Before the Rolling Stones were rock icons, before its members turned into sex […]

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 4 Rolling Stones, ‘Blue & Lonesome’: Album Review By Michael Gallucci November 30, 2016 1:34 PM

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 4 Rolling Stones – Little Rain       Rolling Stones, ‘Blue & Lonesome’: Album Review By Michael Gallucci November 30, 2016 1:34 PM Read More: Rolling Stones, ‘Blue & Lonesome’: Album Review | http://ultimateclassicrock.com/rolling-stones-blue-lonesome-review/?trackback=tsmclip The Rolling Stones were never really a thinking band. A shrewd one, for sure, […]

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 3 Rolling Stones – ‘Blue & Lonesome’ Review Barry Nicolson 12:52 pm – Dec 2, 2016

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 3 The Rolling Stones Mick Jagger chats about new album “Blue & Lonesome” on BBC Breakfast 02 Dec 2016 Rolling Stones – I Gotta Go     Rolling Stones – ‘Blue & Lonesome’ Review Barry Nicolson 12:52 pm – Dec 2, 2016 57shares The Stones sound their youngest […]

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 2 Review The Rolling Stones’ new blues album is an amplified death wheeze. And it rules

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 1 Review: The Rolling Stones Reinvigorate the Blues on ‘Blue and Lonesome’ Our take on rock legends’ first LP since 2005

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 1 The Rolling Stones – Ride ‘Em On Down Published on Dec 1, 2016 Taken from Blue & Lonesome, the brand new album out now. Buy it at http://www.rollingstones.com/blueandl…. Directed by François Rousselet http://www.riffrafffilms.tv/video/dir… Produced by Natalie Arnett Riff Raff Films http://www.riffrafffilms.tv http://www.rollingstones.com/http://www.facebook.com/therollingstones http://twitter.com/RollingStoneshttp://www.rollingstones.com/newsletter Rolling Stones […]

MUSIC MONDAY Karen Carpenter’s tragic story

_____________ Carpenters Close To You Karen Carpenter’s tragic story Karen Carpenter’s velvet voice charmed millions in the 70s… but behind the wholesome image she was in turmoil. Desperate to look slim on stage – and above all desperate to please the domineering mother who preferred her brother – she became the first celebrity victim of […]

MUSIC MONDAY The Carpenters!!!

carpenters -We’ve Only Just Begun The Carpenters – Yesterday Once More (INCLUDES LYRICS) The Carpenters – There’s a kind of hush The Carpenters – Greatest Hits Related posts: MUSIC MONDAY Paul McCartney Mull Of Kintyre November 13, 2016 – 10:29 am Paul McCartney Mull Of Kintyre-Original Video-HQ Uploaded on Nov 25, 2011 Paul McCartney Mull Of […]

__

MUSIC MONDAY The song IF NOT FOR YOU written by Bob Dylan

__

 

Bob Dylan – If Not For You

Uploaded on Oct 8, 2008

Subscribe and checkout my other dylan’s videos!
JUST LIKE A WOMAN https://youtu.be/ymmRnKaTEr8

George Harrison – If Not For You – Lyrics

If Not for You

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
For other uses, see If Not for You (disambiguation).
“If Not For You”
If Not For You single cover.jpg

Artwork for some continental European countries (Dutch vinyl single pictured)
Single by Bob Dylan
from the album New Morning
B-side “New Morning”
Released October 19, 1970
Recorded August 12, 1970
Genre Country rock
Length 2:39
Label Columbia
Writer(s) Bob Dylan
Producer(s) Bob Johnston
Bob Dylan singles chronology
Wigwam
(1970)
If Not For You
(1971)
Watching the River Flow
(1971)

If Not for You” is a song by Bob Dylan, recorded for his 1970 album New Morning. Dylan recorded the album version in August 1970, having first recorded the song in a session with George Harrison on May 1 of that year. In addition to appearing on the album in October 1970, the August recording was released as a single in Europe; the May recording remained unreleased until its inclusion on The Bootleg Series Volumes 1–3 (Rare & Unreleased) in 1991.

In November 1970, a month after Dylan’s original had appeared, George Harrison released a version of the song on his triple album All Things Must Pass. Another well-known cover of the song was recorded by Olivia Newton-John, who had the only U.S. charting version of the song in 1971.

Bob Dylan’s version[edit]

Release[edit]

Bob Dylan recorded “If Not for You” for his album New Morning, on August 12, 1970. The song was released as a single in Europe. It was later included on the Dylan compilations Bob Dylan’s Greatest Hits Vol. II (1971),[1]Masterpieces (1978),[2] Biograph (1985),[3] The Essential Bob Dylan (2000),[4] The Very Best of Bob Dylan (2000),[5] Best of Bob Dylan Vols 1 & 2 (2001),[6] Greatest Hits Vol 1–3 (2003),[7] The Best of Bob Dylan (2005),[8] Dylan (2007),[9] Playlist: The Very Best of Bob Dylan ’70s (2009),[10] and The Real… (2012),[11] as well as on the various artist compilation The Best Year of My Life: 1970 (2011).[12]

A June 2, 1970 outtake of “If Not for You,” featuring only vocal, piano, and violin, is included on The Bootleg Series Vol. 10 – Another Self Portrait (1969–1971).

A previously unreleased version was included on the 2015 album Dylan, Cash, and The Nashville Cats: A New Music City.

Live performances[edit]

Dylan performed “If Not for You” with George Harrison during rehearsals for the Concert for Bangladesh in New York in 1971, but did not perform the song at the concert itself. Since then, however, Dylan has performed the song over 80 times.[13]

Charts[edit]

Chart Peak
position
Dutch Single Top 100 30[14]

George Harrison’s version[edit]

“If Not for You”
Song by George Harrison from the album All Things Must Pass
Released 27 November 1970
Genre Folk rock
Length 3:29
Label Apple
Writer(s) Bob Dylan
Producer(s) George Harrison, Phil Spector
All Things Must Pass track listing

George Harrison had sat in on a session for Dylan’s New Morning album, on May 1, 1970, at Columbia’s Studio B in New York, where he had played on an early take of “If Not for You” (later included on the Bob Dylan box set The Bootleg Series Volumes 1–3 (Rare & Unreleased)).[15] News of the collaboration between Dylan and the recently ex-Beatle caused great excitement in the music press, even though Columbia Records had made a point of announcing that neither artist deemed the results worthy of release.[16]

Over the following months, and despite having a wealth of extra material of his own, Harrison thought enough of the song to record it in London for his All Things Must Pass set. His was a characteristically melody-centric version of the track, which more clearly defined the song’s verse and bridge sections and eschewed the Dylan preference for spontaneity.[17] Harrison’s “If Not for You” immediately met with favour from critics and album reviewers: Mikal Gilmore describes it as “surprisingly beautiful”,[18] while to musical biographer Simon Leng, it’s a “gleaming pop creation”.[17]

Live performances[edit]

The following year, Dylan and Harrison duetted on “If Not for You” during a soundcheck for the historic Concert for Bangladesh in New York.[19] Judging by this, and from Harrison’s early notes for a possible setlist,[20] the pair had considered performing it at the UNICEF benefit later that day. (This soundcheck performance was later released on the 2005 remastered DVD of The Concert for Bangladesh.)

Harrison finally got a chance to perform “If Not for You” live, again at Madison Square Garden, on 16 October 1992 during the all-star concert celebrating Dylan’s first three decades in the music industry.[21] Backed by the house band for the night, Harrison performed “startling versions” of “If Not for You” and “Absolutely Sweet Marie“,[22] but only the latter found its way onto the officially released album the following August.

Personnel[edit]

The musicians who performed on Harrison’s studio version of the song are believed to be as follows:[17]

Olivia Newton-John version[edit]

“If Not For You”
Single by Olivia Newton-John
from the album If Not For You
B-side “The Biggest Clown”
Released May 1971
Format 7″
Genre Country, pop
Length 2:50
Label Uni 55281
Writer(s) Bob Dylan
Producer(s) Bruce Welch, John Farrar
Olivia Newton-John singles chronology
“Till You Say You’ll Be Mine”
(1966)
If Not For You
(1971)
“Banks of the Ohio”
(1971)

Basing her version on the Harrison arrangement rather than Dylan’s,[23] Australian singer Olivia Newton-John enjoyed considerable international success with “If Not for You”. It was the title track of her debut album, and became her first hit single, reaching the Top 10 in several countries. In addition, the single spent three weeks at No. 1 on the United States Easy Listening charts.[24][25]

Chart performance[edit]

Weekly charts[edit]

Chart (1971) Peak
position
Australia[26] 7
Belgium[27] 29
Canadian RPM Top Singles[28] 18
Netherlands[29] 11
New Zealand Listener[30] 8
Norway[31] 6
UK[32] 7
U.S. Billboard Hot 100[33] 25
U.S. Billboard Easy Listening[25] 1
U.S. Cash Box Top 100[34] 23

Year-end charts[edit]

Chart (1971) Rank
Australia[35] 71
UK 84
U.S.[36] 76

Other cover versions[edit]

Numerous other artists have covered “If Not For You”. These include Rod Stewart,[37] Bryan Ferry,[38] Richie Havens,[39] Sarah Vaughan,[40] Glen Campbell,[41] Barb Jungr,[42] Katie Buckhaven,[43] Susan McKeown and Lindsey Horner,[44] Phil Keaggy,[45] Lee Everton, Karl Blau, Ed Kuepper,[46] and the Flatmates.[47]Melinda Schneider and Beccy Cole covered the song on their album Great Women of Country (2014).

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. Jump up^ Erlewine (Bob Dylan’s Greatest Hits, Vol. 2 Review)
  2. Jump up^ Ruhlmann
  3. Jump up^ Erlewine (Biograph Review)
  4. Jump up^ Erlewine (The Essential Bob Dylan Review)
  5. Jump up^ Leggett (The Very Best of Bob Dylan Review)
  6. Jump up^ Best of Bob Dylan Vols. 1 & 2 Overview
  7. Jump up^ Jurek
  8. Jump up^ Erlewine (Best of Bob Dylan Review)
  9. Jump up^ Erlewine (Dylan (2007) Review)
  10. Jump up^ Leggett (Playlist: The Very Best of Bob Dylan ’70s Review)
  11. Jump up^ The Real… Overview
  12. Jump up^ The Best Year of My Life: 1970 Overview
  13. Jump up^ If Not For You: Discover
  14. Jump up^ Bob Dylan – If Not for You
  15. Jump up^ Badman 2001, p. 7
  16. Jump up^ Harrison (Rolling Stone Press/Simon & Schuster), pp. 179–180
  17. ^ Jump up to:a b c Leng 2006, p. 88
  18. Jump up^ Harrison (Rolling Stone Press/Simon & Schuster), p. 40
  19. Jump up^ Leng 2006, p. 120
  20. Jump up^ Harrison 2011, p. 288
  21. Jump up^ Leng 2006, p. 273
  22. Jump up^ Harrison (Rolling Stone Press/Simon & Schuster), p. 48
  23. Jump up^ Clayson 2003, p. 296
  24. Jump up^ Whitburn 2002, p. 181
  25. ^ Jump up to:a b Top 40 Easy Listening
  26. Jump up^ Steffen Hung. “Forum – 1970 (ARIA Charts: Special Occasion Charts)”. Australian-charts.com. Archived from the originalon 2016-06-02. Retrieved 2016-10-03.
  27. Jump up^ Olivia Newton-John – If Not For You (Ultratop)
  28. Jump up^ Top Singles – Volume 16, No. 4, September 11, 1971
  29. Jump up^ Top 40 (1971-04-03)
  30. Jump up^ “flavour of new zealand – search listener”. Flavourofnz.co.nz. Retrieved 2016-10-03.
  31. Jump up^ Olivia Newton-John – If Not For You (Norwegiancharts.com)
  32. Jump up^ Olivia Newton-John: Singles
  33. Jump up^ Olivia Newton-John Billboard Singles
  34. Jump up^ “Archived copy”. Archived from the original on 2016-03-04. Retrieved 2016-06-03.
  35. Jump up^ David Kent’s “Australian Chart Book 1970-1992” ArchivedMarch 5, 2016, at the Wayback Machine.
  36. Jump up^ Whitburn, Joel (1999). Pop Annual. Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin: Record Research Inc. ISBN 0-89820-142-X.
  37. Jump up^ Erlewine (Still the Same: Great Rock Classics of Our Time Overview)
  38. Jump up^ Erlewine (Dylanesque Review)
  39. Jump up^ Eder (Sings Beatles & Dylan Review)
  40. Jump up^ Eder (Time in My Life Review)
  41. Jump up^ Worbois
  42. Jump up^ Swihart
  43. Jump up^ Katie Buckhaven Overview
  44. Jump up^ Mighty Rain Overview
  45. Jump up^ Acoustic Cafe Overview
  46. Jump up^ Out-Takes, Castaways, Pirate Women and Takeaways Overview
  47. Jump up^ Sendra

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Related posts:

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 8 Blue & Lonesome is the album any Rolling Stones fan would have wished for – review Neil McCormick, music critic

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 8 Rolling Stones – Hoo Doo Blues Blue & Lonesome is the album any Rolling Stones fan would have wished for – review 9 Comments Evergreen: The Rolling Stones perform in Cuba earlier this year CREDIT: REX FEATURES Neil McCormick, music critic 22 NOVEMBER 2016 • 12:19PM The Rolling […]

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 7 The Rolling Stones Alexis Petridis’s album of the week The Rolling Stones: Blue & Lonesome review – more alive than they’ve sounded for years

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 7 Rolling Stones – Everybody Knows About My Good Thing The Rolling Stones Alexis Petridis’s album of the week The Rolling Stones: Blue & Lonesome review – more alive than they’ve sounded for years 4/5stars Mick Jagger’s voice and harmonica drive an album of blues covers that returns […]

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 6 Music Review: ‘Blue & Lonesome’ by the Rolling Stones By Gregory Katz | AP November 29

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 6 Rolling Stones – Just Like I Treat You   Music Review: ‘Blue & Lonesome’ by the Rolling Stones By Gregory Katz | AP November 29 The Rolling Stones, “Blue & Lonesome” (Interscope) It shouldn’t be a surprise, really, but still it’s a bit startling to hear just how well […]

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 5 Review: The Rolling Stones make blues magic on ‘Blue & Lonesome’ Maeve McDermott , USATODAY6:07 p.m. EST November 30, 2016

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 5 Rolling Stones – Everybody Knows About My Good Thing Review: The Rolling Stones make blues magic on ‘Blue & Lonesome’ Maeve McDermott , USATODAY6:07 p.m. EST November 30, 2016 (Photo: Frazer Harrison, Getty Images) Before the Rolling Stones were rock icons, before its members turned into sex […]

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 4 Rolling Stones, ‘Blue & Lonesome’: Album Review By Michael Gallucci November 30, 2016 1:34 PM

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 4 Rolling Stones – Little Rain       Rolling Stones, ‘Blue & Lonesome’: Album Review By Michael Gallucci November 30, 2016 1:34 PM Read More: Rolling Stones, ‘Blue & Lonesome’: Album Review | http://ultimateclassicrock.com/rolling-stones-blue-lonesome-review/?trackback=tsmclip The Rolling Stones were never really a thinking band. A shrewd one, for sure, […]

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 3 Rolling Stones – ‘Blue & Lonesome’ Review Barry Nicolson 12:52 pm – Dec 2, 2016

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 3 The Rolling Stones Mick Jagger chats about new album “Blue & Lonesome” on BBC Breakfast 02 Dec 2016 Rolling Stones – I Gotta Go     Rolling Stones – ‘Blue & Lonesome’ Review Barry Nicolson 12:52 pm – Dec 2, 2016 57shares The Stones sound their youngest […]

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 2 Review The Rolling Stones’ new blues album is an amplified death wheeze. And it rules

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 1 Review: The Rolling Stones Reinvigorate the Blues on ‘Blue and Lonesome’ Our take on rock legends’ first LP since 2005

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 1 The Rolling Stones – Ride ‘Em On Down Published on Dec 1, 2016 Taken from Blue & Lonesome, the brand new album out now. Buy it at http://www.rollingstones.com/blueandl…. Directed by François Rousselet http://www.riffrafffilms.tv/video/dir… Produced by Natalie Arnett Riff Raff Films http://www.riffrafffilms.tv http://www.rollingstones.com/http://www.facebook.com/therollingstones http://twitter.com/RollingStoneshttp://www.rollingstones.com/newsletter Rolling Stones […]

MUSIC MONDAY Karen Carpenter’s tragic story

_____________ Carpenters Close To You Karen Carpenter’s tragic story Karen Carpenter’s velvet voice charmed millions in the 70s… but behind the wholesome image she was in turmoil. Desperate to look slim on stage – and above all desperate to please the domineering mother who preferred her brother – she became the first celebrity victim of […]

MUSIC MONDAY The Carpenters!!!

carpenters -We’ve Only Just Begun The Carpenters – Yesterday Once More (INCLUDES LYRICS) The Carpenters – There’s a kind of hush The Carpenters – Greatest Hits Related posts: MUSIC MONDAY Paul McCartney Mull Of Kintyre November 13, 2016 – 10:29 am Paul McCartney Mull Of Kintyre-Original Video-HQ Uploaded on Nov 25, 2011 Paul McCartney Mull Of […]

WOODY WEDNESDAY Woody Allen On ‘Irrational Man’, His Movies & Hollywood’s Perilous Path – Cannes Q&A by Mike Fleming Jr May 14, 2015 2:46pm

_____________

New Year’s Eve 1963

Published on Dec 30, 2013

Audio recording from live broadcast of “The Tonight Show” with Johnny Carson made 50 years ago. Guests include Rudy Vallee and Woody Allen. Also included is the count down from Times Square with Ben Grauer.

Woody Allen Bob Hope Tonight Show 1971

TIME Interviews Woody Allen

Liked the book MOBY DICK during the filming of LOVE AND DEATH.

Woody Allen talks ‘Midnight in Paris’

AT THE 27 MIN MARK Woody Allen says:

I have never gotten to the point where I can give an optimistic view of anything. I have these ideas for stories that I hope are entertaining and I am always criticized for being pessimistic or nihilistic. To me this is just a realistic appraisal of life. There are these little Oasis’s these little distractions you get. Last night I was caught up in the Bulls and Heat basketball game on television and for the time being I was thinking about who was going to win. I wasn’t thinking about my mortality or the fact that I am finite and aging. That was not on my mind. Labron James was on my mind and the game. That is the best you can do is get a little  detraction. What I have learned over the years is that there is no other solution to it. There is no satisfying answer. There is no optimistic answer I can give anybody.

The outcome of that basketball game is no less meaningful or no more meaningful than human life if you take the long view of it. You could look at the earth and say who cares about those creatures running around there and just brush it. Ernest Hemingway in one of his stories ( A FAREWELL TO ARMS) is looking at a burning log with ants running on it. This is the kind of thinking that has over powered me over the years and slips into my stories.

I have always been an odd mixture, completely accidentally, I was a nightclub comic joke writer whose two biggest influences were Groucho Marx, who I have always adored and he still makes me laugh  and Igmar Bergman. I have always had a morbid streak in my work and I when I do something that works , it works to my advantage because it gives some substance and depth to the story, but I when I fail the thing could be too grim or too moralizing or not interesting enough. Then someone will say we only like you when you are funny.

 

Axel Kuschevatzky interviews Woody Allen – part 1

Axel Kuschevatzky interviews Woody Allen – part 2

Axel Kuschevatzky interviews Woody Allen – part 3

Axel Kuschevatzky interviews Woody Allen – part 4

(at the beginning of part 4 is about the Darwinian struggle)

BBC Radio – Woody Allen Interview 2013

Woody Allen Interview on NPR

 _______________

1994 Woody Allen NBC interview

Woody Allen Blue Jasmine Interview BBC Newsnight 2013

Martin Landau on Woody Allen’s ‘Crimes & Misdemeanors’ in 1990 interview

Brian Linehan’s City Lights- Woody Allen 1982

WOODY ALLEN – The Dick Cavett Show (1971) | SUB ITA

Woody Allen Interview

 

Woody Allen On ‘Irrational Man’, His Movies & Hollywood’s Perilous Path – Cannes Q&A

CANNES, FRANCE - MAY 15: Director Woody Allen attends the "You Will Meet A Tall Dark Stranger" press conference at the Palais des Festivals during the 63rd Annual Cannes Film Festival on May 15, 2010 in Cannes, France. (Photo by Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images)

EXCLUSIVE: The 79-year-old director Woody Allen comes to the Cannes Film Festival’s Palais tomorrow to premiere Irrational Man, a comedy about an existentially challenged professor that stars Joaquin Phoenix, Emma Stone and Parker Posey. It’s Allen’s 46th film as a director, a total he reached by making one a year like clockwork, for as long as anyone can remember.

For Deadline’s Cannes Q&A, Allen invited us to his Manhattan screening room. There, he explained how he has managed a storied career without ever showing a script or cast list to a financier, or getting a script note. And how, despite a groundbreaking TV series deal with Amazon, he doesn’t own a computer or understand what a streaming service is; all he knows is, he regrets a deal that has taken him out of his comfort zone. And despite his four Oscars, and the seven won by actors in his films, Allen believes he has never done anything of real consequence in all the years of generating stand-up comedy, books, plays and movies. The room is a warm, cozy dimly lit place with dated drapes and upholstered chairs and couches. It has the vibe of a place where people might play bridge, which is exactly what they did until he got hold of it.

DEADLINE: What is this place?
ALLEN: A bridge club years ago that we took over and made into a screening room with a projector, to screen films recreationally. I found it a great place to work. So we edit in the other room, and come in here and look at it. Then we become depressed, go back in that room and try to fix it.

DEADLINE: How long is it from depression to finished film?
ALLEN: It used to take a long time, when we worked with celluloid. Now with the Avid I can edit a film in seven to eight days and it is no big deal.

DEADLINE: Purists like Scorsese and Tarantino are dedicated to preserving film. You?
ALLEN: I have no strong feeling on it. I’m happy to go whichever way everyone is. Digital looks very good to me if it’s done well. Film always looks great if it’s done well. I’ve never shot anything in digital, but I think I will shoot my next film digitally to see what that’s like. It is more than the wave of the future; it’s the wave of the present, really.

DEADLINE: What are the advantages compelling you to try it for the first time?
ALLEN: They seem minimal. It’s all the after-stuff of not having to cut celluloid, but digital is really not cheaper and it’s not faster. It’s just that that’s the way everything has moved and it looks pretty. I see digital shot by good cameramen that is beautiful and I wouldn’t be able to tell the difference, so I don’t mind it. I like that I can edit fast. You just punch electronics where it used to be you’d cut and then have to splice it and tape it and then look at it and un-tape it. Now, it’s bang, bang, bang, bang, bang and it’s done. I never start editing a film until it’s completely shot; I don’t edit along the way, ever. When it’s finished I come in here and we start with reel one, scene one and start editing shot by shot by shot until we’re finished. Once we get in here, going from nothing to the first draft is the longest part and that’s only about eight days for me. Then you look at it and the big problems become apparent, the ones you can’t get rid of by cutting or speeding it up.

