Category Archives: Current Events

MUSIC MONDAY John Barry teamed up with lyricist Don Black and wrote “Thunderball” in a rush. Tom Jones, who sang the new theme song, allegedly fainted in the recording booth after singing the song’s final, high note. Jones said of the final note, “I closed my eyes and I held the note for so long when I opened my eyes the room was spinning!

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NO TIME TO DIE | Final US Trailer

007 : James Bond : Theme

Goldfinger Theme Song – James Bond

Diamonds Are Forever Theme Song – James Bond

Moonraker Theme Song – James Bond

Adele – Skyfall (Lyric Video)

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Billie Eilish – No Time To Die

 

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Sam Smith – Writing’s On The Wall (from Spectre) (Official Video)

 

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Thunderball Theme Song – James Bond

Thunderball (soundtrack)

 
 

Thunderball is the soundtrack album for the fourth James Bond film Thunderball.

Thunderball
007Thunderballsoundtrack65.jpg
Soundtrack album by

 

Released 1965
Recorded October 1965
Length 39:11
Label United Artists
Producer Frank Collura (Reissue)
John Barry chronology
The Knack and How to Get It
(1965)
Thunderball
(1965)
Born Free
(1966)
 
James Bond soundtrack chronology
Goldfinger
(1964)
Thunderball
(1965)
You Only Live Twice
(1967)
Singles from Thunderball
  1. “Thunderball”
    Released: 1965
Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
AllMusic 4/5 stars

The album was first released by United Artists Records in 1965 in both monaural and stereo editions, with a CD release in 1988.[1] The music was composed and conducted by John Barry, and performed by the John Barry Orchestra. This was Barry’s third soundtrack for the series. The soundtrack was still being recorded when it came time for the album to be released, so the LP only featured twelve tracks from earlier in the film; an expanded edition with six bonus tracks was released for the first time when the album was reissued on Compact Disc on 25 February 2003 as part of the “James Bond Remastered” collection. Additionally, the music in the film was unfinished days before the film’s release in theatres due to a late change by Eon Productions to use a title song with the same name as the film.

 

Title theme changeEdit

The original main title theme to Thunderball was titled “Mr. Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang“, which was written by John Barry and Leslie Bricusse. The title was taken from an Italian journalist who in 1962 dubbed agent 007 as “Mr. Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang”. Barry had thought he could not write a song about a vague “Thunderball” term or the film’s story, so his song was a description of the character James Bond.[2]

The song was originally recorded by Shirley Bassey. When there were concerns with the length of the track compared to the needed titles, it was later rerecorded by Dionne Warwick as Bassey was not available and featured a longer instrumental opening designed so the lyrics would not be heard until after the title “Thunderball” appeared in Maurice Binder‘s title design.[3] Neither version was released until the 1990s. The song was removed from the title credits after United Artists requested that the theme song contain the film’s title in its lyrics.[4] When it was planned to use the Warwick version in the end titles Shirley Bassey sued the producers[5][6] with the result being that neither version was heard in the film and different instrumental versions of the theme appeared on the High Fidelity (Bassey’s) and Stereo (Warwick’s) soundtrack LPs.[7]

Barry teamed up with lyricist Don Black and wrote “Thunderball” in a rush.[8] Tom Jones, who sang the new theme song, allegedly fainted in the recording booth after singing the song’s final, high note.[8]Jones said of the final note, “I closed my eyes and I held the note for so long when I opened my eyes the room was spinning.”[9]

Country musician Johnny Cash also submitted a song to Eon productions titled “Thunderball” but it wasn’t used.[10] The lyrics of Cash’s “Thunderball” describe the film’s story.[11]

The producers’ decision to change the film’s theme song so close to the release date meant that only some of the film’s soundtrack had been recorded for release on LP.[8] Adding to the delay issues, Barry had written large amounts of the score around the original theme and woven it throughout the score (along with the recurring underwater “Search For Vulcan” motif). After “Thunderball” was written, Barry wrote, orchestrated, and recorded several new pieces interpolating it.

Though “Mr. Kiss Kiss Bang Bang” was dropped as the theme song, some of the pieces which included its melody remained part of the score, and it receives full statements twice: by full orchestra and jazz rhythm quartet with bass, drums, guitar, and vibraphone in the track “Café Martinique” (immediately followed by the “Vulcan” cue), and as a wild, bongo-laden cha-cha-cha in “Death of Fiona.” The scene which includes the latter takes place at Club Kiss Kiss, and features the bongo drumming of bandleader King Errisson.

 

CompositionEdit

The tune was composed in the key of B-flat minor.[12]

 

Track listingEdit

  1. “Thunderball (Main Title)” – Tom Jones[A]
  2. “Chateau Flight”[A]
  3. “The Spa”
  4. “Switching the Body”
  5. “The Bomb”
  6. “Cafe Martinique”
  7. “Thunderball (Instrumental)”
  8. “Death of Fiona”
  9. “Bond Below Disco Volante”
  10. “Search for Vulcan”
  11. “007”[B]
  12. “Mr. Kiss Kiss Bang Bang”
CD bonus tracks
  1. “Gunbarrel / Traction Table / Gassing the Plane / Car Chase”[A]
  2. “Bond Meets Domino / Shark Tank / Lights out for Paula / For King and Country”[A]
  3. “Street Chase”[B]
  4. “Finding the Plane / Underwater Ballet / Bond with SPECTRE Frogmen / Leiter to the Rescue / Bond Joins Underwater Battle”[B]
  5. “Underwater Mayhem / Death of Largo / End Titles”[A][B]
  6. “Mr. Kiss Kiss Bang Bang (Mono Version)”
 

NotesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e contains the “James Bond Theme“, originally composed for the Dr. No soundtrack
  2. ^ a b c d contains “007“, originally from the From Russia with Love soundtrack
 

Outside the filmEdit

 

Parodies / tributesEdit

 

Nancy Sinatra – You Only Live Twice (HQ)

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The Man with the Golden Gun Opening Title Sequence

 

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The spy who loved me (1977) INTRO HD

Sheena Easton • For Your Eyes Only – James Bond/007

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James Bond – Octopussy – Theme Song

A View to a Kill Opening Title Sequence

 –

A-ha • The Living Daylights – James Bond 007

 

LICENCE TO KILL HIGH DEFINITION

 

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James Bond – Goldeneye Opening Theme (HQ)

Sheryl Crow – Tomorrow Never Dies

 

Barry, Beatles, Billie: 60 years of Bond tunes

<img class=”i-amphtml-intrinsic-sizer” role=”presentation” src=”data:;base64,” alt=”” aria-hidden=”true” />Barry, Beatles, Billie: 60 years of Bond tunes

 

British actor Daniel Craig poses during a photocall to promote the 24th James Bond film ‘Spectre’ on February 18, 2015 at Rome’s city hall. AFP PHOTO / TIZIANA FABI (Photo by VINCENZO PINTO and TIZIANA FABI / AFP)

Paris, France — Ever since the twanging guitar of John Barry’s theme song first appeared in “Dr No” in 1962, music has been crucial to the James Bond phenomenon.

The songs written for each title sequence have become a way of marking out the evolution of pop music through the past 60 years, from the classics of Shirley Bassey and Paul McCartney to Adele and Billie Eilish.

Nobody remembers Monty

Many assume the original theme was written by John Barry, in part because he became so closely associated with the Bond franchise, composing the soundtrack for 11 of the films.

 

In fact, Barry only arranged and performed the theme tune.

The famous dung-digger-dung-dung line was actually written by theater composer Monty Norman, developed from an unused Indian-themed score he had written for an adaptation of VS Naipaul’s “A House for Mr Biswas.”

It was Barry’s job to jazz it up, adding the blaring horns that made it so dramatic.

While Norman was given a one-off payment of just £250, Barry built a Hollywood career that has included five Oscars and classic soundtracks to “Midnight Cowboy,” “Out of Africa,” and many more.

Golden girl Shirley Bassey

Bassey became almost as closely linked to Bond as Barry — the only singer to deliver three title tracks: “Goldfinger” (1964), “Diamonds are Forever” (1971), and “Moonraker” (1979).

The first two are considered the most memorable in Bond history, the latter less so — Bassey later admitted she hated the “Moonraker” song and only did it as a favor to Barry.

“Goldfinger” made her a star, but the recording sessions were grueling, with Barry insisting that Bassey, then 27, hold the last belting note for seven full seconds.

“I was holding it and holding it — I was looking at John Barry and I was going blue in the face and he’s going — hold it just one more second. When it finished, I nearly passed out,” she later recalled.

 A new Beatles beginning

The first Bond film without Barry on the baton was “Live and Let Die” in 1973.

For this, the producers turned to another famous “B” The Beatles.

The group’s producer George Martin took over composing duties and brought in Paul McCartney and his band Wings for the theme song.

It became another classic and spawned a famous cover by Guns’N’Roses in later years.

From this point on, the Bond title song became its own mini-industry, without the involvement of the composer.

Big pop tie-ins followed, ranging from the not-so-successful (Lulu’s “The Man with the Golden Gun”) to classics like Carly Simon’s “Nobody Does it Better” and Duran Duran’s “A View to a Kill.”

<img class=”i-amphtml-intrinsic-sizer” role=”presentation” src=”data:;base64,” alt=”” aria-hidden=”true” />Barry, Beatles, Billie: 60 years of Bond tunes

FILE PHOTO: Auctioneer specialists hold a rare intact James Bond ‘Thunderball’ (1965) film poster (estimate £8,000-£12,000), featuring two panels of poster illustrations on the left by Frank McCarthy and two on the right by Robert McGinnis, at Ewbank’s Auctioneers, ahead of an upcoming sale, in Woking, Britain, April 7, 2021. REUTERS/Hannah McKay

 

The next generation

After a few desultory outings during the Pierce Brosnan years, the Bond genre got a shot of adrenaline with Adele’s “Skyfall” in 2012, which was the first to win an Oscar for best song.

<img class=”i-amphtml-intrinsic-sizer” role=”presentation” src=”data:;base64,” alt=”” aria-hidden=”true” />Barry, Beatles, Billie: 60 years of Bond tunes

 

Image: Twitter/@007

The following year’s “Writing’s on the Wall” by Sam Smith also won an Oscar, though it got a more mixed critical reception.

The latest incarnation is pop princess Billie Eilish with “No Time to Die,” which she co-wrote with her brother Finneas.

It already has a thumbs-up from the doyenne of the Bond theme world, with Bassey telling The Big Issue: “She did a good job.”

Golden girl Shirley Bassey Bassey became almost as closely linked to Bond as Barry -- the only singer to deliver three title tracks: "Goldfinger" (1964), "Diamonds are Forever" (1971), and "Moonraker" (1979).  The first two are considered the most memorable in Bond history, the latter less so -- Bassey later admitted she hated the "Moonraker" song and only did it as a favor to Barry.

The latest James Bond movie “Skyfall” stars Daniel Craig. 007 boozed so much that in all reality he would have had the tremulous hands of a chronic alcoholic, according to an offbeat study published by the British Medical Journal. PHOTO FROM FACEBOOK.COM/JAMESBONDOO7

Live And Let Die Theme Song – James Bond

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Paul McCartney Uncle Albert Rare Studio Demo

Paul McCartney; Uncle AlbertAdmiral Halsey. (RAM 1971)

Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
“Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey”
Single by Paul and Linda McCartney
from the album Ram
B-side Too Many People
Released 2 August 1971 (US only)
Format 7″
Recorded 6 November 1970
Genre
Length 4:49
Label Apple
Writer(s) Paul and Linda McCartney
Producer(s) Paul and Linda McCartney
Paul and Linda McCartney singles chronology
Another Day
(1971)
Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey
(1971)
The Back Seat of My Car
(1971)
Ram track listing
 

Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey” is a song by Paul and Linda McCartney from the album Ram. Released in the United States as a single on 2 August 1971,[1] but premiering on WLS the previous week (as a “Hit Parade Bound” (HPB)),[2] it reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 on 4 September 1971,[3][4] making it the first of a string of post-Beatles, McCartney-penned singles to top the US pop chart during the 1970s and 1980s. Billboard ranked it number 22 on its Top Pop Singles of 1971 year-end chart.[5]

Elements and interpretation[edit]

https://youtu.be/XI6C7L66zq8
“Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey” is composed of several unfinished song fragments that McCartney stitched together similar to the medleys from the Beatles‘ album Abbey Road.[6] The song is noted for its sound effects, including the sounds of a thunderstorm, with rain, heard between the first and second stanza, the sound of a telephone ringing, and a message machine, heard after the second stanza, and a sound of chirping sea birds and wind by the seashore. Linda’s voice is heard in the harmonies as well as the bridge section of the “Admiral Halsey” portion of the song.

McCartney said “Uncle Albert” was based on his uncle. “He’s someone I recall fondly, and when the song was coming it was like a nostalgia thing.”[7] McCartney also said, “As for Admiral Halsey, he’s one of yours, an American admiral”, referring to Fleet Admiral William “Bull” Halsey (1882–1959).[7] McCartney has described the “Uncle Albert” section of the song as an apology from his generation to the older generation, and Admiral Halsey as an authoritarian figure who ought to be ignored.[8]

Despite the disparate elements that make up the song, author Andrew Grant Jackson discerns a coherent narrative to the lyrics, related to McCartney’s emotions in the aftermath of the Beatles’ breakup.[9] In this interpretation, the song begins with McCartney apologizing to his uncle for getting nothing done, and being easily distracted and perhaps depressed in the lethargic “Uncle Albert” section.[9] Then, after some sound effects reminiscent of “Yellow Submarine,” Admiral Halsey appears to him calling him to action, although McCartney remains more interested in “tea and butter pie.” McCartney stated that he put the butter in the pie so that it would not melt at all.[9] Jackson sees a possible sinister allusion in the use of Admiral Halsey as a character in the song, since Halsey was famous for fighting the Japanese in World War II and claiming that “after the war, the Japanese language will be spoken only in hell,” and McCartney’s ex-Beatle partner John Lennon had recently married a Japanese woman, Yoko Ono.[9] The “hands across the water” section which follows could be taken as evocative of the command “All hands on deck!”, rousing McCartney to action, perhaps to compete with Lennon.[9] The song then ends with the “gypsy” section, in which McCartney resolves to get back on the road and perform his music, now that he was on his own without his former bandmates who no longer wanted to tour.[9]

Reception[edit]

Paul McCartney won the Grammy Award for Best Arrangement Accompanying Vocalists in 1971 for the song.[10][11] The single was certified Gold by the Recording Industry Association of America for sales of over one million copies.[12]

According to Allmusic critic Stewart Mason, fans of Paul McCartney’s music are divided in their opinions of this song.[13] Although some fans praise it as “one of his most playful and inventive songs” others criticize it for being “exactly the kind of cute self-indulgence that they find so annoying about his post-Beatles career.”[13] Mason himself considers it “churlish” to be annoyed by the song, given that song isn’t intended to be completely serious, and praises the “Hands across the water” section as being “lovably giddy.”[13]

On the US charts, the song set a songwriting milestone as the all-time songwriting record (at the time) for the most consecutive calendar years to write a #1 song. This gave McCartney eight consecutive years (starting with “I Want to Hold Your Hand“), leaving behind Lennon with only seven years.

Later release[edit]

“Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey” also appears on Wings Greatest from 1978, even though Ram was not a Wings album, and again on the US version of McCartney’s 1987 compilation, All the Best!, as well as the 2001 compilation Wingspan: Hits and History.

Personnel[edit]

Song uses[edit]

Charts[edit]

Peak positions[edit]

Chart (1971) Position
Australian Kent Music Report[14] 5
Canadian RPM Top 100 Singles[15] 1
Mexican Singles Chart[16] 3
U.S. Billboard Hot 100[4] 1
West German Media Control Singles Chart[17] 30

Year-end charts[edit]

Chart (1971) Position
Canadian RPM Singles Chart[18] 14
U.S. Billboard Top Pop Singles[16] 22

Certifications[edit]

Region Certification
United States (RIAA)[19] Gold

Notes[edit]

  1. Jump up^ McGee 2003, p. 195.
  2. Jump up^ “89WLS Hit Parade”. 1971-08-02. Retrieved 2013-12-21.
  3. Jump up^ Billboard.
  4. ^ Jump up to:a b “Allmusic: Paul McCartney: Charts & Awards”. allmusic.com. Retrieved 2 May 2013.
  5. Jump up^ “Top Pop 100 Singles” Billboard December 25, 1971: TA-36
  6. Jump up^ Blaney, J. (2007). Lennon and McCartney: together alone: a critical discography of their solo work. Jawbone Press. pp. 46, 50. ISBN 978-1-906002-02-2.
  7. ^ Jump up to:a b McGee 2003, p. 196.
  8. Jump up^ Benitez, V.P. (2010). The Words and Music of Paul McCartney: The Solo Years. Praeger. pp. 30–31. ISBN 978-0-313-34969-0.
  9. ^ Jump up to:a b c d e f Jackson, A.G. (2012). Still the Greatest: The Essential Songs of The Beatles’ Solo Careers. Scarecrow Press. ISBN 978-0810882225.
  10. Jump up^ “Past Winners Search”. National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Retrieved 2 May 2014.
  11. Jump up^ “1971 Grammy Awards”.
  12. Jump up^ riaa.com
  13. ^ Jump up to:a b c Mason, S. “Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey”. Allmusic. Retrieved 2013-12-25.
  14. Jump up^ Kent, David (1993). Australian Chart Book 1970–1992. St Ives, NSW: Australian Chart Book. ISBN 0-646-11917-6.
  15. Jump up^ “Top Singles – Volume 16, No. 5”. RPM. 18 September 1971. Retrieved 5 May 2013.
  16. ^ Jump up to:a b Nielsen Business Media, Inc (25 December 1971). Billboard – Talent in Action 1971. Retrieved 1 May 2014.
  17. Jump up^ “Single Search: Paul and Linda McCartney – “Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey”” (in German). Media Control. Retrieved 20 February 2013.
  18. Jump up^ “RPM 100 Top Singles of 1971”. RPM. 8 January 1972. Retrieved 11 March 2014.
  19. Jump up^ “American single certifications – Paul Mc Cartney – Uncle Albert”. Recording Industry Association of America. If necessary, click Advanced, then click Format, then select Single, then click SEARCH

References[edit]

Preceded by
How Can You Mend a Broken Heart” by Bee Gees
Billboard Hot 100 number-one single
4 September 1971 (one week)
Succeeded by
Go Away Little Girl” by Donny Osmond
Preceded by
Sweet Hitch-Hiker” by Creedence Clearwater Revival
Canadian “RPM” Singles Chart number-one single
18 September 1971 – 2 October 1971 (three weeks)
Succeeded by
Maggie May” by Rod Stewart

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MUSIC MONDAY Don’t fear the Reaper

______________

More Cowbell – SNL

Blue Öyster Cult ~ Live ~ Don’t Fear The Reaper ~ 2002

(Don’t Fear) The Reaper

(Don’t Fear) The Reaper” is a song by American rock band Blue Öyster Cult from the band’s 1976 album Agents of Fortune. The song, written and sung by lead guitarist Donald “Buck Dharma” Roeser, deals with eternal love and the inevitability of death. Dharma wrote the song while picturing an early death for himself.

Released as an edited single (omitting the slow building interlude in the original), the song is Blue Öyster Cult’s highest chart success, reaching #7 in Cash Box and #12 on the Billboard Hot 100 in late 1976. Critical reception was positive and in December 2003 “(Don’t Fear) The Reaper” was listed at number 405 on Rolling Stones list of the top 500 songs of all time.[4]

BackgroundEdit

“I felt that I had just achieved some kind of resonance with the psychology of people when I came up with that, I was actually kind of appalled when I first realized that some people were seeing it as an advertisement for suicide or something that was not my intention at all. It is, like, not to be afraid of [death] (as opposed to actively bring it about). It’s basically a love song where the love transcends the actual physical existence of the partners.”

 — Buck Dharma, lead singer[5]

The song is about the inevitability of death and the foolishness of fearing it, and was written when Dharma was thinking about what would happen if he died at a young age.[5] Lyrics such as “Romeo and Juliet are together in eternity” have led many listeners to interpret the song to be about a murder-suicide pact, but Dharma says the song is about eternal love, rather than suicide.[6] He used Romeo and Juliet to describe a couple who wanted to be together in the afterlife.[7] He guessed that “40,000 men and women” died each day, and the figure was used several times in the lyrics; this rate was 100,000 off the mark.[8]

Composition and recordingEdit

“(Don’t Fear) The Reaper” was written and sung by lead guitarist Buck Dharma and produced by David Lucas, Murray Krugman, and Sandy Pearlman.[9]The song’s distinctive guitar riff is built on the “i-VII-VI” chord progression, in an A minor scale.[10] The riff was recorded with Krugman’s Gibson ES-175guitar, which was run through a Music Man 410 combo amplifier, and Dharma’s vocals were captured with a Telefunken U47 tube microphone. The guitar solo and guitar rhythm sections were recorded in one take, while a four-track tape machine amplified them on the recording. Sound engineer Shelly Yakus remembers piecing together the separate vocals, guitar and rhythm section into a master track, with the overdubbing occurring in that order.[11]

Mojo described its creation: “‘Guys, this is it!’ engineer Shelly Yakus announced at the end of the first take. ‘The legendary once-in-a-lifetime groove!’ … What evolved in the studio was the extended solo section; it took them nearly as long to edit the five-minute track down to manageable length as it did to record it.”[12]

The song features prominent use of the cowbellpercussion instrument, overdubbed on the original recording. Bassist Joe Bouchard remembered the producer requesting his brother, drummer Albert Bouchard, play the cowbell: “Albert thought he was crazy. But he put all this tape around a cowbell and played it. It really pulled the track together.”[13]However, producer David Lucas says that he played it,[14] a claim supported by bandmember Eric Bloom.[15]

ReceptionEdit

The song was on the Billboard Hot 100 chart for 20 weeks, reaching number 12 for the weeks beginning November 6 and November 13 in 1976.[16] It was BÖC’s highest-charting U.S. song and helped Agents of Fortune reach number 29 on the Billboard200.[17] “(Don’t Fear) The Reaper” charted even higher in Canada, peaking at number 7.[18] The single edit was released in the UK in July 1976 (CBS 4483) but failed to chart. However the unedited album version was released as a single (CBS 6333) in May 1978, where it reached number 16 on the UK Singles Chart.[19]

Critical reaction was mostly positive. Denise Sullivanof Allmusic praised the song’s “gentle vocals and virtuoso guitar” and “haunting middle break which delivers the listener straight back to the heart of the song once the thunder is finished”.[20] Nathan Beckett called it BÖC’s “masterpiece” and compared the vocals to the Beach Boys.[21] Writing for PopMatters, James Mann hailed it as a “landmark, genre-defining masterpiece” that was “as grand and emotional as American rock and roll ever got”.[22] Pitchfork Media also referred to the song as a “masterpiece”.[23] “Extremely poetic” was the verdict of Fountains of Wayne founder Chris Collingwood. “A sad ballad about a man who wants to die with his true love before their love is spoiled by earthly things.”‘[12]

Track listingEdit

7″ Vinyl
  1. “(Don’t Fear) The Reaper” (Roeser) – 3:45
  2. “Tattoo Vampire” (Albert Bouchard, Helen Robbins) – 2:40

PersonnelEdit

with:

  • Michael and Randy Brecker – horns (their contribution appears only on the extended album track and was edited out of the released single)[25]
  • David Lucas – backing vocals, keyboards, percussion

ChartsEdit

“(Don’t Fear) The Reaper”
DontFearTheReaper.jpg
Single by Blue Öyster Cult
from the album Agents of Fortune
B-side “Tattoo Vampire”
Released July 1976
Recorded 1975
Genre
Length
  • 5:08
  • 3:45 (single edit)
Label Columbia
Songwriter(s) Donald “Buck Dharma” Roeser
Producer(s)
Blue Öyster Cult singles chronology
“Then Came the Last Days of May”
(1975)
(Don’t Fear) The Reaper
(1976)
This Ain’t the Summer of Love
(1976)
Official audio
“(Don’t Fear) The Reaper” on YouTube
Year Chart Peak
position
1976 Canada Top Singles (RPM)[18] 7
US Billboard Hot 100 Chart[17] 12
1978 Ireland (IRMA)[26] 17
UK Singles (The Official Charts Company)[27] 16
2017 US Billboard Hot Rock Songs[28] 11

AccoladesEdit

In 1976 Rolling Stone named “(Don’t Fear) The Reaper” the song of the year[9] and, in 2004, the magazine placed the song at number 397 on its list of “The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time“;[30]however, the 2010 version of the list moved it down to number 405.[9] In 1997 Mojo listed the song as the 80th best single of all time,[31] while Q ranked “(Don’t Fear) The Reaper” number 404 in its 2003 countdown of the “1001 Best Songs Ever.”[32]

When The Guardian released its unranked list of the “1000 Songs Everyone Must Hear” in 2009, the song was included. The publication wrote that the song’s charm “lies in the disjuncture between its gothic storyline and the sprightly, Byrdsian guitar line that carries it.”[6] In his book The Heart of Rock and Soul: The 1001 Greatest Singles Ever Made, rock critic Dave Marsh ranked the song at number 997.[33]

Other versionsEdit

LegacyEdit

“More Cowbell”Edit

The song was memorialized in the April 2000 Saturday Night Live comedy sketch “More Cowbell”. The six-minute sketch presents a fictionalized version of the recording of “(Don’t Fear) The Reaper” on an episode of VH1’s Behind the Music.Will Ferrell wrote the sketch and played Gene Frenkle, an overweight cowbell player. “Legendary” producer Bruce Dickinson, played by Christopher Walken, asked Frenkle to “really explore the studio space” and up the ante on his cowbell playing. The rest of the band is visibly annoyed by Frenkle, but Dickinson tells everyone, “I got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell!” Buck Dharma said that the sketch was fantastic and he never gets tired of it[13] but also lamented that it made the song lose its ‘creepy’ vibe for some time.[39]

A segment of the song was performed by Red Hot Chili Peppers on May 22, 2014,[40] as the conclusion of a drumming contest between the band’s drummer Chad Smith and actor Will Ferrell. In a repeat of the 2000 SNL sketch, Ferrell again played cowbell for the rendition, which appeared on an episode of The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon.[41][42]

In other mediaEdit

Stephen King cited the song as the inspiration for his novel The Stand, and its lyrics are quoted at the beginning of the novel. It also appears as the opening theme song for the 1994 TV miniseries based on the novel.[22] It was subsequently used as the end credits music for the sixth episode of the 2020-21 miniseries adaptation.

In the film Halloween, the song plays in the car when Jamie Lee Curtis‘ character, Laurie Strode, is being stalked by serial killer Michael Myers.[43]

The 1994 film The Stoned Age features the song when one of the main characters criticizes the song as being “a pussy song” despite it being performed by Blue Oyster Cult.[44]

The song was featured in the starting tracklist of the rhythm game Rock Band.[45]


Mad World – Gary Jules

Uploaded on Jan 8, 2006

The original video of Gary Jules’ and Michael Andrews’ cover version of Mad World, directed by Michel Gondry. Throughout the video children are making animated figures on the sidewalk below. (the song was featured in the movie Donnie Darko. If you haven’t seen it, seriously consider it.)

