Category Archives: Current Events

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones 1965 album “The Rolling Stones, Now!”

 

the rolling stones – what a shame – stereo edit

Rolling Stones – Heart Of Stone

 

The Rolling Stones- Off the Hook (TAMI Show)

Rolling Stones – “Little Red Rooster.” 1965

the rolling stones – down the road apiece – stereo edit

The Rolling Stones, Now!

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Rolling Stones, Now!
Rollingstonesnow.jpg
Studio album by The Rolling Stones
Released 13 February 1965 (United States)
Recorded 10 June – 8 November 1964, except “Mona (I Need You Baby)”, 3–4 January 1964
Genre Rhythm and blues[1]
Length 35:58
Language English
Label London
Producer Andrew Loog Oldham
The Rolling Stones American chronology
12 X 5
(1964)
The Rolling Stones, Now!
(1965)
Out of Our Heads
(1965)
Singles from The Rolling Stones, Now!
  1. Little Red Rooster
    Released: 13 November 1964 (UK)
  2. Heart of Stone
    Released: 19 December 1964 (United States)
Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 5/5 stars[1]

The Rolling Stones, Now! is the third American studio album by the Rolling Stones, released in 1965 by their initial American distributor, London Records.

The album contained seven tracks from their second UK album The Rolling Stones No. 2, the recent US Top 20 hit “Heart of Stone“, the recent UK No. 1 hit single “Little Red Rooster“, “Surprise, Surprise”, from The Lord’s Taverners Charity Album, “Mona (I Need You Baby)” from The Rolling Stones and “Oh Baby (We Got A Good Thing Goin’)” which would appear on the UK edition of the Stones’ next album Out of Our Heads later in 1965. The album contains a different, and shorter, version of “Everybody Needs Somebody to Love” than the recording on The Rolling Stones No. 2, although the latter version was accidentally used on the 1986 CD of The Rolling Stones, Now!. The 2002 CD includes the shorter version, as heard on the original LP. Four of the songs on The Rolling Stones, Now! were penned by the songwriting team of Mick Jagger and Keith Richards (who dropped the “s” from his surname until 1978).

For the back cover, London Records simply took the back cover of The Rolling Stones No. 2 and amended the track listing and label information. Where the UK liner cover said “No. 2” after ‘THE ROLLING STONES’ was simply whited out for the American cover. One thing that was overlooked, however, was a mention of Ian Stewart playing organ on “Time Is on My Side,” which made no sense on The Rolling Stones, Now! as the song was not on that album. This credit was deleted from the 1986 and 2002 reissues.

The liner notes on initial pressings contained Andrew Loog Oldham’s advice to the record buying public, which was quickly temporarily removed from some subsequent pressings:

“(This is THE STONES new disc within. Cast deep in your pockets for the loot to buy this disc of groovies and fancy words. If you don’t have the bread, see that blind man knock him on the head, steal his wallet and low and behold you have the loot, if you put in the boot, good, another one sold!)”

The Rolling Stones, Now! is generally considered a very strong album and a highlight of their early American releases. Upon its February issuing, The Rolling Stones, Now! reached No. 5 in the US and became another gold seller for The Rolling Stones. In 2003, the album was ranked number 180 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.[2]

In August 2002 The Rolling Stones, Now! was reissued in a new remastered CD and SACD digipak by ABKCO Records. This version included stereo mixes of “Heart of Stone”, “What a Shame”, and “Down the Road Apiece”.[3]

Track listing[edit]

Side one
No. Title Writer(s) Length
1. Everybody Needs Somebody to Love” (alternative long version appears on The Rolling Stones No. 2) Solomon Burke, Bert Berns, Jerry Wexler 3:00
2. “Down Home Girl” (originally released on The Rolling Stones No. 2) Jerry Leiber, Arthur Butler 4:13
3. You Can’t Catch Me” (originally released on The Rolling Stones No. 2) Chuck Berry 3:40
4. Heart of Stone Jagger, Richards 2:49
5. “What a Shame” (originally released on The Rolling Stones No. 2) Jagger, Richards 3:06
6. Mona (I Need You Baby)” (originally released on The Rolling Stones) Ellas McDaniel 3:35
Side two
No. Title Writer(s) Length
7. Down the Road Apiece” (originally released on The Rolling Stones No. 2) Don Raye 2:56
8. “Off the Hook” (originally released on The Rolling Stones No. 2) Jagger, Richards 2:36
9. “Pain in My Heart” (originally released on The Rolling Stones No. 2) Allen Toussaint 2:12
10. “Oh Baby (We Got a Good Thing Goin’)” Barbara Lynn Ozen 2:06
11. Little Red Rooster Willie Dixon 3:04
12. “Surprise, Surprise” 2:29