DEADLINE: Like?
ALLEN: You need to make a character less likable or more likable or a relationship more believable. Maybe you add a music track or narration. Or certain things aren’t coherent in that version that’s two hours and ten minutes long. By the time you’re done running back and forth, it’s an hour and forty minutes. And you’ve removed all the junk, the stuff you were so gung-ho about, that you thought was so great. Reality sets in, and it’s gone.

DEADLINE: Are you a ruthless executioner of lines you loved when you wrote them on the page?
ALLEN: Ruthless. I think probably over the years I’ve been too ruthless, mainly because I’m anxiety-ridden. I’ve cut jokes and bits out of movies that would have played just great, if only I had had the nerve to leave them in. I regret having cut different jokes and different bits out of pictures and in retrospect I think they would have worked fine. I just didn’t have the nerve at the time. I worried they wouldn’t work.

DEADLINE: Afraid of overstaying your welcome with audiences with an overly long film?
ALLEN: Sometimes it didn’t even get to that. Once you’ve tested it, if they laugh they laugh; if they didn’t then you could always throw it away. There is a number of funny things that I never even tested with audience because I didn’t have the nerve to even show them, I was so anxiety-ridden they might be embarrassing or terrible or unfunny. They never saw the light of day. A number of them I regret because they were funny…probably.

DEADLINE: Can you recall specific jokes you killed that you regret?
ALLEN: I can recall many bits. InBananas, there was a very funny bit when the dictator came to the United States and was on the Cousin Brucie show. We cut that because I just didn’t have the nerve. There was a wonderful bit in Bananas too where the guys were in the jungle and all of a sudden a plane lands and the troops come out and it’s allegedly Bob Hope entertaining them. But then my character realizes, the guy’s not Bob Hope, he’s one of the police underground acting like Bob Hope; he’s a Latin American version, doing Hope jokes with the golf club, and all of a sudden when I realized that, the shooting starts and everybody scatters. I remember walking out of my house in Love And Death in the cold of winter, and the snow is covering the front door, and my having to dig a tunnel straight through. It looked very funny at the time. I cut it. There were a couple of great jokes in Manhattan that were too out of character, too broad for the tone of the picture. They would have been good in Take The Money And Run or Bananas. They were funny. In one, I was bicycling in a park with Mariel Hemingway and Michael Murphy and Anne Byrne Hoffman and Diane Keaton, and I got somehow sidetracked into a team of very fast cyclists. I was just riding this bike and made a turn and suddenly I was in with six guys who were going a mile a minute. It looked fun as I tried to escape that, but I worried it stood out like a sore thumb in the movie.

DEADLINE: Some would call that discipline. What you call it?
ALLEN: Anxiety. It’s easy for me to cut length, I never care about that. I notice a lot of people don’t like to cut, they’re reluctant to part with lines in stage plays and bits in movies. But I was brought up to cut stuff. When I learned how to write, the person I was most influenced by was always telling me, any doubt, cut it.

DEADLINE: Who was that?
ALLEN: Danny Simon. Neil Simon’s brother, who was really very helpful to me when I was 20 years old. He was a merciless editor and that rubbed off on me. This was when I was writing television. Danny and I would work on a skit. It would be coming along fine and then either he or I might come up with a great joke. And he would say, “Yes, it’s a great joke but it’s an expensive laugh.” He meant you’re stopping the action for the joke. I didn’t want to part with it because the joke was great, but then you thought, maybe the joke is too inside and only 100 people would get it. And nobody knows who Thelonious Monk is. Danny was a merciless cutter.

DEADLINE: Irrational Man marks the 11th time you’ve brought a film to Cannes, 12 if you count your contribution to the anthology New York Stories. You didn’t want to premiere in competition. Why?
ALLEN: I’ve never had a film in competition in my life. I just don’t feel you can say one film is better than another. Who’s to say some arbitrarily appointed group of judges can decide one is better? Is The Godfather better than Goodfellas, or whatever came out the same calendar year? You don’t make these films to compete. People make films for different reasons. For money. Or, they make them because something in them demands artistic expression. I do it because I enjoy the work. Once a film is over and I see it in this room and we’ve taken it as far as we can go, with no room for improvement… that’s it. It leaves this room and I never see it again ever, for the rest of my life.

DEADLINE: Ever?
ALLEN: Ever. I’ve never seen Take The Money And Run since I made it. I never sawAnnie Hall again, or Bananas or Manhattan or any of them. Because, you can only have regrets. If I was to screen any of my films now I would only see what I could have done, what I did badly, where I screwed up, how much worse it is than the way I remembered it. You’re never going to think “Oh, God, this thing is great.” Many years ago I was in Europe making What’s New Pussycat. I was having lunch in a cafeteria in France on this film set. Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor were making a film there, I think it was The Sandpiper. I was chatting with him for a moment, I hardly knew him, and he said, “I never see my films after I make them, ever.” This was a great actor, but I thought, gee, that’s so strange. I was just a writer on my first film and I didn’t know anything. When I got into directing films myself, I understood completely what he meant.

DEADLINE: Daniel Day-Lewis once told me he rigorously prepares for roles and lives in the character’s skin through the shoot, and can’t watch the results because he sees only flaws. What’s it like when you have to watch yourself over and over in editing? Are you self-conscious or does that only kick in after you’re done?
ALLEN: Well, a little of both. If I’m in it it’s tougher. It’s like if you’ve ever heard your own voice on a tape recorder? It’s worse when you see and hear yourself. If I’m not in the film and it has delightful people like Diane Keaton or Emma Stone, I have no problem editing it. But then it’s finished, I have to let go because I get that feeling. Oh, God, I had such great people here and I let them down, whether it’s Dianne Wiest, Naomi Watts one all these wonderful actresses who I’ve worked with, and I’ve worked with so many over the years. They trusted me completely and they do my films for very little money and I always feel, ‘Oh, God, I let them down.’ So… the less I have to do with the movie when it’s done, the better.

Emma Stone Woody Allen Magic in the Moonlight

DEADLINE: Directors say, don’t ask me to choose my favorite film; they are all my children.
ALLEN: Yeah, well I hate them all. None are different, and all are…unsatisfying, when you’re finished. Once, I had a generally positive feeling when I finished Match Point. I thought I was very lucky with this film. I was going to use an actress and she fell out a week before we shot and by sheer luck I stumbled onto Scarlett Johansson, who was luckily available. I was shooting in London. I needed a cloudy day, and that day it was cloudy. I needed it to be rainy for two hours — it would rain. I wanted a week of sun, we got it. I could do nothing wrong; I couldn’t screw up no matter how hard I tried. Everything fell into place. When the picture was over, I had a nice feeling about it. I felt that every actor, even those who had one line or two made a contribution to the picture. They didn’t just say the line in a neutral tone. If some guy was repairing our clock or delivering a sandwich, whatever they did they did beautifully and made a contribution. Everybody brought their own thing to this movie and I felt by wonderful good luck, that picture came out very, very close if not right on to what I had conceived to begin with.

DEADLINE: If you watched it now?
ALLEN: I would never watch it because I remembered it so fondly and it would be like, my God what was I thinking?

Irrational ManDEADLINE: What of Joaquin Phoenix’s work made him right forIrrational Man, playing this tormented philosophy professor who seems reinvigorated by a death wish?
ALLEN: Often, I write a part with an actor in mind; I didn’t in this case. I finished the story because I thought I had a good idea. Then, who would be good for this? The first thought I had was certainly Emma Stone because she’s great for practically anything. She’s young and beautiful and gifted and she plays comedy, romance, drama. I saw her singing and dancing on Broadway…she was an easy choice. And then Juliet Taylor, the casting director, mentioned Joaquin. All of us thought he was a great actor. I wondered to myself, would he be a crazy or hard guy to work with? But he wasn’t. He was a very sweet nice person and very, very self-deprecating and insecure. He doesn’t appreciate how good he is and my job was not to direct him as much as to explain to him that his last take was not bad, it was great. He has such a high bar for himself and you explain to him that he is reaching the high bar that he set for himself. We knew as soon as Juliet mentioned his name, oh, he’s perfect.

DEADLINE: I’ve covered the casting of your films for years and young actors consider your invitation to be real validation of their talent. How does a young actor get on your radar and how voracious are you in watching movies to keep current?
ALLEN: I see movies, but not to keep current. I watch strictly for enjoyment. But you do get exposed to the ones that come along. I saw Winter’s Bone and became aware of Jennifer Lawrence. And Juliet Taylor has an encyclopedic knowledge and will so often say, I want you to meet so-and-so. Like Chazz Palminteri. He had not appeared in anything and I was doing Bullets Over Broadway and the second he stepped into this room…I didn’t even have to hear him say anything. I just cast him right away.

DEADLINE: How does your audition process work?
ALLEN: Sometimes I read them but very briefly. I don’t like that as much as just hearing them say something. They don’t have to read from my movie; I just like to hear them and so they come in, sit down here and read for one minute. Half a page maximum and you can tell. Juliet also shows me videos, says here’s three things this actress has done. I see her and she looks interesting and we ask her to come in here and if she’s normal, not incoherent or crazy…I hate casting and keep it short. The person walks in and I do a quick look, just to see them live. I get them out in less than a minute. I say I’m doing a film next April, and Juliet thought you’d be right for something in it. I just wanted to say hello so I don’t have to cast strictly from video. And they say hello and I say OK. I’ve got nothing more to say than thanks for coming in. That’s the way we cast. Once in a while, we’ll read somebody if we’re not sure they sound correct for the character.

DEADLINE: If I was a young actor, auditioning for Woody Allen, I’d be crushed if I was out of there in one minute. Does your assistant routinely say, it’s OK, that’s how he works?
ALLEN: They warn them beforehand that I cast quickly. Actors of course are so insecure. We never turn anybody down because they’re bad; we don’t hire them because we found somebody that suits the part better. But naturally every actor that comes in and doesn’t get the role thinks it’s because they’re no good or they screwed up. It’s never that. Once in a great while if a big actor comes in…say like Joaquin, who actually didn’t come in. Juliet says, he flew in from California; you’ve got to let him sit down for a minute. Please. And I’ve got nothing to say to him. So I make up meaningless stuff. I say, ‘Well, what are you in town for? What was your last picture? Oh, great.’ And, was it boring in Mexico? And then I turn to Juliet and say, you know, I’m out of stuff to say…and I think they don’t want to stay there either. They have a life to lead and they’re not interested in sitting in here getting interrogated. Worse is that very annoying thing of having to read in a room with three people looking at you. I’ve seen the people on tape and it’s painful for me to put actors through that. I know what I would feel like if I had to come in to a room and say hello and you hand me a sheet of paper and I start to act.

DEADLINE: I recall the time when Hollywood studios backed your films, you gave them a bare-bones idea of what you wanted to do, a budget and they said yes without seeing a script. Do you still do it that way?
ALLEN: It’s even freer, now that I’m backed independently. I’ve never had a script note in my life. I write the script; nobody sees it, not the people that put the money in the picture. I cast who I want, and make the film. That’s why I’ve always felt the only thing standing between me and greatness, is me. There’s no excuse for me not to be great except that I’m not. What can I say? Nobody tells me who to cast, how long to shoot, what to shoot, what themes to do, what stories, what line to take out. The backing arrives, and I show up at some point with the film. It could be horror, a comedy; it could be a black-and-white tragedy in medieval Prussia. Nobody knows. What they’re buying is me and the assumption that over many years, he hasn’t done anything that outlandish. The budgets are small compared to most film budgets. If you were backing me my whole film career you would have made money. But also, a film opens like The Avengers and in one weekend, one weekend, it makes more money than six of my films make in ten years.

DEADLINE: It must take discipline not to waver from that formula. Did somebody say something early on that made you realize you’re better not having your confidence rocked by some silly suggestion?
ALLEN: No, I never had that problem. Now, once in a while I will sit down with my wife or with Juliet Taylor and say, who do you think would be better here, Joaquin Phoenix or Alec Baldwin? Every once in a while I bounce something off somebody to get feedback. But I was very lucky from day one, when I made my first film, Take The Money And Run. It was a new film company, Palomar, and the film only cost a million dollars and we brought it in for less. At that time they felt there were certain people like me or Mel Brooks, who had some inexplicable magic comic thing, and that we knew what we were doing and didn’t want to mess with it. They were wrong; I floundered and stumbled all the way through, but they let me alone completely. My second film I did for United Artists, whose policy was to leave the artist alone. Again, I did the whole film for a million dollars. By the time I was up to my third or fourth film, we were saying he gets final cut. I’ve never made a film in my life, outside of the first two when it didn’t matter, where I didn’t have final cut, where I had to show scripts to people, where I had to check with anybody on casting. I’ve never had that problem in my life.

match-pointDEADLINE: Did your transition from studios to overseas funding come because of a slump, or because the game was changing?
ALLEN: The studio game was changing. It started on Match Point. I wrote Match Point for New York. When we began raising the money, people from London called and said if you do a film here we’ll back it. I thought, gee, this film wouldn’t work in Africa, but it would work in London. So I did it over there and I had a wonderful time. The weather was cool in the summer, the skies were gray, the people were lovely that I worked with, the British crews were great. So I made four films in London. And then other countries started calling me. Would you make one in Spain, would you make one in Rome, would you make one in Sweden? If they’d said, make a film in Egypt, well I don’t have an idea for Egypt. But I knew Rome well enough. So I started doing that and it worked out very nicely. My family liked going away in the summers, and they were backing the film there and then the films were successful.

When private backers contacted me, we would tell them what it amounted to in a certain sense is, you put the money in a brown paper bag and you get the film when it’s done. There’s nothing else to do. And some would say OK, but when it came down to contract discussions they would say, well I would like to at least know that it’s going to have somebody in it whose name I recognize. And we would get rid of them. We would say no, this is not going to work out, because we can’t guarantee anything. But there were a few who said look, we have faith in you as an artist, and if that’s the way you want to work, we’ll back your films. I don’t try and be difficult. If someone said, can I come on the set? Sure, I don’t care. If I didn’t want them I’d say well don’t come Tuesday because that’s a very dramatic scene. But come after that. I’m not looking to make people’s life miserable. If somebody putting money in my film asks, who’ll be in your film and I know I’m using Emma Stone or Joaquin, I don’t say you can’t know. I just like to feel I have the final say. Same with the distribution company; I have final say on ads. But I’ve never had to use it, at all. They send me posters. I pick a poster I like and I send it back and if they say to me we don’t really love this one, could you consider some of these others, I do; I’m very easy to work with, and flexible.

DEADLINE: So what are you looking for?
ALLEN: I just want to know in the end that nobody can say to me, ‘well, that’s the one we’re using,’ even if I feel it doesn’t represent the picture at all or if it was cheap and burlesque-y and they could say, ‘too bad, we’re using it.’ David Picker tells the story in his book when I first went to United Artists and they made a deal where I could do anything I wanted. I brought in the script that 25 or 30 years later becameSweet And Lowdown with Sean Penn. David Picker read it and they didn’t want to do it. I said hey, no problem. I could have forced them; the contract was they do what I want. I said, don’t be silly; I don’t want to do a project you’re not enthused over. Give it back to me, I’ll give you another script. My manager, Jack Rollins, who just celebrated his 100th birthday, taught me years ago that no deal is worth the paper it’s printed on. I’ve been with Jack for 50 years, on a handshake. And that’s really how I work. If the guys who put money in my films are not satisfied then I don’t want to be with them.

DEADLINE: You might have started shooting these cities for financial reasons, but I’ve watched the way you shot them in Vicky Cristina Barcelona, Midnight In Paris orTo Rome With Love, and wanted to go there. There is such romanticism…
ALLEN: That’s because I’m a city freak. I love cities, cosmopolitan areas. Not all of them but almost all of them. Paris, Barcelona, London; these are fantastic places. I don’t think I could do that if I made a movie in Albuquerque. But just like with Manhattan, if you’re going to be in Paris or London or Rome or Spain, these cities became part of the story.

DEADLINE: When did it go from hardship of leaving home to reinvigorating your storytelling?
ALLEN: Right away it was artistically provocative to shoot in those cities. I’d like to go back to Paris and make a film. I did four in London and I always wanted to make another in Spain. Maybe where the festival is in San Sebastian. Just a great visual place. I knew those cities, and over the years I’d been to Barcelona, and Paris a million times. London a lot and Rome. But it wouldn’t feel that way in all cities. I contemplated making a film in Sweden; I’ve been there several times and have some sense of it. But if I had to make a film in Japan, I’d have to be shown around. I don’t have any feel for it at all.

DEADLINE: Everybody is courting China. How about there?
ALLEN: That is one of the countries that asked me to come and make a film. I don’t think I can. I’d have to make a film in a place I could live in for four months for the pre-production and shooting. I can live in Paris for four months or London or, you know, Barcelona. These are places that are like New York. But I don’t think I could live in many places. When I had to make a film in the United States I picked San Francisco because to me it’s one of the great cities of America.

DEADLINE: What’s your favorite Cannes memory? And did global media react differently when you started making movies outside New York?
ALLEN: I’ve always been very lucky abroad. Europe, South America, the Far East, they’ve always supported my films enthusiastically. Right from the start with Take The Money And Run.Bananas was a big hit in Europe and I remember being surprised that it was seen as a movie about politics. To me, it was just a bunch of jokes. They have supported me devotedly. If I show a film at Cannes, the audience there comes to enjoy movies. They’re not going there with a chip on their shoulder, or to be nasty. They see a lot of new movies, mine among them, and the publicity I do permeates the whole of Europe and beyond into Israel, Argentina, Japan, Tokyo. The film gets off to a tremendous commercial start there. America is a totally different. You open in America, and you either get good press or bad press. If you get bad press usually nobody comes. These blockbusters, you can get the worst press in the world and make a hundred million dollars. If I get bad press, people won’t come. If I get great press? Maybe they’ll come and maybe they won’t.

DEADLINE: Culture, from books to movies, is increasingly consumed on smart phones and iPads. I imagine a room in your house with a floor-to-ceiling wall of cherished hardcover books that kids probably consider to be dusty relics. How does the reverence for literature and films shown on big screens compare to when you were imprinting authors and filmmakers who influenced your growth as an artist?
ALLEN: Big difference from when I grew up, and I’m talking about not just my childhood in the ’40s but when I was a young adult, living in Manhattan at twenty-five with my peer group. We were not intellectuals, by any means. I was thrown out of school and none of us were intellectuals. We were sports fans. It was a big talk when the next film by Truffaut, Fellini or De Sica was coming out. This is what we waited to see. We were thrilled to see those pictures and we talked about them. Now, if I talk to young, bright kids, they don’t know from Citizen Kane, La Grande Illusion; they don’t know who Ingmar Bergman or Bunuel is, or the first thing about their films. There are people who’ve seen Citizen Kane on a screen this size [he holds his fingers two inches apart]. So there is no reverence; it’s a different time. I think it’s a big loss. They don’t and I can understand that because they are the future and I’m not. But I think that’s a huge loss for them to go and see Treasure Of The Sierra Madre on a three-inch screen, but they don’t. As far as books go, it’s exactly as you said and what Marshall McLuhan said years ago, that as time passes, books will become art objects.

DEADLINE: How invested are you in the digital age?
ALLEN: I don’t own a computer. I’ve never seen anything online at all — nothing. I don’t own a word processor. I have none of that stuff. It’s not an act of rebellion. I’m just not a gadget person.

DEADLINE: But you’ll shoot your next film digital. Aren’t you curious about what else technology offers?
ALLEN: Yeah, but to me it doesn’t make any difference. I don’t work in it. I set the shot up, I compose, I do all that. But it’s irrelevant to me whether they push the button on the camera; it doesn’t matter.

DEADLINE: How do you reconcile your avoidance of computers and iPads, when you signed on to create a TV series forAmazon’s streaming service?
ALLEN: I don’t even know what a streaming service is; that’s the interesting thing. When you said streaming service, it was the first time I’ve heard that term connected with the Amazon thing. I never knew what Amazon was. I’ve never seen any of those series, even on cable. I’ve never seen The Sopranos, or Mad Men. I’m out every night and when I come home, I watch the end of the baseball or basketball game, and there’s Charlie Rose and I go to sleep. Amazon kept coming to me and saying, please do this, whatever you want. I kept saying I have no ideas for it, that I never watch television. I don’t know the first thing about it. Well, this went on for a year and a half, and they kept making a better deal and a better deal. Finally they said look, we’ll do anything that you want, just give us six half hours. They can be black and white, they can take place in Paris, in New York and California, they can be about a family, they can be comedy, you can be in them, they can be tragic. We don’t have to know anything, just come in with six half hours. And they offered a lot of money and everybody around me was pressuring me, go ahead and do it, what do you have to lose?

DEADLINE: So you said yes…
ALLEN: And I have regretted every second since I said OK. It’s been so hard for me. I had the cocky confidence, well, I’ll do it like I do a movie…it’ll be a movie in six parts. Turns out, it’s not. For me, it has been very, very difficult. I’ve been struggling and struggling and struggling. I only hope that when I finally do it — I have until the end of 2016 — they’re not crushed with disappointment because they’re nice people and I don’t want to disappoint them. I am doing my best. I fit it in between films, so it’s not like, no film this year, I’m doing Amazon. It’s a job within my usual schedule. But I am not as good at it as I fantasized I might be. It’s not a piece of cake; it’s a tough thing and I’m earning every penny that they’re giving me and I just hope that they don’t feel, ‘My God, we gave him a very substantial amount of money and freedom and this is what he gives us?’

DEADLINE: But haven’t you just voiced the anxiety and insecurity that fueled your entire creative career?
ALLEN: I hope it’s just the anxiety again, but this is hard. I’m like a fish out of water. Movies I’ve been doing for decades, and even the stage stuff, I know the stage and have seen a million plays. But this…how to begin something and end it after a half an hour and then come back the next time. It’s not me.

DEADLINE: You really regret that deal?
ALLEN: Oh, it’s amazing how you can regret. I haven’t had a pleasurable moment since I undertook it.

DEADLINE: You mentioned review-proof blockbusters. There is an obsession with global box office, sequels, cross pollination of branded content. You’ve never made a sequel. How do you feel about the way the movie business is going?
ALLEN: Well, I think it’s terrible. To me, movies are valuable as an art form and as a wonderful means of popular entertainment. But I think movies have gone terribly wrong. It was much healthier when the studios made a hundred films a year instead of a couple, and the big blockbusters for the most part are big time wasters. I don’t see them. I can see what they are: eardrum-busting time wasters. I think Hollywood has gone in a disastrous path. It’s terrible. The years of cinema that were great were the ’30s, ’40s, not so much the ’50s…but then the foreign films took over and it was a great age of cinema as American directors were influenced by them and that fueled the ’50s and ’60s and ’70s. Then it started to turn. Now it’s just a factory product. They can make a billion dollars on a film and spend hundreds of millions making it. They spend more money on the advertising budget of some of those films than all the profits of everything Bergman, Fellini and Bunuel made on all their films put together in their lifetimes. If you took everything that Bergman made in profit, everything Bunuel made and everything that Fellini made in their lifetimes and added it all together, you wouldn’t equal one weekend with the The Avengers and its $185 million to $200 million.