Directed by Michel Gondry http://www.michelgondry.com.

_______________

Mad World

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
“Mad World”
Single by Tears for Fears
from the album The Hurting
B-side “Ideas as Opiates”
“Saxophones as Opiates” (12″)
Released 20 September 1982
Format 7″, 12″
Recorded 1982
Genre Synthpop, new wave, post-punk
Length 3:32
Label Phonogram, Mercury
Writer(s) Roland Orzabal
Producer Chris Hughes
Ross Cullum
Tears for Fears singles chronology
Pale Shelter (You Don’t Give Me Love)
(1982)
Mad World
(1982)
Change
(1983)
Music sample
0:00

Mad World” is a song by the British band Tears for Fears. Written by Roland Orzabal and sung by bassist Curt Smith, it was the band’s third single release and first chart hit, reaching #3 on the UK Singles Chart in November 1982. Both “Mad World” and its B-side, “Ideas as Opiates”, appeared on the band’s debut LP The Hurting the following year. The song eventually became Tears for Fears’ first international hit, reaching the Top 40 in several countries in 1982 and 1983, peaking notably at #2 in South Africa.[1]

Two decades later, the song made a popular resurgence when it was covered in a much slower, minimalist style by composers Michael Andrews and Gary Jules for the soundtrack to the movie Donnie Darko in 2001. This version reached #1 in the UK in December 2003, and also became an international hit.

Background

“Mad World” was originally written on acoustic guitar when Orzabal was 19, it was a deliberate attempt to write something in the vein of Duran Duran’s “Girls on Film“. After a few false starts with Orzabal on vocals, Smith took over and “suddenly it sounded fabulous”.[2]

It began life intended to be the b-side for the band’s second single “Pale Shelter (You Don’t Give Me Love)“. At Polygram’s insistence, the band instead decided it may be something people would like to hear on the radio and held back its release, waiting to issue the song as a single in its own right after re-recording it with producer Chris Hughes, a former drummer with Adam and the Ants.[3]

That came when I lived above a pizza restaurant in Bath and I could look out onto the centre of the city. Not that Bath is very mad – I should have called it “Bourgeois World”![4]

—Roland Orzabal

“Mad World” was the first single off the finished album. The intention was to gain attention from it and we’d hopefully build up a little following. We had no idea that it would become a hit. Nor did the record company.[4]

—Curt Smith

Curt Smith’s ad lib in the song’s final chorus resulted in a mondegreen. Smith clarified the actual lyric in 2010:

With Mad World’s again-resurgent popularity, I’m getting asked more frequently about the last line on the album version from The Hurting, a line which I occasionally also sing in concert. The actual line is: “Halargian world.” (Not “illogical world”, “raunchy young world”(!), “enlarging your world”, or a number of other interesting if not amusing guesses.) The real story: Halarge was an imaginary planet invented by either Chris Hughes or Ross Cullum during the recording of The Hurting. I added it as a joke during the lead vocal session, and we kept it. And there you have it.[5]

—Curt Smith

Meanings

[2] The song was influenced by the theories of Arthur Janov, author of The Primal Scream.[citation needed] The lyric “the dreams in which I’m dying are the best I’ve ever had” suggests that dreams of intense experiences such as death will be the best at releasing tension.[6]

Lyrically the song is pretty loose. It throws together a lot of different images to paint a picture without saying anything specific about the world.[4]

—Roland Orzabal

It’s very much a voyeur’s song. It’s looking out at a mad world from the eyes of a teenager.[4]

—Curt Smith

Song versions

The 7″ version of “Mad World” is the same mix of the song found on The Hurting. The song had only one remix on its initial release, the World Remix that was featured on a 7″ double-single. This mix is very similar to the album version, with the most notable differences being the additional echo added to the intro and middle sections and the subtraction of a subtle keyboard part from the bridge. A later remix by noted British music producer Afterlife was featured on the 2005 reissue of the Tears for Fears greatest hits collection Tears Roll Down (Greatest Hits 82–92).

B-side

Ideas as Opiates” is a song that originally served as the B-side to the “Mad World” single. It was later re-recorded for inclusion on The Hurting. The song takes its name from a chapter title in Arthur Janov‘s book Prisoners of Pain and features lyrics related to the concept of primal therapy. The song is musically sparse, featuring just a piano, drum machine, and saxophone. An alternative version of this song titled “Saxophones as Opiates” was included as a B-side on the 12″ single and is mostly instrumental.

That’s the chapter from Janov, and it’s really a reference to people’s mindsets, the way that the ego can suppress so much nasty information about oneself – the gentle way that the mind can fool oneself into thinking everything is great.[4]

—Roland Orzabal

It really was all about that kind of thing – the psychological answer to religion being the opiate of the masses, whereas we thought ideas were, more than anything else.[4]

—Curt Smith

Music video

Curt Smith in the “Mad World” music video

The promotional clip for “Mad World”, filmed in late summer 1982, was Tears for Fears’ first music video. It features a gloomy looking Curt Smith staring out a window, while Roland Orzabal performs a bizarre dance outside on a lakeside jetty. A brief party scene in the video features friends and family of the band, including Smith’s then-wife Lynn.

According to Smith, “When we made the video in a country estate on the cheap, we bussed all our friends and family up from Bath and had a fun day. The woman who’s having the birthday party in the video is my mum.”[2]

The clip was directed by Clive Richardson who was notable for his work at that time with Depeche Mode.

Track listings

7″: Mercury / IDEA3 (United Kingdom) / 812 213-7 (United States)
  1. “Mad World” – 3:32
  2. “Ideas as Opiates” – 3:54
7″: Mercury / IDEA3 (Ireland) / 6059 568 (Australia, Europe) / TOS 1411 (South Africa)
  1. “Mad World” (World Remix) – 3:30
  2. “Ideas as Opiates” – 3:54
7″ double pack: Mercury / IDEA33 (United Kingdom)
  1. “Mad World” – 3:32
  2. “Mad World” (World Remix) – 3:30
  3. “Suffer the Children” (Remix) – 4:15
  4. “Ideas as Opiates” – 3:54
12″: Mercury / IDEA312 (United Kingdom) / 6400 677 (Europe)
  1. “Mad World” – 3:32
  2. “Ideas as Opiates” – 3:54
  3. “Saxophones as Opiates” – 3:54

Chart positions

Year Chart Position
1982 UK Singles Chart 3
1983 Australian Singles Chart 12
1983 German Singles Chart 21
1982 Irish Singles Chart 6
1983 New Zealand Singles Chart[7] 25
1983 South African Singles Chart 2
1983 Swiss Singles Chart 10

Michael Andrews and Gary Jules version

“Mad World”
Single by Michael Andrews featuring Gary Jules
from the album Donnie Darko (Original Soundtrack) and Trading Snakeoil for Wolftickets
B-side “No Poetry”
Released 2001
15 December 2003
Format CD
Recorded 2000
Genre Piano rock
Length 3:06
Label Sanctuary

“Mad World” achieved a second round of success almost twenty years later after it was covered by Michael Andrews and Gary Jules for the film Donnie Darko (2001). While the Tears for Fears version featured synthesizers and heavy percussion, the Andrews/Jules version was stripped down; instead of a full musical backing, it used only a set of piano chords, a cello, and modest use of a vocoder on the chorus. Their version was originally released on CD in 2002 on the film’s soundtrack, but an increasing cult-following spawned by the movie’s DVD release finally prompted Jules and Andrews to issue the song as a proper single. The release was a success in late 2003, becoming the Number One single over the Christmas holiday in the UK, a feat Tears for Fears themselves never accomplished. The music video, directed by Michel Gondry, has since been very popular on YouTube, with its most popular posting garnering over 60 million views by September 2013.[8] It is included on the DVD compilation Michel Gondry 2: More Videos (Before and After DVD 1). The song was later included in the commercial to the videogame Gears of War. [9] A instrumental version plays in Gears of War 3 when Dom sacrifices himself to save Delta Squad by attacking hordes of Locust and Lambent. Its success did not translate to the United States, where it reached number 30 on the Billboard Modern Rock Tracks chart.

Gary Jules recently performed “Mad World” with Mylène Farmer on her Timeless 2013 Tour.[10]

Track listings

CD1: Sanctuary / SANXD250 (United Kingdom)
  1. “Mad World” – 3:06
  2. “No Poetry” – 3:59
  3. “Mad World” (alternate version) – 3:37
CD2: Sanctuary / SANXD250X (United Kingdom)
  1. “Mad World” (Grayed Out Mix) – 6:45
  2. “The Artifact & Living” – 2:26
  3. “Mad World” (video) – 3:20

Chart positions

Chart (2003/2004/2007/2009/2010) Peak
position
UK Singles Chart 1
US Billboard Modern Rock Tracks 30
Australian Singles Chart 28
Austrian Singles Chart 13
Belgium Flanders Singles Chart 23
Canadian Digital Singles Chart 1
Danish Singles Chart 6
Dutch Singles Chart 4
French Digital Singles Chart[11] 11
German Singles Chart 3
Irish Singles Chart 2
Portuguese Singles Chart[12] 1
Swedish Singles Chart 10
Swiss Singles Chart 53
New Zealand Singles Chart 37

Year-end charts

Chart (2004) Position
German Singles Chart[13] 14
Chart (2000–2009) Peak
position
UK Top 100 Songs of the Decade 53[14]

Certifications

Region Certification Sales/shipments
Germany (BVMI)[15] Gold 250,000^
Italy (FIMI)[16] Gold 25,000*
United Kingdom (BPI)[17] Platinum 600,000^
*sales figures based on certification alone
^shipments figures based on certification alone

Chart positions for Adam Lambert’s version

Chart (2009) Peak
position
Canadian Hot 100 10
U.S. Billboard Hot 100 19
U.S. Billboard Pop 100 30

Popular culture

  • In 2011, the song was covered in the TV reality show The Glee Project.
  • In late 2006, a condensed version of the Andrews/Jules cover of “Mad World” was featured in the award-winning commercial for the video game Gears of War.[18]
  • In addition to its usage in numerous advertisements and fan-made YouTube videos, the Andrews/Jules cover has also become a popular choice for background music in television dramas, having appeared in the following series among others: Being Human (U.S.), Brothers & Sisters, Cold Case, CSI, Dead Like Me, Smallville, The Cleveland Show, The OC, Jericho and The Mentalist. The Lambert version has appeared in ER, FlashForward and General Hospital. Curt Smith sang this song on the television show Psych.
  • It is used on Broadway as the closing number in Butley starring Nathan Lane (2006).
  • The Andrews/Jules version was used in the 28 July 2010, episode of So You Think You Can Dance by choreographer Stacey Tookey in a routine about homelessness, performed by Billy Bell and Ade Obayomi.
  • The 2011 game Gears of War 3 contains a distinct instrumental cover of Gary Jules’ version that plays when Dom saves Delta Squad by sacrificing himself to destroy the Locust and Lambent attacking them.
  • UFC fighter Chris Leben used the Gary Jules version as his walkout theme at UFC 138.
  • An instrumental cover of the Andrews/Jules version was used in one of the scenes of the 2011 Philippine film Manila Kingpin: The Asiong Salonga Story.
  • Cleveland from the animated Fox television program The Cleveland Show sang “Mad World” for the first 2 minutes of the show that aired 1 April 2012.
  • In the web-based parody of Yu-Gi-Oh!, Yu-Gi-Oh: The Abridged Series, “Mad World” is adopted as the theme for Noah Kaiba.
  • A commercial for the video game Battlefield: Bad Company titled “Mad World” uses the chorus, sung by Sweetwater. It is used as he and Haggard run through a destroyed street. Haggard is annoyed and questions the meaning of the line “the dreams in which I’m dying are the best I’ve ever had.” He then proposes the song “Shortnin’ Bread“.
  • The Gary Jules version was used in an advertisement for Underground: The Julian Assange Story, which was shown on Network Ten in Australia in 2012.
  • The Gary Jules version is also used in the credits of the movie Donnie Darko.

Other versions and covers

In addition to the Andrews/Jules version, “Mad World” has been recorded over the years by the following artists:

Samples and quotations

  • Wale (rapper) samples a version of the song on his track “Vanity” on his album The Gifted.
  • Prozak samples the song on the track “American Princess”, from the Strange Music compilation Strictly Strange 08 (2008).
  • British dubstep artist The Bug, with vocalist Warrior Queen, included the song “Insane” on the album London Zoo (2008). The song ends with a quote from “Mad World”.
  • Orbital sampled the song on “The Moebius”, the first song on their debut album.

Notes

  1. Jump up ^ [1]
  2. ^ Jump up to: a b Guardian: ‘Tears For Fears: how we made Mad World’
  3. Jump up ^ Mad World. Songfacts.com. Retrieved 9 April 2009.
  4. ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f Cranna, Ian (1999). In The Hurting: Remastered & Expanded [CD booklet]. London: Mercury Records.
  5. Jump up ^ Curt Smith. “It’s a Mad Halargian World.” Curt Smith: The Official Site. October 11, 2010.
  6. Jump up ^ Toby Creswell (2007), 1001 Songs, Hardie Grant Publishing, pp. 87–88, ISBN 978-1-74066-458-5
  7. Jump up ^ Mad World, charts.org.nz
  8. Jump up ^ Mad World (Gary Jules), Youtube.com
  9. Jump up ^ Bissell, Tom. Extra Lives: Why Video Games Matter. p. 56.
  10. Jump up ^ http://www.mylene.net/modules/index.php?r=4&z=3972#setlist
  11. Jump up ^ “French Digital Singles Chart”. SNEP. Lescharts. 2010-05-01.
  12. Jump up ^ Billboard
  13. Jump up ^ http://www.mtv.de/charts/Single_Jahrescharts_2004
  14. Jump up ^ Radio 1 Official Chart of the Decade, as broadcast on BBC Radio 1 on Tuesday 29 December 2009, presented by Nihal
  15. Jump up ^ “Gold-/Platin-Datenbank (Michael Andrews featuting Gary Jules; ‘Mad World’)” (in German). Bundesverband Musikindustrie.
  16. Jump up ^ “Italian single certifications – Michael Andrews feat. Gary Jules – Mad World” (in Italian). Federation of the Italian Music Industry. Select Online in the field Scegli la sezione. Select Weekand Year —-. Enter Michael Andrews feat. Gary Jules in the field Artista. Click Avvia la ricerca
  17. Jump up ^ “British single certifications – Michael Andrews ft Gary Jules – Mad World”. British Phonographic Industry. Enter Mad World in the field Search. Select Title in the field Search by. Select single in the field By Format. Click Go
  18. Jump up ^ Ross Miller (2006). “Mad World: Gears ad propels song to #1 on iTunes”. Joystiq. Retrieved 27 February 2010.

External links

_______________

____________

Dan Mitchell on Supply Chain Mess: “People and businesses in the private sector make mistakes…there’s a big feedback mechanism in the private sector. It’s called profit and loss!”

 

Government, Markets, and the Supply Chain

Way back in 2009, I shared a meme that succinctly summarizes how Washington operates.

It’s basically a version of Mitchell’s Law. To elaborate, governments cause problems and politicians then use those problems as an excuse to make government even bigger.

Lather, rinse, repeat.

I worry the same thing may be about to happen because of the current concern about “supply chain” issues, perhaps best illustrated by the backlog of ships at key ports, leading to shortages of key goods.

Some of this mess is fallout from the coronavirus pandemic, but it’s being exacerbated by bad policy.

In a column for Reason, J.D. Tuccille points out that government is the problem, not the solution.

…supply-chain issues…create shortages and push prices up around the world. …Lockdowns also changed people’s lives, closing offices and factories and confining people at home. That resulted in massive and unpredictable shifts in demand and unreliable supply. …”Market economies tend to be pretty good at getting food on the supermarket shelves and fuel in petrol stations, if left to themselves,” agrees Pilkington. “That last part is key: if left to themselves. Heavy-handed interference in market economies tends to produce the same pathologies we see in socialist economies, including shortages and inflation. That has been the unintended consequence of lockdown.” …The danger is that people see economic problems caused by earlier fiddling and then demand even more government intervention. …if the government were to further meddle in the market to allocate products made scarce by earlier actions, it’s hard to see how the result wouldn’t be anything other than increased supply chain chaos.

Allysia Finley opines for the Wall Street Journal about California’s role in the supply-chain mess.

The backup of container ships at the Long Beach and Los Angeles ports has grown in recent weeks… The two Southern California ports handle only about 40% of containers entering the U.S., mostly from Asia. Yet ports in other states seem to be handling the surge better. Gov. Ron DeSantis said last month that Florida’s seaports had open capacity.So what’s the matter with California? State labor and environmental policies. …business groups recently asked Gov. Gavin Newsom to declare a state of emergency and suspend labor and environmental laws that are interfering with the movement of goods. …One barrier is a law known as AB5. …Trucking companies warned that the law could put small carriers out of business and cause drivers to leave the state. …there’s little doubt the law hinders efficiency and productivity. …State officials have also pressed localities to attach green mandates to permits for new warehouses, which can be poison pills. …This boatload of regulations is making it more expensive and difficult to store goods arriving at California ports.

Needless to say, I’m not surprised California is making things worse.

The state seems to have some of the nation’s worst politicians.

But let’s set that aside and close with some discussion about one of the differences between government and the private sector.

This may surprise some readers, but people and businesses in the private sector make mistakes all the time.

So part of the supply-chain mess presumably is a result of companies and entrepreneurs making bad guesses.

That being said, there’s a big feedback mechanism in the private sector. It’s called profit and loss.

So when mistakes are made, there’s a big incentive to quickly change.

With government, by contrast, there’s very little flexibility (as we saw during the pandemic). And when politicians and bureaucrats do act, they often respond to political incentives that lead them to make things worse.

 

 

Big-Government Republicans Enable Big-Government Democrats

I get asked why I frequently criticize Republicans.

My response is easy. I care about results rather than rhetoric. And while GOP politicians often pay lip service to the principles of limited government,they usually increase spending even faster than Democrats.

Indeed, Republicans are even worse than Democrats when measuring the growth of domestic spending!

This is bad news because it means the burden of government expands when Republicans are in charge.

And, as Gary Abernathy points out in a column for the Washington Post, Republicans then don’t have the moral authority to complain when Democrats engage in spending binges.

President Biden is proposing another $3 trillion in spending… There are objections, but none that can be taken seriously. …Republicans had lost their standing as the party of fiscal responsibility when most of them succumbed to the political virus of covid fever and rubber-stamped around $4 trillion in “covid relief,”… With Trump out and Biden in, Republicans suddenly pretended that their 2020 spending spree happened in some alternate universe.But the GOP’s united opposition to Biden’s $1.9 trillion package won’t wash off the stench of the hypocrisy. …I noted a year ago that we had crossed the Rubicon, that our longtime flirtation with socialism had become a permanent relationship. Congratulations, Bernie Sanders. The GOP won’t become irrelevant because of its association with Trump, as some predict. It will diminish because it is bizarrely opposing now that which it helped make palatable just last year. Fiscal responsibility is dead, and Republicans helped bury it. Put the shovels away, there’s no digging it up now.

For what it’s worth, I hope genuine fiscal responsibility isn’t dead.

Maybe it’s been hibernating ever since Reagan left office (like Pepperidge Farm, I’m old enough to remember those wonderful years).

Subsequent Republican presidents liked to copy Reagan’s rhetoric, but they definitely didn’t copy his policies.

  • Spending restraint was hibernating during the presidency of George H.W. Bush.
  • Spending restraint also was hibernating during the presidency of George W. Bush.
  • And spending restraint was hibernating during the presidency of Donald Trump.

I’m not the only one to notice GOP hypocrisy.

Here are some excerpts from a 2019 column in the Washington Post by Fareed Zakaria.

In what Republicans used to call the core of their agenda — limited government — Trump has been profoundly unconservative. …Trump has now added more than $88 billion in taxes in the form of tariffs, according to the right-leaning Tax Foundation. (Despite what the president says, tariffs are taxes on foreign goods paid by U.S. consumers.) This has had the effect of reducing gross domestic product and denting the wages of Americans.…For decades, conservatives including Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan preached to the world the virtues of free trade. But perhaps even more, they believed in the idea that governments should not pick winners and losers in the economy… Yet the Trump administration…behaved like a Central Planning Agency, granting exemptions on tariffs to favored companies and industries, while refusing them to others. …In true Soviet style, lobbyists, lawyers and corporate executives now line up to petition government officials for these treasured waivers, which are granted in an opaque process… On the core issue that used to define the GOP — economics — the party’s agenda today is state planning and crony capitalism.

Zakaria is right about Republicans going along with most of Trump’s bad policies (as illustrated by this cartoon strip).*

The bottom line is that Republicans would be much more effective arguing against Biden’s spending orgy had they also argued for spending restraint when Trump was in the White House.

P.S. It will be interesting to see what happens in the near future. Will the GOP be a small-government Reagan party or a big-government Trump party?

Or maybe it will go back to being a Nixon-type party, which would mean bigger government but without mean tweets. And there are plenty of options.

If they make the wrong choice (anything other than Reaganism), Margaret Thatcher has already warned us about the consequences.

*To be fair, Republicans also went along with Trump’s good policies. It’s just unfortunate that spending restraint wasn’t one of them.

—-

March 31, 2021

President Biden  c/o The White House
1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW
Washington, DC 20500

Dear Mr. President,

Please explain to me if you ever do plan to balance the budget while you are President? I have written these things below about you and I really do think that you don’t want to cut spending in order to balance the budget. It seems you ever are daring the Congress to stop you from spending more.

President Barack Obama speaks about the debt limit in the East Room of the White House in Washington. | AP Photo

 

“The credit of the United States ‘is not a bargaining chip,’ Obama said on 1-14-13. However, President Obama keeps getting our country’s credit rating downgraded as he raises the debt ceiling higher and higher!!!!

Washington Could Learn a Lot from a Drug Addict

Just spend more, don’t know how to cut!!! Really!!! That is not living in the real world is it?

Making more dependent on government is not the way to go!!

Why is our government in over 16 trillion dollars in debt? There are many reasons for this but the biggest reason is people say “Let’s spend someone else’s money to solve our problems.” Liberals like Max Brantley have talked this way for years. Brantley will say that conservatives are being harsh when they don’t want the government out encouraging people to be dependent on the government. The Obama adminstration has even promoted a plan for young people to follow like Julia the Moocher.  

David Ramsey demonstrates in his Arkansas Times Blog post of 1-14-13 that very point:

Arkansas Politics / Health Care Arkansas’s share of Medicaid expansion and the national debt

Posted by on Mon, Jan 14, 2013 at 1:02 PM

Baby carrot Arkansas Medicaid expansion image

 

Imagine standing a baby carrot up next to the 25-story Stephens building in Little Rock. That gives you a picture of the impact on the national debt that federal spending in Arkansas on Medicaid expansion would have, while here at home expansion would give coverage to more than 200,000 of our neediest citizens, create jobs, and save money for the state.

Here’s the thing: while more than a billion dollars a year in federal spending would represent a big-time stimulus for Arkansas, it’s not even a drop in the bucket when it comes to the national debt.

Currently, the national debt is around $16.4 trillion. In fiscal year 2015, the federal government would spend somewhere in the neighborhood of $1.2 billion to fund Medicaid expansion in Arkansas if we say yes. That’s about 1/13,700th of the debt.

It’s hard to get a handle on numbers that big, so to put that in perspective, let’s get back to the baby carrot. Imagine that the height of the Stephens building (365 feet) is the $16 trillion national debt. That $1.2 billion would be the length of a ladybug. Of course, we’re not just talking about one year if we expand. Between now and 2021, the federal government projects to contribute around $10 billion. The federal debt is projected to be around $25 trillion by then, so we’re talking about 1/2,500th of the debt. Compared to the Stephens building? That’s a baby carrot.

______________

Here is how it will all end if everyone feels they should be allowed to have their “baby carrot.”

How sad it is that liberals just don’t get this reality.

Here is what the Founding Fathers had to say about welfare. David Weinberger noted:

While living in Europe in the 1760s, Franklin observed: “in different countries … the more public provisions were made for the poor, the less they provided for themselves, and of course became poorer. And, on the contrary, the less was done for them, the more they did for themselves, and became richer.”

Alexander Fraser Tytler, Lord Woodhouselee (15 October 1747 – 5 January 1813) was a Scottish lawyer, writer, and professor. Tytler was also a historian, and he noted, “A democracy cannot exist as a permanent form of government. It can only exist until the majority discovers it can vote itself largess out of the public treasury. After that, the majority always votes for the candidate promising the most benefits with the result the democracy collapses because of the loose fiscal policy ensuing, always to be followed by a dictatorship, then a monarchy.”

Thomas Jefferson to Joseph Milligan

April 6, 1816

[Jefferson affirms that the main purpose of society is to enable human beings to keep the fruits of their labor. — TGW]

To take from one, because it is thought that his own industry and that of his fathers has acquired too much, in order to spare to others, who, or whose fathers have not exercised equal industry and skill, is to violate arbitrarily the first principle of association, “the guarantee to every one of a free exercise of his industry, and the fruits acquired by it.” If the overgrown wealth of an individual be deemed dangerous to the State, the best corrective is the law of equal inheritance to all in equal degree; and the better, as this enforces a law of nature, while extra taxation violates it.

[From Writings of Thomas Jefferson, ed. Albert E. Bergh (Washington: Thomas Jefferson Memorial Association, 1904), 14:466.]

_______

Jefferson pointed out that to take from the rich and give to the poor through government is just wrong. Franklin knew the poor would have a better path upward without government welfare coming their way. Milton Friedman’s negative income tax is the best method for doing that and by taking away all welfare programs and letting them go to the churches for charity.

_____________

_________

Thank you so much for your time. I know how valuable it is. I also appreciate the fine family that you have and your commitment as a father and a husband.

Sincerely,

Everette Hatcher III, 13900 Cottontail Lane, Alexander, AR 72002, ph 501-920-5733

Williams with Sowell – Minimum Wage

Thomas Sowell

Thomas Sowell – Reducing Black Unemployment

By WALTER WILLIAMS

—-

Ronald Reagan with Milton Friedman
Milton Friedman The Power of the Market 2-5

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FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE PART 396 My letter to the famous producer Rick Rubin who appears in the video “God’s Gonna Cut You Down” by Johnny Cash FEATURED ARTIST IS Daniel Gordon

____

March 16, 2016

Rick Rubin c/o Def Jam Recordings

New York, NY 10019

Dear Rick,

Thank you for encouraging Johnny Cash to do his last few albums. They have been such a blessing.

I understand that you are Jewish. If Johnny Cash was here today, I bet he would share something like this below from the scriptures. Johnny was a student of the whole Bible. He wrote the book THE MAN IN WHITE about the apostle Paul and it took him 10 years to write and in that book you can tell that he spent much time in research asking Jewish leaders what life was like for the Jews in the 1st century in Palestine while being occupied by the Romans.