Personnel[edit]

The Rolling Stones[edit]

Additional personnel[edit]

Chart positions[edit]

Album
Year Chart Position
1965 Billboard 200[4] 5
Singles
Year Single Chart Position
1965 “Heart of Stone” The Billboard Hot 100[5] 19

Certifications[edit]

Country Provider Certification
(sales thresholds)
United States RIAA Gold

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jump up to:a b Richie Unterberger. “The Rolling Stones, Now! – The Rolling Stones | Songs, Reviews, Credits, Awards”. AllMusic. Retrieved 2014-06-13.
  2. Jump up^ “#180 The Rolling Stones, Now!”. Rolling Stone. 1 November 2003. Retrieved 18 June 2013.
  3. Jump up^ Walsh, Christopher (24 August 2002). “Super audio CDs: The Rolling Stones Remastered”. Billboard. Billboard. p. 27.
  4. Jump up^ Stephen Thomas Erlewine. “The Rolling Stones | Awards”. AllMusic. Retrieved 2014-06-13.
  5. Jump up^ Stephen Thomas Erlewine. “The Rolling Stones | Awards”. AllMusic. Retrieved 2014-06-13.

External links[edit]

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Woody Allen Videos

Woody Allen – Concerto Parigi 1996 – Wild Man Blues

Woody Allen & The Eddy Davis New Orleans Jazz Band

I have spent alot of time talking about Woody Allen films on this blog and looking at his worldview. He has a hopelessmeaningless, nihilistic worldview that believes we are going to turn to dust and there is no afterlife. Even though he has this view he has taken the opportunity to look at the weaknesses of his own secular view. I salute him for doing that. That is why I have returned to his work over and over and presented my own Christian worldview as an alternative.

My interest in Woody Allen is so great that I have a “Woody Wednesday” on my blog www.thedailyhatch.org every week. Also I have done over 30 posts on the historical characters mentioned in his film “Midnight in Paris.” (Salvador Dali, Ernest Hemingway,T.S.Elliot,  Cole Porter,Paul Gauguin,  Luis Bunuel, and Pablo Picasso were just a few of the characters.)

Woody Allen interviews Billy Graham pt.1 – Featured Video – GodTube Logged In.flv

Woody Allen interviews Billy Graham pt.2 – Featured Video – GodTube Logged In.flv


October 25, 2011
Woody Allen and evangelicals: A surprisingly romantic pair

REMO CASILLI REUTERS Director Woody Allen looks on during the shooting of his movie “The Bop Decameron” in downtown Rome … Continued

by Michelle Boorstein

 

REMO CASILLI

REUTERS

Director Woody Allen looks on during the shooting of his movie “The Bop Decameron” in downtown Rome July 25, 2011.

Earlier this year I was sitting at a cafeteria lunch table with evangelical icon Chuck Colson and some of his close faith advisors when the conversation took a turn I hadn’t predicted: Colson started talking about Woody Allen.

In detail.

It turned out Colson and some others at the table, who help him craft theological writings and classes, are hard-core fans of Allen, and were easily able to recite bits of dialogue. A debate launched about the religious subtexts of various Allen films and what were the moviemaker’s own theological conclusions.

It was only when my regular chats with Southern Baptist leader Richard Land began turning to Allen that I got curious — what’s the deal with evangelicals and Woody Allen?

It turned out that I was clueless to a fascination that now makes perfect sense, since Allen marries two things core to modern-day evangelicals: popular culture and religion. Think “Crimes and Misdemeanors” and the symbolism of the rabbi going blind; think “Match Point” and questions raised about the apparent randomness of life.