DEADLINE: Hasn’t the movie business always been art meeting commerce? Isn’t it just that the pendulum shifting toward the latter?
ALLEN: Hollywood is just commerce, and it’s a shame. There are all these wonderfully gifted actors out there that, as you said before, will be in a film of mine for virtually nothing, union minimum, for what you called validation. Really, it’s because they want to work on something that doesn’t insult their intelligence; they don’t want to have to get in to a suit and practice stunts for two months and then do stunts and then… they want to be in something that doesn’t demean their artistic impulses.

DEADLINE: Some of your peers, Martin Scorsese and Ridley Scott for example, are making big-budget broad canvas movies. Was there ever a big story you wanted to tell so badly that you have been tempted to compromise your creative control so you could get the financing?
ALLEN: No. I don’t have any interest in that. I’ve got to say though, the guys you just mentioned, I have nothing but amazed admiration for them. How a guy like Scorsese or Ridley Scott can make a big film, and still put their artistic vision into it and deal with the studios and stars and triumph over that to make the fabulous films that they make is something that is beyond me. I don’t have the personal resources, the character, the intelligence; I don’t know how they do it but they do it. They make wonderful films that work. Those directors compromise but the results are not artistically demeaning. They manipulate and navigate the waters and come up with great movies, fighting the battle against the Philistine studios, the money people, and triumph artistically. I have nothing but awe and admiration for them. I can’t imagine how they do it. Me, I don’t want to be bothered or have to talk to anybody. I don’t want to have to talk to anyone. I just don’t have the temperament for it. I couldn’t survive it so I’d rather get my little 18 million dollar budget and make my film. And if I go over, I give away a portion of my salary and that’s fine with me. Over the years I’ve given away a lot of monies, starting right from the beginning. I get the film I want, I never have to think about it but I still admire that those guys can make big-canvas, high-budget movies, these beautiful, wonderful films and they can finesse the terrible burden of having to deal with the suits.

DEADLINE: Quentin Tarantino has told me he will retire a couple of movies from now, on the grounds that he wants to stop before feeling that his next film can’t be his greatest, at which point he begins repeating himself. What is your feeling about a filmmaker’s longevity? Is there a time to stop?
ALLEN: Only when you want to. It depends. Some guys only make a few films, and then a guy like Bunuel made them his whole life. I enjoy the making of the film and it’s something for me to do. If nobody ever comes to my films, if people don’t want to give me money to make films, that will stop me. But as long as people come all over the world and I have an audience and I have ideas for films, I will do them for as long as I enjoy the process. And I like the whole process of making a film.

DEADLINE: So until you get that tap on the shoulder…
ALLEN: I’ll keep going. Now, sometimes I come out with a film and nobody wants to see it. But it doesn’t matter to me. I’m already working on another film and having the enjoyment of that and maybe that film a lot of people will come and see, but then I’m on the next one anyway. I never look back. When I was a little boy, I thought the fun in the movies would be the fame and the adulation and the money. Then when I started making films, I realized the fun in the film is not that it’s well-reviewed or that people line up and see it or it’s heartbreaking if they don’t or you’re a great hero if you win an award. All that stuff is nonsense. If it’s not fun when you’re spending the three months writing the film, and then three months shooting the film and the three months editing… if that comprises most of your year and it’s not fun, then why do it? It’s fun for me. I’m in contact with beautiful women and charming guys and art directors and costumes and Cole Porter’s music…it’s a wonderful way to earn a living.

DEADLINE: In that PBS Masters special on your early years, you were a prolific comedy writer, and did great stand-up comedy and you make a movie each year like clockwork. What’s the biggest thing that you struggle with as a creator?
ALLEN: The constant desire to do something great and the knowledge that it’s not really in me. I’ve had more than my share of opportunity over the decades to do something great, to break new ground, to find a new form, to electrify, to really stun people. After a while I had to realize, well, wait a minute, nobody’s stopping me. I mean, go ahead and do it. You can do anything you want to. You can have a blank screen for an hour and a half in the movie house if you wanted; you’re the boss. And then I start to think the reason it is not coming is that you can’t do it. You don’t have it in you. You do not have greatness in you; you’re not Kurosawa, or Fellini. You’re a comic turned film director with a modest talent to amuse, to entertain. But true greatness is not in you. You’re not William Faulkner or Cole Porter. You’re one of the entertainers of your lifetime and that’s it. So I’m constantly struggling to say no, this isn’t so, wait until you see what I do next. Then I see what I do next and it’s truly fine and nice but it’s not…I can’t live up to my own egotistical image of myself, I guess.

DEADLINE: Well, if it’s any consolation, this interview takes one item off my bucket list.
ALLEN: I’m 79. You got it in, just under the wire.

Subscribe to Deadline Breaking News Alerts and keep your inbox happy

 

Related posts:

WOODY WEDNESDAY Settling into a hotel bar in Soho after a long day shooting a film for Woody Allen in the Bronx, Justin Timberlake wastes no time ordering the first of several Vesper martinis. “I was terrified all day today, dude,”

___________ Justin Timberlake Talks ‘Trolls,’ Family Life and His New Album With Pharrell Williams Andrew Barker Senior Features Writer@barkerrant TOM MUNRO FOR VARIETY NOVEMBER 1, 2016 | 10:00AM PT Settling into a hotel bar in Soho after a long day shooting a film for Woody Allen in the Bronx, Justin Timberlake wastes no time ordering […]

WOODY WEDNESDAY Woody Allen’s 81st Birthday

_ Woody Allen – standup – ’65 – RARE! Happy 81st Birthday, Woody Allen December 2, 2016 1 Comment Woody Allen turns 81 today. And he shows no signs of slowing down. Allen spent his 80th year being remarkably prolific, even by his own standards. The end of 2015 saw that year’s film, Irrational Man, […]

WOODY WEDNESDAY Everything We Know About Woody Allen’s 2017 Film With Kate Winslet And Justin Timberlake October 16, 2016

  _ Everything We Know About Woody Allen’s 2017 Film With Kate Winslet And Justin Timberlake October 16, 2016 3 Comments Woody Allen has, it seems, wrapped production on his 2017 Film. The new film stars Kate Winlset and Justin Timberlake. And despite some very public days of shooting, We still don’t know that much […]

WOODY WEDNESDAY At 79, Woody Allen Says There’s Still Time To Do His Best Work JULY 29, 2015 5:03 PM ET

_____________ Woody Allen – The Atheist At 79, Woody Allen Says There’s Still Time To Do His Best Work JULY 29, 2015 5:03 PM ET When asked about his major shortcomings, filmmaker Woody Allen says, “I’m lazy and an imperfectionist.” Thibault Camus/AP Woody Allen is a prolific filmmaker — he’s been releasing films pretty much […]

WOODY WEDNESDAY Midnight in Paris: TAP’s Movie of the Month for June 2015 JUNE 1, 2015 by TAP Adventures

Midnight in Paris: TAP’s Movie of the Month for June 2015 JUNE 1, 2015 by TAP Adventures Each month in TAP, we select a Movie of the Month to help prepare our students for their overseas trip. This month we’re starting to prepare for our 2016 adventure in France and the Benelux countries, so we’ve selected […]

“Woody Wednesday” An Interview with Woody Allen Woody Allen’s World: Whatever Works Robert E. Lauder April 15, 2010 – 2:31pm

This interview   below reveals Woody Allen’s nihilistic views and reminds me of his best movie which is  CRIMES AND MISDEMEANORS!!!! Crimes and Misdemeanors 1989 Woody Allen Woody Allen Crimes and Misdemeanors Nihilism Nietzsche’s Death of God An Interview with Woody Allen Woody Allen’s World: Whatever Works Robert E. Lauder April 15, 2010 – 2:31pm Woody […]

WOODY WEDNESDAY Woody’s Cold Comforts Robert E. Lauder April 19, 2010

Top 10 Woody Allen Movies   Woody’s Cold Comforts Robert E. LauderApril 19, 2010 – 1:36pm Friends have often asked me about my interest in the films of Woody Allen: Why is a Catholic priest such an ardent admirer of the work of an avowed atheist, an artist who time and again has insisted on […]

WOODY WEDNESDAY New bio reassesses Woody Allen at 80 James Endrst , Special for USA TODAY2:03 p.m. EST November 7, 2015

Woody Allen & Parker Posey Red-Carpet Interviews for ‘Irrational Man’ New bio reassesses Woody Allen at 80 James Endrst , Special for USA TODAY2:03 p.m. EST November 7, 2015 Woody: The Biography by  David Evanier  (St. Martin’s Press) in Biography Buy Now USA TODAY Rating Woody Allen turns 80 on Dec. 1 and David Evanier has […]

WOODY WEDNESDAY A Handy Guide to All the Philosophers Referenced in Irrational Man by Eliza Berman July 17, 2015

___ Existentialism and the Meaningful Life [The Common Room] Francis Schaeffer “BASIS FOR HUMAN DIGNITY” Whatever…HTTHR A Handy Guide to All the Philosophers Referenced in Irrational Man Eliza Berman @lizabeaner July 17, 2015 David Livingston–Getty ImagesJoaquin Phoenix and Emma Stone attend the premiere of “Irrational Man” in Los Angeles on July 9, 2015. Leave it […]

Woody Wednesday All 47 Woody Allen movies – ranked from worst to best Part H

Woody Wednesday All 47 Woody Allen movies – ranked from worst to best (L-R): Annie Hall, Sleeper and To Rome With Love Robbie Collin, Film Critic Tim Robey, Film Critic 12 October 2016 • 2:55pm Annie Hall or Bananas? Blue Jasmine or Sleeper? Our critics Robbie Collin and Tim Robey rank all 47 Woody Allen movies […]

___________

__________

MUSIC MONDAY George Harrison’s best album is possibly ALL THINGS MUST PASS

 

George Harrison – ”All Things Must Pass” [Full Album]

All Things Must Pass

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This article is about the album. For other uses, see All Things Must Pass (disambiguation).
“Apple Jam” redirects here. For jam made from apples, see apple jam and apple sauce.
All Things Must Pass
All Things Must Pass 1970 cover.jpg
Studio album by George Harrison
Released 27 November 1970
Recorded 26 May–late October 1970
Studio Abbey Road Studios, London; Trident Studios, London; Apple Studio, London
Genre
Length 105:59
Label Apple
Producer George Harrison, Phil Spector
George Harrison chronology
Electronic Sound
(1969)
All Things Must Pass
(1970)
The Concert for Bangladesh
(1971)
Singles from All Things Must Pass
  1. My Sweet Lord
    Released: 23 November 1970 (US); 15 January 1971 (UK)
  2. What Is Life
    Released: 15 February 1971 (US)
Alternative cover

Album artwork of the 2001 re-release of All Things Must Pass

All Things Must Pass is a triple album by English musician George Harrison. Recorded and released in 1970, the album was Harrison’s first solo work since the break-up of the Beatles in April that year, and his third solo album overall. It includes the hit singles “My Sweet Lord” and “What Is Life“, as well as songs such as “Isn’t It a Pity” and the title track that had been turned down for inclusion on releases by the Beatles. The album reflects the influence of Harrison’s musical activities with artists such as Bob Dylan, the Band, Delaney & Bonnie and Billy Preston during 1968–70, and his growth as an artist beyond his supporting role to former bandmates John Lennon and Paul McCartney. All Things Must Pass introduced Harrison’s signature sound, the slide guitar, and the spiritual themes that would be present throughout his subsequent solo work. The original vinyl release consisted of two LPs of songs and a third disc of informal jams, titled Apple Jam. Several commentators interpret Barry Feinstein‘s album cover photo, showing Harrison surrounded by four garden gnomes, as a statement on his independence from the Beatles.

Production began at London’s Abbey Road Studios in May 1970, with extensive overdubbing and mixing continuing through October. Among the large cast of backing musicians were Eric Clapton and Delaney & Bonnie’s Friends band – three of whom formed Derek and the Dominos with Clapton during the recording – as well as Ringo Starr, Gary Wright, Preston, Klaus Voormann, John Barham, Badfinger and Pete Drake. The sessions produced a double album’s worth of extra material, most of which remains unissued.

All Things Must Pass was critically and commercially successful on release, with long stays at number 1 on charts around the world. The album was co-produced by Phil Spector and employs his Wall of Sound production technique to notable effect; Ben Gerson of Rolling Stone described the sound as “Wagnerian, Brucknerian, the music of mountain tops and vast horizons”.[1] Reflecting the widespread surprise at the assuredness of Harrison’s post-Beatles debut, Melody Makers Richard Williams likened the album to Greta Garbo‘s first role in a talking picture and declared: “Garbo talks! – Harrison is free!”[2] According to Colin Larkin, writing in the 2011 edition of his Encyclopedia of Popular Music, All Things Must Pass is “generally rated” as the best of all the former Beatles’ solo albums.[3]

During the final year of his life, Harrison oversaw a successful reissue campaign to mark the 30th anniversary of the album’s release. Following this reissue, in March 2001, the set was certified six-times platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America. Among its appearances in critics’ best-album lists, All Things Must Pass was ranked 79th on The Times “The 100 Best Albums of All Time” in 1993, while Rolling Stone currently places it 433rd on the magazine’s “500 Greatest Albums of All Time“. In January 2014, All Things Must Pass was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame.

Background[edit]

Music journalist John Harris has identified the start of George Harrison‘s “journey” to making All Things Must Pass as his visit to America in late 1968, following the acrimonious sessions for the BeatlesWhite Album.[4] While in Woodstock in November,[5] Harrison established a long-lasting friendship with Bob Dylan[4] and experienced a creative equality among the Band that contrasted sharply with John Lennon and Paul McCartney‘s domination in the Beatles.[6][7] Coinciding with this visit was a surge in Harrison’s songwriting output,[8] following his renewed interest in the guitar, after three years spent studying the Indian sitar.[9][10] As well as being one of the few musicians to co-write songs with Dylan,[4] Harrison had recently collaborated with Eric Clapton on “Badge“,[11] which became a hit single for Cream in the spring of 1969.[12]

Billboard ad for Harrison’s Wonderwall Music soundtrack (1968)

Once back in London, and with his compositions continually overlooked for inclusion on releases by the Beatles,[13][14] Harrison found creative fulfilment in extracurricular projects that, in the words of his musical biographer, Simon Leng, served as an “emancipating force” from the restrictions imposed on him in the band.[15] His activities during 1969 included producing Apple signings Billy Preston and Doris Troy, two American singer-songwriters whose soul and gospel roots proved as influential on All Things Must Pass as the music of the Band.[16] He also recorded with artists such as Leon Russell[17] and Jack Bruce,[18] and accompanied Clapton on a short tour with Delaney Bramlett‘s soul revue, Delaney & Bonnie and Friends.[19] In addition, Harrison identified his involvement with the Hare Krishna movement as providing “another piece of a jigsaw puzzle” that represented the spiritual journey he had begun in 1966.[20] As well as embracing the Vaishnavist branch of Hinduism, Harrison produced two hit singles during 1969–70 by the UK-based devotees, credited as Radha Krishna Temple (London).[21] In January 1970,[22] Harrison invited American producer Phil Spector to participate in the recording of Lennon’s Plastic Ono Band single “Instant Karma![23][24] This association led to Spector being given the task of salvaging the Beatles’ Get Back rehearsal tapes, released officially as the Let It Be album (1970),[25][26] and later co-producing All Things Must Pass.[27]

Harrison first discussed the possibility of making a solo album of his unused songs during the ill-tempered Get Back sessions, held at Twickenham Film Studios in January 1969.[28][29][nb 1] At Abbey Road Studios on 25 February, his 26th birthday,[32] Harrison recorded demos of “All Things Must Pass” and two other compositions that had received little interest from Lennon and McCartney at Twickenham.[33][34] With the inclusion of one of these songs – “Something” – and “Here Comes the Sun” on the Beatles’ Abbey Road album in September 1969, music critics acknowledged that Harrison had bloomed into a songwriter to match Lennon and McCartney.[35][36] Although he began talking publicly about recording his own album from the autumn of 1969,[37][38] it was only after McCartney announced that he was leaving the Beatles, in April 1970, signalling the band’s break-up,[39] that Harrison committed to the idea.[40] Despite having already made Wonderwall Music (1968), a mostly instrumental soundtrack album, and the experimental Electronic Sound (1969),[41] Harrison considered All Things Must Pass to be his first solo album.[42][nb 2]

Content[edit]

Main body[edit]

I went to George’s Friar Park … and he said, “I have a few ditties for you to hear.” It was endless! He had literally hundreds of songs and each one was better than the rest. He had all this emotion built up when it was released to me.[47]

– Phil Spector, on first hearing Harrison’s backlog of songs in early 1970

Spector first heard Harrison’s stockpile of unreleased compositions early in 1970, when visiting his recently purchased home, Friar Park.[47] “It was endless!” Spector later recalled of the recital, noting the quantity and quality of Harrison’s material.[47] Harrison had accumulated songs from as far back as 1966; both “Isn’t It a Pity” and “Art of Dying” date from that year.[48] He co-wrote at least two songs with Dylan while in Woodstock,[49] one of which, “I’d Have You Anytime“, appeared on All Things Must Pass.[50] Harrison wrote “Let It Down” in late 1968 also.[51]

He introduced the Band-inspired[52] “All Things Must Pass”, along with “Hear Me Lord” and “Let It Down”, at the Beatles’ Get Back rehearsals, only to have them rejected by Lennon and McCartney.[53][54][nb 3] The tense atmosphere at Twickenham fuelled another All Things Must Pass song, “Wah-Wah“,[58] which Harrison wrote in the wake of his temporary departure from the band on 10 January 1969.[59]Run of the Mill” followed soon afterwards, its lyrics focusing on the failure of friendships within the Beatles[60] amid the business problems surrounding their Apple organisation.[61] Harrison’s musical activities outside the band during 1969 inspired other compositions on the album: “What Is Life” came to him while driving to a London session that spring for Preston’s That’s the Way God Planned It album;[62]Behind That Locked Door” was Harrison’s message of encouragement to Dylan,[63] written the night before the latter’s comeback performance at the Isle of Wight Festival;[64] and Harrison began “My Sweet Lord” as an exercise in writing a gospel song[65] during Delaney & Bonnie’s stopover in Copenhagen in December 1969.[66][nb 4]

I Dig Love” resulted from Harrison’s early experiments with slide guitar, a technique that Bramlett had introduced him to,[65] in order to cover for guitarist Dave Mason‘s departure from the Friends line-up.[69] Other songs on All Things Must Pass, all written during the first half of 1970, include “Awaiting on You All“, which reflected Harrison’s adoption of chanting through his involvement with the Hare Krishna movement;[70][71]Ballad of Sir Frankie Crisp (Let It Roll)“, a tribute to the original owner of Friar Park;[72] and “Beware of Darkness“.[73] The latter was another composition influenced by Harrison’s association with the Radha Krishna Temple,[74] and was written while some of the devotees were staying with him at Friar Park.[75]

Shortly before beginning work on All Things Must Pass, Harrison attended a Dylan session in New York on 1 May 1970,[76] during which he acquired a new song of Dylan’s, “If Not for You“.[58] Harrison wrote “Apple Scruffs“, which was one of a number of Dylan-influenced compositions on the album,[77] towards the end of production on All Things Must Pass, as a tribute to the diehard fans who had kept a vigil outside the studios where he was working.[71][78]

According to Leng, All Things Must Pass represents the completion of Harrison’s “musical-philosophical circle”, in which his 1966–68 immersion in Indian music found a Western equivalent in gospel music.[79] While identifying hard rock, country and western, and Motown among the other genres on the album, Leng writes of the “plethora of new sounds and influences” that Harrison had absorbed through 1969 and now incorporated, including “Krishna chants, gospel ecstasy, Southern blues-rock [and] slide guitar”.[80] The melodies of “Isn’t It a Pity” and “Beware of Darkness” have aspects of Indian classical music, and on “My Sweet Lord”, Harrison combined the Hindu bhajan tradition with gospel.[81] The recurrent lyrical themes on the album are Harrison’s spiritual quest, as it would be throughout his solo career,[82] and friendship, particularly the failure of relationships among the Beatles.[83][84] Rob Mitchum of Pitchfork Media describes the album as “dark-tinged Krishna folk-rock”.[85]

Apple Jam[edit]

On the original LP‘s third disc, entitled Apple Jam, four of the five tracks – “Out of the Blue”, “Plug Me In”, “I Remember Jeep” and “Thanks for the Pepperoni” – are improvised instrumentals built around minimal chord changes,[86] or in the case of “Out of the Blue”, a single-chord riff.[87] The title for “I Remember Jeep” originated from the name of Clapton’s dog, Jeep,[88] and “Thanks for the Pepperoni” came from a line on a Lenny Bruce comedy album.[89] In a December 2000 interview with Billboard magazine, Harrison explained: “For the jams, I didn’t want to just throw [them] in the cupboard, and yet at the same time it wasn’t part of the record; that’s why I put it on a separate label to go in the package as a kind of bonus.”[90][nb 5]

The only vocal selection on Apple Jam is “It’s Johnny’s Birthday”, sung to the tune of Cliff Richard‘s 1968 hit “Congratulations“, and recorded as a gift from Harrison to Lennon to mark the latter’s 30th birthday.[92] Like all the “free” tracks on the bonus disc,[93] “It’s Johnny’s Birthday” carried a Harrison songwriting credit on the original UK release of All Things Must Pass,[94] while on the first US copies, the only songwriting information on the record’s face labels was the standard inclusion of a performing rights organisation, BMI.[95] In December 1970, “Congratulations” songwriters Bill Martin and Phil Coulter claimed for royalties,[92] with the result that the composer’s credit for Harrison’s track was swiftly changed to acknowledge Martin and Coulter.[88]

Demo tracks and outtakes[edit]

Aside from the seventeen compositions issued on discs one and two of the original album,[96] Harrison recorded at least twenty other songs – either in demo form for Spector’s benefit, just before recording got officially under way in late May, or as outtakes from the sessions.[97][98] In a 1992 interview, Harrison commented on the volume of material: “I didn’t have many tunes on Beatles records, so doing an album like All Things Must Pass was like going to the bathroom and letting it out.”[99][nb 6] As well as “Wah-Wah”, “Art of Dying” and others that would soon be developed in a band setting, Harrison’s solo performance for Spector included the following songs,[100] all of which remain unreleased:[29][nb 7]

  • “Window, Window” – another composition turned down by the Beatles in January 1969[102]
  • “Everybody, Nobody” – the melody of which Harrison adapted for “Ballad of Sir Frankie Crisp”[100]
  • “Nowhere to Go” – a second Harrison–Dylan collaboration from November 1968, originally known as “When Everybody Comes to Town”[103]
  • “Cosmic Empire”, “Mother Divine” and “Tell Me What Has Happened to You”.[29][104]

Also from this performance were two tracks that Harrison returned to in later years.[97]Beautiful Girl” appeared on his 1976 album Thirty Three & 1/3,[29] and the Dylan-written “I Don’t Want to Do It” was Harrison’s contribution to the soundtrack for Porky’s Revenge! (1985).[58]

During the main sessions for All Things Must Pass, Harrison taped or routined early versions of “You“, “Try Some, Buy Some” and “When Every Song Is Sung“.[105][106] Harrison offered these three songs to Ronnie Spector in February 1971 for her proposed (and soon abandoned) solo album on Apple Records.[107] After releasing his own versions of “Try Some, Buy Some” and “You” between 1973 and 1975,[108] he offered “When Every Song Is Sung” (since retitled “I’ll Still Love You”) to former bandmate Ringo Starr for his 1976 album Ringo’s Rotogravure.[109]Woman Don’t You Cry for Me“, written in December 1969 as his first slide-guitar composition,[110] was another song that Harrison revisited on Thirty Three & 1/3.[69] Harrison included “I Live for You” as the only all-new bonus track on the 2001 reissue of All Things Must Pass.[111] “Down to the River” remained unused until he reworked it as “Rocking Chair in Hawaii[112] for his final studio album, the posthumously released Brainwashed (2002).[113]

Harrison recorded the following compositions during the All Things Must Pass sessions but they have never received an official release:[106]

Contributing musicians[edit]

That was the great thing about [the Beatles] splitting up: to be able to go off and make my own record … And also to be able to record with all these new people, which was like a breath of fresh air.[29]

– George Harrison, December 2000

The precise line-up of contributing musicians is open to conjecture.[116][117] Due to the album’s big sound and the many participants on the sessions, commentators have traditionally referred to the grand, orchestral nature of this line-up.[118][119][120] In 2002, music critic Greg Kot described it as “a who’s who of the decade’s rock royalty”,[53] while Harris writes of the cast taking on “a Cecil B. De Mille aspect”.[58]

Jim Gordon, Carl Radle, Bobby Whitlock and Eric Clapton formed Derek and the Dominos while participating in the sessions for All Things Must Pass.