I know that you will spending lots of time in the scriptures and I wanted to share with you some key scriptures that talk about the Messiah. Rusty Wright of Probe Ministries wrote the article below:

Many crime victims feel forsaken by God. So do many divorced people, war prisoners, and starving refugees. But this young man’s cry of desperation carried added significance because of its historical allusion.

The words had appeared about a thousand years earlier in a song written by a king. The details of the song are remarkably similar to the suffering the young man endured. It said, “All who see me mock me; they hurl insults, shaking their heads …. They have pierced my hands and my feet…. They divide my garments among them and cast lots for my clothing.”{2}

Historians record precisely this behavior during the young man’s execution.{3} It was as if a divine drama were unfolding as the man slipped into death.

Researchers have uncovered more than 300 predictions or prophesies literally fulfilled in the life and death of this unique individual. Many of these statements written hundreds of years before his birth-were beyond his human control. One correctly foretold the place of his birth. {4} Another said he would be born of a virgin. {5} He would be preceded by a messenger who would prepare the way for his work, {6} He would enter the capital city as a king but riding on a donkeys back {7} He would be betrayed for thirty pieces of Silver, {8} pierced, {9} executed among thieves, {10} and yet, though wounded, {11} he would suffer no broken bones.{12}

Peter Stoner, a California mathematics professor, calculated the chance probability of just eight of these 300 prophecies coming true in one person. Using conservative estimates, Stoner concluded that the probability is 1 in 10 to the 17th power that those eight could be fulfilled by a fluke.

He says 1017silver dollars would cover the state of Texas two feet deep. Mark one coin with red fingernail polish. Stir the whole batch thoroughly. What chance would a blindfolded person have of picking the marked coin on the first try? One in 1017, the same chance that just eight of the 300 prophecies “just happened” to come true in this man, Jesus. {13}

In his dying cry from the cross Jesus reminded His hearers that His life and death precisely fulfilled God’s previously stated plan. According to the biblical perspective, at the moment of death Jesus experienced the equivalent of eternal separation from God in our place so that we might be forgiven and find new life.

He took the penalty due for all the crime, injustice, evil, sin, and shortcomings of the world-including yours and mine.

Though sinless Himself, He likely felt guilty and abandoned. Then-again in fulfillment of prophecy {14} and contrary to natural law-He came back to life. As somewhat of a skeptic I investigated the evidence for Christ’s resurrection and found it to be one of the best-attested facts in history. {15} To the seeker Jesus Christ offers true inner peace, forgiveness, purpose, and strength for contented living.

SO WHAT?

“OK, great,” you might say, “but what hope does this give the crime or divorce victim, the hungry and bleeding refugee, the citizen paralyzed by a world gone bad?” Will Jesus prevent every crime, reconcile every troubled marriage, restore every refugee, stop every war? No. God has given us free will. Suffering–even unjust suffering–is a necessary consequence of sin.

Sometimes God does intervene to change circumstances. (I’m glad my assailant became nervous and left.) Other times God gives those who believe in Him strength to endure and confidence that He will see them through. In the process, believers mature.

Most significantly we can hope in what He has told us about the future. Seeing how God has fulfilled prophecies in the past gives us confidence to believe those not yet fulfilled. Jesus promises eternal life to all who trust Him for it: “Whoever hears my word and believes him who sent me has eternal life and will not be condemned; he has crossed over from death to life.”{16}

He promised He would return to rescue people from this dying planet.{17}

He will judge all evil.{18}

Finally justice will prevail. Those who have chosen to place their faith in Him will know true joy: “He shall wipe away every tear from their eyes; and there shall no longer be any death; there shall no longer be any mourning, or crying, or pain.”{19}

Does God intend that we ignore temporal evil and mentally float off into unrealistic ethereal bliss? Nor at all. God is in the business of working through people to turn hearts to Him, resolve conflicts, make peace. After my assailant went to prison, I felt motivated to tell him that I forgave him because of Christ. He apologized, saying he, too, has now come to believe in Jesus.

But through every trial, every injustice you suffer, you can know that God is your friend and that one day He will set things right. You can know that He is still on the throne of the universe and that He cares for you. You can know this because His Son was born (Christmas is, of course, a celebration of His birth), lived, died, and came back to life in fulfillment of prophecy. Because of Jesus, if you personally receive His free gift of forgiveness, you can have hope!

Will you trust Him?

Notes

1. Matthew 27:46.

2. Psalm 22.

3. Matthew 27:35-44; John 20:25.

4. Micah 5:2; Matthew 2:1.

5. Isaiah 7:14; Matthew 1:18, 24-25; Luke 1:26-35.

6. Malachi 3:1; Isaiah 40:3; Matthew 3:1-2.

7. Zechariah 9:9; John 12:15; Matthew 21: 1-9.

8. Zechariah 11:12; Matthew 26:15.

9. Zechariah 12:10; John 19:34, 37.

10. Isaiah 53:12.

11. Matthew 27:38; Isaiah 53:5; Zechariah 13:6; Matthew 27:26.

12. Psalm 34:20; John 19:33, 36.

13. Peter Stoner, Science Speaks, pp. 99-112.

14. Psalm 6:10; Acts 2:31-32.

15. Josh McDowell, Evidence That Demands a Verdict, pp. 185-273.

16. John 5:24.

17. 1 Thessalonians 4:13-18.

18. Revelation 20:10-15.

19. Revelation 21:4 NAS.

©1994 Rusty Wright. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

Reprinted with permission from Pursuit magazine (© 1994, Vol. III, No. 3)


About the Author

Rusty Wright, former associate speaker and writer with Probe Ministries, is an international lecturer, award-winning author, and journalist who has spoken on six continents. He holds Bachelor of Science (psychology) and Master of Theology degrees from Duke and Oxford universities, respectively. www.RustyWright.com

You and I have something in common and it is the song GOD’S GONNA CUT YOU DOWN. You were in the video and my post about that video entitled, People in the Johnny Cash video “God’s Gonna Cut You Down” is the most popular post I have done in recent years. It ranked #1 for all of 2015 and I have over 1,000,000 hits on my http://www.thedailyhatch.org blog site. The ironic thing is that I never knew what a big deal Johnny Cash was until he had died. I grew up in Memphis with his nephew Paul Garrett and we even went to the same school and church. Paul’s mother was Johnny Cash’s sister Margaret Louise Garrett.

Stu Carnall, an early tour manager for Johnny Cash, recalled, “Johnny’s an individualist, and he’s a loner….We’d be on the road for weeks at a time, staying at motels and hotels along the way. While the other members of the troupe would sleep in, Johnny would disappear for a few hours. When he returned, if anyone asked where he’d been, he’d answer straight faced, ‘to church.'”

Have you ever taken the time to read the words of the song?

You can run on for a long time
Run on for a long time
Run on for a long time
Sooner or later God’ll cut you down
Sooner or later God’ll cut you down
Go tell that long tongue liar
Go and tell that midnight rider
Tell the rambler,
The gambler,
The back biter
Tell ’em that God’s gonna cut ’em down
Tell ’em that God’s gonna cut ’em down
Well my goodness gracious let me tell you the news
My head’s been wet with the midnight dew
I’ve been down on bended knee talkin’ to the man from Galilee
He spoke to me in the voice so sweet
I thought I heard the shuffle of the angel’s feet
He called my name and my heart stood still
When he said, “John go do My will!”

 Well you may throw your rock and hide your hand

Workin’ in the dark against your fellow man
But as sure as God made black and white
What’s down in the dark will be brought to the light
You can run on for a long time
Run on for a long time
Sooner or later God’ll cut you down
___
Johnny Cash sang this song of Judgment because he knew the Bible says in  Romans 6:23, “For the wages of sin is death; but the GIFT OF GOD IS ETERNAL LIFE THROUGH JESUS CHRIST OUR LORD.” The first part of this verse is about the judgment sinners must face if not pardoned, but the second part is about Christ who paid our sin debt!!! Did you know that Romans 6:23 is part of what we call the Roman Road to Christ. Here is how it goes:
  • Because of our sin, we are separated from God.
    For all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God.  (Romans 3:23)
  • The Penalty for our sin is death.
    For the wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in Jesus Christ our Lord. (Romans 6:23)
  • The penalty for our sin was paid by Jesus Christ!
    But God demonstrates His own love toward us, in that while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us. (Romans 5:8)
  • If we repent of our sin, then confess and trust Jesus Christ as our Lord and Savior, we will be saved from our sins!
    For whoever calls on the name of the Lord shall be saved.  (Romans 10:13)
    …if you confess with your mouth the Lord Jesus and believe in your heart that God has raised Him from the dead, you will be saved. For with the heart one believes unto righteousness, and with the mouth confession is made unto salvation. (Romans 10:9,10)

The answer to find meaning in life is found in putting your faith and trust in Jesus Christ. The Bible is true from cover to cover and can be trusted.

Thanks for your time.

Everette Hatcher, everettehatcher@gmail.com, http://www.thedailyhatch.org, cell ph 501-920-5733, Box 23416, LittleRock, AR 72221

PS:If one repents and puts trust in Christ alone for eternal life then he or she will be forgiven. Francis Schaeffer noted, “If Satan tempts you to worry over it, rebuff him by saying I AM FORGIVEN ON THE BASIS OF THE WORK OF CHRIST AS HE DIED ON THE CROSS!!!

Johnny Cash – God’s Gonna Cut You Down

Johnny Cash’s version of the traditional God’s Gonna Cut You Down, from the album “American V: A Hundred Highways”, was released as a music video on November 9 2006, just over three years after Cash died. Producer Rick Rubin opens the music video, saying, “You know, Johnny always wore black. He wore black because he identified with the poor and the downtrodden…”. What follows is a collection of black and white clips of well known pop artists wearing black, each interacting with the song in their own way. Some use religious imagery. Howard sits in his limo reading from Ezekiel 34, a Biblical passage warning about impending judgment for false shepherd. Bono leaning on a graffiti-filled wall between angel’s wings and a halo, pointing to the words, “Sinners Make The Best Saints. J.C. R.I.P.” A number of artists wear or hold crosses.

Faces in Johnny Cash God's Gonna Cut You Down music video

Artists appear in this order: Rick Rubin, Iggy Pop, Kanye West, Chris Martin, Kris Kristofferson, Patti Smith, Terence Howard, Flea (Red Hot Chili Peppers), Q-Tip, Adam Levine (Maroon 5), Chris Rock, Justin Timberlake, Kate Moss, Sir Peter Blake (Sgt Peppers Artist), Sheryl Crow, Denis Hopper, Woody Harrelson, Amy Lee of Evanescence, Tommy Lee, Natalie Maines, Emily Robison, Martie Maguire (Dixie Chicks), Mick Jones, Sharon Stone, Bono, Shelby Lynne, Anthony Kiedis, Travis Barker, Lisa Marie Presley, Kid Rock, Jay Z, Keith Richards, Billy Gibbons, Corinne Bailey Rae, Johnny Depp, Graham Nash, Brian Wilson, Rick Rubin and Owen Wilson. The video finishes with Rick Rubin traveling to a seaside cliff with friend Owen Wilson to throw a bouquet of flowers up in the air.

  • American singer and civil rights activist Odetta recorded a traditional version of the song. Musician Sean Michel covered the song during his audition on Season 6 of American Idol. Matchbox Twenty also used the song before playing “How Far We’ve Come” on their “Exile in America” tour.

  • The New Jersey rock band The Gaslight Anthem have also covered the song.[citation needed] Canadian rock band Three Days Grace has used the song in the opening of their live shows, as well as the rock band Staind . Bobbie Gentry recorded a version as “Sermon” on her album The Delta Sweete. Guitarist Bill Leverty recorded a version for his third solo project Deep South, a tribute album of traditional songs. Tom Jones recorded an up-tempo version which appears on his 2010 album Praise & BlamePow woW recorded a version with the Golden Gate Quartet for their 1992 album Regagner les Plaines and performed a live version with the quartet in 2008. A cover of the song by Blues Saraceno was used for the Season 8 trailer of the TV series DexterPedro Costarecorded a neo-blues version for the Discovery channel TV show Weed Country (2013). Virginia based folk rock band Carbon Leaf covered the song many times during their live shows.
  • Chart positions[edit]

    Moby version: “Run On”[edit]

    Chart (1999) Peak
    position
    UK Singles Chart 33

    Johnny Cash version[edit]

    Chart (2006) Peak
    position
    UK Singles Chart 77

  • American Idol contestant ministers in Chile

  • SANTIAGO, Chile (BP)–Sean Michel smiled through his distinctive, foot-long beard as he slid the guitar strap over his shoulder and greeted the crowd at El Huevo nightclub with what little Spanish he knows. The former American Idol contestant and his band then erupted into the sounds of Mississippi Delta blues-rock.But unlike other musicians who played that night, the Sean Michel band sang about every person’s need for God and the salvation that comes only through faith in Jesus Christ.”We came down [to Chile] to open doors that other ministries couldn’t,” said Jay Newman, Michel’s manager. “To get in places that only a rock band could — to create a vision for new church-planting movements among the underground, disenfranchised subcultures of Chile.”The Sean Michel band recently traveled through central Chile playing more than 15 shows in bars, churches, schools and parks. The group consists of Southern Baptists Sean Michel, lead singer; Alvin Rapien, lead guitarist; Seth Atchley, bass guitarist; and Tyler Groves, drummer.”Although we’re a blues rock ‘n’ roll band, we’re an extension of the church,” Michel said. “We’re kind of like ‘musicianaries,’ if you will.”MISSIONS-MINDED MUSICIANSThe band formed after Michel and Newman met as students at Ouachita Baptist University in Arkadelphia, Ark. While there, the two began recording and selling Michel’s music as a way to raise money for mission trips to Africa and Asia.”We were just trying to raise money for a mission trip, but we’d also seen God speaking to people through the music,” Michel said. “So we were like, ‘Well, maybe we need to do something with this,’ and we became a music ministry. But it’s always been rooted in missions and … in the Great Commission.”Michel graduated from Ouachita in 2001, Newman in 2004. In 2007, Newman talked Michel into auditioning for American Idol. The exposure Michel received through the television show gained a wider audience for their ministry.”The whole American Idol thing was so weird,” Michel said. “We just kind of went on a whim. But the Lord used it in a big way.”During his tryout, Michel belted out a soulful rendition of Johnny Cash’s “God’s Gonna Cut You Down.” The video of the audition went viral on the Internet.Soon he was doing radio interviews in which he identified himself as a Christian and directed listeners to the band’s Gospel-laden MySpace page. On their next mission trip to Asia, Michel and Newman found that being recognizable gave them access to venues they couldn’t have entered before.The band is now an official extension of First Southern Baptist Church of Bryant, Ark., where the musicians have long been active members serving in the music and youth ministries. Every mission trip they have taken has involved working with International Mission Board (IMB) missionaries.”We’re Southern Baptist,” Michel said. “That’s who we roll with.”

    TOUR DE FAITH

    “With short-term mission trips, you can plan, but you just got to be willing for your plans to change,” said Michel. When the band arrived in Chile, they were surprised to find that their schedule wasn’t nearly as full as expected. Almost no public venues had booked shows, and many rock-wary churches had declined to host the band.

    “The biggest barrier we had was the pastors,” said Cliff Case, an IMB missionary in Santiago, Chile, and a 1984 graduate of Ouachita Baptist. “The older pastors on two or three different occasions gave excuses for not doing it. It was a real frustration in that sense.”

    Disappointed by the lack of interest, the band prayed for God’s help. They met Jose Campos — or Pépe, as the band came to know him. Campos works with music and youth for the Ministry of the Down and Out, an independent Christian ministry that seeks to reach the often-overlooked demographics of Santiago.

    Campos was able to use his connections to book shows for the band in venues they wouldn’t have known about otherwise.

    “Had we met Pépe (Campos) two or three weeks before the group came, there’s no telling how many shows we might have done,” said Case, who met Newman at Ouachita when Case and his wife, Cinthy, were missionaries-in-residence there.

    Campos booked the show at El Huevo, possibly Chile’s most popular club. Playing there has given the band musical credibility among Chilean rockers. And, one Chilean church reported that a youth accepted Christ after hearing Newman talk before a show. The band already is contemplating a return tour next year.

    OPENING NEW DOORS

    Sharing the Gospel through their songs is only the beginning for the Sean Michel band. Their vision is to be a catalyst to help churches — and missionaries — connect with the lost people of their communities.

    “God is not saving the world through rock bands,” Michel said. “He’s saving the world through the church. And it will always be through the local body.”

    The band wants to see churches take ministry beyond the church doors.

    “If you’re going to want to legitimately reach lost people, you’re going to have to get out,” Michel said. “Go out into the dark places. Those are the places we need to be to reach out.”

    The band’s ministry in Chile opened new doors for IMB missionaries to reach the young, musical subculture of Chilean society.

    “They laid the groundwork for more opportunities,” Case said. “Now we have a network of who to talk to and how to get organized. We can focus on how to use the work they’re doing so we can win people to the Lord and plant some churches.”


    Tristan Taylor is an International Mission Board writer living in the Americas.

  • Featured artist is Daniel Gordon

    __

    For all general inquiries, please contact
    daniel [at] danielgordonstudio [dot] com

    Designed and developed by The Work We Do.

    __

    MATTE: Daniel Gordon

    by MATTHEW LEIFHEIT on MARCH 6, 2014 MATTE

    Daniel Gordon, portrait by Matthew Lefiheit.

    Daniel Gordon, portrait by Matthew Lefiheit.

    This interview series is produced in partnership with MATTE Magazine, a publication produced by writer and curator Matthew Leifheit that focuses on the work of a single photographer per issue.

    You’ve probably seen Daniel Gordon’s photography before. He’s shown at MoMA, MoMA PS1, and Wallspace to name just a few venues, and the work’s hard to miss; the faces, plants, and fruit that occupy his pictures look like they’ve been constructed out of Photoshop and a glue gun (you can even see the drips). MATTE publisher Matthew Leifheit sat down with Gordon to talk about his work in relationship to painting, surgery, portraiture, and pretty much everything else.

    Daniel_Gordon_Flying5

    Stepping back in time, before you made photographs of constructed tableau or constructed portraits, you were making pictures of your own body. Your “Flying Pictures.”

    Right. I made that work in college, starting in 2000. At the same time I made the flying pictures I was making photographs in the same way that I do now, by constructing a tableau, but using my own photographs as the constructed material instead of using found images. I think both of these approaches are essentially investigating the veracity of a photograph.

    When I was in graduate school at Yale I made a forest that was probably about 500 square feet in the studio out of photographs I had taken, and I photographed the tableau with an 8 x 10 inch camera. It took like six months to do this thing, because I was printing everything out on an 8.5 x 11 inch printer, and I was making everything in a really strict way where I didn’t want the seams to be visible.

    Daniel Gordon, "Deprong Moridpi," which he made while at Yale.

    Daniel Gordon, “Deprong Moridpi,” referred to above.

    I almost killed myself making it, you know? It resolved as a giant print. And I looked at it and thought, “I might as well have made this whole thing on the computer.” It didn’t read as a physical object that had been photographed. So, I decided to make a picture every day as a way to loosen things up. This also allowed me to find a subject matter. Pictures of the body started creeping in among the still lifes and landscape pictures that I was making. It shocked me and reminded me of the first images that I saw growing up, which were photographs of operations.

    Your parents are surgeons.

    Yeah, I’ve watched a lot of operations, and I’ve never had any issues with getting squeamish or feeling sick to my stomach. I am really fascinated by bodies and that lead to making portraits. I became interested in the problems with a male photographer making a portrait of a woman. There’s been a history of exploitation, and the fact that I’m searching for images online means there is a lot of pornography.

    Especially if your search term is “skin.”

    Exactly. You do a search for “skin,” and all this stuff [porn] comes up. I think some people have misread some of my early portraits of women as misogynist, but they were a critique; they were difficult pictures.

    Are you a feminist?

    Yes.

    Daniel Gordon, "Red Eyed Woman," 2011. Courtesy the artist.

    Daniel Gordon, “Red Eyed Woman,” 2011. Courtesy the artist.

    It’s important for men to be talking about problems with the way women are depicted.

    As a man, a lot of the time you just feel like a beast, you know?  I think in a lot of ways those pictures were about that feeling, as well as the history of the artist and exploited muse relationship.

    It seems like you reference painting often. Your newest series is called “The Green Line,” after the Matisse painting by that name.

    Lately my work has been talked about in relationship to painting, which is funny when I feel so connected to photography—to the essence of what the act of making a picture can do. That is, transform what is in front of the lense, so that the photograph is something different than what originally existed. I think of what I’m doing as extremely photographic, though I am inspired by many different types of art—including painting.

    You’re kind of a street photographer, in the weirdest way. Garry Winogrand is going out into the street to photograph people and you’re going into Google images.

    Yes, I don’t manipulate anything once I shoot the film (other than standard color correction). My ideal form of appropriation would kind of take the form that I imagine a street photographer possesses: pulling seemingly unconnected parts together to create one frenetic whole.

    You graduated with an MFA in 2006, and you were in the New Photography show at MoMA in 2009.

    I’m so grateful that I was included in that show; it was incredible to have my work in the Museum of Modern Art. I had a show with Zach Feuer one year after I finished school, in 2007. Then I had a few studio visits with Eva Respini, a curator at MoMA, and the next year I was invited to be in that show.

    big still life book

    Eva wrote the forward to your new book Still Lifes, Portraits, and Parts.

    I asked her to write whatever she wanted to write. She decided to recycle old essays that she had written about other artists, splicing it all together to make it about me.

    That’s pretty smart.

    Yes, I think it’s great. It was the perfect thing for my book.

    You were featured in Art21. What was that like? In art school, teachers show Art21 in classes.

    When they’re hungover.

    Still, I regard that series as important.

    They took their time making the video, so we got to know each other and I felt comfortable having them around. I was working in my studio while they filmed. I felt like I didn’t have to be guarded. Now they’re doing 10 minute segments for the web instead of 30 minute documentaries, like three short stories. Hopefully we’re going to do a couple more. The first one was about process. We’ll see what the next one is.

    Why are you making photographs, not sculptures?

    Well, everything is made good enough for the camera. I’m a photographer; I’m interested in that transformation the camera performs. When the light hits the film, something changes and when you can harness that transformation that’s incredibly exciting

    Art 21 take us around Brooklyn-based artist Daniel Gordon’s studio

4 Things to Know about Dune, the Sci-Fi Movie with Religious Themes (Plus extensive video interviews with Dune creator Frank Herbert)

I watched DUNE tonight and enjoyed it a lot.

DUNE “The Royal Houses” Clip & Trailer (2021)

DUNE – THE VOICE (4k) – (2021) Premiere – Timothee Chalamet, Zendaya, Re…

Frank Herbert Interview on Dune

Dune | Official Main Trailer

Frank Herbert on the origins of Dune (1965)

Frank Herbert speaking at UCLA 4/17/1985 https://youtu.be/5IfgBX1EW00

Frank Herbert interviewed by W. McNelly (1969)

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4 Things to Know about Dune, the Sci-Fi Movie with Religious Themes

Paul is a smart, deep-thinking teen boy who was born into a family of nobility and who is trying to find his place in the world.

The year is 10191, and Paul and his parents are living on the nearly uninhabitable planet of Arrakis, which is the political center of the universe despite being covered with sand.

Arrakis is the only planet where melange – a­­ high-priced natural resource – can be harvested. And melange, or “spice” as it is called, is necessary for space travel.

Paul’s father, Duke Leto Atreide, was assigned to Arrakis by the emperor to oversee the spice-harvesting operation.

Leto, though, believes the assignment was a trap in order to have his family killed.

Paul, too, believes danger is lurking around the corner. In fact, he has been having a series of dreams he believes could be prophetic – dreams about the future of him and his people.

Not everyone, though, accepts Paul’s dreams as prescient.

“Dreams make for good stories, but everything important happens when we’re awake,” he is told.

Will anyone listen to Paul?

It’s all part of the new science fiction movie Dune (PG-13), which is based on the classic story and stars an all-star cast, including Timothée Chalamet, Zendaya, Rebecca Ferguson, Oscar Isaac, Jason Momoa and Dave Bautista.

Here are four things you should know about the film:

1. It’s Based on an Award-Winning Novel

This isn’t the first Dune film, nor will it be the last. (It’s called “Dune: Part One” on the screen.)

A 1984 movie of the same name was a major flop, grossing only $30 million on a $40 million budget. It was directed by David Lynch.

All are based on the 1965 book by Frank Herbert that won a Nebula Award and a Hugo Award for best sci-fi novel. The Nebular Awards website calls it “undoubtedly the grandest epic in science fiction” and a “stunning blend of adventure and mysticism, environmentalism and politics.”

The plot of the 1984 movie was criticized for straying too far from the book.

Denis Villeneuve, who directed the 2021 version, is among those who didn’t think the 1984 film was close enough to the book. He also helmed Arrival and Blade Runner 2049.

“When I read the book as a teen … I was mesmerized, and I saw the full potential of it. And I remember being very excited when David Lynch’s Dune came out in the theater,” he toldthe YouTube channel HMV.

Lynch’s movie “had a lot of strength and a lot of beauty in it, but also things that deviated from the novel,” Villeneuve said.

Dune 2021 is “closer to the spirit of the book,” Villeneuve said.

He calls it his “dream project.”

2. It’s not ‘Star Wars’… but Still Fun

Advertisements for Dune have used a quotefrom a Collider reviewer calling it “the next Star Wars, the next Lord of the Rings.” I wouldn’t go that far. The plot in Dune moves slower than every movie in those groundbreaking series. It’s more cerebral. There’s less action. Additionally – in case you know nothing about the film – there are no space battles (although there are battles on land).

Still, it’s entertaining. (When the credits rolled, my 13-year-old son was ready to watch Part Two.) Factions battle over “melange,” a so-called spice that is harvested from Arrakis’ sand and that is necessary to travel the galaxy. That same spice, though, is considered by the native Fremen to be a “sacred hallucinogen, which preserves life and brings enormous health benefits,” we are told. The spice is harvested by giant machines that must avoid sandworms – giant worms that are hundreds of feet long and eat anything in their path. The preferred mode of human flight in Dune is the wing-flapping dragonfly ornithopter, which looks like a cross between an insect and the body of a helicopter.

Star Wars creator George Lucas has said Herbert’s novel influenced his own story, and it doesn’t take much effort to see the parallels: a boy grows up on a sand-covered planet to rescue his people. He learns the way of a mysterious religion. (See below.) His nemesis is the emperor. That sounds like Luke Skywalker, but it’s actually Paul Atreides.

No doubt, many children this Christmas will be playing with ornithopters and Paul Atreides figurines.

3. It’s a Religious ‘Melting Pot’

Brian Herbert, Frank Herbert’s son, once called the Dune universe a “spiritual melting pot” in which “religious beliefs have combined.” The religion in the novel, Brain Herbert wrote, includes elements from Buddhism, Sufi mysticism, Islam, Hinduism, Judaism, Catholicism and Protestantism.