The musicians included Bobby Whitlock, Jim Gordon, Carl Radle, Bobby Keys, Jim Price and Dave Mason,[121] all of whom had recently toured with Delaney & Bonnie.[122] Along with Eric Clapton, there were also musicians whose link with Harrison went back some years, such as Ringo Starr and Billy Preston, and German bassist Klaus Voormann,[123] formerly of Manfred Mann and a friend since the Beatles’ years in Hamburg.[124] Handling much of the keyboard work with Whitlock was Gary Wright,[116] who went on to collaborate regularly with Harrison throughout the 1970s.[125]

From within Apple’s stable of musicians, Harrison recruited the band Badfinger, future Yes drummer Alan White, and Beatles assistant Mal Evans on percussion.[126][127] Badfinger drummer Mike Gibbins‘ powerful tambourine work led to Spector giving him the nickname “Mr Tambourine Man”, after the Dylan song,[58] while bandmates Pete Ham, Tom Evans and Joey Molland provided rhythm acoustic-guitar parts that, in keeping with Spector’s Wall of Sound principles, were to be “felt but not heard”.[71] Orchestral arranger John Barham also sat in on the sessions, occasionally contributing on harmonium and vibraphone.[128] Other guests included Nashville pedal steel player Pete Drake, Procol Harum‘s Gary Brooker and a pre-Genesis Phil Collins.[129] An uncredited Peter Frampton played acoustic guitar on the country tracks featuring Drake.[130]

For contractual reasons, on UK pressings of All Things Must Pass, Clapton’s participation on the first two discs of the album remained unacknowledged for many years,[119][131] although he was listed among the musicians appearing on the Apple Jam disc in Britain.[132][133][nb 8] Harrison was unaware of Collins’s contribution until putting together the 30th anniversary reissue of the album in 2000,[139] at which point he offered Collins his belated thanks.[140] Clapton’s former bandmate in Cream and Blind Faith, Ginger Baker, participated in the session for “I Remember Jeep” only, according to the album’s sleeve notes.[106]

Simon Leng consulted Voormann, Barham, Molland and Delaney Bramlett for his chapter covering the making of All Things Must Pass and credits Tony Ashton as one of the keyboard players on both versions of “Isn’t It a Pity”.[141][nb 9] Unsubstantiated claims exist regarding possible guest appearances from John Lennon,[144] Maurice Gibb[145] and Pink Floyd‘s Richard Wright.[146][147] In addition, for some years after the album’s release, rumours claimed that the Band backed Harrison on the country-influenced “Behind That Locked Door”.[148]

Production[edit]

Initial recording[edit]

You could feel after the first few sessions that it was going to be a great album.[149]

– Klaus Voormann, 2003

The date for Harrison’s run-through of songs for Spector, at Abbey Road Studios, is generally thought to have been 20 May 1970, the same day as the Let It Be film’s world premiere,[150] with recording sessions beginning on 26 May.[29][98][151][nb 10] With assistance from former Beatles engineers Ken Scott and Phil McDonald,[126] Spector recorded most of the album’s backing tracks live,[153] in some cases featuring multiple drummers and keyboard players, and as many as five rhythm guitarists.[58][139]

Abbey Road Studios, where Harrison recorded much of All Things Must Pass

According to authors Chip Madinger and Mark Easter, the majority of these backing tracks were taped on 8-track at Abbey Road, with the first batch of sessions taking place from late May through to the second week of June.[154] The first song recorded was “Wah-Wah”;[155] “What Is Life”, versions one and two of “Isn’t It a Pity”, and the songs on which Drake participated, such as “All Things Must Pass” and “Ballad of Sir Frankie Crisp”, were among the other tracks taped then.[156][nb 11] The Apple Jam instrumentals “Thanks for the Pepperoni” and “Plug Me In”, featuring Harrison, Clapton and Mason each taking extended guitar solos,[160] were recorded later in June, at the Beatles’ Apple Studio, and marked the formation of Clapton, Whitlock, Radle and Gordon’s short-lived band Derek and the Dominos.[161] Harrison also contributed on guitar to both sides of the band’s debut single, “Tell the Truth[162] and “Roll It Over”,[163] which were produced by Spector and recorded at Apple on 18 June.[161][164] The eleven-minute “Out of the Blue” featured contributions from Keys and Price,[165] both of whom began working with the Rolling Stones around this time.[166]

Although Harrison had estimated in a New York radio interview that the solo album would take no more than eight weeks to complete,[167][168] recording, overdubbing and mixing on All Things Must Pass lasted for five months, until late October.[161][169] Part of the reason for this was Harrison’s need to make regular visits to Liverpool to tend to his mother, who had been diagnosed with cancer.[170][171] Participants at the recording sessions identify Spector’s erratic behaviour as another factor affecting progress on the album.[58][161][172] Harrison later referred to Spector needing “eighteen cherry brandies” before he could start work, a situation that forced much of the production duties onto Harrison alone.[58][171] In July 1970, by which time sessions had resumed at Trident Studios,[97] Spector fell over in the studio and broke his arm.[149] Early that month, work on All Things Must Pass was temporarily brought to a halt as Harrison headed north to see his dying mother for the last time.[173][nb 12] EMI‘s growing concerns regarding studio costs added to the pressure on Harrison,[149] and a further complication, John Harris notes, was that Clapton had become infatuated with Harrison’s wife, Pattie Boyd, and adopted a heroin habit as a means of coping with his guilt.[58][nb 13]

Overdubbing[edit]

In Spector’s absence, Harrison had completed the album’s backing tracks and preliminary overdubs by 12 August.[161] He then sent early mixes of many of the songs to his co-producer, who was convalescing in Los Angeles,[126] and Spector replied by letter dated 19 August with suggestions for further overdubs and final mixing.[161] Among Spector’s comments were detailed suggestions regarding “Let It Down”,[60] the released recording of which Madinger and Easter describe as “the best example of Spector running rampant with the ‘Wall of Sound'”, and an urging that he and Harrison carry out further work on the songs at the superior, 16-track Trident Studios facility.[178] Spector then returned to oversee conversion of the 8-track recordings to 16-track masters,[171] a process that allowed for more freedom when overdubbing new instruments.[126]

John Barham’s orchestrations were recorded during the next phase of the album’s production,[155] starting in early September, along with many further contributions from Harrison, such as his lead vocals, slide guitar parts and multi-tracked backing vocals (the latter credited to “the George O’Hara-Smith Singers”).[179] Leng recognises Barham’s arrangements on “pivotal” songs such as “Isn’t It a Pity”, “My Sweet Lord”, “Beware of Darkness” and “All Things Must Pass” as important elements of the album’s sound,[115] while Spector has praised Harrison’s guitar and vocal work on the overdubs, saying: “Perfectionist is not the right word. Anyone can be a perfectionist. He was beyond that …”[47] Harrison’s style of slide guitar playing incorporated aspects of both Indian music and the blues tradition;[52] from its introduction on All Things Must Pass, Leng writes, Harrison’s slide guitar became his musical signature – “as instantly recognisable as Dylan’s harmonica or Stevie Wonder‘s”.[180]

Mixing and mastering[edit]

If I were doing [All Things Must Pass] now, it would not be so produced. But it was the first record … And anybody who’s familiar with Phil [Spector]’s work – it was like Cinemascope sound.[42]

– George Harrison, January 2001

On 9 October, while carrying out final mixing at Abbey Road, Harrison presented Lennon with the recently recorded “It’s Johnny’s Birthday”.[181][nb 14] The track featured Harrison on vocals, harmonium and all other instruments, and vocal contributions from Mal Evans and assistant engineer Eddie Klein.[92] That same month, Harrison finished his production work on Starr’s 1971 single “It Don’t Come Easy“, the basic track for which they had recorded with Voormann in March at Trident.[183] Aside from his contributions to projects by Starr, Clapton, Preston and Ashton during 1970, over the following year Harrison would reciprocate the help that his fellow musicians on All Things Must Pass had given him by contributing to albums by Whitlock, Wright, Badfinger and Keys.[184][nb 15]

On 28 October, Harrison and Boyd arrived in New York, where he and Spector carried out final preparation for the album’s release, such as sequencing.[126] Harrison harboured doubts about whether all the songs they had finished were worthy of inclusion; Allan Steckler, Apple Records’ US manager, was “stunned” by the quality of the material and assured Harrison that he should issue all the songs.[29] Spector’s signature production style gave All Things Must Pass a heavy, reverb-oriented sound, which Harrison came to regret with the passage of time.[186][187][188] Outtakes from the recording sessions became available on bootlegs in the 1990s.[189] One such unofficial release, the three-disc The Making of All Things Must Pass,[190] contains multiple takes of some of the songs on the album, providing a work-in-progress on the sequence of overdubs onto the backing tracks.[155]

Artwork[edit]

Harrison commissioned Tom Wilkes to design a hinged box in which to house the three vinyl discs, rather than have them packaged in a triple gatefold cover.[88] Apple insider Tony Bramwell later recalled: “It was a bloody big thing … You needed arms like an orang-utan to carry half a dozen.”[134] The packaging caused some confusion among retailers, who, at that time, associated boxed albums with opera or classical works.[134]

The stark black-and-white cover photo was taken on the main lawn at Friar Park[71] by Wilkes’ Camouflage Productions partner, Barry Feinstein.[88] Commentators interpret the photograph – showing Harrison seated in the centre of, and towering over, four comical-looking garden gnomes – as representing his removal from the Beatles’ collective identity.[191][192] The gnomes had recently been delivered to Friar Park and placed on the lawn;[193] seeing the four figures there, and mindful of the message in the album’s title, Feinstein immediately drew parallels with Harrison’s former band.[134] Author and music journalist Mikal Gilmore has written that Lennon’s initial negativity regarding All Things Must Pass was possibly because he was “irritated” by this cover photo;[170] Harrison biographer Elliot Huntley attributes this reaction to envy on Lennon’s part during a time when “everything [Harrison] touched turned to gold”.[194][nb 16]

Apple included a poster with the album, showing Harrison in a darkened corridor of his home, standing in front of an iron-framed window.[198] Wilkes had designed a more adventurous poster, but according to Beatles author Bruce Spizer, Harrison was uncomfortable with the imagery.[199][nb 17] Some of the Feinstein photographs that Wilkes had incorporated into this original poster design appeared instead on the picture sleeves for the “My Sweet Lord” single and its follow-up, “What Is Life”.[88]

Release[edit]

Music should be used for the perception of God, not jitterbugging.[170]

– George Harrison, January 1971

EMI and its US counterpart, Capitol Records, had originally scheduled the album for release in October 1970, and advance promotion began in September.[161] An “intangible buzz” had been “in the air for months” regarding Harrison’s solo album, according to Alan Clayson, and “for reasons other than still-potent loyalty to the Fab Four”.[200] Harrison’s stature as an artist had grown over the past year through the acclaim afforded his songs on Abbey Road,[201][202] as well as the speculation caused by his and Dylan’s joint recording session in New York.[203] Noting also Harrison’s role in popularising new acts such as the Band and Delaney & Bonnie, and his association with Clapton and Cream, NME critic Bob Woffinden concluded in 1981: “All in all, Harrison’s credibility was building to a peak.”[201]

Trade ad for the “What Is Life” single, February 1971

All Things Must Pass was released on 27 November 1970 in the United States, and on 30 November in Britain,[197] with the rare distinction of having the same Apple catalogue number (STCH 639) in both countries.[93] Often credited as rock‘s first triple album,[170] it was the first triple set of previously unissued music by a single act, the multi-artist Woodstock live album having preceded it by six months.[171] Adding to the commercial appeal of Harrison’s songs, Clayson writes, All Things Must Pass appeared at a time when religion and spirituality had become “a turn-of-the-decade craze” among Western youth, just as the Twist had been in 1960.[204] Another factor behind the album’s first weeks of release was Harrison’s meeting with McCartney in New York,[197] the failure of which led to McCartney filing suit in London’s High Court to dissolve the Beatles’ legal partnership.[205]

Apple issued “My Sweet Lord” as the album’s first single, as a double A-side with “Isn’t It a Pity” in the majority of countries.[206] It was highly successful,[202] topping singles charts around the world during the first few months of 1971,[71]on its way to becoming the most performed song of that year.[207][nb 18] Discussing the song’s cultural impact, Gilmore credits “My Sweet Lord” with being “as pervasive on radio and in youth consciousness as anything the Beatles had produced”.[170] Issued in February 1971, the second single, “What Is Life” backed with “Apple Scruffs”,[209] was also successful.[210]

All Things Must Pass was number 1 on the UK’s official albums chart for eight weeks, although until 2006, chart records incorrectly stated that it had peaked at number 4.[211][nb 19] On Melody Makers national chart, the album was also number 1 for eight weeks, from 6 February to 27 March, six of which coincided with “My Sweet Lord” topping the magazine’s singles chart.[212] In America, All Things Must Pass spent seven weeks at number 1 on the Billboard Top LP’s chart, from 2 January until 20 February, and a similarly long period atop the listings compiled by Cash Box and Record World;[213] for three of those weeks, “My Sweet Lord” held the top spot on the Billboard Hot 100.[214] Writing in the April 2001 issue of Record Collector, managing editor Peter Doggett described Harrison as “arguably the most successful rock star on the planet” at the start of 1971, with All Things Must Pass “easily outstripping other solo Beatles projects later in the year, such as [McCartney’s] Ram and [Lennon’s] Imagine“.[215] Harrison’s so-called “Billboard double” – whereby one artist simultaneously holds the top positions on the magazine’s albums and singles listings – was a feat that none of his former bandmates equalled until Paul McCartney and Wings repeated the achievement in June 1973.[216][nb 20] At the 1972 Grammy Awards, All Things Must Pass was nominated for Album of the Year and “My Sweet Lord” for Record of the Year, but Harrison lost out in both categories to Carole King.[218][219]

All Things Must Pass was awarded a gold disc by the Recording Industry Association of America on 17 December 1970[220] and it has since been certified six times platinum.[213][221] According to John Bergstrom of PopMatters, as of January 2011, All Things Must Pass had sold more than Imagine and McCartney and Wings’ Band on the Run (1973) combined.[222] Also writing in 2011, Lennon and Harrison biographer Gary Tillery describes it as “the most successful album ever released by an ex-Beatle”.[223] In his 2004 book The 100 Best-Selling Albums of the 70s, Hamish Champ ranks it as the 36th best-selling album of that decade.[224]

Critical reception[edit]

Contemporary reviews[edit]

All Things Must Pass received almost universal critical acclaim on release – as much for the music and lyrical content as for the fact that, of all the former Beatles, it was the work of supposed junior partner George Harrison.[2][187][225] Beatles author Robert Rodriguez has written of critics’ attention being centred on “a major talent unleashed, one who’d been hidden in plain sight all those years” behind Lennon and McCartney.[226] “That the Quiet Beatle was capable of such range,” Rodriguez continues, “from the joyful ‘What Is Life’ to the meditative ‘Isn’t It a Pity’ to the steamrolling ‘Art of Dying’ to the playful ‘I Dig Love’ – was revelatory.”[226] Most reviewers tended to discount the third disc of studio jams, accepting that it was a “free” addition to justify the set’s high retail price,[86][132]although Anthony DeCurtis recognises Apple Jam as further evidence of the album’s “bracing air of creative liberation”.[227]

Ben Gerson of Rolling Stone deemed All Things Must Pass “both an intensely personal statement and a grandiose gesture, a triumph over artistic modesty” and referenced the three-record set as an “extravaganza of piety and sacrifice and joy, whose sheer magnitude and ambition may dub it the War and Peace of rock and roll”.[1] Gerson also lauded the album’s production as being “of classic Spectorian proportions, Wagnerian, Brucknerian, the music of mountain tops and vast horizons”.[1] In the NME, Alan Smith referred to Harrison’s songs as “music of the mind”, adding: “they search and they wander, as if in the soft rhythms of a dream, and in the end he has set them to words which are often both profound and profoundly beautiful.”[94] Billboard magazine hailed All Things Must Pass as “a masterful blend of rock and piety, technical brilliance and mystic mood, and relief from the tedium of everyday rock”.[228]

Melody Makers Richard Williams summed up the surprise many felt at Harrison’s apparent transformation: All Things Must Pass, he said, provided “the rock equivalent of the shock felt by pre-war moviegoers when Garbo first opened her mouth in a talkie: Garbo talks! – Harrison is free!”[2] In another review, for The Times, Williams opined that, of all the Beatles’ solo releases thus far, Harrison’s album “makes far and away the best listening, perhaps because it is the one which most nearly continues the tradition they began eight years ago”.[225][nb 21] William Bender of Time magazine described it as an “expressive, classically executed personal statement … one of the outstanding rock albums in years”, while Don Heckman wrote in The New York Times: “If anyone had any doubts that George Harrison was a major talent, they can relax … This is a release that shouldn’t be missed.”[231]

That the album sounded so contemporary in 1970 contributed to All Things Must Pass seeming dated and faddish later in the decade.[131] Village Voice critic Robert Christgau, having bemoaned in 1971 that the album was characterised by “overblown fatuity” and uninteresting music,[232] wrote in a 1981 review of its “featurelessness”, “right down to the anonymity of the multitracked vocals”.[233] In their book The Beatles: An Illustrated Record, Roy Carr and Tony Tyler were likewise lukewarm in their assessment, criticising the “homogeneity” of the production and “the lugubrious nature of Harrison’s composing”.[132] Writing in The Beatles Forever in 1977, however, Nicholas Schaffner praised the album as the “crowning glory” of Harrison and Spector’s careers, and highlighted “All Things Must Pass” and “Beware of Darkness” as the “two most eloquent songs … musically as well as lyrically”.[234]

Retrospective reviews and legacy[edit]

Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
AllMusic 5/5 stars[45]
Blender 5/5 stars[235]
Christgau’s Record Guide C[233]
Encyclopedia of Popular Music 4/5 stars[236]
Mojo 5/5 stars[188]
MusicHound 5/5[237]
Pitchfork Media 9.0/10[238]
Q 5/5 stars[239]
Rolling Stone 4.5/5 stars[227]
Uncut 5/5 stars[240]

AllMusic‘s Richie Unterberger views All Things Must Pass as “[Harrison’s] best … a very moving work”,[45] while Roger Catlin of MusicHound describes the set as “epic and audacious”, its “dense production and rich songs topped off by the extra album of jamming”.[237] Q magazine considers it to be an exemplary fusion of “rock and religion”, as well as “the single most satisfying collection of any solo Beatle”.[239] Filmmaker Martin Scorsese has written of the “powerful sense of the ritualistic on the album”, adding: “I remember feeling that it had the grandeur of liturgical music, of the bells used in Tibetan Buddhist ceremonies.”[241] Writing for Rolling Stone in 2002, Greg Kot described this grandeur as an “echo-laden cathedral of rock in excelsis” where the “real stars” are Harrison’s songs;[53] in the same publication, Mikal Gilmore labelled the album “the finest solo work any ex-Beatle ever produced”.[242] In his July 2001 feature for Mojo, John Harris called it “the inaugural solo album that still stands as the best Beatles solo record”,[4] while earlier that year the magazine’s album review read in part: “This remains the best Beatles solo album … oozing both the goggle-eyed joy of creative emancipation and the sense of someone pushing himself to the limit …”[243]

George Harrison confronted the breakup head-on, with the graceful, philosophical All Things Must Pass. A series of elegies, dream sequences, and thoughts on the limits of idealism, it is arguably the most fully realized solo statement from any of the Beatles.[244]

– Author Tom Moon, in 1,000 Recordings to Hear Before You Die (2008)

In his PopMatters review, John Bergstrom likens All Things Must Pass to “the sound of Harrison exhaling”, noting: “He was quite possibly the only Beatle who was completely satisfied with the Beatles being gone.”[222] Bergstrom credits the album with heavily influencing bands such as ELO, My Morning Jacket, Fleet Foxes and Grizzly Bear, as well as helping bring about the dream pop phenomenon.[222] Another Rolling Stone critic, James Hunter, commented in 2001 on how All Things Must Pass “helped define the decade it ushered in”, in that “the cast, the length, the long hair falling on suede-covered shoulders … foretold the sprawl and sleepy ambition of the Seventies.”[245] In The Rolling Stone Album Guide (2004), Mac Randall writes that the album is exceptional, but “a tad overrated” by those critics who tend to overlook how its last 30 minutes comprise “a bunch of instrumental blues jams that nobody listens to more than once”.[246] Unterberger similarly cites the inclusion of Apple Jam as “a very significant flaw”, while recognising that its content “proved to be of immense musical importance”, with the formation of Derek and the Dominos.[45] Writing for Pitchfork Media in 2016, Jayson Green said that Harrison was the only former Beatle who “changed the terms of what an album could be” since, although All Things Must Pass was not the first rock triple LP, “in the cultural imagination, it is the first triple album, the first one released as a pointed statement.”[247]

Among Harrison’s biographers, Simon Leng views All Things Must Pass as a “paradox of an album”: as eager as Harrison was to break free from his identity as a Beatle, Leng suggests, many of the songs document the “Kafkaesque chain of events” of life within the band and so added to the “mythologized history” he was looking to escape.[248] Ian Inglis notes 1970’s place in an era marking “the new supremacy of the singer-songwriter”, through such memorable albums as Simon & Garfunkel‘s Bridge Over Troubled Water, Neil Young‘s After the Gold Rush, Van Morrison‘s Moondance and Joni Mitchell‘s Ladies of the Canyon, but that none of these “possessed the startling impact” of All Things Must Pass.[249] Harrison’s triple album, Inglis writes, “[would] elevate ‘the third Beatle’ into a position that, for a time at least, comfortably eclipsed that of his former bandmates”.[249]

All Things Must Pass features in music reference books such as The Mojo Collection: The Greatest Albums of All Time,[250] Robert Dimery’s 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die[251] and Tom Moon’s 1,000 Recordings to Hear Before You Die.[252] In 1999, All Things Must Pass appeared at number 9 on The Guardians “Alternative Top 100 Albums” list, where the editor described it as the “best, mellowest and most sophisticated” of all the Beatles’ solo efforts.[253] In 2006, Pitchfork Media placed it at number 82 on the site’s “Top 100 Albums of the 1970s”.[85] Six year later, it was voted 433rd on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the “500 Greatest Albums of All Time“.[254] According to the website Acclaimed Music, All Things Must Pass has also appeared in the following critics’ best-album books and lists, among others: Paul Gambaccini‘s The World Critics Best Albums of All Time (1977; ranked number 79), The Times “100 Best Albums of All Time” (1993; number 79), Allan Kozinn‘s The 100 Greatest Pop Albums of the Century (published in 2000), Qs “The 50 (+50) Best British Albums Ever” (2004), Mojos “70 of the Greatest Albums of the 70s” (2006), the NMEs “100 Greatest British Albums Ever” (2006; number 86), Paste magazine’s “The 70 Best Albums of the 1970s” (2012; number 27), and Craig Mathieson and Toby Creswell‘s The 100 Best Albums of All Time (2013).[251] In January 2014, All Things Must Pass was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame,[255] an award bestowed by the Recording Academy “to honor recordings of lasting qualitative or historical significance that are at least 25 years old”.[256]

Subsequent releases[edit]

2001[edit]

Front cover of the 2001 album booklet, reflecting Harrison’s environmental concerns at the start of the 21st century; copyright Gnome Records

To mark the 30th anniversary of the album’s release, Harrison supervised a remastered edition of All Things Must Pass, which was issued in January 2001, less than a year before his death from cancer at the age of 58.[257][nb 22] The reissue appeared on Gnome Records, a label specifically set up by him for the project.[259] Harrison oversaw revisions to Wilkes and Feinstein’s album artwork,[140] which included a colorised “George & the Gnomes” front cover[140]and, on the two CD sleeves and the album booklet, further examples of this cover image showing an imaginary, gradual encroachment of urbanisation on the Friar Park landscape.[91][nb 23] The latter series served to illustrate Harrison’s dismay at “the direction the world seemed headed at the start of the millennium”, Gary Tillery observes, a direction that was “so far afield from the Age of Aquarius that had been the dream of the sixties”.[260][nb 24] Harrison launched a website dedicated to the reissue, which offered, in the description of Chuck Miller of Goldmine magazine, “graphics and sounds and little Macromedia-created gnomes dancing and giggling and playing guitars in a Terry Gilliam-esque world”.[262] As a further example of his willingness to embrace modern media,[263] Harrison prepared an electronic press kit, which he described as “not exactly an EPK but it is a threat to world order as we know it”.[264]

Titled All Things Must Pass: 30th Anniversary Edition, the new album contained five bonus tracks, including “I Live For You”,[265] two of the songs performed for Spector at Abbey Road in May 1970 (“Beware of Darkness” and “Let It Down“) and “My Sweet Lord (2000)“, a partial re-recording of Harrison’s biggest solo hit.[266] In addition, Harrison resequenced the content of Apple Jam so that the album closed with “Out of the Blue”, as he had originally intended.[90][140] Assisting Harrison with overdubs on the bonus tracks were his son, Dhani Harrison, singer Sam Brown and percussionist Ray Cooper,[90] all of whom contributed to the recording of Brainwashed around this time.[267]

With Harrison undertaking extensive promotional work, the 2001 reissue was a critical and commercial success.[268] Having underestimated the album’s popularity, Capitol faced a back order of 20,000 copies in America.[269] There, the reissue debuted at number 4 on Billboards Top Pop Catalog Albums chart[270] and topped the magazine’s Internet Album Sales listings.[271] In the UK, it peaked at number 68 on the national albums chart.[272] Writing in Record Collector, Doggett described this success as “a previously unheard-of achievement for a reissue”.[273]

Following Harrison’s death on 29 November 2001, All Things Must Pass returned to the US charts, climbing to number 6 and number 7, respectively, on the Top Pop Catalog and Internet Album Sales charts.[274] With the release on iTunes of much of the Harrison catalogue, in October 2007,[275] the album re-entered the US Top Pop Catalog chart, peaking at number 3.[276]

2010[edit]

For the 40th anniversary of All Things Must Pass, EMI reissued the album in its original configuration, in a limited-edition box set of three vinyl LPs.[277][278] Available via participating Record Store Day retailers, with each copy individually numbered,[279] the release took place on 26 November 2010.[280] In what Bergstrom notes as a contrast to the more aggressive marketing campaign run simultaneously by John Lennon’s estate, to commemorate Lennon’s 70th birthday,[222] a digitally remastered 24-bit version of the album was made available for download from Harrison’s official website.[277][278] The reissue coincided with the Harrison estate’s similarly low-key[281] release of the Ravi Shankar–George Harrison box set Collaborations[282] and East Meets West Music‘s reissue of Raga, the long-unavailable documentary on Shankar that Harrison had helped release through Apple Films in 1971.[283][284]

2014[edit]

All Things Must Pass was remastered again for inclusion in the eight-disc Harrison box set The Apple Years 1968–75,[285] issued in September 2014.[286] Also available as a separate, double CD release, the reissue reproduces Harrison’s 2001 liner notes[287] and includes the same five bonus tracks that appeared on the 30th anniversary edition.[285] In addition, the box set’s DVD contains the promotional film created for the 2001 reissue.[288]

Track listing[edit]

All tracks written by George Harrison, except where noted.

Original release[edit]

Side one

  1. I’d Have You Anytime” (Harrison, Bob Dylan) – 2:56
  2. My Sweet Lord” – 4:38
  3. Wah-Wah” – 5:35
  4. Isn’t It a Pity (Version One)” – 7:10

Side two

  1. What Is Life” – 4:22
  2. If Not for You” (Dylan) – 3:29
  3. Behind That Locked Door” – 3:05
  4. Let It Down” – 4:57
  5. Run of the Mill” – 2:49

Side three

  1. Beware of Darkness” – 3:48
  2. Apple Scruffs” – 3:04
  3. Ballad of Sir Frankie Crisp (Let It Roll)” – 3:48
  4. Awaiting on You All” – 2:45
  5. All Things Must Pass” – 3:44

Side four

  1. I Dig Love” – 4:55
  2. Art of Dying” – 3:37
  3. Isn’t It a Pity (Version Two)” – 4:45
  4. Hear Me Lord” – 5:46

Side five (Apple Jam)

  1. “Out of the Blue” – 11:14
  2. “It’s Johnny’s Birthday” (Bill Martin, Phil Coulter, Harrison) – 0:49
  3. “Plug Me In” – 3:18

Side six (Apple Jam)

  1. “I Remember Jeep” – 8:07
  2. “Thanks for the Pepperoni” – 5:31

2001 remaster[edit]

Disc one

Tracks 1–9 as per sides one and two of original issue, with the following additional tracks:

  1. I Live for You” – 3:35
  2. Beware of Darkness” (acoustic demo) – 3:19
  3. Let It Down” (alternate version) – 3:54
  4. What Is Life” (backing track/alternate mix) – 4:27
  5. My Sweet Lord (2000)” – 4:57

Disc two

Tracks 1–9 as per sides three and four of original issue, followed by the reordered Apple Jam tracks, for which all participants are believed to now be credited as composers also.[nb 25]

  1. “It’s Johnny’s Birthday” (Martin, Coulter; new lyrics by Mal Evans, Harrison, Eddie Klein) – 0:49
  2. “Plug Me In” (Eric Clapton, Jim Gordon, Harrison, Dave Mason, Carl Radle, Bobby Whitlock) – 3:18
  3. “I Remember Jeep” (Ginger Baker, Clapton, Harrison, Billy Preston, Klaus Voormann) – 8:07
  4. “Thanks for the Pepperoni” (Clapton, Gordon, Harrison, Mason, Radle, Whitlock) – 5:31
  5. “Out of the Blue” (Al Aronowitz, Clapton, Gordon, Harrison, Bobby Keys, Jim Price, Radle, Whitlock, Gary Wright) – 11:16

Personnel[edit]

The following musicians are either credited on the 2001 reissue of All Things Must Pass[289] or are acknowledged as having contributed after subsequent research:[292]

Accolades[edit]

Grammy Awards[edit]

Year Nominee/work Award Result
1972 All Things Must Pass Album of the Year[218] Nominated
“My Sweet Lord” Record of the Year[218] Nominated
2014 All Things Must Pass Hall of Fame Award[256] Won

Charts[edit]

Weekly charts[edit]

Original release
Chart (1970–71) Position
Australian Kent Music Report[295] 1
Canadian RPM 100 Albums[296] 1
Dutch MegaCharts Albums[297] 1
Italian Albums Chart[298] 2
Japanese Oricon LP Chart[299] 4
Norwegian VG-lista Albums[300] 1
Spanish Albums Chart[301] 1
Swedish Kvällstoppen Chart[302] 1
UK Albums Chart[272] 1
US Billboard Top LP’s[271] 1
West German Media Control Albums Chart[303] 10
Reissue
Chart (2001) Position
French SNEP Albums Chart[304] 68
Japanese Oricon Albums Chart[299] 46
UK Albums Chart[272] 68
US Billboard Top Pop Catalog Albums[276] 3

Year-end charts[edit]

Chart (1971) Position
Australian Kent Music Report[295] 5
Dutch Albums Chart[305] 11
Italian Albums Chart[298] 18
US Billboard Year-End[306] 18

Certifications[edit]

Region Certification Certified units/Sales
Canada (Music Canada)[307] Gold 50,000^
United Kingdom (BPI)[308] Gold 100,000^
United States (RIAA)[309] 6× Platinum 6,000,000^
*sales figures based on certification alone
^shipments figures based on certification alone

Related posts:

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 8 Blue & Lonesome is the album any Rolling Stones fan would have wished for – review Neil McCormick, music critic

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 8 Rolling Stones – Hoo Doo Blues Blue & Lonesome is the album any Rolling Stones fan would have wished for – review 9 Comments Evergreen: The Rolling Stones perform in Cuba earlier this year CREDIT: REX FEATURES Neil McCormick, music critic 22 NOVEMBER 2016 • 12:19PM The Rolling […]

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 7 The Rolling Stones Alexis Petridis’s album of the week The Rolling Stones: Blue & Lonesome review – more alive than they’ve sounded for years

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 7 Rolling Stones – Everybody Knows About My Good Thing The Rolling Stones Alexis Petridis’s album of the week The Rolling Stones: Blue & Lonesome review – more alive than they’ve sounded for years 4/5stars Mick Jagger’s voice and harmonica drive an album of blues covers that returns […]

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 6 Music Review: ‘Blue & Lonesome’ by the Rolling Stones By Gregory Katz | AP November 29

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 6 Rolling Stones – Just Like I Treat You   Music Review: ‘Blue & Lonesome’ by the Rolling Stones By Gregory Katz | AP November 29 The Rolling Stones, “Blue & Lonesome” (Interscope) It shouldn’t be a surprise, really, but still it’s a bit startling to hear just how well […]

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 5 Review: The Rolling Stones make blues magic on ‘Blue & Lonesome’ Maeve McDermott , USATODAY6:07 p.m. EST November 30, 2016

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 5 Rolling Stones – Everybody Knows About My Good Thing Review: The Rolling Stones make blues magic on ‘Blue & Lonesome’ Maeve McDermott , USATODAY6:07 p.m. EST November 30, 2016 (Photo: Frazer Harrison, Getty Images) Before the Rolling Stones were rock icons, before its members turned into sex […]

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 4 Rolling Stones, ‘Blue & Lonesome’: Album Review By Michael Gallucci November 30, 2016 1:34 PM

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 4 Rolling Stones – Little Rain       Rolling Stones, ‘Blue & Lonesome’: Album Review By Michael Gallucci November 30, 2016 1:34 PM Read More: Rolling Stones, ‘Blue & Lonesome’: Album Review | http://ultimateclassicrock.com/rolling-stones-blue-lonesome-review/?trackback=tsmclip The Rolling Stones were never really a thinking band. A shrewd one, for sure, […]

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 3 Rolling Stones – ‘Blue & Lonesome’ Review Barry Nicolson 12:52 pm – Dec 2, 2016

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 3 The Rolling Stones Mick Jagger chats about new album “Blue & Lonesome” on BBC Breakfast 02 Dec 2016 Rolling Stones – I Gotta Go     Rolling Stones – ‘Blue & Lonesome’ Review Barry Nicolson 12:52 pm – Dec 2, 2016 57shares The Stones sound their youngest […]

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 2 Review The Rolling Stones’ new blues album is an amplified death wheeze. And it rules

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 1 Review: The Rolling Stones Reinvigorate the Blues on ‘Blue and Lonesome’ Our take on rock legends’ first LP since 2005

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 1 The Rolling Stones – Ride ‘Em On Down Published on Dec 1, 2016 Taken from Blue & Lonesome, the brand new album out now. Buy it at http://www.rollingstones.com/blueandl…. Directed by François Rousselet http://www.riffrafffilms.tv/video/dir… Produced by Natalie Arnett Riff Raff Films http://www.riffrafffilms.tv http://www.rollingstones.com/http://www.facebook.com/therollingstones http://twitter.com/RollingStoneshttp://www.rollingstones.com/newsletter Rolling Stones […]

MUSIC MONDAY Karen Carpenter’s tragic story

_____________ Carpenters Close To You Karen Carpenter’s tragic story Karen Carpenter’s velvet voice charmed millions in the 70s… but behind the wholesome image she was in turmoil. Desperate to look slim on stage – and above all desperate to please the domineering mother who preferred her brother – she became the first celebrity victim of […]

MUSIC MONDAY The Carpenters!!!

carpenters -We’ve Only Just Begun The Carpenters – Yesterday Once More (INCLUDES LYRICS) The Carpenters – There’s a kind of hush The Carpenters – Greatest Hits Related posts: MUSIC MONDAY Paul McCartney Mull Of Kintyre November 13, 2016 – 10:29 am Paul McCartney Mull Of Kintyre-Original Video-HQ Uploaded on Nov 25, 2011 Paul McCartney Mull Of […]

The Work of artist David Garibaldi featured today!!!

______

David Garibaldi

David Garibaldi – Jesus Painting

Uploaded on Sep 24, 2011

David Garibaldi paints secular people primarily, but this is a nice “surprise” video in which he paints Jesus on the cross.

Image result for david garibaldi painting

Hues of Hendrix

Image result for david garibaldi painting

_

Image result for david garibaldi painting mick jagger

_

Image result for david garibaldi painting mick jagger

David Garibaldi (artist)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

David Garibaldi paints a portrait of Michael Jackson at the 11th Annual Sacramento Film & Music Festival – July 29th, 2010

David Michael Garibaldi (born December 15, 1982)[1] is an American performance painter. His specialty is his “Rhythm and Hue” stage act in which he rapidly creates paintings of notable rock musicians.

Garibaldi was born in Los Angeles, California. In July 2006 he was invited to the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in Cleveland, Ohio, where he painted a portrait of Mick Jagger. In September 2008 he was the opening act for Blue Man Group‘s tour in Canada and the United States.[2] He has also opened for Snoop Dogg. During the halftime of a Golden State Warriors basketball game in November 2007, Garibaldi painted Carlos Santana, after which the musician unexpectedly greeted Garibaldi and later signed the creation.[3] On April 11, 2009, he appeared on The 700 Club and painted a portrait of Jesus.[4] On July 29, 2010, he painted his first self-portrait during a benefit performance at the 11th Annual Sacramento Film and Music Festival at the Crest Theatre, following the world premiere of Walking Dreams, a documentary about his work directed by Chad Ross.[5] On April 20, 2012, Garibaldi painted Jeremy Lin during halftime of the New York Knicks game.

Garibaldi appeared in the seventh season of America’s Got Talent. He has gone forward all the way to the finals with his act, David Garibaldi and His CMYK‘s, finishing in fourth place.

Garibaldi’s work is strongly derivative of the work of artists Denny Dent[6] and Jean-Pierre Blanchard.

On the 17th of February 2017, David was invited by Matthew Patrick (MatPat) to guest star on GTLive on YouTube. David Garibaldi created several paintings which were given to lucky raffle winners watching the stream.

References[edit]

  1. Jump up^ “David Garibaldi”. Californiabirthindex.org.
  2. Jump up^ Donnelly, Pat (2008-09-26). “Blue Man Group at the Bell Centre: Performance Art gone Arena Show”. Montreal: The Gazette. Archived from the original on 2008-11-04. Retrieved 2009-02-26.
  3. Jump up^ “Warriors Santana Art Auction”. NBA. November 2007. Retrieved 2008-09-22.
  4. Jump up^ “David Girabaldi: Portrait of Christ – CBN TV – Video”. Cbn.com. Retrieved 2012-10-15.
  5. Jump up^ “Sacramento Film & Music Festival”. Sacfilm.com. Retrieved 2012-10-15.
  6. Jump up^ “Interview with the artist”. Youtube.com. 2009-08-18. Retrieved 2012-10-15.

External links[edit]

________

Related posts:

Taking on Ark Times Bloggers on various issues Part F “Carl Sagan’s views on how God should try and contact us” includes film “The Basis for Human Dignity”

I have gone back and forth and back and forth with many liberals on the Arkansas Times Blog on many issues such as abortion, human rights, welfare, poverty, gun control  and issues dealing with popular culture. Here is another exchange I had with them a while back. My username at the Ark Times Blog is Saline […]

Carl Sagan v. Nancy Pearcey

On March 17, 2013 at our worship service at Fellowship Bible Church, Ben Parkinson who is one of our teaching pastors spoke on Genesis 1. He spoke about an issue that I was very interested in. Ben started the sermon by reading the following scripture: Genesis 1-2:3 English Standard Version (ESV) The Creation of the […]

Review of Carl Sagan book (Part 4 of series on Evolution)

Review of Carl Sagan book (Part 4 of series on Evolution) The Long War against God-Henry Morris, part 5 of 6 Uploaded by FLIPWORLDUPSIDEDOWN3 on Aug 30, 2010 http://www.icr.org/ http://store.icr.org/prodinfo.asp?number=BLOWA2http://store.icr.org/prodinfo.asp?number=BLOWASGhttp://www.fliptheworldupsidedown.com/blog _______________________ I got this from a blogger in April of 2008 concerning candidate Obama’s view on evolution: Q: York County was recently in the news […]

Review of Carl Sagan book (Part 3 of series on Evolution)

Review of Carl Sagan book (Part 3 of series on Evolution) The Long War against God-Henry Morris, part 4 of 6 Uploaded by FLIPWORLDUPSIDEDOWN3 on Aug 30, 2010 http://www.icr.org/ http://store.icr.org/prodinfo.asp?number=BLOWA2http://store.icr.org/prodinfo.asp?number=BLOWASGhttp://www.fliptheworldupsidedown.com/blog______________________________________ I got this from a blogger in April of 2008 concerning candidate Obama’s view on evolution: Q: York County was recently in the news […]

Carl Sagan versus RC Sproul

At the end of this post is a message by RC Sproul in which he discusses Sagan. Over the years I have confronted many atheists. Here is one story below: I really believe Hebrews 4:12 when it asserts: For the word of God is living and active and sharper than any two-edged sword, and piercing as far as the […]

Review of Carl Sagan book (Part 4 of series on Evolution)jh68

Review of Carl Sagan book (Part 4 of series on Evolution) The Long War against God-Henry Morris, part 5 of 6 Uploaded by FLIPWORLDUPSIDEDOWN3 on Aug 30, 2010 http://www.icr.org/ http://store.icr.org/prodinfo.asp?number=BLOWA2http://store.icr.org/prodinfo.asp?number=BLOWASGhttp://www.fliptheworldupsidedown.com/blog _______________________ This is a review I did a few years ago. THE DEMON-HAUNTED WORLD: Science as a Candle in the Dark by Carl […]

Review of Carl Sagan book (Part 3 of series on Evolution)

Review of Carl Sagan book (Part 3 of series on Evolution) The Long War against God-Henry Morris, part 4 of 6 Uploaded by FLIPWORLDUPSIDEDOWN3 on Aug 30, 2010 http://www.icr.org/ http://store.icr.org/prodinfo.asp?number=BLOWA2http://store.icr.org/prodinfo.asp?number=BLOWASGhttp://www.fliptheworldupsidedown.com/blog______________________________________ I was really enjoyed this review of Carl Sagan’s book “Pale Blue Dot.” Carl Sagan’s Pale Blue Dot by Larry Vardiman, Ph.D. […]

Atheists confronted: How I confronted Carl Sagan the year before he died jh47

In today’s news you will read about Kirk Cameron taking on the atheist Stephen Hawking over some recent assertions he made concerning the existence of heaven. Back in December of 1995 I had the opportunity to correspond with Carl Sagan about a year before his untimely death. Sarah Anne Hughes in her article,”Kirk Cameron criticizes […]

FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE Part 18 “Michelangelo’s DAVID is the statement of what humanistic man saw himself as being tomorrow” (Feature on artist Paul McCarthy)

In this post we are going to see that through the years  humanist thought has encouraged artists like Michelangelo to think that the future was extremely bright versus the place today where many artist who hold the humanist and secular worldview are very pessimistic.   In contrast to Michelangelo’s DAVID when humanist man thought he […]

Was Antony Flew the most prominent atheist of the 20th century?