“Dad drew on a variety of religious influences, without adhering to any one of them,” Brian Herbert wrote.

The movie mirrors that syncretism. Some believe Paul is the “messiah” or “the one” – the boy who will save his people. Characters discuss a belief in “the way.” In one scene, we see a group of people – their faces partially covered – reading small books of a sacred text and holding beads. We hear the phrases “God willing” and “God in heaven.”

Paul’s mother tells him her people have been crossing bloodlines to create a “mind powerful enough to bridge space and time, past and future.” That person is Paul.

Dune is a science fiction movie, but it also is a religious film.

Of course, Star Wars, too, had religious themes. It even had a “chosen one.”

Stories like these are a reminder that all persons, theists and atheists alike, are chasing meaning beyond this natural world. Too often, though, we’re on a dead-end road. As Pascal once wrote, we have a void in our soul – an “infinite abyss” – that can only be filled by “an infinite and immutable object.” That “object” is our Creator: God Himself.

That’s fodder for discussion with your science fiction friends.

4. It Earns Its PG-13 Rating

If language, sex and violence are your only concerns – and they shouldn’t be – then you may find Dune to be a “leaner” movie than many superhero films. The movie contains no sexuality and minimal coarse language (details below). The battle scenes are typical for a superhero and science fiction film, with plenty of bloodless explosions and deaths. (Although, in several scenes, we do see a person’s hand coated with blood.)

Still, Dune has a few scenes that may trouble young viewers (and trouble parents, too). The emperor – a large grotesque man – floats through the air like a witch. A group of soldiers stands in procession as it listens to a low-voiced man chant, similar to what is done in Buddhism. The giant worm eats people. And there are a few off-screen, implied beheadings.

But for older viewers, it can be entertaining.

Villeneuve, the director, said his goal was to make the movie enjoyable to those who had never read the book. For the most part, he succeeds.

Rated PG-13 for sequences of strong violence, some disturbing images and suggestive material. Language details: A– (1), h-ll (2), d–n (2), s–t (1).

Entertainment rating: 3 out of 5 stars. 

Family-friendly rating: 2.5 out of 5 stars.

Photo courtesy: ©Alon Amir/Warner Brothers


Michael Foust has covered the intersection of faith and news for 20 years. His stories have appeared in Baptist Press, Christianity Today, The Christian Post, the Leaf-Chroniclethe Toronto Star and the Knoxville News-Sentinel

Hinduism tells us good and evil come from the same impersonal force and that is exactly the lesson from STAR WARS:THE FORCE AWAKENS. There is a lot of talk of a “balance needed in the force” but should there be a balance between light and darkness or good and evil?

________

Star Wars: The Force Awakens Official Teaser Trailer #1 (2015) – J.J. Abrams Movie HD

__________

Star Wars: The Force Awakens Official Teaser #2

STAR WARS: THE FORCE AWAKENS

Wonderfully Familiar AND Fresh with the same false worldview

None Light Moderate Heavy
Language        
Violence        
Sex        
Nudity        
© Baehr, 2015

Starring: Harrison Ford, Carrie Fisher,
Mark Hamill, Daisy Ridley,
John Boyega, Adam Driver,
Oscar Isaac, Anthony Daniels,
Peter Mayhew, Andy Serkis,
Domnhall Gleeson, Lupita
Nyong’o, Gwendolyn Christie

Genre: Science Fiction

Audience: Teenagers and adults

Rating: PG-13

Runtime: 135 minutes

Distributor: Lucasfilm/Walt Disney Company

Director: J.J. Abrams

Executive Producer: Tommy Harper, Jason McGatlin

Producer: Kathleen Kennedy, J.J. Abrams,
Bryan Burk

Writer: Lawrence Kasdan, J.J. Abrams,
Michael Arndt

Address Comments To:

Robert Iger, President/CEO, The Walt Disney Company (Walt Disney Pictures, Pixar, Marvel Studios, Lucasfilm, Touchstone Pictures)
Alan Horn, Chairman, Walt Disney Studios
500 South Buena Vista Street
Burbank, CA 91521
Phone: (818) 560-1000; Website: http://www.disney.com

Content:

(PaPaPa, FRFR, O, Ro, BB, C, ACAC, L, VV, A, M) Strong pagan, somewhat mixed, worldview with New Age monism regarding the impersonal and all-encompassing Force, (including confusing talk about restoring “balance” to the Force although it’s clear that the “good side” of the Force must overcome and perhaps even destroy the “dark side” of the Force), characters use the occult power of the Force to control minds and move objects and people without physically touching them, some pagan mysticism includes mystical visions, but mitigated by strong moral elements and some redemptive elements including strong anti-totalitarian message, villains try to control people and make them conform, but one character resists, doing the right thing is explicitly extolled, strong pro-family sentiments expressed, and sacrifice and repentance promoted; two “h” obscenities; strong, exciting action violence includes explosions, laser gunfights, lightsaber battles, people killed, spaceships flying about and chasing one another, fighting, character thrown against tree, characters wounded, large monsters attack people, brief images of blood, and character apparently has been beaten up, and villain tries to torture characters to talk; no sexual content, but some implied romance and hugs; no nudity; implied alcohol use; no smoking or drugs; and, brief lying but exposed and lead villain gets uncontrollably angry when things don’t go his way.

Summary:

STAR WARS: THE FORCE AWAKENS combines some old familiar faces with some new ones in a story about a hunt for Luke Skywalker, who has disappeared but is desperately needed to train some new Jedi warriors to fight a new threat to the peace of the galaxy. STAR WARS: THE FORCE AWAKENS provides nearly constant, inspiring fun in a new battle of good versus evil, but it’s marred by a little too much New Age paganism and unbiblical monism. Parents please teach your children to be media wise.

Review:

First, the good news. STAR WARS: THE FORCE AWAKENS is the best, most exciting, and best written, directed and acted STAR WARS movie since the first trilogy, probably since THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK. It also has some strong moral content, redemptive moments and pro-family sentiments. However, although it only lags a couple brief moments during its 132 minutes, the movie sometimes could use a little bit better dialogue (especially during the second half) and a stronger, slightly more satisfying redemptive climax, which is always the key to making a really great movie.

Above all, though, the movie’s biggest problem has nothing to do with bad storytelling or bad filmmaking, or even a better climax. Far from it! The biggest problem is that the movie has a very strong New Age pagan worldview promoting impersonal Eastern monism, a worldview that, ultimately, is irrational and warrants strong caution.

The setup for the story is that a new threat to the new republic has arisen. A group of really bad guys calling themselves the First Order (and still using the old empire’s cloned storm troopers) is trying to destroy the republic. Meanwhile, General Leia Organa has sent her best pilot, Poe Dameron, to find her brother, Luke Skywalker, who disappeared years ago. Poe is headed to see a man who might have a map to Luke’s whereabouts. If the republic’s resistance fighters can find Luke, perhaps he can raise up a new Jedi order to defeat the First Order.

Eventually, everything depends on a repentant storm trooper whom Poe names Finn and a feisty female scavenger named Rey. Will the ambivalent Force be with them?

STAR WARS: THE FORCE AWAKENS is, in many ways, the STAR WARS movie that fans and moviegoers have been longing to see. With STAR WARS screenwriting veteran Lawrence Kasdan (SILVERADO) and Director J.J. Abrams (STAR TREK) on board, THE FORCE AWAKENS has a tight script with lots of exciting action and great characterizations. The movie makes excellent use of veteran STAR WARS performers Harrison Ford, Carrie Fisher and Mark Hamill. After all, the story’s premise involves the hunt for the missing Luke Skywalker, Hamill’s iconic hero. That said, the movie relies the most on Harrison Ford’s lovable rogue, Han Solo, and his trusty companion, Chewbacca (Peter Mayhew). Their appearance early in the movie will get a big cheer not only from STAR WARS fans but also from movie lovers everywhere.

Also holding the film together are newcomers Daisy Ridley and John Boyega, who play Rey and Finn. Daisy Ridley in particular is a real find. Her appearance is one of the most striking first appearances in a major movie role since . . . well, since Harrison Ford first donned the persona of Han Solo in the original STAR WARS in 1977. As for Boyega, he easily fits in well with whoever is onscreen, whether it’s Daisy Ridley, Harrison Ford, Oscar Isaac as Poe, or even Chewbacca. To top it all, Adam Driver makes an imposing antagonist as the lead villain, even when he takes off his mask.

Director J.J. Abrams is one of the best action directors around. THE FORCE AWAKENS is his best movie since MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE III. He also does very well with all the actors. A few lines of expository dialogue occasionally let him down, John Williams’ newer music is sometimes a little repetitive, and the script should have developed Oscar Isaac’s character a bit better. Still, THE FORCE AWAKENS has plenty of nifty twists, exhilarating action, nostalgic moments, clever one-liners, and emotional scenes to help Abrams keep things moving and keep viewers engaged.

All in all, therefore, STAR WARS: THE FORCE AWAKENS is clearly one of the better popcorn movies of the year. However, despite its strong moral elements and lightly conservative, but strong, opposition to totalitarian bullies, THE FORCE AWAKENS has a strong New Age pagan worldview overall.

For instance, the movie has a couple mystical moments where characters establish an emotional connection to the Force or through it. In regard to the infamous Force, the movie also promotes modern monism, a New Age theology claiming that there’s a universal, but impersonal, energy or “Force” that is part of everything and surrounds everyone. This is typical STAR WARS mythology. However, in THE FORCE AWAKENS, it’s suggested a couple times that there must be a “balance” not only in the Force but also between the “good side” and the “dark side” of the Force. This is Non-Christian Eastern monism and moral dualism.

In this light, it’s interesting to note that these lines in the movie logically contradict the rest of the story, which clearly and strongly says the good must defeat and overcome, if not destroy, the dark side. The movie also suggests, in a redemptive way, that characters who succumb to the dark side can actually redeem themselves by rejecting the dark side and coming into the light. That’s not really “balance.” It also reflects an ethical monotheistic theology, not a monistic, pantheistic one where morality is “maya,” or an illusion.

Thus, Christians, and especially Christian parents and grandparents, should teach their children and other people about the logical contradictions and irrational mysticism of the STAR WARS movies, including THE FORCE AWAKENS. They should also note how such New Age thinking differs from the ethical monotheism and redemption of the Gospel of Jesus Christ and the enlightenment and divine fellowship or communion that comes from a personal relationship with Jesus and from the power of the Holy Spirit.

MOVIEGUIDE® recommends people focus on the positive moral and redemptive content or messages in STAR WARS: THE FORCE AWAKENS. Strong or extreme caution is warranted when it comes to the movie’s confused, impersonal, pagan monism. Christians have a better, more personal “Force” – our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ, who created everything and redeems us and comes to us through the personal, divine power of the Holy Spirit.

Parents please teach your children to be media wise. A great way to learn how to teach them to keep the faith and be media-wise is by reading THE CULTURE-WISE FAMILY®.

Star Wars: The Force Awakens Trailer (Official)

In Brief:

STAR WARS: THE FORCE AWAKENS combines old familiar faces with new ones. A new group of bad guys called the First Order is threatening the new republic. General Leia Organa has sent her best pilot to obtain a map revealing the whereabouts of her brother, Luke Skywalker, who disappeared years ago. The republic needs Luke to train new Jedi knights to save the galaxy. Han Solo and Chewbacca team up with a repentant storm trooper and a female scavenger to get the map to Leia and her resistance fighters.

STAR WARS: THE FORCE AWAKENS is the STAR WARS movie that fans and moviegoers have been longing to see. It’s exciting, emotional and well made, with standout performances by Harrison Ford and newcomer Daisy Ridley. It also has some strong moral content, redemptive moments and pro-family sentiments. However, the movie’s pagan, somewhat mixed worldview contains some New Age mysticism and a renewed, rather contradictory, monistic take on the Force and the morality behind it. So, MOVIEGUIDE® advises strong or extreme caution for THE FORCE AWAKENS. Parents please teach your children to be media wise.

(HD 1080p) Anakin Skywalker vs. Obi-Wan Kenobi

__________

Obi-Wan Kenobi: Let her go, Anakin!

Padmé: [struggling to breathe] Anakin…

Obi-Wan: Let… her… go.[Vader releases Padmé; she collapses into unconsciousness]

Vader: You turned her against me!

Obi-Wan: You have done that yourself!

Vader: YOU WILL NOT TAKE HER FROM ME!!

Obi-Wan: Your anger and your lust for power have already done that. You have allowed this Dark Lord to twist your mind, until now…until now you have become the very thing you swore to destroy.

Vader: Don’t lecture me, Obi-Wan! I see through the lies of the Jedi! I do not fear the Dark Side as you do! I have brought peace, freedom, justice, and security to my new Empire!

Obi-Wan: [incredulously] Your new Empire?

Vader: Don’t make me kill you.

Obi-Wan: Anakin, my allegiance is to the Republic! To democracy!!

Vader: If you’re not with me, then you’re my enemy!

Obi-Wan: Only a Sith deals in absolutes. I will do what I must.

Vader: You will try.[They duel]

LET ME GIVE THE SHORT ANSWER TO THIS FIRST:

Philosopher and Theologian, Francis A. Schaeffer has argued, “If there are no absolutes by which to judge society, then society is absolute.” Francis Schaeffer, How Shall We Then Live? (Old Tappan NJ: Fleming H Revell Company, 1976), p. 224.

Star Culture Wars

While tweaking the original Star Wars movie for re-release, director George Lucas decided that he needed to clarify the status of pilot Han Solo’s soul.

In the old version, Solo shot first in his cantina showdown with a bounty hunter. But in the new one, Lucas addressed this moral dilemma with a slick edit that showed Greedo firing first. Thus, Solo was not a murderer, but a mere scoundrel on the way to redemption.

“Lucas wanted to make sure that people knew that Han didn’t shoot someone in cold blood,” said broadcaster Dick Staub. “That would raise serious questions about his character, because we all know that murder if absolutely wrong.”

The Star Wars films do, at times, have a strong sense of good and evil.

Yet in the climactic scene of the new “Revenge of the Sith,” the evil Darth Vader warns his former master: “If you’re not with me, you’re my enemy.” Obi-Wan Kenobi replies, “Only a Sith deals in absolutes.”

Say what? If that is true, how did Lucas decide it was wrong for Solo to gun down a bounty hunter? Isn’t that a moral absolute? If so, why are absolutes absolutely wrong in the saga’s latest film? Good questions, according to Staub.

While we’re at it, the Jedi knights keep saying they must resist the “dark side” of the mysterious, deistic Force. But they also yearn for a “chosen one” who will “bring balance” to the Force, a balance between good and evil.

“There is this amazing internal inconsistency in Lucas that shows how much conflict there is between the Eastern religious beliefs that he wants to embrace and all those Judeo-Christian beliefs that he grew up with,” said Staub, author of a book for young people entitled “Christian Wisdom of the Jedi Masters.”

“I mean, you’re supposed balance the light and the dark? How does that work?”

The key is that Lucas — who calls himself a “Buddhist Methodist” — believes all kinds of things, even when the beliefs clash. This approach allows the digital visionary to take chunks of the world’s major religions and swirl them in the blender of his imagination. Thus, the Force contains elements of Judaism, Christianity, Animism, Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism and even Islam.

Is Jesus a Sith?

OK, it’s finally over. My childhood movie fascination is now complete—I’ve seen “Episode Three.” I have in many ways “grown-up” with Star Wars. I was six when the first (I mean the fourth) movie came out, and I saw all of the original three (Episodes 4, 5, and 6) in the theater when they first came out. I had all the Star Wars figures, the Death Star, the Millennium Falcon, the Land Speeder—you name it, I had it. All of my friends had them too…we were the Star Wars generation.

Incredibly though, the new trilogy of movies (Episodes 1, 2, and 3) has captured the imagination of a whole new generation. My son was more excited to see the movie than I was. He wore his Darth Vader tee shirt and sat in patient anticipation through the obligatory “coming attractions.” And it was interesting to observe the reactions of people as they were walking out of the theater two and a half hours later. For the fathers and mothers, it was sort of like a sigh of relief, a moment of closure. They weren’t so much energized by the movie as they were contemplating it. You could see wheels turning and brains buzzing putting all of the Star Wars pieces together. The kids on the other hand were all ablaze with what they just witnessed, they were talking about their favorite parts and “Anakin this” and “Yoda that.” One movie—two very different reactions.

Being a parent and well on the “contemplative” side of the age gap, I found myself mulling over what I had just seen as we walked to the car. With my son talking a mile a minute about his favorite parts, I kept replaying a certain scene in my mind. If you’ve seen the movie you’ll remember the scene, if not, let me try to paint the picture. Anakin (Darth Vader) and Obi-Wan are fighting. They stop fighting to discuss why they’re fighting (in typical Hollywood style). After voicing his displeasure with the Jedi (the “good” side), Anakin turns his back to the audience and tells Obi-Wan, “Whoever is not with me is my enemy.” Obi-Wan looks at Anakin unbelievingly and states emphatically, “Only the Sith deal in absolutes.” The Sith are the Dark Side’s equivalent of the Jedi. Obi-Wan is saying that Anakin is now a full-fledged “bad guy.” This scene took the magic of the whole Star Wars series that has been building ever since I was six and instantly deflated it. The whole “good vs. evil” story that had been the staple of all of the Star Wars episodes was a sham. I had been had.

I realized at this point in the movie that Darth Vader wasn’t the “bad guy” because he was on the bad side of the force, it was because he was so sure he was right. Obi-Wan and Yoda constantly lament Anakin’s association with the Chancellor of the Senate, Palpatine (who becomes the Emperor). They begin to fear that Palpatine is a Sith. About this they are right, Palpatine is a Sith and he is slowly turning Anakin against his former mentors. The turning point for Anakin comes when a member of the Jedi council, Mace Windu, is ready to kill Palpatine because he is “too dangerous” to leave alive. Anakin tells Windu that this is not the Jedi way (which it’s not), but situational ethics are the name of the game for Windu. Anakin sees the hypocrisy in this and his view of the Jedi instantly changes, and he does nothing as Palpatine (now the Emperor) proceeds to kill Windu. Anakin becomes Palpatine’s disciple—and consequently, Darth Vader—on the spot.

The troubling part about all of this for me was the post-modern double standard that we are faced with in our own day and galaxy. You see, Anakin is constantly counseled in all of the first three episodes that the Dark Side of the force is bad and the Jedi are good. But we get to the real deal in Episode Three when Obi-Wan makes this revealing statement about only the Sith dealing in absolutes. What does the Jedi deal in then? Feelings, emotions, hopes? On what basis does Obi-Wan make his assessment that the Dark Side and the Emperor are “evil?” This is exactly the same dilemma that the court at the Nuremberg Trial found itself in. The Nazis argued that they acted in accord with the laws of Germany and were simply following orders, yet were on trial for crimes against humanity. The “sovereign nation” ideal had its limits. Obi-Wan wants the same thing here. It’s easy enough to proclaim that the Dark Side is evil, but it’s really another thing to prove it when the Jedi are also out trying to eliminate those that they deem “dangerous.” It all becomes relative; the only true “bad guy” is one who “deals in absolutes.”

What would Obi-Wan have said to Jesus, who said much the same thing as Anakin in Matthew 12:30, “He who is not with Me is against Me; and he who does not gather with Me scatters.” Jesus makes an emphatic statement here. He is declaring for all who read and hear that there is no middle-ground, there is no neutrality. As much as our post-modern world would like to have each viewpoint as valid as the next, they can’t live this way. Obi-Wan couldn’t live this way either. If Anakin’s absolutist worldview was just another valid viewpoint (presumably Obi-Wan doesn’t deal in absolutes), then why bother fighting him. Why not shake hands and wish him well in his future galaxy-conquesting endeavors? Why not? Because Obi-Wan is an absolutist too, he just doesn’t want to admit it.

As I said, this scene revealed the whole Star Wars series for what it really was. George Lucas showed his true colors here. He was not making a grand good vs. evil epic. He was making a modern commentary, complete with double-standards and non-sequiturs. Lucas was simply toeing the line of modern politics. The only real enemy in today’s world is the one who thinks in terms of black and white—the fundamentalist. Whether they are Christian, Muslim, Democrat or Republican, the only one who is wrong, is the one who thinks he’s right. But we, as Christians, must remember Jesus’ (and Anakin’s) words. There is a war of ideas going on, and you must fall on one side or the other. Neutrality is not an option…as much as we would like it to be.

All Seven Star Wars Teaser Trailers

In the article, “Star Wars: The Religion,” from the August 1999  Trumpet  Print Edition » by DENNIS LEAP we read:

In the second produced film, The Empire Strikes Back, Yoda, the little green 900-year-old Jedi master, describes the Force to a troubled, weak-in-faith Luke Skywalker. He explains, “For my ally is the Force. And a powerful ally it is. Life creates it and makes it grow. Its energy surrounds us and binds us. Luminous beings are we, not this crude matter. You must feel the Force around you. You—between you and me—the tree—the rock—everywhere. Yes, even between the land and the ship.” If the Force represents God, then the Star Wars God is very impersonal!

Let’s be honest. The Force represents evolution and nature worship far better than the worship of a personal God. Did you realize that people who practice witchcraft love the concept of the Force? Why? They believe it represents nature worship!

‘Star Wars’ SPOILER: Watch a Major Scene From the Movie

This entire post is one big spoiler, so if you don’t want to hear about a major moment in Star Wars history, stop reading. Star Wars: The Force Awakens brings about the end of an era with the sad, yet heroic death of Han Solo. Harrison Ford returns to the franchise, reprising his role as Han Solo, and we are introduced to his son Kylo Ren (aka Ben Solo), played by actor Adam Driver. Han Solo’s son Kylo is actually the one who kills him, as Kylo needs to cut off his last emotional tie in order to fully join the Dark Side. This may sound familiar as it is the same kind of idea that Luke Skywalker and Darth Vader battled with years ago.

The death scene occurs in the third act of the movie with Kylo stabbing Han Solo with his lightsaber before Solo falls off of a bridge. Here is a Twit pic of the scene below.

Han Solo, Han Solo Dies, Han Solo Death Scene, Han Solo Dead, Han Solo Star Wars The Force Awakens, Han Solo Dies In Force Awakens, Star Wars The Force Awakens Spoilers, Force Awakens Ending

(Twitter)

Solo confronts his son and tries to convince him that Snoke is just using him for his power, but Kylo stands firm. Solo tells Kylo that when Snoke gets what he wants, he’ll crush him. Both men’s eyes well up with tears as Solo pleads with his son to return home. Kylo tells him that it’s too late and that he wants to be “free of this pain.” Kylo says he knows what he has to do but he doesn’t know if he has the strength to do it. He then asks his father to help him and Solo says he’ll do anything for him. Kylo pulls out the lightsaber and the two share a long last look at each other. Kylo suddenly stabs his father with tears in his eyes and tells him, “Thank you.” Solo then reaches out to lovingly touch his son’s face before he falls limply off the bridge. As Solo is stabbed to death, Chewbacca and main character Rey cry out in upset. It is a truly heartbreaking scene.

Top 15 Star Wars The Force Awakens Facts You Should Know

Take a look at this excellent article by Steven J. Rosen on Hinduism and Star Wars:

Yoda and Yoga

The Bhagavad-Gita may well have been Yoda’s manual for teaching Luke Skywalker the way of the Jedi.

BY: Steven J. Rosen

At first glance, it might seem that “Star Wars” and Hinduism have little in common. The “Star Wars” films are modern science-fiction classics, created as entertainment. They make use of futuristic spaceships and imaginative weapons that the real world has not yet seen. Hinduism, for its part, is an ancient religious tradition-or, more explicitly, a family of religious traditions, such as Vaishnavism, Shaivism, and Shaktism–meant for spiritual enhancement and personal fulfillment. What, if anything, do the films have to do with the religion?

My thesis is simple. Lucas, the creator of “Star Wars,” was heavily influenced by Joseph Campbell, the famed mythologist. Campbell’s preferred stock of philosophical stories comes from India. This is well known. Campbell explained the Mahabharata and the Ramayana, the principal epics of contemporary Hinduism, to Lucas, who digested their many stories and gave them back to us as “Star Wars.” Lucas himself says that he was “influenced by Eastern myths.” Here’s one example I use in my forthcoming book, drawing on the first film of the series, which was released in 1977:

A beautiful princess is kidnapped by a powerful but evil warlord. With determined urgency, a mysterious non-human entity delivers a distress call to a budding young hero. The youthful hero, a prince, comes to the princess’s rescue, aided by a noble creature that is half-man and half-animal. In the end, after a war that epitomizes the perennial battle between good and evil, the beautiful maiden returns home. The valiant efforts of the prince and his comrade, who were assisted by an army of anthropomorphic bears in the fight to return the princess to safety, are duly rewarded, and peace and righteousness once again engulf the kingdom.

In the Eastern part of the world, the story evokes memories of the Ramayana, an ancient epic from which many of India’s myths and religious traditions originate: The princess is Sita, kidnapped by the power-mad Ravana. Her loving husband Rama, the archetypal hero who, as the story goes, is Vishnu (God) in human form, soon becomes aware of her plight and anxiously pursues her.

How did he learn of Ravana’s nefarious deed? The good-hearted Jatayu, a talking vulture-like creature, sworn to protect the princess, sees the demon-king abduct Sita. He attempts to rescue her on his own, but Ravana mercilessly cuts him down. Luckily, Rama happens upon the dying Jatayu, who manages to recount all that has taken place before he expires.

After a period of intense grieving, Rama engages his devoted half-human/half monkey companion, Hanuman, in a lengthy search for the princess and, after a complex series of events, they wage war to get Sita back. Aided by an army of Vanaras (bears and monkeys who have anthropomorphic characteristics), Rama rescues Sita from Ravana. The forces of the underworld defeated, Rama-raja (the kingdom of truth and righteousness) reigns supreme.

In Western countries, the story would remind most readers of the first “Star Wars” movie. Here, too, the princess–this time, Princess Leia–is kidnapped. In the “Star Wars” universe, evil incarnates as Darth Vader, who holds Leia against her will. Artoo-Deetoo (R2-D2), an android, carries a desperate cry for help. The princess, just before being captured, managed to conceal a holographic message in the droid’s memory banks. Thus, through this futuristic robot, she asks for the assistance of Obi-Wan Kenobi, a master among the mystical Jedi knights, hoping he would come to her aid.

Luke Skywalker, a farm boy from the planet Tatooine, is the one who first receives this message, however, and it is he who turns to the retired Obi-Wan to alert him to the princess’s plight. Luke himself is reluctant to travel into unknown territory, into a world of action and intrigue. But Obi-Wan convinces him to go, telling him that “the Force” will protect him.

The two team up with Han Solo, a renegade space cowboy, and Chewbacca, a “half-man/ half-monkey” creature who devotedly assists them. By the end of the original “Star Wars” trilogy, in the company of legions of bear soldiers, they wage a war to end all wars–Darth Vader and his evil empire are defeated and the princess is returned to safety.