_________ Antony Flew on God and Atheism Published on Feb 11, 2013 Lee Strobel interviews philosopher and scholar Antony Flew on his conversion from atheism to deism. Much of it has to do with intelligent design. Flew was considered one of the most influential and important thinker for atheism during his time before his death […]

____________

 

 

__

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones 1972 Exile On Main Street full album

_

Rolling Stones 1972 Exile On Main Street full album

Exile on Main St

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Exile on Main St
ExileMainSt.jpg
Studio album by The Rolling Stones
Released 12 May 1972
Recorded October 1970, June 1971 – March 1972
Studio Olympic Studios, London; Nellcôte, France; Sunset Sound Recorders, Los Angeles
Genre Rock and roll, hard rock[1]
Length 67:07
Language English
Label Rolling Stones
Producer Jimmy Miller
The Rolling Stones chronology
Sticky Fingers
(1971)
Exile on Main St
(1972)
Goats Head Soup
(1973)
Singles from Exile on Main St
  1. Tumbling Dice” / “Sweet Black Angel
    Released: 14 April 1972
  2. Happy” / “All Down the Line
    Released: 15 July 1972

Exile on Main St is a double album by English rock band the Rolling Stones, released on 12 May 1972 by Rolling Stones Records. It was their tenth studio album released in the United Kingdom.[2] The album’s music incorporates rock and roll, blues, soul, country, and gospel genres.[3] Although it originally received mixed reviews, Exile on Main St has since been considered to be the Rolling Stones’ best work while being ranked on various lists as one of the greatest albums of all time.

A remastered and expanded version of the album was released in Europe on 17 May 2010 and in the United States on 18 May 2010, featuring a bonus disc with 10 new tracks.[4]

Recording[edit]

Exile on Main St was written and recorded between 1969 and 1972. Mick Jagger said “After we got out of our contract with Allen Klein, we didn’t want to give him [those earlier tracks],” as they were forced to do with “Brown Sugar” and “Wild Horses” from Sticky Fingers (1971). Many tracks were recorded between 1969 and 1971 at Olympic Studios and Jagger’s Stargroves country house in England during sessions for Sticky Fingers.[5]

By the spring of 1971 the Rolling Stones had spent the money they owed in taxes and left Britain before the government could seize their assets. Mick Jagger settled in Paris with his new bride Bianca, and guitarist Keith Richards rented a villa, Nellcôte, in Villefranche-sur-Mer, near Nice. The other members settled in the south of France. As a suitable recording studio could not be found where they could continue work on the album, Richards’ basement at Nellcôte became a makeshift studio using the band’s mobile recording truck.

Nellcôte[edit]

Recording began in earnest sometime near the middle of June. Bassist Bill Wyman recalls the band working all night, every night, from eight in the evening until three the following morning for the rest of the month. Wyman said of that period, “Not everyone turned up every night. This was, for me, one of the major frustrations of this whole period. For our previous two albums we had worked well and listened to producer Jimmy Miller. At Nellcôte things were very different and it took me a while to understand why.” By this time Richards had begun a daily habit of using heroin. Thousands of pounds worth of heroin flowed through the mansion each week, along with visitors such as William S. Burroughs, Terry Southern, Gram Parsons and Marshall Chess (who was running the Rolling Stones’ new label).[6] Parsons was asked to leave Nellcôte in early July 1971, the result of his obnoxious behaviour and an attempt by Richards to clean the house of drug users as the result of pressure from the French police.[7]

Richards’ substance abuse prevented him from attending the sessions that continued in his basement, while Mick Jagger and Bill Wyman were often unable to attend sessions for other reasons. This often left the band in the position of having to record in altered forms. A notable instance was the recording of one of Richards’ most famous songs, “Happy”. Recorded in the basement, Richards said in 1982, “‘Happy’ was something I did because I was for one time early for a session. There was Bobby Keys and Jimmy Miller. We had nothing to do and had suddenly picked up the guitar and played this riff. So we cut it and it’s the record, it’s the same. We cut the original track with a baritone sax, a guitar and Jimmy Miller on drums. And the rest of it is built up over that track. It was just an afternoon jam that everybody said, ‘Wow, yeah, work on it'”.

The basic band for the Nellcôte sessions consisted of Richards, Bobby Keys, Mick Taylor, Charlie Watts, Miller (a skilled drummer in his own right who covered for the absent Watts on the aforementioned “Happy” and “Shine a Light”),[5] and Jagger when he was available. Wyman did not like the ambience of Richards’ villa and sat out many of the French sessions. Although Wyman is credited on only eight songs of the released album, he told Bass Player Magazine that the credits are incorrect and that he actually played on more tracks than that. The other bass parts were credited to Taylor, Richards and session bassist Bill Plummer. Wyman noted in his memoir Stone Alone that there was a division between the band members who freely indulged in drugs (Richards, Miller, Keys, Taylor, engineer Andy Johns) and those who abstained to varying degrees (Wyman, Watts and Jagger).[6]

Los Angeles[edit]

Work on other basic tracks (probably only “Rip this Joint”, “Shake Your Hips”, “Casino Boogie”, “Happy”, “Rocks Off”, “Turd on the Run” and “Ventilator Blues”)[5] began in the basement of Nellcôte and taken to Sunset Sound Recorders in Los Angeles, where overdubs (all piano and keyboard parts, all lead and backing vocals, all guitar and bass overdubs) were added during sessions that meandered from December 1971 until March 1972. Some tracks (such as “Torn and Frayed” and “Loving Cup”) were freshly recorded in Los Angeles.[5] Although Jagger was frequently missing from Nellcôte,[6] he took charge during the second stage of recording in Los Angeles, arranging for the keyboardists Billy Preston and Dr John and the cream of the city’s session backup vocalists to record layers of overdubs.[5] The final gospel-inflected arrangements of “Tumbling Dice”, “Loving Cup”, “Let It Loose” and “Shine a Light” were inspired by Jagger and Preston’s visit to a local evangelical church.[5]

The extended recording sessions and differing methods on the part of Jagger and Richards reflected the growing disparity in their personal lives.[6] During the making of the album, Jagger had married Bianca, followed closely by the birth of their only child, Jade, in October 1971. Richards was firmly attached to his girlfriend Anita Pallenberg, yet both were in the throes of heroin addiction,[6] which Richards would not overcome until the turn of the decade.

Music and lyrics[edit]

Even though the album is often described as being Richards’ finest moment, as Exile is often thought to reflect his vision for a raw, rootsy rock sound, Jagger was already expressing his boredom with rock and roll in several interviews at the time of the album’s release.[6] With Richards’ effectiveness seriously undermined by his dependence on heroin, the group’s subsequent 1970s releases—directed largely by Jagger—would experiment to varying degrees with other musical genres, moving away from the roots-based sound of Exile on Main St.[6] Music biographer John Perry wrote that the Rolling Stones had developed a style of hard rock for the album that was “entirely modern yet rooted in 1950s rock & roll and 1930s-1940s swing“.[8]

According to Robert Christgau, Exile on Main St expanded on the hedonistic themes the band had explored on previous albums such as Sticky Fingers: “It piled all the old themes—sex as power, sex as love, sex as pleasure, distance, craziness, release—on top of an obsession with time that was more than appropriate in men pushing 30 who were still committed to what was once considered youth music.”[9]

Packaging[edit]

For Exile on Main St, Mick Jagger wanted an album cover that reflected the band as “runaway outlaws using the blues as its weapon against the world”, showcasing “feeling of joyful isolation, grinning in the face of a scary and unknown future”.[10] As the band finished the album in Los Angeles, they approached designer John Van Hamersveld and his photographer partner Norman Seeff, and also invited documentary photographer Robert Frank. The same day Seeff photographed the Stones at their Bel Air mansion, Frank took Jagger for night photographs at Los Angeles’ Main Street. Still, Van Hamersveld and Jagger chose the cover image from an already existing Frank photograph, an outtake from his seminal 1958 book The Americans.[10][11] Named “Tattoo Parlor” but possibly taken from Hubert’s Dime museum in New York City, the image is a collage of circus performers and freaks,[12] such as “Three Ball Charlie”, a 1930s sideshow performer from Humboldt, Nebraska who holds three balls (a tennis ball, a golf ball, and a “5” billiard ball) in his mouth;[13] Joe “The Human Corkscrew” Allen, pictured in a postcard-style advertisement, a contortionist with the ability to wiggle and twist through a 13 1/2 inch hoop; [14] and Hezekiah Trambles, “The Congo Jungle Freak”, a man who dressed as an African savage, in a picture taken by the recently deceased Diane Arbus.[15] The Seeff pictures were repurposed as 12 perforated postcards inside the sleeve, while Frank’s Main Street photographs were used in the gatefold and back cover collage made by Van Hamersveld, which features other pictures Frank took of the band and their crew – including their assistant Chris O’Dell, a former acquaintance of Van Hamersveld who brought him to the Stones – and other The American outtakes.[11]

Release and reception[edit]

Professional ratings
Retrospective reviews
Review scores
Source Rating
AllMusic 5/5 stars[3]
The A.V. Club A[16]
Christgau’s Record Guide A+[17]
Encyclopedia of Popular Music 5/5 stars[18]
Entertainment Weekly A+[19]
MusicHound 5/5[20]
NME 10/10[21]
Q 5/5 stars[22]
The Rolling Stone Album Guide 5/5 stars[23]
Uncut 5/5 stars[24]

Preceded by the UK and US Top 10 hit “Tumbling Dice“, Exile on Main St was released in May 1972. It was an immediate commercial success, reaching No. 1 worldwide just as the band embarked on their celebrated 1972 American Tour. Their first American tour in three years, it featured many songs from the new album. “Happy”, sung by Richards, would be a Top 30 US hit later that summer.[citation needed]

Exile on Main St was not well received by most contemporary critics, who found the quality of the songs inconsistent.[18] In a review for Rolling Stone, Lenny Kaye said the record had “a tight focus on basic components of the Stones’ sound as we’ve always known it,” including blues-based rock music with a “pervading feeling of blackness” but, because of the uneven quality of songs, he felt that “the great Stones album of their mature period is yet to come”.[25] Richard Williams from Melody Maker was more enthusiastic and deemed it the band’s best album, writing that it would “take its place in history” as it “utterly repulses the sneers and arrows of outraged put down artists. Once and for all, it answers any questions about their ability as rock ‘n’ rollers.”[26] In a year-end list for Newsday, Christgau named it the year’s best album and wrote that “this fagged-out masterpiece” was the peak of rock music in 1972 as it “explored new depths of record-studio murk, burying Mick’s voice under layers of cynicism, angst and ennui”.[27]

Critics later reassessed Exile on Main St favourably,[18] and by the late 1970s they had come to view Exile on Main St as the Rolling Stones’ greatest record.[28] Bill Janovitz later called it “the greatest, most soulful, rock & roll record ever made” because it seamlessly distills “perhaps all the essential elements of rock & roll up to 1971, if not beyond”.[29] On the response to the album, Richards said, “When [Exile] came out it didn’t sell particularly well at the beginning, and it was also pretty much universally panned. But within a few years the people who had written the reviews saying it was a piece of crap were extolling it as the best frigging album in the world.”[30]

Legal issues with ABKCO[edit]

After the release of Exile on Main St, Allen Klein sued the Rolling Stones for breach of settlement because five songs on the album were composed while Jagger and Richards were under contract with his company, ABKCO: “Sweet Virginia“, “Loving Cup“, “All Down the Line“, “Shine a Light“, and “Stop Breaking Down” (written by Robert Johnson but re-interpreted by Jagger and Richards). ABKCO acquired publishing rights to the songs, giving it a share of the royalties from Exile on Main St, and was able to publish another album of Rolling Stones songs, More Hot Rocks (Big Hits & Fazed Cookies).[31]

Legacy[edit]

Band appraisal[edit]

At the time of Exile’s release, Jagger said, “This new album is fucking mad. There’s so many different tracks. It’s very rock & roll, you know. I didn’t want it to be like that. I’m the more experimental person in the group, you see I like to experiment. Not go over the same thing over and over. Since I’ve left England, I’ve had this thing I’ve wanted to do. I’m not against rock & roll, but I really want to experiment. The new album’s very rock & roll and it’s good. I mean, I’m very bored with rock & roll. The revival. Everyone knows what their roots are, but you’ve got to explore everywhere. You’ve got to explore the sky too.”[5]

In 2003, Jagger said, “Exile is not one of my favourite albums, although I think the record does have a particular feeling. I’m not too sure how great the songs are, but put together it’s a nice piece. However, when I listen to Exile it has some of the worst mixes I’ve ever heard. I’d love to remix the record, not just because of the vocals, but because generally I think it sounds lousy. At the time Jimmy Miller was not functioning properly. I had to finish the whole record myself, because otherwise there were just these drunks and junkies. Of course I’m ultimately responsible for it, but it’s really not good and there’s no concerted effort or intention.” Jagger also stated he did not understand the praise among Rolling Stones fans because the album did not yield many hits.[30] Of the 18 tracks on the album, only “Tumbling Dice”, “Happy” and “All Down The Line” got heavy rotation at concerts. “Sweet Black Angel”, “Ventilator Blues” and “Stop Breaking Down” were each performed live only once, while “Shake Your Hips”, “Casino Boogie”, “Turd on the Run”, “I Just Wanna See His Face”, “Let It Loose” and “Soul Survivor” have never been played live.[32]

Richards said, “Exile was a double album. And because it’s a double album you’re going to be hitting different areas, including ‘D for Down’, and the Stones really felt like exiles. We didn’t start off intending to make a double album; we just went down to the south of France to make an album and by the time we’d finished we said, ‘We want to put it all out.’ The point is that the Stones had reached a point where we no longer had to do what we were told to do. Around the time Andrew Oldham left us, we’d done our time, things were changing and I was no longer interested in hitting Number One in the charts every time. What I want to do is good shit—if it’s good they’ll get it some time down the road.”[30]

Accolades[edit]

Exile on Main St has been ranked on various lists as one of the greatest albums of all time.[33] According to Acclaimed Music, it is the eighth most ranked record on critics’ all-time lists.[34] In 1998, Q magazine readers voted Exile on Main St the 42nd greatest album of all time,[35] while in 2000 the same magazine placed it at number 3 in its list of the 100 Greatest British Albums Ever.[36] In 1987 it was ranked third on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the best 100 albums of the period 1967–1987.[37] In 1993, Entertainment Weeklynamed it No. 1 on their list of “100 Greatest CDs”.[38] In 2003, Pitchfork Media ranked it number 11 on their Top 100 Albums of the 1970s.[39] In 2001, the TV network VH1 placed it at number 22 on their best albums survey.[40] In 2003, the album was ranked 7th on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time, the highest Rolling Stones album ranked on the list.[41] In 2005, Exile on Main St was ranked number 286 in Rock Hard magazine’s book of The 500 Greatest Rock & Metal Albums of All Time.[42]The album was ranked number 19 on the October 2006 issue of Guitar World magazine’s list of the greatest 100 guitar albums of all time[citation needed]. In 2007, the National Association of Recording Merchandisers (NARM) and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame placed the album No. 6 on the “Definitive 200” list of albums that “every music lover should own.”[43] Its re-release has a highest normalised rating of 100 on Metacritic based on seven professional reviews, a distinction it shares with other re-releases such as London Callingby The Clash.[44] The album was also included in the book 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die.[45] In 2012, the album was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame.[46]

In popular culture[edit]

The album and its title have been referenced several times by other bands. For example, the British acid house group Alabama 3 titled its debut album Exile on Coldharbour Lane. Perhaps the most notable reference comes from indie singer/songwriter Liz Phair‘s debut album Exile in Guyville. Phair herself claims the album to be a direct song-by-song “response” of sorts to Exile on Main St. Confrontational garage-trash noise-rock band Pussy Galore released a complete cover of the album, titled Exile on Main St, that reflected their own personal and musical interpretations of the songs, as opposed to paying tribute to the original sound. Post-grunge band Matchbox Twenty paid homage to this album by titling their 2007 retrospective Exile on Mainstream. Industrial Rock band Chemlab named the leading track from their album East Side Militia, “Exile on Mainline”, in reference to the Rolling Stones album.

The Departed, a 2006 film by Martin Scorsese, features a scene in which Bill Costigan mails Madolyn Madden an Exile on Main St jewel case containing an incriminating recording of Colin Sullivan conspiring with crime boss Frank Costello. The same film also uses the song “Let It Loose” from the album.

On 31 October 2009, American rock band Phish covered Exile on Main St in its entirety as the “musical costume” for their Halloween show in Indio, California.

The first episode of the fourth season of the Showtime program Californication is called “Exile on Main St”. A later episode in the sixth season featured a guest character waking up next to her musician boyfriend who had died from an overdose in the night in room “1009,” a reference to the lyrics of “Shine a Light“. The same song was also played by Tim Minchin‘s character in the following episode.

The first episode of the sixth season of the hit CW show Supernatural is titled “Exile on Main Street”.

Re-release[edit]

In 1994, Exile on Main St was remastered and reissued by Virgin Records, along with the rest of the post-Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out catalogue, after the company acquired the masters to the band’s output on its own label. This remaster was initially released in a Collector’s Edition CD, which replicated in miniature many elements of the original vinyl album packaging, including the postcards insert.

Universal Music, which remastered and re-released the rest of the post-1970 Rolling Stones catalogue in 2009,[47] issued a new remastering of Exile on Main St in a deluxe package in May 2010.[48] Of the ten bonus tracks, only two are undoctored outtakes from the original sessions: an early version of “Tumbling Dice” entitled “Good Time Women”, and “Soul Survivor”, the last featuring a Richards lead vocal (with dummy/placeholder lyrics).[49] The other tracks received overdubs just prior to release on this package, with new lead vocals by Jagger on all except “I’m Not Signifying”, backing vocals in places by past and current Stones tour singers Cindy Mizelle and Lisa Fischer, and a new guitar part by Mick Taylor on “Plundered My Soul.”[49] On the selection of tracks, Richards said, “Well, basically it’s the record and a few tracks we found when we were plundering the vaults. Listening back to everything we said, ‘Well, this would be an interesting addition.'”.[50] All harmonica heard was added during 2010 sessions by Jagger, and Richards added a new guitar lead on ‘So Divine’. “Title 5” is not an actual outtake from the sessions for Exile, it is an outtake from early 1967 sessions. It features the MRB effect from a Vox Conqueror or Supreme amp, as used by Richards in 1967 and 1968. “Loving Cup” is an outtake from early June 1969, but is actually an edit from two outtakes. The first 2:12 minutes is the well known ‘drunk’ version, as has been available on bootlegs since the early 1990s, but the second part is spliced from a second, previously unknown take. “Following the River” features Jagger overdubs on a previously uncirculated track featuring Nicky Hopkins on piano.

Jimmy Fallon announced on his show, Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, that he would mark the re-release of the album with a week’s worth of musicians performing songs from the album.[51] Phish, who had played the album in its entirety live in concert before, were the first confirmed act to join the salute.

The re-released album entered at number one in the UK charts, almost 38 years to the week after it first occupied that position.[52] The album also re-entered at number two in the US charts selling 76,000 during the first week.[53] The bonus disc, available separately as Exile on Main St Rarities Edition exclusively in the US at Target also charted, debuting at number 27 with 15,000 copies sold.

It was released once again in 2011 by Universal Music Enterprises in a Japanese-only SHM-SACD version.

Track listing[edit]

All songs written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, except where noted.

Side one
No. Title Length
1. Rocks Off 4:31
2. Rip This Joint 2:22
3. Shake Your Hips” (Slim Harpo) 2:59
4. Casino Boogie 3:33
5. Tumbling Dice 3:45
Side two
No. Title Length
6. Sweet Virginia 4:27
7. Torn and Frayed 4:17
8. Sweet Black Angel 2:54
9. Loving Cup 4:25
Side three
No. Title Length
10. Happy 3:04
11. “Turd on the Run” 2:36
12. Ventilator Blues” (Jagger/Richards/Mick Taylor) 3:24
13. I Just Want to See His Face 2:52
14. Let It Loose 5:16
Side four
No. Title Length
15. All Down the Line 3:49
16. Stop Breaking Down” (Robert Johnson) 4:34
17. Shine a Light 4:14
18. “Soul Survivor” 3:49

Personnel[edit]

The Rolling Stones

Additional musicians

  • Nicky Hopkins – piano
  • Bobby Keyssaxophone; percussion on “Happy”
  • Jim Pricetrumpet, trombone, organ on “Torn and Frayed”
  • Ian Stewart – piano on “Shake Your Hips”, “Sweet Virginia” and “Stop Breaking Down”
  • Jimmy Miller – drums on “Tumbling Dice” (the outro), “Happy” and “Shine a Light”, percussion on “Sweet Black Angel”, “Loving Cup”, “I Just Want to See His Face” and “All Down the Line”
  • Bill Plummer – upright bass on “Rip This Joint”, “Turd on the Run”, “I Just Want to See His Face” and “All Down the Line”
  • Billy Preston – piano and organ on “Shine a Light”
  • Al Perkinspedal steel guitar on “Torn and Frayed”
  • Richard Washington – marimba on “Sweet Black Angel”
  • Clydie King, Venetta Fields – backing vocals on “Tumbling Dice”, “I Just Want to See His Face”, “Let It Loose” and “Shine a Light”
  • Joe Green – backing vocals on “Let It Loose” and “Shine a Light”
  • Gram Parsons – backing vocals on “Sweet Virginia”
  • Chris Shepard – tambourine on “Turd on the Run”
  • Jerry Kirkland – backing vocals on “I Just Want to See His Face” and “Shine a Light”
  • Mac Rebennack, Shirley Goodman, Tami Lynn – backing vocals on “Let It Loose”
  • Kathi McDonald – backing vocals on “All Down the Line”
  • Glyn – engineer
  • Andy Johns – engineer
  • Joe Zaganno – engineer
  • Jeremy Gee – engineer
  • Doug Sax – mastering
  • Robert Frank – cover photography and concept
  • John Van Hamersveld – layout design
  • Norman Seeff – layout design

Additional personnel on 2010 bonus disc

Charts[edit]

Weekly charts[edit]

Original release
Chart Position
Australian Kent Music Report[54] 2
Canadian RPM Albums Chart[55] 1
Dutch Albums Chart[56] 1
Italian Albums Chart[57] 4
Japanese Albums Chart[58] 7
Norwegian Albums Chart[59] 1
Spanish Albums Chart[60] 1
Swedish Kvällstoppen Chart[61] 2
UK Albums Chart[62] 1
US Billboard 200[63] 1
West German Media Control Albums Chart[64] 2
2010 reissue
Chart Position
Argentine Album Chart[56] 5
Australian ARIA Album Chart[65] 6
Austrian Albums Chart[66] 7
Belgian Albums Chart (Flanders)[67] 8
Belgian Albums Chart (Wallonia)[68] 9
Canadian RPM Albums Chart[55] 3
Czech Albums[63] 42
Finnish Albums[63] 25
French SNEP Albums Chart[69] 2
Danish Albums Chart[70] 5
Dutch Albums Chart[56] 2
Greek Albums Chart[71] 2
Irish Albums Chart[72] 11
Italian Albums Chart[72] 4
Japanese Albums Chart[73] 12
New Zealand Albums Chart[74] 4
Norwegian Albums Chart[59] 1
Scottish Singles and Albums Charts[75] 1
Korean Albums Gaon[63] 8
Spanish Albums Chart[76] 2
Swedish Albums Chart[77] 1
Swiss Albums Chart[78] 8
UK Albums Chart[62] 1
US Billboard 200[63] 2
German Media Control Albums Chart[64] 3

Year-end charts[edit]

Chart (1972) Position
Australian Albums Chart[54] 19
Dutch Albums Chart[79] 11
Italian Albums Chart[57] 36
U.S. Billboard Top Pop Albums[citation needed] 31
Chart (2010) Position
Dutch Albums Chart[80] 66
German Albums Chart[81] 84
Swedish Albums Chart[82] 72
US Billboard 200[83] 176

Certifications[edit]

Region Certification Certified units/Sales
Australia (ARIA)[84]
2010 release
Platinum 70,000^
Italy (FIMI)[85] Gold 50,000*
New Zealand (RMNZ)[86]
2010 release
Gold 7,500^
United Kingdom (BPI)[87]
2010 release
Platinum 300,000^
United States (RIAA)[88] Platinum 1,000,000^
^shipments figures based on certification alone

References[edit]

Footnotes
  1. Jump up^ Janovitz 2005, pp. 1, 61.
  2. Jump up^ “Rolling Stones: defining moments”. The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 18 June 2015.
  3. ^ Jump up to:a b Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. Exile on Main St at AllMusic. Retrieved 27 June 2004.
  4. Jump up^ Itzkoff, Dave (26 February 2010). “Seen Much Better Days: Rolling Stones Return to ‘Main Street'”. The New York Times. Retrieved 2 May 2010.
  5. ^ Jump up to:a b c d e f g “Exile on Main St”. timeisonourside.com. Retrieved 6 July 2006.
  6. ^ Jump up to:a b c d e f g Greenfield, Robert (21 September 2006). “Making Exile on Main St“. Rolling Stone (1009). p. 72. Posted on 8 September 2006 at “Making ‘Exile on Main St'”. rollingstone.com. Archived from the original on 1 October 2007. Retrieved 7 July 2007.
  7. Jump up^ Richards, Keith; Fox, James (2010). Life. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson. ISBN 978-0-297-85439-5.
  8. Jump up^ Perry, John (2000). Exile on Main Street: The Rolling Stones. Schirmer Books. p. 27. ISBN 0825671809.
  9. Jump up^ Christgau, Robert (1998). Grown Up All Wrong: 75 Great Rock and Pop Artists from Vaudeville to Techno. Harvard University Press. p. 81. ISBN 0674443187. Retrieved 5 October 2014.
  10. ^ Jump up to:a b Robert Frank: The Photographer Behind ‘Exile On Main St.’
  11. ^ Jump up to:a b Cover Story – The Rolling Stones’ “Exile on Main Street”, with artwork by John Van Hamersveld
  12. Jump up^ Tattoo Parlor
  13. Jump up^ Sideshow World, Sideshow Performers from around the world
  14. Jump up^ Pittsburgh Post-Gazette – Google News Archive Search
  15. Jump up^ I Put a Spell on You
  16. Jump up^ Hyden, Steven (25 May 2010). “The Rolling Stones: Exile On Main Street”. The A.V. Club. Chicago. Retrieved 9 July 2013.
  17. Jump up^ Christgau, Robert (1981). Christgau’s Record Guide: Rock Albums of the ’70s. Da Capo Press. p. 327. ISBN 0-306-80409-3.
  18. ^ Jump up to:a b c Larkin, Colin (2011). “Rolling Stones”. The Encyclopedia of Popular Music (5th ed.). Omnibus Press. pp. 2515, 2525. ISBN 0857125958.
  19. Jump up^ Collis, Clark (21 May 2010). “Exile on Main Street Review”. Entertainment Weekly (1103). Retrieved 9 July 2013.
  20. Jump up^ Rucker, Leland (1996). “The Rolling Stones”. In Graff, Gary. MusicHound Rock: The Essential Album Guide. Detroit: Visible Ink Press. ISBN 0787610372.
  21. Jump up^ NME. London: 43. 9 July 1994.
  22. Jump up^ Q. London: 137. June 2010.
  23. Jump up^ “The Rolling Stones > Album Guide”. rollingstone.com. Archived from the original on 12 April 2011. Retrieved 2 December 2011.
  24. Jump up^ Uncut. London: 104. June 2010.
  25. Jump up^ Kaye, Lenny (6 July 1972). “The Rolling Stones Exile on Main St > Album Review”. Rolling Stone (112). Archived from the original on 21 October 2006. Retrieved 15 June 2006. Posted on 21 January 1997.
  26. Jump up^ The Rolling Stones – Off The Record by Mark Paytress, Omnibus Press, 2005, page 211. ISBN 1-84449-641-4
  27. Jump up^ Christgau, Robert (31 December 1972). “Choice Bits From a “Sorry” Year”. Newsday. Retrieved 9 July 2013.
  28. Jump up^ Christgau, Robert (25 April 1977). “Too Strait Are the Gates of Eden: Morris Dickstein’s ‘Gates of Eden'”. The Village Voice. New York. Retrieved 21 June 2013.
  29. Jump up^ Janovitz 2005, p. 1.
  30. ^ Jump up to:a b c Loewenstein, Dora; Philip Dodd (2003). According to the Rolling Stones. San Francisco: Chronicle Books. ISBN 0-8118-4060-3.
  31. Jump up^ Goodman, Fred (2015). Allen Klein: The Man Who Bailed Out the Beatles, Made the Stones, and Transformed Rock & Roll. Boston, New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. pp. 235–236. ISBN 978-0-547-89686-1.
  32. Jump up^ Live debuts of each Rolling Stones song
  33. Jump up^ “‘Exile On Main St’ Concert Information”. CBS Pittsburgh. 20 April 2012. Retrieved 12 January 2014.
  34. Jump up^ http://www.acclaimedmusic.net/Current/genre420.htm
  35. Jump up^ ‘Q Readers All Time Top 100 Albums’. Q. February 1998. Retrieved 8 July 2007.
  36. Jump up^ Greatest British Albums “100 Greatest British Albums”. Q. June 2000. Retrieved 8 July 2007.
  37. Jump up^ DeCurtis, Anthony; M. Coleman (27 August 1987). “The Best 100 Albums of the Last Twenty Years”. Rolling Stone (507). p. 45. List posted at “Rolling Stone Top 100 Albums of the Last 20 Years”. rocklistmusic.co.uk. Retrieved 8 July 2007.
  38. Jump up^ “ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY’S 100 Greatest CDs”. Entertainment Weekly. 1993 (Retrieved 16 May 2010).
  39. Jump up^ “Top 100 Albums of the 1970s”. Pitchfork. 23 June 2004. Retrieved 8 July 2007.
  40. Jump up^ “Greatest Albums of Rock and Roll”. VH1. 23 June 2001. Retrieved 8 July 2007.
  41. Jump up^ Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Albums of All Time. Rolling Stone. Retrieved on 4 September 2012.
  42. Jump up^ […], Rock Hard (Hrsg.). [Red.: Michael Rensen. Mitarb.: Götz Kühnemund] (2005). Best of Rock & Metal die 500 stärksten Scheiben aller Zeiten. Königswinter: Heel. p. 98. ISBN 3-89880-517-4.
  43. Jump up^ “The ‘Definitive 200′”. MacVolPlace. March 2007. Retrieved 25 November 2010.
  44. Jump up^ Exile on Main St [Reissue] – The Rolling Stones”. metacritic. Retrieved 3 December 2011. The Rolling Stonereview is actually of the 1994 Deluxe Edition not the Reissue.
  45. Jump up^ Robert Dimery; Michael Lydon (23 March 2010). 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die: Revised and Updated Edition. Universe. ISBN 978-0-7893-2074-2.
  46. Jump up^ “Grammy Hall of Fame Award”. Grammy.org. Retrieved 21 December 2012
  47. Jump up^ Cavanagh, David. “Album reviews: the rolling stones reissues”. Uncut. IPC Media. Retrieved 17 May 2010.
  48. Jump up^ “Rolling stones reissue ‘exile on main street'”. Uncut. IPC Media. Retrieved 30 March 2010.
  49. ^ Jump up to:a b Sexton, Paul (9 May 2010). “Behind the bonus tracks on ‘exile on main street'”. The Sunday Times. London: Times Newspapers Ltd. Posted at “Behind the bonus tracks on Exile on Main St”. entertainment.timesonline.co.uk. Archived from the original on 15 June 2011. Retrieved 8 June 2010.
  50. Jump up^ Greene, Andy (9 March 2010). “The Secrets Behind the Rolling Stones’ “Exile on Main Street” Reissue”. rollingstone.com. Retrieved 30 March 2010.
  51. Jump up^ Collis, Chris (30 March 2010). “Phish to appear on Jimmy Fallon’s Exile on Main St tribute week”. music-mix.EW.com. Entertainment Weekly Inc. Music Mix. Retrieved 30 March 2010.
  52. Jump up^ “Archive Chart”. Theofficialcharts.com. 29 May 2010. Retrieved 13 March 2011.
  53. Jump up^ “‘Glee’ Stops the Show at No. 1, Stones Come in Second On Billboard 200”. Billboard.com. 14 September 2009. Retrieved 13 March 2011.
  54. ^ Jump up to:a b Kent, David (1993). Australian Chart Book 1970–1992. St Ives, NSW: Australian Chart Book. ISBN 0-646-11917-6.
  55. ^ Jump up to:a b “Top Albums/CDs – Volume 17, No. 20”. RPM. 1 July 1972. Retrieved 5 May 2013.
  56. ^ Jump up to:a b c “dutchcharts.nl The Rolling Stones – Exile on Main St(ASP). Hung Medien (in Dutch). MegaCharts. Retrieved 1 May2012.
  57. ^ Jump up to:a b “Hit Parade Italia – Gli album più venduti del 1972” (in Italian). hitparadeitalia.it. Retrieved 1 May 2012.
  58. Jump up^ Oricon Album Chart Book: Complete Edition 1970–2005. Roppongi, Tokyo: Oricon Entertainment. 2006. ISBN 4-87131-077-9.
  59. ^ Jump up to:a b “norwegiancharts.com The Rolling Stones – Exile on Main St” (ASP). Retrieved 1 May 2012.
  60. Jump up^ Salaverri, Fernando (September 2005). Sólo éxitos: año a año, 1959–2002 (1st ed.). Spain: Fundación Autor-SGAE. ISBN 84-8048-639-2.
  61. Jump up^ “Swedish Charts 1969–1972 / Kvällstoppen – Listresultaten vecka för vecka > Juni 1972 > 13 Juni” (PDF). hitsallertijden.nl(in Swedish). Retrieved 13 February 2014.Note: Kvällstoppencombined sales for albums and singles in the one chart; Exile on Main St peaked at the number-three on the list, behind Sven-Bertil Taube’s “frihetEn sång om frihet” and Gilbert O’Sullivan’s Himself.
  62. ^ Jump up to:a b “The Rolling Stones > Artists > Official Charts”. UK Albums Chart. Retrieved 1 May 2013.
  63. ^ Jump up to:a b c d e “Allmusic: Exile on Main St : Charts & Awards : Billboard Albums”. allmusic.com. Retrieved 1 May 2013.
  64. ^ Jump up to:a b “Album Search: The Rolling Stones – Exile on Main St(ASP) (in German). Media Control. Retrieved 1 May 2013.
  65. Jump up^ “australian-charts.com The Rolling Stones – Exile on Main St” (ASP). Australian Recording Industry Association. Retrieved 8 May 2013.
  66. Jump up^ “austriancharts.at The Rolling Stones – Exile on Main St(ASP). Hung Medien (in German). Retrieved 8 May 2013.
  67. Jump up^ “ultratop.be The Rolling Stones – Exile on Main St (ASP). Hung Medien (in Dutch). Ultratop. Retrieved 8 May 2013.
  68. Jump up^ “ultratop.be The Rolling Stones – Exile on Main St (ASP). Hung Medien (in French). Ultratop. Retrieved 8 May 2013.
  69. Jump up^ “InfoDisc : Tous les Albums classés par Artiste > Choisir Un Artiste Dans la Liste” (in French). infodisc.fr. Retrieved 1 June2013.Note: user must select ‘The Rolling Stones’ from drop-down.
  70. Jump up^ “danishcharts.com The Rolling Stones – Exile on Main St. danishcharts.com. Retrieved 8 May 2013.
  71. Jump up^ “greekcharts.com The Rolling Stones – Exile on Main St(ASP). Hung Medien. Retrieved 13 May 2011.
  72. ^ Jump up to:a b “irma.com The Rolling Stones – Exile on Main St. irma.com. Retrieved 14 January 2014.
  73. Jump up^ “ザ・ローリング・ストーンズ-リリース-ORICON STYLE-ミュージック” [Highest position and charting weeks of Exile on Main St by The Rolling Stones]. oricon.co.jp (in Japanese). Oricon Style. Retrieved 8 May 2013.
  74. Jump up^ “charts.org.nz The Rolling Stones – Exile on Main St (ASP). Hung Medien. Recording Industry Association of New Zealand. Retrieved 11 January 2014.
  75. Jump up^ “scotishcharts.com The Rolling Stones – Exile on Main St(ASP). Hung Medien. Retrieved 8 May 2013.
  76. Jump up^ “spanishcharts.com The Rolling Stones – Exile on Main St(ASP). Hung Medien. Retrieved 8 May 2013.
  77. Jump up^ “swedishcharts.com JThe Rolling Stones – Exile on Main St(ASP) (in Swedish). Retrieved 8 May 2013.
  78. Jump up^ “The Rolling Stones – Exile on Main St – hitparade.ch” (ASP). Hung Medien (in German). Swiss Music Charts. Retrieved 8 May2013.
  79. Jump up^ “Dutch charts jaaroverzichten 1972” (ASP) (in Dutch). Retrieved 2 April 2014.
  80. Jump up^ “Jaaroverzichten – Album 2010” (in Dutch). Retrieved 2 May2013.
  81. Jump up^ [1] Archived 8 January 2011 at the Wayback Machine.
  82. Jump up^ “Årslista Album – År 2010” (in Swedish). Hitlistan.se. Sverigetopplistan. Retrieved 17 January 2013.
  83. Jump up^ “Best of 2010 – Billboard Top 200”. Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc. Retrieved 31 December 2010.
  84. Jump up^ “ARIA Charts – Accreditations – 2010 Albums”. Australian Recording Industry Association. Retrieved 1 May 2012.
  85. Jump up^ “Italian album certifications – The Rolling Stones – Exile on Main St” (in Italian). Federazione Industria Musicale Italiana. Retrieved 27 June 2014. Select Album e Compilation in the fieldSezione. Enter The Rolling Stones in the field Filtra. Select 2014 in the field Anno. The certification will load automatically
  86. Jump up^ “New Zealand album certifications – The Rolling Stones – Exile on Main St”. Recorded Music NZ. Retrieved 1 May 2012.
  87. Jump up^ “British album certifications – The Rolling Stones – Exile on Main St”. British Phonographic Industry. Retrieved 1 May2012. Enter Exile on Main St in the field Keywords. Select Title in the field Search by. Select album in the field By Format. Select Platinum in the field By Award. Click Search
  88. Jump up^ “American album certifications – The Rolling Stones – Exile on Main St”. Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved 1 May 2012. If necessary, click Advanced, then click Format, then select Album, then click SEARCH

Bibliography

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Bolan Boogie by T.Rex
UK Albums Chart number-one album
10–17 June 1972
Succeeded by
20 Dynamic Hits
by Various artists
Preceded by
Night Train by Keane
UK Albums Chart number-one album
23–30 May 2010
Succeeded by
Immersion by Pendulum
Preceded by
Thick as a Brick by Jethro Tull
Billboard 200 number-one album
17 June – 14 July 1972
Succeeded by
Honky Château by Elton John

Related posts:

Rolling Stones Jumping Jack Flash

__________ __ The Rolling Stones ~ Jumpin’ Jack Flash. (1968) The Dirty Mac Band (John Lennon, Eric Clapton, Keith Richards & Mitch Mitchell) | FeelNumb.com John Lennon, Eric Clapton, Keith Richards, Mitch Mitchell, Jimi Hendrix     ____

“Music Monday” Katy Perry and the Rolling Stones

News/ Katy Perry Sings With Mick Jagger at Rolling Stones Concert—Watch Now by Rebecca Macatee Today 5:45 AM PDT The Rolling Stones & Katy Perry – Beast Of Burden – Live – By Request Published on May 12, 2013 The Rolling Stones and special guest Katy Perry perform ‘Beast Of Burden’ at the Las Vegas […]

Katy Perry performs song “Beast of Burden” with Rolling Stones

News/ Katy Perry Sings With Mick Jagger at Rolling Stones Concert—Watch Now by Rebecca Macatee Today 5:45 AM PDT The Rolling Stones & Katy Perry – Beast Of Burden – Live – By Request Published on May 12, 2013 The Rolling Stones and special guest Katy Perry perform ‘Beast Of Burden’ at the Las Vegas […]

RESPONDING TO HARRY KROTO’S BRILLIANT RENOWNED ACADEMICS!! Part 98 Michael Mann, UCLA Anthropologist, “My mother was a very loving, warm person who I remember her getting extremely unhappy when I told her at the age of 13 I was an atheist but she was the core of the family”

MUSIC MONDAY Eric Clapton and Jimi Hendrix were good friends!!

Jimi Hendrix & Cream – Sunshine Of Your Love Jimi Hendrix & Eric Clapton Jimi Hendrix & Mick Jagger Jimi Hendrix & Keith Richards Jimi Hendrix & Brian Jones Jimi Hendrix & Janis Joplin Jimi Hendrix with Cream & Pink Floyd Even “Legends” want to meet a “Legend” Jimi Hendrix: ‘You never told me he […]

Eric Clapton and Jimi Hendrix were good friends!!

Eric Clapton and Jimi Hendrix were good friends!! Jimi Hendrix & Cream – Sunshine Of Your Love Uploaded on Feb 5, 2012 Hey Joe JIMI HENDRIX live images in 1969, in London! BBC! dedicated to cream”Sunshine of Your Love”. High quality and superior sound. ¡¡¡¡¡full screen!!!!! Everyone wanted to meet or take a picture with […]

RESPONDING TO HARRY KROTO’S BRILLIANT RENOWNED ACADEMICS!! Michael Mann, UCLA Anthropologist, “My mother was a very loving, warm person who I remember her getting extremely unhappy when I told her at the age of 13 I was an atheist but she was the core of the family”

RESPONDING TO HARRY KROTO’S BRILLIANT RENOWNED ACADEMICS!! Michael Mann, UCLA Anthropologist, “My mother was a very loving, warm person who I remember her getting extremely unhappy when I told her at the age of 13 I was an atheist but she was the core of the family”

Open letter to George F. Will concerning Donald Trump!!!

The following was emailed to George F. Will on 6-27-16: Scott Ableman / Wikimedia Dear Mr. Will, I really enjoyed your You Tube cllip “George Will Keynotes 2010 Milton Friedman Prize Dinner:” If you google ARKANSAS MILTON FRIEDMAN you will be brought to my website http://www.thedailyhatch.org since I have written so many posts on my economic hero […]

MUSIC MONDAY Christian Rock Pioneer Larry Norman’s Songs Part 14

Christian Rock Pioneer Larry Norman’s Songs Part 14 I posted a lot in the past about my favorite Christian musicians such as Keith Green (I enjoyed reading Green’s monthly publications too), and 2nd Chapter of Acts and others. Today I wanted to talk about one of Larry Norman’s songs. David Rogers introduced me to Larry […]

FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE PART 107 A look at the BEATLES as featured in 7th episode of Francis Schaeffer film HOW SHOULD WE THEN LIVE? Was popularity of OCCULTISM in UK the reason Aleister Crowley appeared on SGT PEP cover? Schaeffer notes, “People put the Occult in the area of non-reason in the hope of some kind of meaning even if it is a horrendous kind of meaning” Part E (Artist featured today is Gerald Laing )

On the cover of Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band Album there were many individuals that were historical figures that changed history. Many of these individuals had died before the release June 1, 1967 of the album. Aldous Huxley was a major figure in the drug culture and he had died on November 22, 1963. Aleister […]

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones 1971 Sticky Fingers full album

_

Rolling Stones 1971 Sticky Fingers full album

Sticky Fingers

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This article is about The Rolling Stones album. For other uses, see Sticky Fingers (disambiguation).
Sticky Fingers
RSSF71.jpg
Studio album by The Rolling Stones
Released 23 April 1971
Recorded 2–4 December 1969, Muscle Shoals Sound Studio, Sheffield, Alabama; 17 February, March – May, 17–31 October 1970, Olympic Studios, Trident Studios, London, UK; except “Sister Morphine“, 22–31 March 1969
Genre Hard rock[1]
Length 46:25
Label Rolling Stones
Producer Jimmy Miller
The Rolling Stones chronology
Let It Bleed
(1969)
Sticky Fingers
(1971)
Exile on Main St
(1972)
Spanish issue
Singles from Sticky Fingers
  1. Brown Sugar” / “Bitch
    Released: 16 April 1971
  2. Wild Horses” / “Sway
    Released: 12 June 1971

Sticky Fingers is the ninth British and 11th American studio album by the English rock band The Rolling Stones, released in April 1971. It is the band’s first album of the 1970s and its first release on the band’s newly formed label, Rolling Stones Records, after having been contracted since 1963 with Decca Records in the UK and London Records in the US. It is also Mick Taylor‘s first full-length appearance on a Rolling Stones album, the first Rolling Stones album not to feature any contributions from guitarist and founder Brian Jones and the first one on which singer Mick Jagger is credited with playing guitar.

Sticky Fingers is widely regarded as one of the Rolling Stones’ best albums. It achieved triple platinum certification in the US and contains songs such as the chart-topping “Brown Sugar“, the country ballad “Dead Flowers“,[2][3]Wild Horses“, “Can’t You Hear Me Knocking“, and the sweeping ballad “Moonlight Mile”.

History[edit]

With the end of their Decca/London association at hand, The Rolling Stones were finally free to release their albums (cover art and all) as they pleased. However, their departing manager Allen Klein dealt the group a major blow when they discovered that they had inadvertently signed over their entire 1960s copyrights to Klein and his company ABKCO, which is how all of their material from 1963’s “Come On” to Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out! The Rolling Stones in Concert has since been released solely by ABKCO Records. The band would remain incensed with Klein for decades for that act.