Is it a stretch to say that Lucas was directly and/ or indirectly influenced by the Ramayana? This author, obviously, thinks not. And there are many other parallels between Star Wars and Hindu tradition as well. Consider the example of the relationship between Yoda and Luke–a dead-ringer for the traditional Guru/ disciple relationship, especially as depicted in the ancient Hindu text, the Bhagavad-gita.

Yoda teaches Luke self-control, the importance of restraining the senses. Every Jedi, he says, must overcome desire and anger. The Gita must have been Yoda’s sourcebook: “A faithful man who is dedicated to the pursuit of knowledge–and who subdues his senses–is eligible to achieve such knowledge, and having achieved it he quickly attains the supreme spiritual peace.” (4.39) Again, “By the time death arrives, one must be able to tolerate the urges of the material senses and overcome the force of desire and anger. If one does so, he will be well situated and able to leave his body without regret.” (5.23)

It is interesting, too, that Yoda locates the source of the Jedis’ strength as flowing from “the Force,” which he essentially defines as the ground of all being. Indeed, Yoda tells Luke that all ability comes from the Force, but that this is especially true of the Jedis’ supernatural powers. The Gita also says that all power flows from the “Force,” i.e., the metaphysical source of all that is: “Of all that is material and all that is spiritual, know for certain that I am both the origin and dissolution. . . .Everything rests upon Me, as pearls are strung on a thread. . . . I am the ability in man.” (7.6-8)

Yoda’s name is closely linked to the Sanskrit “yuddha,” which means “war.” Accordingly, he teaches a chivalrous form of warfare, imbued with ethics and spirituality, to the Jedi knights. The non-aggressive but valiant ways of these knights are exactly like those of Kshatriyas, ancient Indian warriors who emphasized yogic codes and the art of protective combat. In this, Yoda resembles Dronacharya from the Mahabharata, who, in the forest (again like Yoda), trains the Pandava heroes to be righteous protectors of the innocent.

In the Ramayana, Vishvamitra Muni, as Rama’s spiritual master, teaches the great avatar (incarnation of God) to be adept in the art of war, but he also teaches him that fighting must always be based on yogic principles–he teaches Rama while they are living in the forest as well. Both Dronacharya and Vishvamitra seem like earlier incarnations of Yoda.

In this sense, and in many others, the Hindu scriptures may be the ultimate guidebooks for aspiring Jedis: Consider the Bhagavad-gita yet again: Lust, anger, and greed, the Gita tells us, are deeply embedded in our consciousness. Just ask Anakin. And deep-rooted habits are not always easy to overcome. Nonetheless, in the Gita, Krishna helps us through the darkest of battles by explaining the source of our dilemma, the gradual steps by which we delude ourselves, and by putting us in touch with the spiritual element lying dormant within our hearts. He tells us that those who are enamored by materialistic life begin simply by contemplating the objects of the senses.

Again, just ask Anakin. Such contemplation naturally leads to self-interested action and, finally, attachment. This, in turn, gives rise to anger. Why anger? Because everything in the world is temporary, and so we eventually lose the objects of our attachment. Anger, Krishna says, leads to bewilderment, and bewilderment to loss of memory. At this point, intelligence is lost. We can watch this happening to Anakin in “Attack of the Clones” and, further, in the latest film, “Revenge of the Sith.”

Other connections to Hinduism are also apparent in the prequels. For example, the idea of midi-chlorians, or living cells found in high concentration in Jedi blood, resonates with the idea of Paramatma, or the Lord in the Heart. Vaishnava Hinduism uses this concept to explain how God (the Force?) exists inside our bodies as a symbiont, as it were, allowing living entities to commune with Him. Also, young Anakin Skywalker, a Jedi priest, wears a shikha, or a tuft of hair, on the back of his head. While this religious symbolism is found in several ancient monastic traditions, it is nowhere as pronounced as in the Vaishnava Hindu tradition. In the Bhagavad-Gita, Krishna teaches that intelligence means good memory and fine discretion–both of which fall away when we adopt a materialistic and self-centered approach to life. This vicious cycle puts us in a non-spiritual frame of mind, in which we forget who we are and what life is really all about. Krishna refers to this as “a material whirlpool” that drags people ever lower; it is a complex downward spiral that begins, as He says in the Gita, simply by one’s contemplating the objects of the senses. (2.61-64) Krishna thus tells Arjuna not to be fooled by sensual stimulation and, instead, to control his senses for a higher purpose. This, indeed, is the teaching of the Jedi and a lesson that is valuable to each and every one of us.

Can people learn this Hindu wisdom from watching “Star Wars”? Most likely not. They’ll have to go to established religious texts and the paths traversed by the sages. But something is definitely afoot here. More than 70,000 people in Australia, in a census poll, declared that they are followers of the Jedi faith, the “religion” engendered by the “Star Wars” films. Despite the extremism and absurdity of this statistic-of people adhering to a faith concocted in a fictional film series-experts see in it a manifestation of the movies’ spiritual dimension.

In light of this enthusiasm, it’s not surprising that the “Star Wars” universe continues to grow. Lucas is now re-mastering the entire series into special 3-D versions, updated for modern times. New TV shows based on “Star Wars” are planned for upcoming seasons. And you now learn of parallels between this consequential film epic and one of the earliest religious traditions known to humankind. What’s next?! Only the Force is likely to know!

Francis Schaeffer “BASIS FOR HUMAN DIGNITY” Whatever…HTTHR

At the 20:15 mark in the above video Francis Schaeffer discusses how Eastern Religions unsuccessfully attempt to relieve the tension.

Relieving the Tension in the East
Within Eastern thinking, attempts to relieve the tension have been made by introducing “personal gods.” To the uninitiated these gods seem to be real persons; they are said to appear to human beings and even have sexual intercourse with them. But they are not really personal. Behind them their source is the “impersonal everything” of which they are simply emanations. We find a multitude of gods and goddesses with their attendant mythologies, like the Ramayana, which then give the simple person a “feeling” of personality in the universe. People need this, because it is hard to live as if there is nothing out there in or beyond the universe to which they can relate personally. The initiated, however, understand. They know that ultimate reality is impersonal. So they submit themselves to the various techniques of the Eastern religions to eliminate their “personness.” Their goal is to achieve a state of consciousness not bounded by the body and the senses or even by such ideals as “love” or “good.”
Probably the most sophisticated Eastern attempt to deal with the tension we are considering is the Bhagavad-Gita. This is a religious writing probably produced around 200 B.C. in India. It has been the inspiration for multitudes of Hindus through the centuries and most notably for Indian spiritual and political leader Mahatma Gandhi. In it the individual is urged to participate in acts of charity. At the same time, however, the individual is urged to enter into these acts in “a spirit of detachment.” Why? Because the proper attitude is to understand that none of these experiences really matter. It is the state of consciousness that rises above personality which is important, for personality is, after all, an abnormality within the impersonal universe.
Alternatively, the East proposes a system of “endless cycles” to try to give some explanation for things which exist about us. This has sometimes been likened to the ocean. The ocean casts up waves for a time, but the waves are still a part of the ocean, and then the waves pull back into the ocean and disappear. Interestingly enough, the Western materialist also tries to explain the form of the universe by a theory of endless cycles. He says that impersonal material or energy always exists, but that this goes through endless cycles, taking different forms – the latest of which began with the “big bang” which spawned the present expanding universe. Previously, billions and billions of years ago, this eternal material or energy had a different form and had contracted into the heavy mass from which came the present cycle of our universe. Both the Eastern thought and the Western put forth this unproven idea of endless cycles because their answers finally answer nothing.
We have emphasized the problems involved in these two alternatives because they are real. It is helpful to see that the only serious intellectual alternatives to the Christian position have such endless difficulties that they actually are non-answers. We do it, too, because we find people in the West who imagine that Christianity has nothing to say on these big issues and who discard the Bible without ever considering it. This superior attitude, as we said earlier, is quite unfounded. The real situation is very different. The humanists of the Enlightenment acted as if they would conquer all before them, but two centuries have changed that.
One would have imagined at this point that Western man would have been glad for a solution to the various dilemmas facing him and would have welcomed answers to the big questions. But people are not as eager to find the truth as is sometimes made out. The history of Western thought during the past century confirms this.

Star Wars: The Force Awakens [All 3 trailers.]

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MUSIC MONDAY Shirley Bassey became well-known for her expressive voice and for recording the soundtrack theme songs of the James Bond films Goldfinger (1964), Diamonds Are Forever (1971), and Moonraker(1979)!

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NO TIME TO DIE | Final US Trailer

007 : James Bond : Theme

Goldfinger Theme Song – James Bond

Diamonds Are Forever Theme Song – James Bond

Moonraker Theme Song – James Bond

Shirley Bassey

 
 

Dame Shirley Veronica Bassey, DBE (/ˈbæsi/; born 8 January 1937)[1] is a Welsh singer. Born in Tiger Bay, Cardiff, she began performing as a teenager in 1953. She became well-known for her expressive voice and for recording the soundtrack theme songs of the James Bond films Goldfinger (1964), Diamonds Are Forever (1971), and Moonraker(1979).[2][3][4] In January 1959, Bassey became the first Welsh person to gain a number-one single on the UK Singles Chart.[5] In 2020, with the release of her final album, I Owe It All To You, Bassey became the first female artist to chart an album in the top 40 of the UK Albums Chart in seven consecutive decades.[6]

Shirley Bassey
Bassey in 1971

 

Bassey in 1971
Background information
Birth name Shirley Veronica Bassey
Born 8 January 1937 (age 84)
Cardiff, Wales
Genres Pop
Occupation(s) Singer
Years active 1953–present
Labels

In 2000, Bassey was appointed a Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (DBE) for services to the performing arts. In 1977, she received the Brit Award for Best British Female Solo Artist.[7] Bassey is widely regarded as one of the most popular female vocalists in Britain.[8][9]

 

Early lifeEdit

Shirley Veronica Bassey, the sixth and youngest child of Henry Bassey and Eliza Jane Start,[10] was born on Bute Street, Tiger Bay, Cardiff. She grew up in the adjacent community of Splott.[11] Her father was Nigerian, and her mother came from Teesside.[2][12][13][14]

Two of her mother’s four children from previous relationships lived in the Bassey household. Bassey’s mother listed her first husband, Alfred Metcalfe, as her own father in the registry of her marriage to Henry Bassey, giving rise to speculation that this marriage was bigamous in the absence of a prior divorce.[15] Eliza and Henry’s second child died in infancy, so Shirley was born into a household of three sisters, two half-sisters, and one brother.

Teachers and students alike at Moorland Road School noticed Bassey’s strong voice, but gave the pre-teen little encouragement: “…everyone told me to shut up. Even in the school choir the teacher kept telling me to back off till I was singing in the corridor!” A classmate recalled her singing the refrain “Can’t Help Lovin’ Dat Man” from Show Boatwith such feeling that she made their teacher uncomfortable.[16] She left Splott secondary modern school aged 14 to work at Curran Steels and, in the evenings and weekends, to sing in local pubs and clubs.[17]

 

CareerEdit

1953–1959: Career beginningsEdit

In a 1999 interview with Nigel Havers in her Monte Carlo apartment, Bassey pointed to a piece of paper framed on the wall and referred to it as her first contract, at a salary of £14 a week (a considerable sum for a sixteen-year-old in 1953). However, upon closer inspection, this document, dated 17 December 1953 (three weeks before her 17th birthday), appears to promise £10 for two performances.[18] Also in 1953, Bassey signed a contract to sing in the touring variety show Memories of Jolson, a musical based on the life of Al Jolson.[19] She next took up a professional engagement in Hot from Harlem, which ran until 1954.[citation needed]

In 1955, Bassey toured various theatres until she was noticed by the impresario Jack Hylton. He invited her to feature in Al Read‘s Such Is Life at the Adelphi Theatre in London’s West End.

During the show’s run, Philips record producer Johnny Franz spotted her on television, was impressed, and offered her a recording deal. Bassey recorded her first single, “Burn My Candle“, released in February 1956, when she was 19. Owing to the suggestive lyrics, the BBC banned it. More singles followed, and in February 1957, Bassey had her first hit with “The Banana Boat Song“, which reached number 8 in the UK Singles Chart.[20]

In 1957 she also recorded under the direction of American producer Mitch Miller in New York City for the Columbia Records label (which at the time had a distribution deal with Philips), producing the single “If I Had a Needle and Thread” b/w “Tonight My Heart She Is Crying”. She then made her American stage début in Las Vegas at El Rancho Vegas.[21]

In mid-1958, she recorded two singles that would become classics in the Bassey catalogue. “As I Love You” was released as the B-side of another ballad, “Hands Across the Sea”; it did not sell well at first, but after an appearance at the London Palladiumsales began to pick up. In January 1959, “As I Love You” reached number one and stayed there for four weeks; it was the first number-one single by a Welsh artist.[5]

While “As I Love You” climbed the charts, so did Bassey’s recording of “Kiss Me, Honey Honey, Kiss Me” and both records would end up occupying the top 3 at the same time. A few months later, Bassey signed to EMI‘s Columbia label, and the second phase in her recording career had begun.[citation needed]

1960–1979: Success and breakthroughEdit

In the early and mid-1960s, Bassey had numerous hits in the UK, and five albums in the top 15. Her 1960 recording of “As Long As He Needs Me” from Lionel Bart‘s Oliver! reached number two, and had a chart run of 30 weeks.[4] Bassey made her American television début on 13 November 1960, when she performed on The Ed Sullivan Show.[22] Her collaboration with Nelson Riddle and his orchestra, the album Let’s Face the Music (1962), reached number 12 in the UK album chart; and the single, “What Now My Love” made it to number five. Other UK top 10 singles of the period included her second number-one, the double A-sideReach for the Stars“/”Climb Ev’ry Mountain” (1961), “I’ll Get By” (also 1961), and a cover version of the Ben E. Kinghit “I (Who Have Nothing)” in 1963.[20] Bassey appeared on the cover of Ebony magazine in 1963, and sang at a Washington gala celebrating President Kennedy‘s second year in office.[23]

Bassey made her Carnegie Hall debut on 15 February 1964. The complete concert recording was not released until it was included in the EMI compilation ‘The EMU/UA Years 1959–1979’ (ref: AllMusic review by Bruce Eder).

Bassey enjoyed her only US top 40 Billboard Hot 100hit in 1965 with the title song of the James Bond film, Goldfinger. The single, released in the United States during January 1965, peaked at number eight, while the original soundtrack of Goldfinger hit number one in the US that year. Also in 1965, she sang the title song for the James Bond spoof The Liquidator, and had a top 20 live album, recorded during a sold-out run at the Pigalle in London.

Bassey recorded a song for the next Bond film, Thunderball (1965). “Mr Kiss Kiss Bang Bang” was not used in the movie, although the film’s score follows its melodic theme. Written by John Barry and Leslie Bricusse, after Bassey’s version it was re-recorded by Dionne Warwick, and then rejected in favour of a new song, “Thunderball,” hastily written by Barry and given to Tom Jones (who, like Bassey, is Welsh) after the film’s producers decided the song over the opening credits must feature the film’s title.[24]

The “Goldfinger” theme song, however, had a lasting impact on her career. In the sleeve notes for Bassey’s 25th Anniversary Album (1978), Peter Clayton noted that: “Acceptance in America was considerably helped by the enormous popularity of (“Goldfinger”)…But she had actually established herself there as early as 1961, in cabaret in New York. She was also a success in Las Vegas…’I suppose I should feel hurt that I’ve never been really big in America on record since “Goldfinger”…But, concertwise, I always sell out.’…”[25] This was reflected in the fact that Bassey had only one solo LP reach the top 20 in a US chart (R&B, Live at Carnegie Hall), and she was technically a one-hit wonder. In the aftermath of “Goldfinger” her UK sales started to falter as well: only two of her singles would enter the UK top 40 from 1966 to 1970. She had signed to United Artists, and her first album on that label, I’ve Got a Song for You (1966), spent one week on the chart; from 1966 to 1970, only two albums would chart, one of those a compilation. One of her best-known singles, “Big Spender” was released in 1967, charting just short of the UK top 20.[20]

Bassey began to live as a tax exile in 1968 and was unable to work in Britain for almost two years.[14][26]

In 1969, she appeared in NBC‘s The Spring Thing, a musical television special hosted by Bobbie Gentryand Noel Harrison. Guests included were Goldie Hawn, Meredith MacRae, Irwin C. Watson, Rod McKuen, and Harpers Bizarre.[27]

 

Bassey performing in West Germany in 1973

Bassey’s UK comeback came in 1970, leading to one of the most successful periods of her career. Starting the year with a BBC Television ‘Special’ The Young Generation Meet Shirley Bassey, recorded in Sweden and shown on BBC1 on 18 March.[28] She returned to the UK with a record-breaking run of performances at the Talk of the Town nightclub. Also that year, her album Something was released, and showcased a new Bassey style, a shift from traditional pop to more contemporary songs and arrangements (the eponymous single was more successful in the UK charts than the original recording by The Beatles) – although Bassey would never completely abandon what that had been her forte: standards, show tunes, and torch songs.[citation needed]

Something” was also a top 10 US hit on the Adult Contemporary chart. Other singles of this period included the hit “Never Never Never“, an English version of the Italian “Grande grande grande”, reaching the top 10 in the US Adult Contemporary Chart, the UK top 10 and number one in Australia and South Africa. The success of “Something” (single number four, album number five in the UK) spawned a series of successful albums on the United Artists label, including Something Else (1971), And I Love You So (1972), I Capricorn (1972), Never Never Never (1973), Good, Bad but Beautiful (1975), Love, Life and Feelings (1976), You Take My Heart Away (1977) and Yesterdays (1978). Additionally, two of Bassey’s earlier LPs also entered the charts in the ’70s: And We Were Lovers (1967, re-issued as Big Spender), and Let’s Face the Music (1962, re-issued as What Now My Love). Two compilations, The Shirley Bassey Singles Album (1975) and 25th Anniversary Album (1978), both made the top three of the UK charts: The Shirley Bassey Singles Albumher highest-charting album, reached number two and earned a gold disc, and the 25th Anniversary Album eventually went platinum.[20][29]

Between 1970 and 1979, Bassey had 18 hit albums in the UK Albums Chart.[4] Her album The Magic Is You(1979) featured a portrait by the photographer Francesco Scavullo. In 1973, her sold-out concerts at New York’s Carnegie Hall were recorded and released as a two-LP set, Shirley Bassey: Live at Carnegie Hall. This album and the majority of her recordings from this period have been released on CD by EMI and BGO Records. Returning to the James Bond franchise, she recorded the theme song for Diamonds Are Forever (1971).[citation needed]

Bassey was the subject of This Is Your Life on two occasions: in November 1972 when she was surprised by Eamonn Andrews at Heathrow Airport,[citation needed] and in January 1993, when Michael Aspel surprised her at the curtain call of a sell-out concert at the Royal Albert Hall.[citation needed]

Bassey appeared on the Morecambe and WiseChristmas Show, broadcast on Christmas Day in 1971.[30] Bassey starred in the six-episode The Shirley Bassey Show (1976), the first of her television programmes for the BBC, followed by a second series of six episodes in 1979. The final show of the first series was nominated for the Golden Rose of Montreux in 1977. The series featured guests including Neil Diamond, Michel Legrand, The Three Degrees and Dusty Springfield and featured Bassey in various international locations as well as in the television studio. In 1978, Bassey pleaded guilty to being drunk and disorderly “after shouting abuse in the street and pushing a policeman”.[3] In 1979, Bassey recorded the title theme song for the Bond film, Moonraker.[citation needed]

1980–1999: Continued successEdit

Throughout most of the 1980s, Bassey focused on charitable work and performing occasional concert tours throughout Europe, Australia, and the United States. She had ended her contract with United Artists, whose former record division was now part of EMI, and began what she referred to as “semi-retirement”. Bassey recorded an album entitled All by Myself (1982) and made a TV special for Thames Television called A Special Lady with guest Robert Goulet. Around this time she recorded a duet with the French film actor Alain Delon, “Thought I’d Ring You” (1983). Bassey was now recording far less often but an album of her most famous songs, I Am What I Am (1984), was recorded with the London Symphony Orchestra (LSO) conducted by Carl Davis. This was followed by a single and video to support the London Tourist Board, “There’s No Place Like London” (1986), which was co-written by Lynsey de Paul and Gerard Kenny. She recorded an album of James Bond themes, The Bond Collectionin 1987, but was apparently unhappy with the results so she declined to release it. (Five years later it was released anyway, Bassey sued in court, and all unsold copies were withdrawn.)[31]

Bassey provided vocals for Swiss artists Yello on “The Rhythm Divine” (1987), a song co-written by Scottish singer Billy Mackenzie.[2] An album sung entirely in Spanish, La Mujer was released in 1989. In the latter mid-1980s Bassey had started working with a vocal coach, a former opera singer, and her album Keep the Music Playing (1991) displayed a grand, operatic pop style on several songs (perhaps also influenced by her album with the LSO seven years earlier).

EMI released the five-CD box set Bassey – The EMI/UA Years 1959–1979 in 1994. The accompanying booklet opened with a poem by Marc Almond. Bassey collaborated with Chris Rea in the film La Passione (1996), appearing in the film as herself and releasing the single “‘Disco’ La Passione“. The remix of this single charted just outside the UK top 40.[20] Bassey’s “History Repeating” (1997), written for her by the Propellerheads, reached number one on the UK Dance Chart, and number 10 on the US Dance Chart.[32] The liner notes of the Propellerheads’ album Decksandrumsandrockandroll included the lines: “We would like to extend our maximum respect to Shirley Bassey for honouring us with her performance. We are still in shock….” Bassey celebrated her 60th birthday in 1997 with two open-air concerts, at Castle Howard and Althorp Park, and another TV special. The resulting live album The Birthday Concert received a Grammy Awardnomination for Best Traditional Pop Vocal Performance.[33] On 7 October 1998 in Egypt, Bassey performed for a benefit at an open-air concert close to the Sphinx and the Great Pyramid. Bassey played the Friday night at Henley Festival in 1984.[citation needed]

Bassey was sued in a breach of contract case in 1998 by her former personal assistant, who also accused Bassey of hitting her and making an ethnic slur. Bassey won the case.[3] The episode was lampooned by Alexander Baron in his one-act play The Trial of Shirley Bassey. The following year, she performed the official song for the rugby World Cup, “World in Union“, with Bryn Terfel at the opening ceremony at The Millennium Stadium, Cardiff, wearing a gown designed on the Welsh flag. Their single made the top 40, and Bassey contributed two more songs to the official album Land of My Fathers, which reached number one on the UK compilations chart, and went silver.[29][34]

2000–present: High profile performances and final albumEdit

 

Bassey at Wembley Arenain 2006

Throughout the 2000s and 2010s, Bassey continued to perform at various high profile events. In 2001, Bassey was principal artiste at the Duke of Edinburgh‘s 80th birthday celebration. On 3 June 2002, she was one of a prestigious line-up of artists including Elton John, Paul McCartney and Tom Jones who performed at the Queen’s 50th Jubilee Party at Buckingham Palace. Bassey celebrated 50 years in show business in 2003 with the release of the CD Thank You for the Years, which was another top 20 album. A gala charity auction of her stage costumes at Christie’s, “Dame Shirley Bassey: 50 Years of Glittering Gowns”, raised £250,000 (US$500,000) for the Dame Shirley Bassey Scholarship at the Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama and the Noah’s Ark Children’s Hospital Appeal.[35] Bassey topped the bill at the 2005 Royal Variety Performance, introducing her new song “The Living Tree“.[citation needed]

Two popular Audiences with Shirley Bassey have aired on British television, one in 1995 that attracted more than 10 million viewers in the UK, with the second being broadcast in 2006. Bassey returned to perform in five arenas around the UK in June the same year, culminating at Wembley. She also performed a concert in front of 10,000 people at the Bryn Terfel Faenol Festival in North Wales broadcast by BBC Wales. Marks & Spencer signed her for their Christmas 2006 James Bond-style television advertising campaign. Bassey is seen in a glamorous Ice Palace singing a cover version of Pink‘s song “Get the Party Started“, wearing an M&Sgown.[citation needed]

The Living Tree“, written, produced, and originally recorded by the group Never the Bride, was released as a single on 23 April 2007, marking Bassey’s 50th anniversary in the UK Singles Chart – and the record for the longest span of top 40 hits in UK chart history.[4] Bassey performed a 45-minute set at the 2007 Glastonbury Festival wearing a pink Julien Macdonald dress, and customised Wellington boots.[36] A new album, Get the Party Started, was subsequently released on 25 June 2007 and entered the UK Albums Chart at number six.[20] The single of the title song reached number 3 on the US Dance Chart.[37] The same year, Bassey performed “Big Spender” with Elton John at his annual White Tie and Tiara Ball to raise money for The Elton John AIDS Foundation.[38] In 2007, Bassey performed in Fashion Rocks in aid of The Prince’s Trust at the Royal Albert Hall.[citation needed]

 

From left to right: Sting, Debbie Harry, Lady Gaga, Sir Elton John, Dame Shirley Bassey and Bruce Springsteen at Carnegie Hall in 2010

She was rushed to hospital in Monaco on 23 May 2008 to have an emergency operation on her stomach after complaining of abdominal pains. She was forced to pull out of the Nelson Mandela 90th Birthday Tribute concert because of her illness.[39] A biography of Bassey, Diamond Diva, was published in 2008.[citation needed]

Bassey recorded the album The Performance(2009), with James Bond composer David Arnold as co-producer (with Mike Dixon). A number of artists wrote songs expressly for Bassey, including Manic Street Preachers, Gary Barlow, Tom Baxter, KT Tunstall, Pet Shop Boys, Nick Hodgson of the Kaiser Chiefs, John Barry and Don Black. Bassey headlined at the BBC Electric Proms on 23 October 2009, in her only full live set of 2009.[3][40] She performed several of the new songs from The Performance in November 2009 on various TV shows: The Graham Norton Show, The Paul O’Grady Show and as the guest singer on Strictly Come Dancing.[citation needed]

Bassey performed at a gala celebrating the 80th birthday of Mikhail Gorbachev on 30 March 2011.[41]She also performed at the Classical Brit Awards in 2011, singing “Goldfinger” in tribute to John Barry.[42]

The BBC broadcast a 70-minute drama entitled Shirley on 29 September 2011, depicting Bassey’s early life and career.[43] Ruth Negga played the title role. Bassey was one of the line-up of artists on 4 June 2012 who performed at the Queen’s 60th Jubilee Party at Buckingham Palace, singing “Diamonds Are Forever”.[44] She performed at the 2013 Academy Awards on 24 February 2013 to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the James Bond movie franchise. It was her first appearance at an Oscars ceremony as a performer.[45] She sang “Goldfinger” to a standing ovation.[citation needed]

Bassey performed “I’m Still Here” and “The Lady Is A Tramp” on 13 November 2014 at the Royal Variety Performance in the presence of The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge.[citation needed]

Bassey released another album, Hello Like Before, was released on 17 November 2014. It includes a 50th-anniversary re-recording of “Goldfinger” (recreating the original orchestration) and a duet of “Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend” with Paloma Faith, produced and conducted by Stuart Barr.[46]

In December 2016, Bassey starred in a 60-minute BBC broadcast hosted by David Walliams.[47]

On 11 March 2018, Bassey performed “Almost Like Being In Love” in a tribute to Sir Bruce Forsyth at the London Palladium. At a gala for AMFAR (The Foundation for Aids Research) in Los Angeles on 18 October 2018, Bassey sang “Goldfinger”, “Diamonds Are Forever”, “Almost Like Being In Love” and “I Am What I Am”.[citation needed]

On 9 August 2019, Dame Shirley performed at UNICEF’s Summer Gala in Porto Cervo, Sardinia, singing “Goldfinger”, “Diamonds Are Forever” and “S’Wonderful”. Bassey appeared on the Ball & Boe TV Christmas Special on Friday 20 December 2019, singing “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas” with Michael Ball and Alfie Boe.[citation needed]

In 2020, with the release of her final album, I Owe It All To You, Bassey became the first female artist to chart an album in the top 40 of the UK Albums Chartin seven consecutive decades.[6]

Adele – Skyfall (Lyric Video)

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Billie Eilish – No Time To Die

 

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Sam Smith – Writing’s On The Wall (from Spectre) (Official Video)

 

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Thunderball Theme Song – James Bond

 

Nancy Sinatra – You Only Live Twice (HQ)

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The Man with the Golden Gun Opening Title Sequence

 

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The spy who loved me (1977) INTRO HD

Sheena Easton • For Your Eyes Only – James Bond/007

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James Bond – Octopussy – Theme Song

A View to a Kill Opening Title Sequence

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A-ha • The Living Daylights – James Bond 007

 

LICENCE TO KILL HIGH DEFINITION

 

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James Bond – Goldeneye Opening Theme (HQ)

Sheryl Crow – Tomorrow Never Dies

 

Barry, Beatles, Billie: 60 years of Bond tunes

<img class=”i-amphtml-intrinsic-sizer” role=”presentation” src=”data:;base64,” alt=”” aria-hidden=”true” />Barry, Beatles, Billie: 60 years of Bond tunes

 

British actor Daniel Craig poses during a photocall to promote the 24th James Bond film ‘Spectre’ on February 18, 2015 at Rome’s city hall. AFP PHOTO / TIZIANA FABI (Photo by VINCENZO PINTO and TIZIANA FABI / AFP)

Paris, France — Ever since the twanging guitar of John Barry’s theme song first appeared in “Dr No” in 1962, music has been crucial to the James Bond phenomenon.

The songs written for each title sequence have become a way of marking out the evolution of pop music through the past 60 years, from the classics of Shirley Bassey and Paul McCartney to Adele and Billie Eilish.

Nobody remembers Monty

Many assume the original theme was written by John Barry, in part because he became so closely associated with the Bond franchise, composing the soundtrack for 11 of the films.

 

In fact, Barry only arranged and performed the theme tune.

The famous dung-digger-dung-dung line was actually written by theater composer Monty Norman, developed from an unused Indian-themed score he had written for an adaptation of VS Naipaul’s “A House for Mr Biswas.”

It was Barry’s job to jazz it up, adding the blaring horns that made it so dramatic.

While Norman was given a one-off payment of just £250, Barry built a Hollywood career that has included five Oscars and classic soundtracks to “Midnight Cowboy,” “Out of Africa,” and many more.

Golden girl Shirley Bassey

Bassey became almost as closely linked to Bond as Barry — the only singer to deliver three title tracks: “Goldfinger” (1964), “Diamonds are Forever” (1971), and “Moonraker” (1979).

The first two are considered the most memorable in Bond history, the latter less so — Bassey later admitted she hated the “Moonraker” song and only did it as a favor to Barry.

“Goldfinger” made her a star, but the recording sessions were grueling, with Barry insisting that Bassey, then 27, hold the last belting note for seven full seconds.

“I was holding it and holding it — I was looking at John Barry and I was going blue in the face and he’s going — hold it just one more second. When it finished, I nearly passed out,” she later recalled.

 A new Beatles beginning

The first Bond film without Barry on the baton was “Live and Let Die” in 1973.

For this, the producers turned to another famous “B” The Beatles.

The group’s producer George Martin took over composing duties and brought in Paul McCartney and his band Wings for the theme song.

It became another classic and spawned a famous cover by Guns’N’Roses in later years.

From this point on, the Bond title song became its own mini-industry, without the involvement of the composer.

Big pop tie-ins followed, ranging from the not-so-successful (Lulu’s “The Man with the Golden Gun”) to classics like Carly Simon’s “Nobody Does it Better” and Duran Duran’s “A View to a Kill.”

<img class=”i-amphtml-intrinsic-sizer” role=”presentation” src=”data:;base64,” alt=”” aria-hidden=”true” />Barry, Beatles, Billie: 60 years of Bond tunes

FILE PHOTO: Auctioneer specialists hold a rare intact James Bond ‘Thunderball’ (1965) film poster (estimate £8,000-£12,000), featuring two panels of poster illustrations on the left by Frank McCarthy and two on the right by Robert McGinnis, at Ewbank’s Auctioneers, ahead of an upcoming sale, in Woking, Britain, April 7, 2021. REUTERS/Hannah McKay

 

The next generation

After a few desultory outings during the Pierce Brosnan years, the Bond genre got a shot of adrenaline with Adele’s “Skyfall” in 2012, which was the first to win an Oscar for best song.

<img class=”i-amphtml-intrinsic-sizer” role=”presentation” src=”data:;base64,” alt=”” aria-hidden=”true” />Barry, Beatles, Billie: 60 years of Bond tunes

 

Image: Twitter/@007

The following year’s “Writing’s on the Wall” by Sam Smith also won an Oscar, though it got a more mixed critical reception.

The latest incarnation is pop princess Billie Eilish with “No Time to Die,” which she co-wrote with her brother Finneas.

It already has a thumbs-up from the doyenne of the Bond theme world, with Bassey telling The Big Issue: “She did a good job.”

Golden girl Shirley Bassey Bassey became almost as closely linked to Bond as Barry -- the only singer to deliver three title tracks: "Goldfinger" (1964), "Diamonds are Forever" (1971), and "Moonraker" (1979).  The first two are considered the most memorable in Bond history, the latter less so -- Bassey later admitted she hated the "Moonraker" song and only did it as a favor to Barry.

The latest James Bond movie “Skyfall” stars Daniel Craig. 007 boozed so much that in all reality he would have had the tremulous hands of a chronic alcoholic, according to an offbeat study published by the British Medical Journal. PHOTO FROM FACEBOOK.COM/JAMESBONDOO7

Live And Let Die Theme Song – James Bond

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Paul McCartney Uncle Albert Rare Studio Demo

Paul McCartney; Uncle AlbertAdmiral Halsey. (RAM 1971)

Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
“Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey”
Single by Paul and Linda McCartney
from the album Ram
B-side Too Many People
Released 2 August 1971 (US only)
Format 7″
Recorded 6 November 1970
Genre
Length 4:49
Label Apple
Writer(s) Paul and Linda McCartney
Producer(s) Paul and Linda McCartney
Paul and Linda McCartney singles chronology
Another Day
(1971)
Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey
(1971)
The Back Seat of My Car
(1971)
Ram track listing
 

Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey” is a song by Paul and Linda McCartney from the album Ram. Released in the United States as a single on 2 August 1971,[1] but premiering on WLS the previous week (as a “Hit Parade Bound” (HPB)),[2] it reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 on 4 September 1971,[3][4] making it the first of a string of post-Beatles, McCartney-penned singles to top the US pop chart during the 1970s and 1980s. Billboard ranked it number 22 on its Top Pop Singles of 1971 year-end chart.[5]

Elements and interpretation[edit]

https://youtu.be/XI6C7L66zq8
“Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey” is composed of several unfinished song fragments that McCartney stitched together similar to the medleys from the Beatles‘ album Abbey Road.[6] The song is noted for its sound effects, including the sounds of a thunderstorm, with rain, heard between the first and second stanza, the sound of a telephone ringing, and a message machine, heard after the second stanza, and a sound of chirping sea birds and wind by the seashore. Linda’s voice is heard in the harmonies as well as the bridge section of the “Admiral Halsey” portion of the song.

McCartney said “Uncle Albert” was based on his uncle. “He’s someone I recall fondly, and when the song was coming it was like a nostalgia thing.”[7] McCartney also said, “As for Admiral Halsey, he’s one of yours, an American admiral”, referring to Fleet Admiral William “Bull” Halsey (1882–1959).[7] McCartney has described the “Uncle Albert” section of the song as an apology from his generation to the older generation, and Admiral Halsey as an authoritarian figure who ought to be ignored.[8]

Despite the disparate elements that make up the song, author Andrew Grant Jackson discerns a coherent narrative to the lyrics, related to McCartney’s emotions in the aftermath of the Beatles’ breakup.[9] In this interpretation, the song begins with McCartney apologizing to his uncle for getting nothing done, and being easily distracted and perhaps depressed in the lethargic “Uncle Albert” section.[9] Then, after some sound effects reminiscent of “Yellow Submarine,” Admiral Halsey appears to him calling him to action, although McCartney remains more interested in “tea and butter pie.” McCartney stated that he put the butter in the pie so that it would not melt at all.[9] Jackson sees a possible sinister allusion in the use of Admiral Halsey as a character in the song, since Halsey was famous for fighting the Japanese in World War II and claiming that “after the war, the Japanese language will be spoken only in hell,” and McCartney’s ex-Beatle partner John Lennon had recently married a Japanese woman, Yoko Ono.[9] The “hands across the water” section which follows could be taken as evocative of the command “All hands on deck!”, rousing McCartney to action, perhaps to compete with Lennon.[9] The song then ends with the “gypsy” section, in which McCartney resolves to get back on the road and perform his music, now that he was on his own without his former bandmates who no longer wanted to tour.[9]

Reception[edit]

Paul McCartney won the Grammy Award for Best Arrangement Accompanying Vocalists in 1971 for the song.[10][11] The single was certified Gold by the Recording Industry Association of America for sales of over one million copies.[12]

According to Allmusic critic Stewart Mason, fans of Paul McCartney’s music are divided in their opinions of this song.[13] Although some fans praise it as “one of his most playful and inventive songs” others criticize it for being “exactly the kind of cute self-indulgence that they find so annoying about his post-Beatles career.”[13] Mason himself considers it “churlish” to be annoyed by the song, given that song isn’t intended to be completely serious, and praises the “Hands across the water” section as being “lovably giddy.”[13]

On the US charts, the song set a songwriting milestone as the all-time songwriting record (at the time) for the most consecutive calendar years to write a #1 song. This gave McCartney eight consecutive years (starting with “I Want to Hold Your Hand“), leaving behind Lennon with only seven years.

Later release[edit]

“Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey” also appears on Wings Greatest from 1978, even though Ram was not a Wings album, and again on the US version of McCartney’s 1987 compilation, All the Best!, as well as the 2001 compilation Wingspan: Hits and History.

Personnel[edit]

Song uses[edit]

Charts[edit]

Peak positions[edit]

Chart (1971) Position
Australian Kent Music Report[14] 5
Canadian RPM Top 100 Singles[15] 1
Mexican Singles Chart[16] 3
U.S. Billboard Hot 100[4] 1
West German Media Control Singles Chart[17] 30

Year-end charts[edit]

Chart (1971) Position
Canadian RPM Singles Chart[18] 14
U.S. Billboard Top Pop Singles[16] 22

Certifications[edit]

Region Certification
United States (RIAA)[19] Gold

Notes[edit]

  1. Jump up^ McGee 2003, p. 195.
  2. Jump up^ “89WLS Hit Parade”. 1971-08-02. Retrieved 2013-12-21.
  3. Jump up^ Billboard.
  4. ^ Jump up to:a b “Allmusic: Paul McCartney: Charts & Awards”. allmusic.com. Retrieved 2 May 2013.
  5. Jump up^ “Top Pop 100 Singles” Billboard December 25, 1971: TA-36
  6. Jump up^ Blaney, J. (2007). Lennon and McCartney: together alone: a critical discography of their solo work. Jawbone Press. pp. 46, 50. ISBN 978-1-906002-02-2.
  7. ^ Jump up to:a b McGee 2003, p. 196.
  8. Jump up^ Benitez, V.P. (2010). The Words and Music of Paul McCartney: The Solo Years. Praeger. pp. 30–31. ISBN 978-0-313-34969-0.
  9. ^ Jump up to:a b c d e f Jackson, A.G. (2012). Still the Greatest: The Essential Songs of The Beatles’ Solo Careers. Scarecrow Press. ISBN 978-0810882225.
  10. Jump up^ “Past Winners Search”. National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Retrieved 2 May 2014.
  11. Jump up^ “1971 Grammy Awards”.
  12. Jump up^ riaa.com
  13. ^ Jump up to:a b c Mason, S. “Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey”. Allmusic. Retrieved 2013-12-25.
  14. Jump up^ Kent, David (1993). Australian Chart Book 1970–1992. St Ives, NSW: Australian Chart Book. ISBN 0-646-11917-6.
  15. Jump up^ “Top Singles – Volume 16, No. 5”. RPM. 18 September 1971. Retrieved 5 May 2013.
  16. ^ Jump up to:a b Nielsen Business Media, Inc (25 December 1971). Billboard – Talent in Action 1971. Retrieved 1 May 2014.
  17. Jump up^ “Single Search: Paul and Linda McCartney – “Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey”” (in German). Media Control. Retrieved 20 February 2013.
  18. Jump up^ “RPM 100 Top Singles of 1971”. RPM. 8 January 1972. Retrieved 11 March 2014.
  19. Jump up^ “American single certifications – Paul Mc Cartney – Uncle Albert”. Recording Industry Association of America. If necessary, click Advanced, then click Format, then select Single, then click SEARCH

References[edit]

Preceded by
How Can You Mend a Broken Heart” by Bee Gees
Billboard Hot 100 number-one single
4 September 1971 (one week)
Succeeded by
Go Away Little Girl” by Donny Osmond
Preceded by
Sweet Hitch-Hiker” by Creedence Clearwater Revival
Canadian “RPM” Singles Chart number-one single
18 September 1971 – 2 October 1971 (three weeks)
Succeeded by
Maggie May” by Rod Stewart

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Dan Mitchell article Reduce Poverty with Free Enterprise

Reduce Poverty with Free Enterprise

I’ve shared several videos (here, here, here, and here) that use rigorous data to show that grinding poverty and severe material deprivation was the norm for humanity – until capitalism gained a foothold a few hundred years ago.

Fortunately, as free enterprise has gradually spread around the world, there’s been a remarkable increase in living standards, leading to a stunning drop in poverty.

For today’s column, let’s look at some new academic evidence about the link between capitalism and poverty reduction.

Here the abstract of a new study by Colin Doran and Thomas Stratmann of George Mason University.

We study the relationship between economic freedom and poverty rates in 151 countries over a twentyyear period. Using the World Bank’s poverty headcountsof those living on less than $1.90 per day, $3.20 per day, and $5.50 per day, we find evidence that economic freedom, measured by the Heritage Foundation’s Index of Economic Freedom, is associated with lower poverty rates. We also test the effect of various components of the Index of Economic Freedom. We find that a government’s integrity and a country’s trade freedom are associated with lower poverty rates.

Keep in mind that this study is looking at the relationship between free markets and extreme poverty (not the relatively comfortable type of poverty that exists in the United States).

More specifically, the authors were investigating the impact of public policy on people who live on between about $700-$2000 per year. In other words, poor people in poor nations.

And the big takeaway is that capitalism leads to less poverty, but what really makes a difference is to have open trade and less corruption.

The good news is that we know how to get free trade. Just get rid of protectionist policies.

The bad news is that corruption in government is a much more challenging topic. Yes, shrinking government would mean less opportunity for graft, but that doesn’t solve the problem of delivering “public goods” in a competent and honest manner.

P.S. Foreign aid makes things worse rather than better.

P.P.S. Click here is you want to learn about poverty reduction in rich nations.

Why can’t do something about the poor?

I love Milton Friedman’s film series “Free to Choose.” In that film series over and over it is shown that the ability to move from poor to rich is more abundant here than any other country in the world.

Poor Choices

by James A. Dorn

James A. Dorn is professor of economics at Towson University and editor of the Cato Journal.

Added to cato.org on September 27, 2011

This article appeared in The Baltimore Sun on September 27, 2011.

The persistence of poverty in Baltimore is disturbing. It is even more so when one looks deeper into the official data.

The 2010 American Community Survey (ACS) estimates that 25.6 percent of Baltimore’s population “for whom poverty status is determined” (602,129 people) are in poverty, as measured by pre-tax income relative to the poverty threshold used by the U.S. Census Bureau. For example, if a two-person family’s pre-tax money income is less than $14,218, it is considered poor; the corresponding figure for a family of four is $22,314.

However, the 25.6 percent figure doesn’t tell the whole story about Baltimore’s poverty.

If latent poverty is to be reduced, Baltimore needs to address the problem of how to improve economic development.

If one looks at the ACS for families, one finds that 28 percent of Baltimore families with children under 18 are living below the poverty level. That figure rises to an astonishing 40.6 percent for female-headed families with no father present. Is it surprising that poverty persists in Baltimore?

Poverty is often blamed on high taxes, onerous regulations, barriers to occupational entry and other economic factors. But poverty is also affected by people’s choices. For individuals who wait to have children, get married and stay married, obtain more education, and stay out of jail, poverty rates diminish greatly.

The poverty rate for married-couple families with related children under 18 in Baltimore is only 7.4 percent (7.5 percent for whites and 6.8 percent for blacks). Educational status is also important: Female-headed households with less than a high school degree have a poverty rate of 44.1 percent; the rate is 11 percent for those with a college degree.

With many dysfunctional families, a culture of crime, and public schools that are frequently ineffective and sometimes dangerous, the cards are stacked against poor people trying to escape poverty in Baltimore.

Government policies can influence one’s choices and the level of responsibility one takes. The growth of the welfare state has eroded personal responsibility and made the poor more dependent. After spending billions on welfare programs since President Lyndon Johnson announced the War on Poverty, the U.S. poverty rate is still about the same as in 1966 (14.7 percent). How can that be?

One answer is that the official poverty statistics mismeasure the actual extent of poverty. The U.S. Census Bureau measures only pre-tax money income and ignores noncash transfer payments in the form of Medicaid (by far the largest welfare program), food stamps, children’s health insurance, and child nutrition and health. If those in-kind transfers were included, the official poverty rate would decrease substantially.

Nevertheless, as Charles Murray pointed out in his landmark book Losing Ground (1984), even if all transfers were included as income and brought many people above the poverty thresholds, “latent poverty” would remain. That is, if welfare payments were taken away, people would return to poverty. Welfare alone cannot create wealth. Economic growth is the only sure way to reduce dependence and poverty.

Just look at China. Since 1978, when it began its march toward the market, China has achieved the world’s highest sustained rate of economic growth and allowed several hundred million people to lift themselves out of absolute poverty.

Counting noncash benefits of those living in poverty in Baltimore would reduce “poverty” but not free people from welfare. A huge underclass has captured politicians for their cause of maintaining and increasing transfers rather than limiting the size and scope of government to make people more responsible and foster economic growth.

No one could say that the poor in Baltimore today are less well-off materially than 50 or 100 years ago. Indeed, if one looks at personal consumption expenditures — a better measure of one’s living standard than pre-tax money income — one finds that official figures significantly overstate the extent of poverty.

Data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics show that in 2009, consumer expenditures for the lowest fifth of income earners were more than twice as high as before-tax income (which includes cash transfers and food stamps). Average annual consumption expenditures were $21,611 for the lowest quintile, while income was $9,846.

James A. Dorn is professor of economics at Towson University and editor of the Cato Journal.

More by James A. Dorn

This disparity is due to underreporting of income, outside financial assistance, loans and other factors. If poverty is better measured by one’s consumption rather than income, then Baltimore’s 25 percent poverty rate is misleading.

Most “poor” households now have a TV, air conditioning, enough food and medical care. Many have Internet access and a cell phone (subsidized by the federal government). What they don’t have is a safe environment, two parents and choice in education.

If latent poverty is to be reduced, Baltimore needs to address the problem of how to improve economic development. Part of that problem lies in heavy taxes on capital, but part also lies in the rise of government welfare and the decline in morality.

The bulk of Baltimore’s budget is spent on public safety (crime reduction) and education. Government failure is evident in those areas — taxpayers are not getting their money’s worth. Rather than spending more on welfare, perhaps it’s time to think about how to reduce latent poverty and make people more responsible for their choices.

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Surprising facts about America’s poor

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The poor in the USA have best chance in the world to go up

I love Milton Friedman’s film series “Free to Choose.” In that film series over and over it is shown that the ability to move from poor to rich is more abundant here than any other country in the world. This article below reminded me of that that. Are Poor Really Helpless Without Government? By Michael […]

RESPONDING TO HARRY KROTO’S BRILLIANT RENOWNED ACADEMICS!! Part 162H PAUSING to look at the life of John Raymond Smythies (Letter about BEYOND THE FRINGE comics Jonathan Miller, Peter Cook, Dudley Moore and Alan Bennett)

I was saddened to learn of the passing of Dr. John Raymond Smythies on January 28, 2019 in La Jolla, CA,  and I wanted to spend time on several posts concentrating on him. I have several tributes, but the best I read can be found at this link.

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Photo of Larry Joe Speaks

Larry Joe Speaks, 69, of Cabot, passed Friday, April 7, 2017. He was born August 20, 1947 in Fort Smith, Arkansas to the late Joe and Doris Speaks. H

The sermon WHO IS JESUS? was preached by Adrian Rogers (pictured below)  and my good friend Larry Speaks (pictured above) gave out hundreds of CD copies of it before he died on April 7, 2017 at the age of 69.

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Dr Keith Krell and his family pictured below:

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Woody Allen  and Mariel Hemingway pictured below: 

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The Visit of the Queen of Sheba to King Solomon’, oil on canvas painting by Edward Poynter, 1890

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On the left are David and Kelly Rogers and their sons Jonathan and Stephen Rogers. During the sermon illustration in WHO IS JESUS? Adrian Rogers told of calling little Jonathan when his family was missionaries in Madrid, Spain.

The band Big Daddy Weave pictured below:

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Your relative Richard Dawkins with comedian Ricky Gervais

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May 28, 2017

John Raymond Smythies, Center for Brain and Cognition,
La Jolla, CA 92093-0109

Dear Dr. Smythies,

On November 21, 2014 I received a letter from Nobel Laureate Harry Kroto and it said:

…Please click on this URL http://vimeo.com/26991975

and you will hear what far smarter people than I have to say on this matter. I agree with them.

Harry Kroto

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When I clicked on the link that Dr. Kroto gave me it led me to a video entitled, “Another 50 Renowned Academics Speaking About God (Part 2),” and in the 95th quote I heard these words from you:

I would like to describe how mescaline works. These hallucination drugs have a very specific action in two ways. Number 1 they produce fantastic visual hallucinations. These are described by the people who have them (most of them are down to earth scientists such as MacDonald Critchley) as being more beautiful than anything they have ever seen in normal art. Some of these people have the sort of experience as union with God, mystical experiences and so on.

I am in the process of posting on my blog a response to your statement and your life work as it relates to the existence of God. I have attempted to respond to all of Dr. Kroto’s friends arguments and I have posted my responses one per week for over a year now. Here are some of my earlier posts:

Arif Ahmed, Sir David AttenboroughMark Balaguer, Horace Barlow, Michael BatePatricia ChurchlandAaron CiechanoverNoam Chomsky,Alan DershowitzHubert DreyfusBart Ehrman, Stephan FeuchtwangDavid Friend,  Riccardo GiacconiIvar Giaever , Roy GlauberRebecca GoldsteinDavid J. Gross Brian Greene, Susan GreenfieldStephen F Gudeman,  Alan Guth, Jonathan HaidtTheodor W. HänschBrian Harrison,  Hermann HauserRoald Hoffmann,  Bruce HoodHerbert Huppert,  Gareth Stedman JonesSteve JonesShelly KaganMichio Kaku,  Stuart Kauffman,  Lawrence KraussHarry KrotoGeorge LakoffElizabeth Loftus,  Alan MacfarlanePeter MillicanMarvin MinskyLeonard Mlodinow Yujin NagasawaAlva NoeDouglas Osheroff,  Jonathan Parry,  Saul PerlmutterHerman Philipse,  Carolyn PorcoRobert M. PriceLisa RandallLord Martin Rees,  Oliver SacksJohn SearleMarcus du SautoySimon SchafferJ. L. Schellenberg,   Lee Silver Peter Singer,  Walter Sinnott-ArmstrongRonald de SousaVictor StengerBarry Supple,   Leonard SusskindRaymond TallisNeil deGrasse Tyson,  .Alexander VilenkinSir John WalkerFrank WilczekSteven Weinberg, and  Lewis Wolpert,

I have had some time to reflect on Larry Speaks’ funeral service and I wanted to share a few thoughts with you.
When I think of the 34 years I knew Larry it reminds me of all the laughs we had together. Larry’s funeral was a happy occasion as we laughed at the many stories about Larry’s life.
There was the occasion that Larry gave a  neighbor of his a chance to work at Larry’s SOUTHERN FRUIT AND GROCERY STORE  because his neighbor had nothing to do and that would keep him busy. We will call him Barry. Barry was a little strange but tried to be very helpful. There was the time Barry was trying to kill a fly with a fly swatter and accidentally busted the electric OPEN sign near the front window. Also Barry would ignore Larry’s instructions not  to talk politics with the customers and  get into arguments with the customers. Eventually Larry had to tell Barry that his help was no longer needed after a while. Larry said probably the first hint he got that Barry couldn’t handle the job was when Barry filled up his car tank with gas and he shook his car because Barry said that allowed more gas to get into the tank!!!
LAUGHTER is something you have been around. I have seen the YouTube videos of BEYOND THE FRINGE with your friends Jonathan Miller, Peter Cook, Dudley Moore and Alan Bennett. I have got a lot of laughs by watching those clips. Peter Cook once said, “Hitler was a very peculiar person wasn’t he? He was another dominator you know — Hitler. And he was a wonderful ballroom dancer. Not many people know that.”
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As you know I am writing you a series of letters on Solomon’s efforts to find a meaning and purpose to life. In the Book of Ecclesiastes what are all of the 6 “L” words that Solomon looked into? He looked into  learning (1:16-18), laughter, ladies, luxuries,  and liquor (2:1-3, 8, 10, 11), and labor (2:4-6, 18-20).
Probing the area of LAUGHTER was one of Solomon’s first places to start. In Ecclesiastes 2:2 he starts this quest but he concludes it is not productive to be laughing the whole time and not considering the serious issues of life. “I said of laughter, “It is foolishness;” and of mirth, “What does it accomplish?” (2:2).   Then Solomon  asserted the nihilistic statement in Ecclesiastes 2:17: “So I hated life, because the work that is done under the sun was grievous to me. All of it is meaningless, a chasing after the wind.”
Keith Krell in his article, 3. Trivial Pursuits (Ecclesiastes 1:12-2:26), notes:

What would it take to make you happy? What if you had the wealth of Bill Gates or Donald Trump? Would this make you happy? What if you had the success of Oprahor Martha Stewart? Do you think you could be happy? What if you had the brains of Carl Sagan or Stephen Hawking? Do you think you could be happy? Let me guess. Your answer is, “I don’t know, but I’d sure like to give it a try.”