When Decca informed The Rolling Stones that they were owed one more single, they cheekily submitted a track called “Cocksucker Blues”,[4] which was guaranteed to be refused. Instead, Decca released the two-year-old Beggars Banquet track “Street Fighting Man” while Klein retained dual copyright ownership in conjunction with The Rolling Stones of “Brown Sugar” and “Wild Horses“.

Recording[edit]

Although sessions for Sticky Fingers began in earnest in March 1970, The Rolling Stones had been recording at Muscle Shoals Sound Studio in Alabama in December 1969. “Sister Morphine“, cut during Let It Bleeds sessions earlier in March of that year, had been held over from this release. Much of the recording for Sticky Fingers was made with The Rolling Stones’ mobile studio unit in Stargroves during the summer and autumn of 1970. Early versions of songs that would eventually appear on Exile on Main St. were also rehearsed during these sessions.[5]

Artwork[edit]

Standard version[edit]

The Rolling Stones posing in an ad with covers of Sticky Fingers, with the original artwork, in 1971, from left to right: Charlie Watts, Mick Taylor, Bill Wyman, Keith Richards, and Mick Jagger

The album’s artwork emphasises the suggestive innuendo of the Sticky Fingers title, showing a close-up of a jeans-clad male crotch with the visible outline of a large penis; the cover of the original (vinyl LP) release featured a working zipper and perforations around the belt buckle that opened to reveal a sub-cover image of cotton briefs. The vinyl release displayed the band’s name and album title along the image of the belt; behind the zipper the white briefs were seemingly rubber stamped in gold with the stylized name of American pop artist Andy Warhol, below which read “THIS PHOTOGRAPH MAY NOT BE—ETC.”[6] While the artwork was conceived by Warhol, photography was by Billy Name and design was by Craig Braun. Braun and his team had other ideas, such as wrapping the album in rolling paper – a concept later used by Cheech & Chong in Big Bambu – but Jagger was enthused by Warhol’s cover with a zipper. Execution was then handled as Warhol sent Braun Polaroid pictures of a model in tight jeans.[7]

The cover photo of a male model’s crotch clad in tight blue jeans was assumed by many fans to be an image of Mick Jagger, but the people actually involved at the time of the photo shoot claim that Warhol had several different men photographed (Jagger was not among them) and never revealed which shots he used. Among the candidates, Jed Johnson, Warhol’s lover at the time, denied it was his likeness, although his twin brother Jay is a possibility. Those closest to the shoot, and subsequent design, name Factory artist and designer Corey Tippin as the likeliest candidate. Warhol “superstar” Joe Dallesandro claims to have been the model.[8]

After retailers complained that the zipper was causing damage to the vinyl (from stacked shipments of the record), the zipper was “unzipped” slightly to the middle of the record, where damage would be minimised.[7]

The Rolling Stones’ logo, designed by John Pasche and modified by Craig Braun,[7] was introduced in 1971.

The album features the first usage of the “tongue & lips” logo of Rolling Stones Records, originally designed by John Pasche in 1970. Jagger suggested to Pasche that he copy the outstuck tongue of the Hindu goddess Kali, and while Pasche first felt it would date the image back to the Indian culture craze of the 1960s, seeing Kali made him change his mind. Before the end of that year his basic version was faxed to Craig Braun by Marshall Chess. The black & white copy was then modified by Braun and his team, resulting in today’s most popular red version, the slim one with the two white stripes on the tongue.[7] Critic Sean Egan has said of the logo, “Without using the Stones’ name, it instantly conjures them, or at least Jagger, as well as a certain lasciviousness that is the Stones’ own … It quickly and deservedly became the most famous logo in the history of popular music.”[9] The tongue and lips design was part of a package that, in 2003, VH1 named the “No. 1 Greatest Album Cover” of all time.[10]

Alternative version and covers[edit]

In Spain, the original cover was censored by the Franco regime and replaced with a “Can of fingers” cover, designed by John Pasche and Phil Jude,[11] and “Sister Morphine” was replaced by a live version of Chuck Berry’s “Let It Rock“. This version was released on the compilation album Rarities 1971–2003 in 2005.

In 1992, the LP release of the album in Russia featured a similar treatment as the original cover; but with Cyrillic lettering for the band name and album name, a colourised photograph of blue jeans with a zipper, and a Soviet Army uniform belt buckle that shows a hammer and sickle inscribed in a star. The model appears to be female.[12]

Release and reception[edit]

Professional ratings
Retrospective reviews
Review scores
Source Rating
AllMusic 5/5 stars[13]
Christgau’s Record Guide A[14]
Encyclopedia of Popular Music 4/5 stars[15]
MusicHound 4.5/5[15]
NME 9/10[16]
Pitchfork Media 10/10[17]
Q 5/5 stars[18]
Record Collector 5/5 stars[18]
The Rolling Stone Album Guide 5/5 stars[19]
Uncut 5/5 stars[20]

Sticky Fingers hit the number one spot on the British charts in May 1971, remaining there for four weeks before returning at number one for a further week in mid June. In the US, the album hit number one within days of release, and stayed there for four weeks. In Germany it was one of only two non-German albums to reach number one in 1971.[citation needed]

In a contemporary review for the Los Angeles Times, music critic Robert Hilburn said that although Sticky Fingers is one of the best rock albums of the year, it is only “modest” by the Rolling Stones’ standards and succeeds on the strength of songs such as “Bitch” and “Dead Flowers”, which recall the band’s previously uninhibited, furious style.[21] Jon Landau, writing in Rolling Stone, felt that it lacks the spirit and spontaneity of the Rolling Stones’ previous two albums and, apart from “Moonlight Mile”, is full of “forced attempts at style and control” in which the band sounds disinterested, particularly on formally correct songs such as “Brown Sugar”.[22] In a positive review, Lynn Van Matre of the Chicago Tribune viewed the album as the band “at their raunchy best” and wrote that, although it is “hardly innovative”, it is consistent enough to be one of the year’s best albums.[23]

Sticky Fingers was voted the second best album of the year in The Village Voices annual Pazz & Jop critics poll for 1971.[24] Lester Bangs voted it number one in the poll and said that it was his most played album of the year.[25] Robert Christgau, the poll’s creator, ranked the album 17th on his own year-end list.[26] In a 1975 article for The Village Voice, Christgau suggested that the release was “triffling with decadence”, but might be the Rolling Stones’ best album, approached only by Exile on Main St. (1972).[27] In his 1980 review of the album, he wrote that it reflected how unapologetic the band was after the Altamont Free Concert and that, despite the concession to sincerity with “Wild Horses”, songs such as “Can’t You Hear Me Knocking” and “I Got the Blues” are as “soulful” as “Good Times“, and their cover of “You Gotta Move” is on-par with their previous covers of “Prodigal Son” and “Love in Vain“.[14]

In 1994, Sticky Fingers was ranked number ten in Colin Larkin‘s All Time Top 1000 Albums. He stated, “Dirty rock like this has still to be bettered, and there is still no rival in sight.”[28] In a retrospective review, Q magazine said that the album was “the Stones at their assured, showboating peak … A magic formula of heavy soul, junkie blues and macho rock”.[18] NME wrote that it “captures the Stones bluesy swagger” in a “dark-land where few dare to tread”.[16] Record Collector magazine said that it showcases Jagger and Richards as they “delve even further back to the primitive blues that first inspired them and step up their investigations into another great American form, country.”[18] In his review for Goldmine magazine, Dave Thompson wrote that the album still is superior to “most of The Rolling Stones’ catalog”.[29] In 2003, Sticky Fingers was listed as No. 63 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.[30]

In 1994, Sticky Fingers was remastered and reissued by Virgin Records. This remaster was initially released in a Collector’s Edition CD, which replicated in miniature many elements of the original vinyl album packaging, including the zipper. Sticky Fingers was remastered again in 2009 by Universal Music Enterprises and in 2011 by Universal Music Enterprises in a Japanese-only SHM-SACD version.

In June 2015, the Rolling Stones reissued Sticky Fingers (in its 2009 remastering) in a variety of formats to coincide with a new concert tour, the Zip Code Tour. The Deluxe and Super Deluxe versions of the reissue featured previously unreleased bonus material (depending on the format): alternative takes of some songs, live tracks recorded on 14 March 1971 at the Roundhouse, London, and the complete 13 March 1971 show at Leeds University. It re-entered the UK Albums chart at #7, extending their UK Top 10 album chart span beyond 51 years and 2 months since their self-titled debuted at #7 on April 23, 1964.[31][32][33][34] It also re-entered the US Albums chart at #5, extending their US Top 10 album chart span beyond 50 years and 6 months since 12 x 5 on December 14, 1964.[31][32][33][34]

Track listing[edit]

All songs written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, except where noted.

Side one
No. Title Length
1. Brown Sugar 3:48
2. Sway 3:50
3. Wild Horses 5:42
4. Can’t You Hear Me Knocking 7:14
5. You Gotta Move” (Fred McDowell/Gary Davis) 2:32
Side two
No. Title Length
6. Bitch 3:38
7. I Got the Blues 3:54
8. Sister Morphine” (Jagger/Richards/Marianne Faithfull) 5:31
9. Dead Flowers 4:03
10. Moonlight Mile 5:56

2015 Deluxe edition bonus disc:

No. Title Length
1. Brown Sugar” (Alternate Version with Eric Clapton) 4:07
2. Wild Horses” (Acoustic version) 5:47
3. Can’t You Hear Me Knocking” (Alternate version) 3:24
4. Bitch” (Extended version) 5:53
5. Dead Flowers” (Alternate version) 4:18
6. “Live with Me” (Live at the Roundhouse, 1971) 4:22
7. Stray Cat Blues” (Live at the Roundhouse, 1971) 3:38
8. Love in Vain” (Live at the Roundhouse, 1971) 6:42
9. Midnight Rambler” (Live at the Roundhouse, 1971) 11:27
10. Honky Tonk Women” (Live at the Roundhouse, 1971) 4:14

2015 Super Deluxe edition bonus disc (Live at Leeds University, 1971):

No. Title Length
1. Jumpin’ Jack Flash” (Live at Leeds University, 1971) 3:42
2. “Live with Me” (Live at Leeds University, 1971) 3:33
3. “Dead Flowers” (Live at Leeds University, 1971) 4:03
4. “Stray Cat Blues” (Live at Leeds University, 1971) 4:37
5. “Love in Vain” (Live at Leeds University, 1971) 4:19
6. “Midnight Rambler” (Live at Leeds University, 1971) 9:15
7. “Bitch” (Live at Leeds University, 1971) 5:53
8. “Honky Tonk Women” (Live at Leeds University, 1971) 3:02
9. (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” (Live at Leeds University, 1971) 3:44
10. “Little Queenie” (Live at Leeds University, 1971) 4:26
11. “Brown Sugar” (Live at Leeds University, 1971) 3:48
12. Street Fighting Man” (Live at Leeds University, 1971) 3:15
13. “Let It Rock” (Live at Leeds University, 1971) 3:14

ROLLING STONES Sticky Fingers 2015 Superdeluxe Edition Disc 4

Published on Jul 15, 2015

1. 0:15 Dead Flowers; 2. 4:40 Stray Cat Blues; 3. 8:35 Love In Vain; 4. 14:50 Midnight Rambler; 5. 27:50 Bitch; 6. 32:00 Introduction; 7. 33:00 Honky Tonk Women; 8. 36:15 (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction; 9. 41:25 Little Queenie; 10. 46:05 Brown Sugar; 11. 50:20 Street Fighting Man; 12 54:40 Let It Rock (encore in stereo)

The Rolling Stones: all songs from the American 1972 Tour

Published on Jan 27, 2014

All songs that have been played during the American 1972 Tour (Stones Touring Party):
1. 0:00 Intro Keith Richards; 2. 0:18 Brown Sugar; 3. 3:42 Bitch; 4. 8:10 Rocks Off; 5. 11:55 Gimme Shelter; 6. 16:58 Dead Flowers; 7. 20:50 Sweet Black Angel; 8. 23:55 Happy; 9. 26:46 Honky Tonk Women; 10. 29:43 Tumbling Dice; 11. 34:15 Loving Cup; 12. 38:42 Torn and Frayed; 13. 43:34 Ventilator Blues; 14. 46:54 Love In Vain; 15. 52:50 Sweet Virginia; 16. 57:30 You Can’t Always Get What You Want; 17. 1:05:00 All Down The Line; 18. 1:08:58 Midnight Rambler; 19. 1:21:10 Band Introduction; 20. 1:21:59 Bye Bye Johnny; 21. 1:25:06 Don’t Lie To Me; 22. 1:27:25 Rip This Joint; 23. 1:29:38 Jumpin’ Jack Flash; 24. 1:33:11 Street Fighting Man; 25. 1:37:38 Uptight Satisfaction

THE ROLLING STONE : Greatest hits – Collection HD/HQ

Published on Feb 27, 2016

01. Paint It Black
02. Sympathy For The Devil
03. Gimme Shelter
04. (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction
05. You Can’t Always Get What You Want
06. Jumpin’ Jack Flash
07. Angie
08. Start Me Up
09. Brown Sugar
10. Wild Horses
11. Under My Thumb
12. It’s Only Rock ‘n’ Roll
13. Ruby Tuesday
14. Can’t You Hear Me Knocking
15. Honky Tonk Women
16. Beast Of Burden
17. Shattered
18. Get Off My Cloud
19. Miss You
20. Tumbling Dice
21. Street Fighting Man
22. Rocks Off
23. As Tears Go By
24. Let It Loose
25. She’s A Rainbow
26. Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo (Heartbreaker)
27. Sweet Virginia

Personnel[edit]

The Rolling Stones
  • Mick Jagger – lead vocals; percussion on “Brown Sugar”; rhythm guitar on “Sway”; acoustic guitar on “Dead Flowers” and “Moonlight Mile”
  • Keith Richards – rhythm guitar, backing vocals; acoustic guitar on “Brown Sugar”, “You Gotta Move”, “I Got the Blues” and “Sister Morphine”; twelve string acoustic guitar on “Wild Horses”; lead guitar on “Brown Sugar”, “Wild Horses”, the first part of “Can’t You Hear Me Knocking” and “Bitch”; co-lead guitar on “Dead Flowers”
  • Mick Taylor – lead guitar; acoustic guitar on “Wild Horses”; rhythm guitar on the first part and lead guitar on “Can’t You Hear Me Knocking” and rhythm guitar on “Bitch”; slide guitar on “Sway” and “You Gotta Move”
  • Bill Wyman – bass guitar; electric piano on “You Gotta Move”
  • Charlie Watts – drums
Additional personnel

Charts[edit]

Weekly charts[edit]

Original release
Chart (1971) Peak
position
Australian Kent Music Report[35] 1
Canadian RPM Albums Chart[36] 1
Dutch Albums Chart[37] 1
French SNEP Albums Chart[38] 3
Italian Albums Chart[39] 5
Japanese Oricon LPs Chart[40] 9
Norwegian Albums Chart[41] 1
Spanish Albums Chart[42] 1
Swedish Kvällstoppen Chart[43] 1
UK Albums Chart[44] 1
US Billboard 200[45] 1
West German Media Control Albums Chart[46] 1
2015 Reissue
Chart Peak
Position
Argentine Albums (CAPIF)[47] 8
Australian Albums (ARIA)[48] 24
Austrian Albums (Ö3 Austria)[49] 9
Belgian Albums (Ultratop Flanders)[50] 7
Czech Albums (ČNS IFPI)[51] 17
French Albums (French SNEP Albums Chart) Chart[52] 11
German Albums (Offizielle Top 100)[53] 5
Greek Albums (IFPI)[54] 9
Irish Albums (IRMA)[55] 6
Italian Albums (FIMI)[56] 15
Dutch Albums (MegaCharts)[57] 2
New Zealand Albums (RMNZ)[58] 8
Norwegian Albums (VG-lista)[59] 16
Japanese Albums (Oricon)[60] 10
Portuguese Albums (AFP)[61] 25
Korean Albums (Gaon)[62] 64
Spanish Albums (PROMUSICAE)[63] 8
Swedish Albums (Sverigetopplistan)[64] 31
Swiss Albums (Schweizer Hitparade)[65] 16
UK Albums (OCC)[66] 7
US Billboard 200[45] 5
US Billboard 200 (Super Deluxe Edition)[45] 65

Year-end charts[edit]

Chart (1971) Position
Australian Albums Chart[35] 18
Dutch Albums Chart[67] 1
French Albums Chart[68] 24
Italian Albums Chart[39] 21
UK Albums Chart[69] 3
US Billboard 200[70] 21

Certifications[edit]

Region Certification Certified units/Sales
Australia (ARIA)[71] Gold 35,000^
France (SNEP)[72] Gold 109,400[73]
United Kingdom (BPI)[74] Gold 100,000dagger^
United States (RIAA)[75] 3× Platinum 3,000,000^
^shipments figures based on certification alone

dagger BPI certification awarded only for sales since 1994.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. Jump up^ Gilman, William (July 1971). “The Pick”. Gramophone. London. 49: 245. The music is hard rock and a reversion to this group’s earlier days prior to their “Beggars’ Banquet” album, which is about the most imaginative LP they have achieved.
  2. Jump up^ Elliot, Martin (2002). The Rolling Stones: Complete Recording Sessions 1962 – 2002. Cherry Red Books LTD. pp. 163–164. ISBN 1 901447 04 9.
  3. Jump up^ Wyman, Bill (2002). Rolling with the Stones. Dorling Kindersley Limited. p. 349. ISBN 0 7513 4646 2.
  4. Jump up^ Sanchez, Tony (1996). Up and Down with the Rolling Stones, p. 195. Da Capo Press. ISBN 0-306-80711-4.
  5. Jump up^ Greenfield, Robert (2006). Exile on Main Street: A Season in Hell with the Rolling Stones, pp. 95–96. Da Capo Press. ISBN 0-306-81433-1.
  6. Jump up^ “Images for Rolling Stones, The – Sticky Fingers”. Discogs.com. Retrieved 2015-06-10.
  7. ^ Jump up to:a b c d “Art of The Rolling Stones: Behind that zipper and that tongue”. New York Times. Retrieved 2015-06-11.
  8. Jump up^ “Album Cover Joe”. Joedallesandro.com. Archived from the original on 13 July 2011. Retrieved 12 May 2013.
  9. Jump up^ Egan 2013.
  10. Jump up^ Goldstein, Mike. “UnCovered Interview – The Rolling Stones Lips & Tongue logo, with designs by Ernie Cefalu”. RockPoP Gallery. RockPoP Gallery. Retrieved 22 November 2014.
  11. Jump up^ “Rare Spanish version of Sticky Fingers to be reissued on vinyl”. Rollingstones.com. Retrieved 2015-06-19.
  12. Jump up^ “Dust & Grooves – Adventures in Record Collecting. A book about vinyl records collectors » DB Burkeman – Brooklyn, NY”. Dustandgrooves.com. Retrieved 2015-06-10.
  13. Jump up^ Stephen Thomas Erlewine (1971-04-23). “Sticky Fingers – The Rolling Stones | Songs, Reviews, Credits, Awards”. AllMusic. Retrieved 2015-06-10.
  14. ^ Jump up to:a b Christgau, Robert (1981). Christgau’s Record Guide: Rock Albums of the Seventies. Ticknor & Fields. p. 329. ISBN 0899190251.
  15. ^ Jump up to:a b “Sticky Fingers”. Acclaimed Music. Retrieved 10 October2015.
  16. ^ Jump up to:a b “Review: Sticky Fingers”. NME. London: 43. 9 July 1994.
  17. Jump up^ “The Rolling Stones: Sticky Fingers”. Pitchfork Media. 19 June 2015. Retrieved 2 July 2015.
  18. ^ Jump up to:a b c d “Rolling Stones – Sticky Fingers CD Album”. Rakuten.com. Muze. Archived from the original on 11 July 2013. Retrieved 21 June 2013.
  19. Jump up^ Moon, Tom (2004). “The Rolling Stones”. In Brackett, Nathan; Hoard, Christian. The New Rolling Stone Album Guide. London: Fireside. pp. 695–699. ISBN 0-7432-0169-8. Portions posted at “The Rolling Stones > Album Guide”. rollingstone.com. Retrieved 2 December 2011.
  20. Jump up^ Cavanagh, David. “Album Reviews: The Rolling Stones Reissues”. Uncut. London. Retrieved 11 July 2013.
  21. Jump up^ Hilburn, Robert (9 May 1971). “The Survival of ‘Sticky Fingers'”. Los Angeles Times. p. Q37. Retrieved 11 July 2013.(subscription required)
  22. Jump up^ Landau, Jon (23 April 1971). “Sticky Fingers”. Rolling Stone. New York. Retrieved 11 July 2013.
  23. Jump up^ Van Matre, Lynn (30 April 1971). “‘Stones’ at their raunchy best”. Chicago Tribune. section 2, p. B12. Retrieved 11 July2013. (subscription required)
  24. Jump up^ “The 1971 Pazz & Jop Critics Poll”. The Village Voice. New York. 10 February 1972. Retrieved 11 July 2013.
  25. Jump up^ Christgau, Robert (17 February 1972). “Pazz & Jop Critics Poll: What Does It All Mean?”. The Village Voice. New York. Retrieved 11 July 2013.
  26. Jump up^ Christgau, Robert (10 February 1972). “Pazz & Jop 1971: Dean’s List”. The Village Voice. New York. Retrieved 11 July2013.
  27. Jump up^ “It Isn’t Only Rock and Roll”. The Village Voice. New York. 30 June 1975. Retrieved 11 July 2013.
  28. Jump up^ Larkin, Colin (1994). Guinness Book of Top 1000 Albums (1 ed.). Gullane Children’s Books. p. 10. ISBN 978-0-85112-786-6.
  29. Jump up^ Thompson, Dave (9 May 2011). “True 5-Star Albums: Rolling Stones’ ‘Sticky Fingers'”. Goldmine. Retrieved 11 July 2013.
  30. Jump up^ “500 Greatest Albums of All Time”. Rolling Stone. New York: 113. 11 December 2003.
  31. ^ Jump up to:a b “The Rolling Stones’ Sticky Fingers lives again!”. http://www.rollingstones.com. 31 March 2015. Retrieved 9 April 2015.
  32. ^ Jump up to:a b “Sticky Fingers Rerelease: Out 8/9 June”. http://www.rollingstones.com. 9 April 2015. Retrieved 9 April 2015.
  33. ^ Jump up to:a b “The Rolling Stones are rereleasing their classic 1971 album Sticky Fingers, along with previously unreleased material and alternative re-workings of beloved album tracks.”. http://www.rollingstones.com. April 2015. Retrieved 9 April 2015