A few people have been able to possess wealth, success, and intelligence just as I described. Solomon, the third king of Israel, was one of them. In some ways he had everything. He had a thousand wives and concubines, enormous wealth, international respect, and unparalleled wisdom. What he didn’t always have, however, was a reason for living. He didn’t always have happiness. He fits the pattern of the highly gifted, extremely ambitious person who climbs the ladder of success—only to contemplate jumping off once he’s reached the top.39

In the first eleven verses of Ecclesiastes chapter one, Solomon examined three broad categories in his search for the key to life: human history, physical nature, and human nature. Now in 1:12-2:26, he narrows his search to his own personal experience.40 In a sense he takes us on his own spiritual sojourn as he searches for satisfaction in life. In the memoirs that follow Solomon informs us that he sought satisfaction in four broad categories, but wound up empty-handed.

  • Humor (2:2). Solomon writes, “I said to myself, ‘Come now, I will test you with pleasure. So enjoy yourself.’ And behold, it too was futility. I said of laughter, ‘It is madness,’ and of pleasure, ‘What does it accomplish?’”57 Solomon mocks “laughter” as “madness.” I’m not surprised he labeled it “madness.” Do you really think the leading comedians of our day are sincerely satisfied with life? Has humor given them an inside track on human happiness? Hardly.58 It is easy to seek to lose ourselves in comedy and entertainment whether it is in a theater, in front of our TV, or on-line. Although it can seem like a great escape, it leaves us empty in the end.
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Francis Schaeffer quoted Woody Allen in his book WHATEVER HAPPENED TO THE HUMAN RACE? (co-authored by Dr. C. Everett Koop):
One of the most striking developments in the last half-century is the growth of a profound pessimism among both the well-educated and less-educated people. The thinkers in our society have been admitting for a long time that they have no final answers at all.
Take Woody Allen, for example. Most people know his as a comedian, but he has thought through where mankind stands after the “religious answers” have been abandoned. In an article in Esquire (May 1977), he says that man is left with:
… alienation, loneliness [and] emptiness verging on madness…. The fundamental thing behind all motivation and all activity is the constant struggle against annihilation and against death. It’s absolutely stupefying in its terror, and it renders anyone’s accomplishments meaningless.
Allen sums up his view in his film Annie Hall with these words: “Life is divided into the horrible and the miserable.”
Many would like to dismiss this sort of statement as coming from one who is merely a pessimist by temperament, one who sees life without the benefit of a sense of humor. Woody Allen does not allow us that luxury. He speaks as a human being who has simply looked life in the face and has the courage to say what he sees. If there is no personal God, nothing beyond what our eyes can see and our hands can touch, then Woody Allenis right: life is both meaningless and terrifying.
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Solomon’s experiment was a search for meaning to life “under the sun.” Then in last few words in the Book of Ecclesiastes he looks above the sun and brings God back into the picture: “The conclusion, when all has been heard, is: Fear God and keep His commandments, because this applies to every person. For God will bring every act to judgment, everything which is hidden, whether it is good or evil.”
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As you know the sermon WHO IS JESUS? was Larry’s favorite sermon and he gave hundreds of that CD copies away.  Let me share a little from that message but first let me give you some background information.

In 1979 I went  on a mission trip to Toronto and  then to Europe  with my good friend David Rogers. We were involved with the group  Operation Mobilization (OM). After the OM Mission Conference in Belgium,  David went to Austria and I went to England. In Manchester, England our group went to the homes of Muslims and Hindus and shared  the gospel.

Fast forward several years later, I  got involved in my family business, but David continued in  missions and  moved to Spain.

Now the illustration from the sermon WHO IS JESUS? by Adrian Rogers:

The other day we called our son David in Madrid, Spain.Momma Bear is burning up our telephone and our bill is going to be big, talking to David and Kelly and little Jonathan. It is an amazing thing that in Memphis,  Tennessee when she picks up a phone  she eliminates everyone that doesn’t have a phone. And then when she dials the first digit that deals with the country Spain she eliminates all other countries. And then when she dials a couple more digits she eliminates all the other cities in Spain except Madrid. And then when she dials a couple more digits she eliminates a lot of people in a particular city in Spain. And then when she dials that last digit it eliminates every home except the very last home which belongs to our son David. 

That is amazing that there are billions of people in the world and  with a phone you can start closing the focus. My friend that is what the Old Testament does.

In Genesis 3, we read about the One who will bruise the head of the serpent. In Genesis 12, He is going to come from the seed of Abraham. In Genesis 22, we read about the sacrifice of Isaac on the very mountain where Jesus was later crucified! The entire book of Leviticus is filled with pictures of blood-atoning sacrifices for sin. You’ll read about the prophetic crucifixion of Jesus in Psalm 22. In Micah 5:2, it is told clearly that Jesus will be born in Bethlehem. There is only one person on the end of the line and his name is Jesus.

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No wonder Larry chose the song YOURS WILL BE to be sung at his funeral. It blessed me tremendously today when I heard it sung. Look it up on You Tube “Yours will Be (The Only Name)”  by Big Daddy Weave:

Yours will be
The only name that matters to me
The only one whose favor I seek
The only name that matters to me

Yours will be
The friendship and affection I need
To feel my Father smiling on me
The only name that matters to me

And Yours is the name, the name that has saved me
Mercy and grace, the power that forgave me and Your love
Is all I’ve ever needed

When I wake up in the Land of Glory
With the saints I will tell my story
There will be one name that I proclaim, Jesus, Jesus, Jesus, just that Name

The answer to find meaning in life is found in putting your faith and trust in Jesus Christ. Just two days ago I attended a U2 concert in Dallas and I heard them sing the song I STILL HAVEN’T FOUND WHAT I’M LOOKING FOR. That  song was perplexing to me because in the song they claim to be believers in Christ, but they are still looking for satisfaction and meaning to their lives outside of Christ. This morning in his sermon, Brandon Barnard, one of our teaching pastors at FELLOWSHIP BIBLE CHURCH noted concerning Hebrews 12:1-3:

We have to look to Jesus , the Founder and Perfecter of our faith. Jesus is the one who completes us. The problem is that many of us are looking to other things to give us joy, peace, hope, meaning and purpose in life. We are looking to relationships, leisure, hobbies and all these other places to fulfill us, but we should look to Jesus. 

Thanks for your time.

Sincerely,

Everette Hatcher, everettehatcher@gmail.com, http://www.thedailyhatch.org, cell ph 501-920-5733, Box 23416, LittleRock, AR 72221

On November 21, 2014 I received a letter from Nobel Laureate Harry Kroto and it said:

…Please click on this URL http://vimeo.com/26991975

and you will hear what far smarter people than I have to say on this matter. I agree with them.

Harry Kroto

Nick Gathergood, David-Birkett, Harry-Kroto

I have attempted to respond to all of Dr. Kroto’s friends arguments and I have posted my responses one per week for over a year now. Here are some of my earlier posts:

Arif Ahmed, Sir David AttenboroughMark Balaguer, Horace Barlow, Michael BatePatricia ChurchlandAaron CiechanoverNoam Chomsky,Alan DershowitzHubert Dreyfus, Bart Ehrman, Stephan FeuchtwangDavid Friend,  Riccardo GiacconiIvar Giaever , Roy GlauberRebecca GoldsteinDavid J. Gross,  Brian Greene, Susan GreenfieldStephen F Gudeman,  Alan Guth, Jonathan HaidtTheodor W. Hänsch, Brian Harrison,  Hermann HauserRoald Hoffmann,  Bruce HoodHerbert Huppert,  Gareth Stedman Jones, Steve JonesShelly KaganMichio Kaku,  Stuart Kauffman,  Lawrence KraussHarry Kroto, George LakoffElizabeth Loftus,  Alan MacfarlanePeter MillicanMarvin MinskyLeonard Mlodinow,  Yujin NagasawaAlva NoeDouglas Osheroff,  Jonathan Parry,  Saul PerlmutterHerman Philipse,  Carolyn PorcoRobert M. PriceLisa RandallLord Martin Rees,  Oliver Sacks, John SearleMarcus du SautoySimon SchafferJ. L. Schellenberg,   Lee Silver Peter Singer,  Walter Sinnott-ArmstrongRonald de Sousa, Victor StengerBarry Supple,   Leonard Susskind, Raymond TallisNeil deGrasse Tyson,  .Alexander Vilenkin, Sir John WalkerFrank WilczekSteven Weinberg, and  Lewis Wolpert,

In  the second video below in the 95th clip in this series are his words but today I just wanted to pause and look at this life. 

Quote from Dr. John Raymond Smythies

I would like to describe how mescaline works. These hallucination drugs have a very specific action in two ways. Number 1 they produce fantastic visual hallucinations. These are described by the people who have them (most of them are down to earth scientists such as MacDonald Critchley) as being more beautiful than anything they have ever seen in normal art. Some of these people have the sort of experience as union with God, mystical experiences and so on.

50 Renowned Academics Speaking About God (Part 1)

Another 50 Renowned Academics Speaking About God (Part 2)

A Further 50 Renowned Academics Speaking About God (Part 3)

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The John Lennon and the Beatles really were on a long search for meaning and fulfillment in their lives  just like King Solomon did in the Book of Ecclesiastes. Solomon looked into learning (1:12-18, 2:12-17), laughter, ladies, luxuries, and liquor (2:1-2, 8, 10, 11), and labor (2:4-6, 18-20). He fount that without God in the picture all […]

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  The Beatles in a press conference after their Return from the USA Uploaded on Nov 29, 2010 The Beatles in a press conference after their Return from the USA. The Beatles:   I have dedicated several posts to this series on the Beatles and I don’t know when this series will end because Francis […]

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__________________   Beatles 1966 Last interview I have dedicated several posts to this series on the Beatles and I don’t know when this series will end because Francis Schaeffer spent a lot of time listening to the Beatles and talking and writing about them and their impact on the culture of the 1960’s. In this […]

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_______________ Francis Schaeffer pictured below: _____________________ I have included the 27 minute  episode THE AGE OF NONREASON by Francis Schaeffer. In that video Schaeffer noted,  ” Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band…for a time it became the rallying cry for young people throughout the world. It expressed the essence of their lives, thoughts and their feelings.” How Should […]

FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE Part 47 Woody Allen and Professor Levy and the death of “Optimistic Humanism” from the movie CRIMES AND MISDEMEANORS Plus Charles Darwin’s comments too!!! (Feature on artist Rodney Graham)

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____________________________________ Francis Schaeffer pictured below: __________ Francis Schaeffer has written extensively on art and culture spanning the last 2000years and here are some posts I have done on this subject before : Francis Schaeffer’s “How should we then live?” Video and outline of episode 10 “Final Choices” , episode 9 “The Age of Personal Peace and Affluence”, episode 8 […]

FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE Part 45 Woody Allen “Reason is Dead” (Feature on artists Allora & Calzadilla )

Love and Death [Woody Allen] – What if there is no God? [PL] ___________ _______________ How Should We then Live Episode 7 small (Age of Nonreason) #02 How Should We Then Live? (Promo Clip) Dr. Francis Schaeffer 10 Worldview and Truth Two Minute Warning: How Then Should We Live?: Francis Schaeffer at 100 Francis Schaeffer […]

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RESPONDING TO HARRY KROTO’S BRILLIANT RENOWNED ACADEMICS!! Part 162G PAUSING to look at the life of John Raymond Smythies (Letter to Dr. Smythies again discussing Aldous Huxley book DOORS OF PERCEPTION)

I was saddened to learn of the passing of Dr. John Raymond Smythies on January 28, 2019 in La Jolla, CA,  and I wanted to spend time on several posts concentrating on him. I have several tributes, but the best I read can be found at this link.

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This picture below is the cover picture of the Facebook page for the ministry HIDDEN CREEK REENTRY CENTER, and this ministry has the purpose of assisting incarcerated individuals with a successful transition to their community. I have had the joy of giving some of my time to help these gentlemen.

Hidden Creek Reentry Center in Little Rock, Arkansas

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FILE – In this May 12, 1959, American novelist Ernest Hemingway, left, speaks with actors Alec Guinness, center, and Noel Coward in Sloppy Joe’s Bar during the making of Sir Carol Reed’s film version of “Our Man in Havana,” based on Graham Greene’s best seller, in Havana, Cuba. Sloppy Joe’s will be reopened in February 2013 by the state-owned tourism company Habaguanex, part of an ambitious revitalization project by the Havana City Historian’s Office, which since the 1990’s has transformed block after block of crumbling ruins into rehabilitated buildings along vibrant cobblestone streets, giving residents and tourists from all over the chance to belly up to the same bar that served thirsty celebrities like Rock Hudson, Babe Ruth and Ernest Hemingway. (AP Photo, File)

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 April 21, 2017

John Raymond Smythies,
La Jolla, CA 92093-0109

Dear Dr. Smythies,

Several of my sons are fans of the musical group THE DOORS. As you can guess the group got their name from the book DOORS OF PERCEPTION by your friend Aldous Huxley. I have posted about Aldous Huxley many times before on my blog (www.thedailyhatch.org). Francis Schaeffer mentions him in episode 7 of his film series HOW SHOULD WE THEN LIVE? Francis Schaeffer noted concerning Aldous Huxley (1894-1963):
 He proposed drugs as a solution. We should, he said, give healthy people drugs and they can then find truth inside their own heads. All that was left for Aldous Huxley and those who followed him was truth inside a person’s own head. With Huxley’s idea, what began with the existential philosophers – man’s individual subjectivity attempting to give order as well as meaning, in contrast to order being shaped by what is objective or external to oneself – came to its logical conclusion. Truth is in one’s own head. The ideal of objective truth was gone.

I don’t know if they had drugs 3000 years ago, but liquor may have been the closest thing to it back then.
As I have promised I am writing you over and over until I go through all 6 things that Solomon pursued to try to finding a lasting meaning in his life UNDER THE SUN in the Book of Ecclesiastes. Today we will look at LIQUOR.
In this letter I am looking at two things.
FIRST, I want to look the problem of escapism and what Solomon had to say about it concerning the path of liquor.
SECOND, I want to look at a portion of the sermon WHO IS JESUS? by Adrian Rogers. (This is the sermon that my good friend Larry Speaks gave to hundreds of people during the last 20 years of his life. Larry put his faith alone in Christ in the mid 1990’s and he passed away on April 7, 2017 at age 69.)
I want to talk about a subject that is very sad indeed and it is the attempt by many today to find  their meaning in life through drugs and alcohol. Perhaps they are trying to escape the hard realities of life by taking this path. Like everyone around us, I too have many close friends and relatives who have fallen into this trap. I have a great deal of compassion for these individuals. In fact, several times this month I have taken time to drive individuals from a facility that my church sponsors to AA meetings. We want these individuals to overcome their addictions and live in victory.  I can’t do anything to go back and  save those who have passed on in the past, but I can do something to encourage those who have obstacles to overcome today!!!!

Our church FELLOWSHIP BIBLE CHURCH sponsors HIDDEN CREEK REENTRY CENTER,  Assisting incarcerated individuals with a successful transition to their community. I have had the joy of giving some of my time to help these gentlemen. Let me share some posts from their Facebook page:

So proud of these guys… They had the honor to go with Mr.Glover yesterday to a school to speak to some children.

Well its been a eye jerker today… great tears of joy!! I have watched these guys grow so much… I pray they continue to grow out there… next month they graduate the program!!

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I have just finished a book about a man who had a tough time breaking drug addition and the it is entitled,  FEARLESS: The undaunted courage and ultimate sacrifice of Navy Seal Team Six Operator Adam Brownby Eric Blehm.
This is how the book opens:

When Adam Brown woke up on March 17, 2010, he didn’t know he would die that night in the Hindu Kush mountains of Afghanistan—but he was ready….Adam Brown did understand what it meant to disappoint, to feel the shame he’d experienced on a hot, humid August afternoon years earlier when his parents had him arrested. “It’s time for you to face what you’ve done,” his father had told him in 1996, just before Adam was handcuffed and escorted to the backseat of the Garland County sheriff’s cruiser. When the deputy slammed the car door shut, Adam watched his mother’s legs buckle, and as she collapsed, his dad caught her and held her tightly against him. She began to cry, and Adam knew he had broken her heart.That vision—of his mother sobbing into his father’s chest—would haunt him for the rest of his life, but it also sparked the journey that defined who he would become. Officially known as a Chief Special Warfare Operator (SEAL), Adam Brown was one of the most respected Special Operations warriors in the U.S. Navy.

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Why do so many individuals today turn to drugs or liquor?  There are various reasons, but let us look at the reason Ernest Hemingway became a drunk.
Ernest Hemingway turned to liquor as a device of escapism because he reached the conclusion that life has no lasting meaning.
“Some lived in it and never felt it but he knew it all was nada y pues nada y nada y pues nada.” This quote from Hemingway’s short story A Clean Well Lighted Place shows that Ernest Hemingway embraced nihilism.The Spanish word NADA meaning NOTHING. The old man in the story tried the previous week to commit suicide but was saved by his niece, and he saw it as a temporary saving.
Hemingway also wrote in his last book THE GARDEN OF EDEN, “Happiness in intelligent people is the rarest thing I know.”A sensational bestseller when it appeared in 1986, The Garden of Eden is the last uncompleted novel of Ernest Hemingway, which he worked on intermittently from 1946 until his death in 1961.
In you go to You Tube and watch the video Woody Allen talks ‘Midnight in Paris’ which was posted on January 27, 2017 and runs 43 minutes and 37 seconds, you will notice at the 27 minute mark that Woody Allen says:

I have never gotten to the point where I can give an optimistic view of anything. I have these ideas for stories that I hope are entertaining and I am always criticized for being pessimistic or nihilistic. To me this is just a realistic appraisal of life. What I have learned over the years is that there is no other solution to it. There is no satisfying answer. There is no optimistic answer I can give anybody.

Ernest Hemingway in one of his stories ( A FAREWELL TO ARMS) is looking at a burning log with ants running on it. This is the kind of thinking that has over powered me over the years and slips into my stories.

Drinking was a large part of Hemingway’s life. Solomon in the Book of Ecclesiastes also takes a long look at liquor and tries to see if it will bring any satisfaction UNDER THE SUN.

In fact, Solomon  filled his home with the best wine (Eccl 2:3).

Concerning the Book of Ecclesiastes Francis Schaeffer noted:

Solomon was searching for a meaning in the midst of the details of life. His struggle was to find the meaning of life.  Humanism since the Renaissance and onward has never found it and it has never found it. Modern man has not found it and it has always got worse and darker in a very real way.

Ecclesiastes is the only pessimistic book in the Bible and that is because of the place where Solomon limits himself. He limits himself to the question of human life, life UNDER THE SUN between birth and death and the answers this would give.

In Ecclesiastes 1:8 he drives this home when he states, “All things are wearisome; Man is not able to tell it. THE EYE IS NOT SATISFIED WITH SEEING. NOR IS THE EAR FILLED WITH HEARING.”  Solomon is stating here the fact that there is no final satisfaction because you don’t get to the end of the thing.

What do you do and the answer is to get drunk and this was not thought of in the RUBAIYAT OF OMAR KAHAYYAM:

Ecclesiastes 2:1-3

I said to myself, “Come now, I will test you with pleasure. So enjoy yourself.” And behold, it too was futility. I said of laughter, “It is madness,” and of pleasure, “What does it accomplish?” I explored with my mind how to stimulate my body with wine while my mind was guiding me wisely, and how to take hold of folly, until I could see what good there is for the sons of men to do under heaventhe few years of their lives.

The Daughter of the Vine (from the RUBAIYAT OF OMAR KAHAYYAM):

You know, my Friends, with what a brave Carouse
I made a Second Marriage in my house;
Divorced old barren Reason from my Bed,
And took the Daughter of the Vine to Spouse.

A perfectly good philosophy coming out of Islam, but Solomon is not the first man that thought of it nor the last. In light of what has been presented by Solomon is the solution just to get intoxicated and black the think out? So many people have taken to alcohol and the dope which so often follows in our day. This approach is incomplete, temporary and immature. PAPA HEMINGWAYCAN FIND THE CHAMPAGNE OF PARIS SUFFICIENT FOR A TIME, BUT ONCE HE LEFT HIS YOUTH HE NEVER FOUND IT SUFFICIENT AGAIN. HE HAD A LIFETIME SPENT LOOKING BACK TO PARIS AND THAT CHAMPAGNE AND NEVER FINDING IT ENOUGH.  It is no solution and Solomon says so too.

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Both Woody Allen and Ernest Hemingway like Solomon looked for meaning UNDER THE SUN in what I call the 6 big L words in the Book of Ecclesiastes. These areas are  learning (1:16-18), laughter, ladies, luxuries,  and liquor (2:1-3, 8, 10, 11), and labor (2:4-6, 18-20). All three men agree with the conclusion of Ecclesiastes 2:17:

17 So I hated life, because what is done under the sun was grievous to me; for all is vanity and a striving after the wind

Then in last few words in the Book of Ecclesiastes Solomon looks above the sun and brings God back into the picture: “The conclusion, when all has been heard, is: Fear God and keep His commandments, because this applies to every person. For God will bring every act to judgment, everything which is hidden, whether it is good or evil.”

Now I just want to provide you with the outline of the 3rd point that Adrian Rogers makes in his sermon WHO IS JESUS? I remember discussing this sermon with Larry Speaks. He was so excited that the Bible gave us so much evidence that Christ was who he said he was.
If you take the time to look up these verses you will see that Christ fulfilled the prophecies in the Old Testament that had been written hundreds of years before he even existed. Some may doubt that these scriptures were written in advance, but after the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls that interpretation is no longer feasible. Contained in the Dead Sea Scrolls and dated back to approximately 200 years before Christ we have copies of portions of manuscripts from EVERY OLD TESTAMENT BOOK IN THE BIBLE (except Esther). Plus we have a complete copy of the Book of Isaiah. With that in mind please take time to read both Old Testament prophecies and the New Testament fulfillment listed below or just google the name PETER STONER.

THE PROPHETIC WITNESS OF THE SCRIPTURES  (Acts 10:43)

  1. The theme of the Old Testament is the Lord Jesus Christ.
  2. Fulfilled prophecy is one of the greatest proofs that Jesus Christ is the Son of God.
  3. All of the prophets speak in unanimity that Jesus is Lord.
    1. It is estimated that there are more than 300 direct Old Testament prophecies that prophesy the miracle birth and earthly life of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.
    2. Micah 5:2
    3. Matthew 2:1
    4. Isaiah 7:14
    5. Isaiah 53:4-5
    6. Isaiah 53:9
    7. Matthew 27:57
    8. Matthew 27:38
    9. Zechariah 11:12
    10. Matthew 26:15
    11. Psalm 22

Thanks for your time.

Sincerely,

Everette Hatcher, everettehatcher@gmail.com, http://www.thedailyhatch.org, cell ph 501-920-5733, Box 23416, LittleRock, AR 72221

PS: I have been so blessed to be a part of a ministry such as Hidden Creek Reentry Center. When I think of the pain and suffering that alcoholism and drugs have caused it makes me think of the Christian track HAPPY HOUR that describes such a case and how Christ can turn someone around. I personally have attended a funeral of a dear friend who went to the grave prematurely. It is true that I can do nothing to bring him back, but I do something about the people who are here now who need help. 

On November 21, 2014 I received a letter from Nobel Laureate Harry Kroto and it said:

…Please click on this URL http://vimeo.com/26991975

and you will hear what far smarter people than I have to say on this matter. I agree with them.

Harry Kroto

Nick Gathergood, David-Birkett, Harry-Kroto

I have attempted to respond to all of Dr. Kroto’s friends arguments and I have posted my responses one per week for over a year now. Here are some of my earlier posts:

Arif Ahmed, Sir David AttenboroughMark Balaguer, Horace Barlow, Michael BatePatricia ChurchlandAaron CiechanoverNoam Chomsky,Alan DershowitzHubert Dreyfus, Bart Ehrman, Stephan FeuchtwangDavid Friend,  Riccardo GiacconiIvar Giaever , Roy GlauberRebecca GoldsteinDavid J. Gross,  Brian Greene, Susan GreenfieldStephen F Gudeman,  Alan Guth, Jonathan HaidtTheodor W. Hänsch, Brian Harrison,  Hermann HauserRoald Hoffmann,  Bruce HoodHerbert Huppert,  Gareth Stedman Jones, Steve JonesShelly KaganMichio Kaku,  Stuart Kauffman,  Lawrence KraussHarry Kroto, George LakoffElizabeth Loftus,  Alan MacfarlanePeter MillicanMarvin MinskyLeonard Mlodinow,  Yujin NagasawaAlva NoeDouglas Osheroff,  Jonathan Parry,  Saul PerlmutterHerman Philipse,  Carolyn PorcoRobert M. PriceLisa RandallLord Martin Rees,  Oliver Sacks, John SearleMarcus du SautoySimon SchafferJ. L. Schellenberg,   Lee Silver Peter Singer,  Walter Sinnott-ArmstrongRonald de Sousa, Victor StengerBarry Supple,   Leonard Susskind, Raymond TallisNeil deGrasse Tyson,  .Alexander Vilenkin, Sir John WalkerFrank WilczekSteven Weinberg, and  Lewis Wolpert,

In  the second video below in the 95th clip in this series are his words but today I just wanted to pause and look at this life. 

Quote from Dr. John Raymond Smythies

I would like to describe how mescaline works. These hallucination drugs have a very specific action in two ways. Number 1 they produce fantastic visual hallucinations. These are described by the people who have them (most of them are down to earth scientists such as MacDonald Critchley) as being more beautiful than anything they have ever seen in normal art. Some of these people have the sort of experience as union with God, mystical experiences and so on.

50 Renowned Academics Speaking About God (Part 1)

Another 50 Renowned Academics Speaking About God (Part 2)

A Further 50 Renowned Academics Speaking About God (Part 3)

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MUSIC MONDAY “Skyfall” is a song recorded by English singer-songwriter Adele for the James Bond film of the same name!

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NO TIME TO DIE | Final US Trailer

007 : James Bond : Theme

Goldfinger Theme Song – James Bond

Diamonds Are Forever Theme Song – James Bond

Moonraker Theme Song – James Bond

Adele – Skyfall (Lyric Video)

—-

Skyfall” is a song recorded by English singer-songwriter Adele for the James Bond film of the same name. It was written by Adele and producer Paul Epworth and features orchestration by J. A. C. Redford. The film company Eon Productions invited the singer to work on the theme song in early 2011, a task that Adele accepted after reading the film’s script. While composing the song, Adele and Epworth aimed to capture the mood and style of the other Bond themes, including dark and moody lyrics descriptive of the film’s plot. “Skyfall” was released at 0:07 BST on 5 October 2012 as part of the Global James Bond Day, celebrating the 50th anniversary of the release of Dr. No, the first James Bond film.

“Skyfall” received worldwide acclaim, with critics praising its lyrics, production and Adele’s vocals, with numerous critics and publications ranking it among the best Bond themes ever. It became a global success, reaching number one in eleven countries and the top five in various other regions. It peaked at number two on the UK Singles Chart and number eight on the US Billboard Hot 100. With sales of 7.2 million copies worldwide, “Skyfall” is one of the best selling digital singles of all time.

“Skyfall” received various accolades, including the Academy Award for Best Original Song, Brit Award for British Single of the Year, Critics’ Choice Movie Award for Best Song, Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song, and the Grammy Award for Best Song Written for Visual Media, thus making it the first Bond theme to win all the aforementioned awards. During the 85th Academy Awards, Adele performed the song live for the first time.

 

Background and productionEdit

In early 2011, Sony Pictures President of Music Lia Vollack suggested to the James Bond film producers at Eon Productions that they ask Adele to record a theme song for their next Bond film, later revealed to be titled Skyfall.[1] Vollack thought that Adele would be a good choice to ask to record a Bond theme song because her music had a “soulful, haunting, evocative quality”, which Vollack considered would bring back the “classic Shirley Bassey feel” associated with several early Bond films.[2]

Adele, who had just released her second album, 21, admitted that initially she was a “little hesitant” about agreeing to write a Bond theme song.[3] On meeting with the Skyfall film crew, the singer had told Skyfall director Sam Mendes that she felt as though she was not the person they were looking for because “my songs are personal, I write from the heart”.[4] Mendes simply replied “just write a personal song”, telling her to use Carly Simon‘s “Nobody Does It Better” from The Spy Who Loved Me as an inspiration.[5] Adele left the meeting with the script of Skyfall and upon reading it, decided that it was a “no-brainer“, as she “fell in love” with the film’s plot. Producer Paul Epworth, who had worked with Adele on 21, was brought in to help her write the song.[3][4] Adele stated that she enjoyed working to a brief and set of guidelines, even though it was something she had never done before.[6]

Production of “Skyfall”, from the first contact with Adele to the song’s release, took 18 months to complete. Vollack stated that the reason for this was “fine-tuning” the song, as Adele and Epworth wanted to ensure that they “were getting it right”.[7]The first cut of the song was completed in October 2011. During an interview at their post-Academy Award for Best Original Song win in February 2013, Adele revealed that the first draft of the song was written in 10 minutes.[8][9] After Adele underwent throat microsurgery for vocal problems, she recorded a demo of the track and sent it to Mendes, who was doing the principal photography of Skyfall. The director in turn played the demo for film producer Barbara Broccoli and Bond actor Daniel Craig, both of whom “shed a tear”.[4] Adele stated that the final cut of the song lasted two studio sessions at Abbey Road Studios in London.[8] It features a 77-piece orchestra conducted by J. A. C. Redford.[10]

 

Composition and lyricsEdit

“Skyfall”
A green-tinted image of the James Bond gun barrel. Adele's face is stamped in the barrel, and Daniel Craig's Bond is coming out of the barrel towards the viewer. The text "Adele", "Skyfall" and the "007" logo are seen at the bottom of the image.
Single by Adele
Released 5 October 2012
Recorded 2012
Studio Abbey Road, London
Genre Orchestral pop
Length 4:46
Label
Songwriter(s)
Producer(s) Paul Epworth
Adele singles chronology
Turning Tables
(2011)
Skyfall
(2012)
Hello
(2015)
 
James Bond theme singles chronology
Another Way to Die
(2008)
Skyfall
(2012)
Writing’s on the Wall
(2015)
Lyric video
Skyfall (Lyric video) on YouTube

“Skyfall” is an orchestral pop song with a duration of four minutes and 46 seconds.[6][11] Epworth stated that although “Skyfall” is an original composition, he and Adele had worked to capture “the James Bond feeling” of previous theme songs. The song intentionally references Monty Norman‘s “James Bond Theme” after the first chorus.[3] Norman said that the song had his seal of approval and that including the leitmotif he wrote for the Bond character was “a pretty sensible thing to do, if you want to feel the ‘James Bond quality’ of the music”.[3] Epworth said that while “Skyfall” was his first experience writing film music, he had been involved with the production of James Bond musicbefore: while Epworth was a tape operator at AIR Studios, he recorded some film soundtracks including David Arnold‘s Tomorrow Never Dies.[12][13]

Epworth stated that the producers’ request was for “a dramatic ballad”, so he and Adele tried to “do something that was simultaneously dark and final, like a funeral, and to try and turn it into something that was not final. A sense of death and rebirth”.[9]Epworth watched the first thirteen Bond films seeking the “musical code” of the songs, “whatever the modal structure or the chord that always seemed to unify those songs” and contributed to the mood and “that kind of ’60s jazzy quality”. Epworth identified as a uniting factor “a minor ninth as the harmonic code … the Bond songs, they have that elaboration to it” and wrote what would become the instrumental part of “Skyfall”.[9] He described it as “a bit of a ‘Eureka!’ moment“.[9][14]

“Skyfall” was composed in the key of C minor using common time at 76 beats per minute (Adagietto).[15]Adele’s vocal range spans over one octave, from the low note of G3 to the high note of C5, on the song.[15] Heavily pregnant at the time of recording, Adele has commented that this was the reason for the song’s low range, and has often struggled to perform the song live due to the lower register.[16]The lyrics closely follow the plot of the film rather than focusing on romanticism.[3][8] According to Epworth, the song is about “death and rebirth”, saying “It’s like, when the world ends and everything comes down around your ears, if you’ve got each other’s back, you can conquer anything. From death to triumph, that was definitely something we set out to try and capture”.[2] The Daily Telegraph writer Neil McCormick described the lyrics as “slightly sinister” and containing references to a number of Bond tropes and motifs.[17]

 

Release and remixesEdit

Thomas Newman wearing a suit attending the Classic Brit Awards.

 

Thomas Newmancomposed Skyfalls musical score. A portion of “Skyfall” was included in the track “Komodo Dragon” as an interpolation due to not being included on the soundtrack album.

The theme song, and the identity of its singer, was kept secret, but rumours of Adele’s involvement still emerged. Adele first mentioned recording a “special project” in September 2011 in an interview on The Jonathan Ross Show, leading to speculation in the media that she was recording a Bond theme.[18] In an interview with NRJ in April 2012, the singer stated that she intended to release a new single by the end of the year; however, it would not be preceding a new album.[19] The song’s title was originally rumoured to be “Let the Sky Fall”.[20] In September 2012, OneRepublic vocalist Ryan Tedder posted a message on Twitter claiming he had heard the title track and that it was “the best James Bond theme in his lifetime”. Adele’s publicist, Paul Moss, mentioned the song on his Twitter feed; both later deleted their messages.[21] The artwork for the song was leaked online,[22] but Adele’s involvement in the project was not officially confirmed until 1 October.[23] “Skyfall” was released at 0:07 BST on 5 October 2012 as part of the “Global James Bond Day”, celebrating the 50th anniversary of the release of Dr. No, the first James Bond film.[24] A 12-inch single featuring unofficial remixes of the song was sold in Germany to promote the song.[25][26]

The song was not included on the soundtrack album, marking the second time in the Bond series that the theme song was split from the soundtrack album, following “You Know My Name” from Casino Royale in 2006.[27] Wilson and Broccoli still asked composer Thomas Newman to include a reference to “Skyfall” in the film’s score “so that it didn’t appear as a kind of ‘one off’ at the top of the movie”. Newman opted to include an interpolation in the track “Komodo Dragon”, used in a scene where Bond enters a casino in Macau. According to Newman, the scene had “a real moment of ‘Bond’ swagger”, and the music fit the scene accordingly.[28][29] Epworth was visited by Newman for advice, and Redford, who was already doing the score’s orchestration, was requested to arrange “Komodo Dragon”; Newman was unable to do the arrangement because he felt that his task “was already so huge and daunting”.[28]

 

Critical receptionEdit

“Skyfall” received widespread critical acclaim. Entertainment Weekly wrote that there is “finally” a great James Bond theme.[30] The Huffington Postdescribed the song as a “brassy and soulful tune [that] fits perfectly alongside the work of Shirley Bassey in the oeuvre of James Bond title tracks”.[31]RedEye gave the song four out of four stars and declared that it “is a return to form, and if it doesn’t get you hyped for the movie, you’re not a Bond fan”.[32] The Daily Record named “Skyfall” its “Single of the Week” and gave the song five stars out of five.[33] PopCrush gave the song four-and-a-half stars out of five and called it “wholly satisfying and worth the wait”.[34] Idolator wrote that “during the song’s final third, Adele does, in fact, make the sky fall, in typical Adele fashion”.[35] Consequence of Sound commented that “rousing instrumentation elevates the vocals to soaring heights”,[36] while HitFix called the song a “majestic ballad” and a “classic James Bond theme”.[37] Newsday was also very positive, writing that “Skyfall” is “unlike anything else she’s done in her young career. It’s self-assured and grand, drawing inspiration from Dame Shirley Bassey, while adding her own powerful phrasing to make it her own. Adele’s style so far has been to downplay her massive voice with lyrics that are questioning and self-deprecating. On ‘Skyfall,’ though, it sounds like the diva point of view suits her, too”.[38]

The Los Angeles Times complimented the song and said that the song “tells good things for this winter’s blockbuster-to-be. It’s not a reimagining or a musical departure, but simply a righting of the ship. The song is big, bold and seems to have a little spot-o-fun”.[39] MTV was also positive, stating that “Adele’s lush song fits right in with classics by Shirley Bassey, Paul McCartney and Carly Simon“.[6]The Wall Street Journal felt similarly, writing that the song “has sweep and drama, [with] orchestral support [that] gives it a classical timelessness that sets it apart from typical pop songs. Because it is a theme for a Bond film, after all, the song is also shot through with the threat of violence and death”.[40] E! Online wrote that Adele’s song was “a cross, and a good one at that, between the 1971 Bassey classicand a more-focused version of Garbage‘s ‘The World Is Not Enough‘.”[41] The Hollywood Reporterwrote that the song “instantly feels like a Bond theme, with the singer’s sultry voice set against a minor chord progression. Done in big, orchestral style, the mood – like the singer – is all 1960s throwback, back when Bond themes like ‘Goldfinger‘ were smooth, seductive and larger than life”.[42]

Jim Farber of the New York-based Daily News wrote in his review: “It suffers from a similarly meandering melody and ponderous progression. The grandeur of its arrangement easily upstages the tune”, but “even so, the luster of Adele’s tone, and the bravura arc of her vocal, makes it enjoyable enough. And, fifty years down the line, isn’t that all we really expect from a Bond product these days?”[43] Yahoo!‘s Rob O’Connor gave the standalone song a positive review but felt that it was too soon to tell how the song would fit into the wider canon of Bond theme songs.[44] Neil McCormick of the Daily Telegraphwas less complimentary, describing the song as “classy” but at the same time, “overly predictable”.[17]

 

Chart performanceEdit

The song went to number one at the UK’s iTunes online store less than ten hours after it was released, surpassing “Diamonds” by Rihanna.[3] At 6 am on 5 October, Clear Channel began airing “Skyfall” on 180 radio stations around the United States every hour, on the hour; within 24 hours, “Skyfall” had garnered 10 million audience impressions and had already begun to rank within the top 50 of the Nielsen Broadcast Data Systems-based Radio Songs chart.[45] On 7 October, “Skyfall” entered the UK Singles Chart at number 4 after less than 48 hours on sale. The single sold 84,000 copies in the UK during its first two days of release.[46] On 14 October, “Skyfall” rose to number 2 on the UK Singles Chart with sales of 92,000 copies. This tied “Skyfall” with Duran Duran‘s “A View to a Kill” as the highest-charting James Bond theme song on the UK Singles Chart.[47] This has since been broken when, in 2015, Sam Smiths “Writing’s on the Wall” debuted at number 1 on the UK Singles Chart. The song was the 20th best-selling song of 2012 in the UK with 547,000 sold.[48] “Skyfall” debuted at number one in Ireland.[49] It also charted at number one on the French Singles Chart for six weeks and spent 24 weeks in the top 10.

The song entered the Billboard Hot 100 at number 8 for the week ending 20 October 2012, becoming Adele’s first song to debut in the top 10 with 261,000 copies sold in the United States during its first three days.[50][51] Although “Skyfall” debuted at number 8, it was actually the third best-selling single in the US that week – the Hot 100 ranks songs based on sales, radio airplay, and online streaming. “Skyfall” is the first James Bond theme to chart within the top 10 in the US since Madonna‘s “Die Another Day” a decade earlier[52] and is the first James Bond theme to debut in the top 10.[53]Interest in “Skyfall” led to a 10% increase in sales of Adele’s last album, 21, in the US.[54] For the week ending 27 October 2012, the second week after its release, the song fell from number 8 to number 13.[55]

After Skyfall was released in cinemas in North America, Adele’s song saw a sales increase of 66%.[56] In January 2013, unofficial remixes also warranted the song an inclusion on the Billboard Hot Dance Club Songs chart,[25] peaking at the 10th spot.[57] After Adele won the Oscar for the song, sales in the US increased by 56% with 56,000 downloads.[58] The following week, “Skyfall” sold an additional 103,000 downloads and climbed 28 spots on the Billboard Hot 100.[59] As of July 2013, “Skyfall” has sold over five million copies worldwide.[citation needed] As of January 2013, it had sold 1,600,000 copies in the US according to Soundscan and is the first Bond song to sell a million digital copies.[60]

Billie Eilish – No Time To Die

 

——

Sam Smith – Writing’s On The Wall (from Spectre) (Official Video)

 

—-

Thunderball Theme Song – James Bond

 

Nancy Sinatra – You Only Live Twice (HQ)

__

The Man with the Golden Gun Opening Title Sequence

 

—-

The spy who loved me (1977) INTRO HD

Sheena Easton • For Your Eyes Only – James Bond/007

—-

James Bond – Octopussy – Theme Song

A View to a Kill Opening Title Sequence

 –

A-ha • The Living Daylights – James Bond 007

 

LICENCE TO KILL HIGH DEFINITION

 

-—

James Bond – Goldeneye Opening Theme (HQ)

Sheryl Crow – Tomorrow Never Dies

 

Barry, Beatles, Billie: 60 years of Bond tunes

<img class=”i-amphtml-intrinsic-sizer” role=”presentation” src=”data:;base64,” alt=”” aria-hidden=”true” />Barry, Beatles, Billie: 60 years of Bond tunes

 

British actor Daniel Craig poses during a photocall to promote the 24th James Bond film ‘Spectre’ on February 18, 2015 at Rome’s city hall. AFP PHOTO / TIZIANA FABI (Photo by VINCENZO PINTO and TIZIANA FABI / AFP)

Paris, France — Ever since the twanging guitar of John Barry’s theme song first appeared in “Dr No” in 1962, music has been crucial to the James Bond phenomenon.

The songs written for each title sequence have become a way of marking out the evolution of pop music through the past 60 years, from the classics of Shirley Bassey and Paul McCartney to Adele and Billie Eilish.

Nobody remembers Monty

Many assume the original theme was written by John Barry, in part because he became so closely associated with the Bond franchise, composing the soundtrack for 11 of the films.

 

In fact, Barry only arranged and performed the theme tune.

The famous dung-digger-dung-dung line was actually written by theater composer Monty Norman, developed from an unused Indian-themed score he had written for an adaptation of VS Naipaul’s “A House for Mr Biswas.”

It was Barry’s job to jazz it up, adding the blaring horns that made it so dramatic.

While Norman was given a one-off payment of just £250, Barry built a Hollywood career that has included five Oscars and classic soundtracks to “Midnight Cowboy,” “Out of Africa,” and many more.

Golden girl Shirley Bassey

Bassey became almost as closely linked to Bond as Barry — the only singer to deliver three title tracks: “Goldfinger” (1964), “Diamonds are Forever” (1971), and “Moonraker” (1979).

The first two are considered the most memorable in Bond history, the latter less so — Bassey later admitted she hated the “Moonraker” song and only did it as a favor to Barry.

“Goldfinger” made her a star, but the recording sessions were grueling, with Barry insisting that Bassey, then 27, hold the last belting note for seven full seconds.

“I was holding it and holding it — I was looking at John Barry and I was going blue in the face and he’s going — hold it just one more second. When it finished, I nearly passed out,” she later recalled.

 A new Beatles beginning

The first Bond film without Barry on the baton was “Live and Let Die” in 1973.

For this, the producers turned to another famous “B” The Beatles.

The group’s producer George Martin took over composing duties and brought in Paul McCartney and his band Wings for the theme song.

It became another classic and spawned a famous cover by Guns’N’Roses in later years.

From this point on, the Bond title song became its own mini-industry, without the involvement of the composer.

Big pop tie-ins followed, ranging from the not-so-successful (Lulu’s “The Man with the Golden Gun”) to classics like Carly Simon’s “Nobody Does it Better” and Duran Duran’s “A View to a Kill.”

<img class=”i-amphtml-intrinsic-sizer” role=”presentation” src=”data:;base64,” alt=”” aria-hidden=”true” />Barry, Beatles, Billie: 60 years of Bond tunes

FILE PHOTO: Auctioneer specialists hold a rare intact James Bond ‘Thunderball’ (1965) film poster (estimate £8,000-£12,000), featuring two panels of poster illustrations on the left by Frank McCarthy and two on the right by Robert McGinnis, at Ewbank’s Auctioneers, ahead of an upcoming sale, in Woking, Britain, April 7, 2021. REUTERS/Hannah McKay

 

The next generation

After a few desultory outings during the Pierce Brosnan years, the Bond genre got a shot of adrenaline with Adele’s “Skyfall” in 2012, which was the first to win an Oscar for best song.

<img class=”i-amphtml-intrinsic-sizer” role=”presentation” src=”data:;base64,” alt=”” aria-hidden=”true” />Barry, Beatles, Billie: 60 years of Bond tunes

 

Image: Twitter/@007

The following year’s “Writing’s on the Wall” by Sam Smith also won an Oscar, though it got a more mixed critical reception.

The latest incarnation is pop princess Billie Eilish with “No Time to Die,” which she co-wrote with her brother Finneas.

It already has a thumbs-up from the doyenne of the Bond theme world, with Bassey telling The Big Issue: “She did a good job.”

Golden girl Shirley Bassey Bassey became almost as closely linked to Bond as Barry -- the only singer to deliver three title tracks: "Goldfinger" (1964), "Diamonds are Forever" (1971), and "Moonraker" (1979).  The first two are considered the most memorable in Bond history, the latter less so -- Bassey later admitted she hated the "Moonraker" song and only did it as a favor to Barry.

The latest James Bond movie “Skyfall” stars Daniel Craig. 007 boozed so much that in all reality he would have had the tremulous hands of a chronic alcoholic, according to an offbeat study published by the British Medical Journal. PHOTO FROM FACEBOOK.COM/JAMESBONDOO7

Live And Let Die Theme Song – James Bond

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Paul McCartney Uncle Albert Rare Studio Demo

Paul McCartney; Uncle AlbertAdmiral Halsey. (RAM 1971)

Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
“Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey”
Single by Paul and Linda McCartney
from the album Ram
B-side Too Many People
Released 2 August 1971 (US only)
Format 7″
Recorded 6 November 1970
Genre
Length 4:49
Label Apple
Writer(s) Paul and Linda McCartney
Producer(s) Paul and Linda McCartney
Paul and Linda McCartney singles chronology
Another Day
(1971)
Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey
(1971)
The Back Seat of My Car
(1971)
Ram track listing
 

Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey” is a song by Paul and Linda McCartney from the album Ram. Released in the United States as a single on 2 August 1971,[1] but premiering on WLS the previous week (as a “Hit Parade Bound” (HPB)),[2] it reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 on 4 September 1971,[3][4] making it the first of a string of post-Beatles, McCartney-penned singles to top the US pop chart during the 1970s and 1980s. Billboard ranked it number 22 on its Top Pop Singles of 1971 year-end chart.[5]

Elements and interpretation[edit]

https://youtu.be/XI6C7L66zq8
“Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey” is composed of several unfinished song fragments that McCartney stitched together similar to the medleys from the Beatles‘ album Abbey Road.[6] The song is noted for its sound effects, including the sounds of a thunderstorm, with rain, heard between the first and second stanza, the sound of a telephone ringing, and a message machine, heard after the second stanza, and a sound of chirping sea birds and wind by the seashore. Linda’s voice is heard in the harmonies as well as the bridge section of the “Admiral Halsey” portion of the song.

McCartney said “Uncle Albert” was based on his uncle. “He’s someone I recall fondly, and when the song was coming it was like a nostalgia thing.”[7] McCartney also said, “As for Admiral Halsey, he’s one of yours, an American admiral”, referring to Fleet Admiral William “Bull” Halsey (1882–1959).[7] McCartney has described the “Uncle Albert” section of the song as an apology from his generation to the older generation, and Admiral Halsey as an authoritarian figure who ought to be ignored.[8]

Despite the disparate elements that make up the song, author Andrew Grant Jackson discerns a coherent narrative to the lyrics, related to McCartney’s emotions in the aftermath of the Beatles’ breakup.[9] In this interpretation, the song begins with McCartney apologizing to his uncle for getting nothing done, and being easily distracted and perhaps depressed in the lethargic “Uncle Albert” section.[9] Then, after some sound effects reminiscent of “Yellow Submarine,” Admiral Halsey appears to him calling him to action, although McCartney remains more interested in “tea and butter pie.” McCartney stated that he put the butter in the pie so that it would not melt at all.[9] Jackson sees a possible sinister allusion in the use of Admiral Halsey as a character in the song, since Halsey was famous for fighting the Japanese in World War II and claiming that “after the war, the Japanese language will be spoken only in hell,” and McCartney’s ex-Beatle partner John Lennon had recently married a Japanese woman, Yoko Ono.[9] The “hands across the water” section which follows could be taken as evocative of the command “All hands on deck!”, rousing McCartney to action, perhaps to compete with Lennon.[9] The song then ends with the “gypsy” section, in which McCartney resolves to get back on the road and perform his music, now that he was on his own without his former bandmates who no longer wanted to tour.[9]

Reception[edit]

Paul McCartney won the Grammy Award for Best Arrangement Accompanying Vocalists in 1971 for the song.[10][11] The single was certified Gold by the Recording Industry Association of America for sales of over one million copies.[12]

According to Allmusic critic Stewart Mason, fans of Paul McCartney’s music are divided in their opinions of this song.[13] Although some fans praise it as “one of his most playful and inventive songs” others criticize it for being “exactly the kind of cute self-indulgence that they find so annoying about his post-Beatles career.”[13] Mason himself considers it “churlish” to be annoyed by the song, given that song isn’t intended to be completely serious, and praises the “Hands across the water” section as being “lovably giddy.”[13]

On the US charts, the song set a songwriting milestone as the all-time songwriting record (at the time) for the most consecutive calendar years to write a #1 song. This gave McCartney eight consecutive years (starting with “I Want to Hold Your Hand“), leaving behind Lennon with only seven years.

Later release[edit]

“Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey” also appears on Wings Greatest from 1978, even though Ram was not a Wings album, and again on the US version of McCartney’s 1987 compilation, All the Best!, as well as the 2001 compilation Wingspan: Hits and History.

Personnel[edit]

Song uses[edit]

Charts[edit]

Peak positions[edit]

Chart (1971) Position
Australian Kent Music Report[14] 5
Canadian RPM Top 100 Singles[15] 1
Mexican Singles Chart[16] 3
U.S. Billboard Hot 100[4] 1
West German Media Control Singles Chart[17] 30

Year-end charts[edit]

Chart (1971) Position
Canadian RPM Singles Chart[18] 14
U.S. Billboard Top Pop Singles[16] 22

Certifications[edit]

Region Certification
United States (RIAA)[19] Gold

Notes[edit]

  1. Jump up^ McGee 2003, p. 195.
  2. Jump up^ “89WLS Hit Parade”. 1971-08-02. Retrieved 2013-12-21.
  3. Jump up^ Billboard.
  4. ^ Jump up to:a b “Allmusic: Paul McCartney: Charts & Awards”. allmusic.com. Retrieved 2 May 2013.
  5. Jump up^ “Top Pop 100 Singles” Billboard December 25, 1971: TA-36
  6. Jump up^ Blaney, J. (2007). Lennon and McCartney: together alone: a critical discography of their solo work. Jawbone Press. pp. 46, 50. ISBN 978-1-906002-02-2.
  7. ^ Jump up to:a b McGee 2003, p. 196.
  8. Jump up^ Benitez, V.P. (2010). The Words and Music of Paul McCartney: The Solo Years. Praeger. pp. 30–31. ISBN 978-0-313-34969-0.
  9. ^ Jump up to:a b c d e f Jackson, A.G. (2012). Still the Greatest: The Essential Songs of The Beatles’ Solo Careers. Scarecrow Press. ISBN 978-0810882225.
  10. Jump up^ “Past Winners Search”. National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Retrieved 2 May 2014.
  11. Jump up^ “1971 Grammy Awards”.
  12. Jump up^ riaa.com
  13. ^ Jump up to:a b c Mason, S. “Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey”. Allmusic. Retrieved 2013-12-25.
  14. Jump up^ Kent, David (1993). Australian Chart Book 1970–1992. St Ives, NSW: Australian Chart Book. ISBN 0-646-11917-6.
  15. Jump up^ “Top Singles – Volume 16, No. 5”. RPM. 18 September 1971. Retrieved 5 May 2013.
  16. ^ Jump up to:a b Nielsen Business Media, Inc (25 December 1971). Billboard – Talent in Action 1971. Retrieved 1 May 2014.
  17. Jump up^ “Single Search: Paul and Linda McCartney – “Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey”” (in German). Media Control. Retrieved 20 February 2013.
  18. Jump up^ “RPM 100 Top Singles of 1971”. RPM. 8 January 1972. Retrieved 11 March 2014.
  19. Jump up^ “American single certifications – Paul Mc Cartney – Uncle Albert”. Recording Industry Association of America. If necessary, click Advanced, then click Format, then select Single, then click SEARCH

References[edit]

Preceded by
How Can You Mend a Broken Heart” by Bee Gees
Billboard Hot 100 number-one single
4 September 1971 (one week)
Succeeded by
Go Away Little Girl” by Donny Osmond
Preceded by
Sweet Hitch-Hiker” by Creedence Clearwater Revival
Canadian “RPM” Singles Chart number-one single
18 September 1971 – 2 October 1971 (three weeks)
Succeeded by
Maggie May” by Rod Stewart

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