Many of Allen’s films wrestle in a complex way with core moral themes, such as the nature of forgiveness, what to do with sin, whether life can have any meaning without God. And he does this as an agnostic.

Land is also a huge Allen fan and can rattle off an amazing amout of dialogue. You can’t get the guy off the phone once he starts talking Woody.

This evangelical-Allen thing reappeared the other day when some friends on Facebook started zapping around an amazing piece of vintage talk-show footage — Allen interviewing evangelical leader Billy Graham (it’s in two parts).

I haven’t been able to determine what show Allen was hosting (he declined to be interviewed), but it looks to be the 1960s, with a wise-guy, 30-something Allen engaging the handsome, older preacher about sex, drugs and life after death.

Allen: “If you come to one of my movies or something, I’ll go to one of your revival meetings.”

Graham: “Well now that is a deal.”

Allen: “You could probably convert me because I’m such a pushover. I have no convictions in any direction and if you make it appealing and promise me some sort of wonderful afterlife with a white robe and wings I would go for it.”

Graham: “I can’t promise you a white robe and wings, but I can promise you a very interesting, thrilling life.”

Allen: “One wing, maybe?”

The off-camera audience is cracking up the entire time, and both men are smiling and relaxed through the 10-minute interview even as they clearly aren’t seriously entertaining the other’s views. It’s entertainment, but it’s also sweet, particularly on Graham’s part, which results in a piece of footage that manages to be both deep and silly (this is not easy to pull off).

The primary feeling I had watching the video was one of nostalgia for a time when the subject of religion wasn’t so firmly planted at the center of a culture war, when people of totally different convictions about matters of life and death and morality could agree to disagree. It seemed almost romantic.

It seems impossible to imagine. Can anyone think of a comparable exchange today? I considered The Daily Show but even that seems too slick.

In the interview Allen is dorky and giggly – he almost seems like a teenager embarassed to ask about dating.

Could he have sex before marriage, he asks Graham, to ensure that his betrothed isn’t “an absolute yo-yo?” Graham turns fatherly, but not dogmatic; “that won’t happen to you,” he assures Allen.

Graham’s framing of the role of faith is decidedly secular, perhaps aimed at Allen’s audience. The purpose of the religious doctrine and rules is because God wants you to have “the best of life .. happiness and fulfillment.” The ban on sex outside a committed marriage, he says, is to protect your psychological self, to keep your body free from disease.

I asked Land to look at the videos and he commented that the wise-cracking Woody of the 1960s seemed to have “less swagger in his agnosticism” than the Woody who created the characters of “Crimes and Misdemeanors” in the 1980s, with their agonizing over mortality and purpose.

“I find Woody over the years, and of course this is true of people as they get older, there is more resignation,” he said. “There is a light touch and a confidence in his earlier movies — I’m not dead, I won’t die for a long time so I have a long time to figure this all out. Some of his more recent movies, you can see he’s aware of his own mortality.”

Land is sure he sees an Allen less confident.

“He asks all the right questions, he just doesn’t have the right answers,” Land said with a chuckle.

In trying to find the source of the clip I stumbled on a 2010 interview with Allen in which he seems to reference the Graham chat and shows that he hasn’t changed his mind a bit. He still has no faith in any higher power and says Graham is “delusional.”

Speaking of characters in his new movie, Allen says “sooner or later, reality sets in in a crushing way. As it does and will with everybody, including Billy Graham. But it’s nice if you can delude yourself for as long as possible.”

It’s hard for me to imagine a talk being the two men being as light-hearted today.

 

 

More on: 2011, Billy Graham, Chuck Colson, Culture War, Evangelical Leader, Faith, Religion, Religious Doctrine, Richard Land, Woody Allen

 

Woody Allen about meaning and truth of life on Earth

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Woody Allen interview 1971 PART 2/4

Woody Allen interview 1971 PART 1/4

Dick & Woody talk about food & health

Woody Allen vs William Buckley – FUNNY

Dick & Woody discuss particle physics

This is not my list:

 

10

 

Small Time Crooks 10

9

7
Zelig
1983

Zelig

6

Sleeper
1973

Take the Money and Run
1969

WOODY ALLEN TAKE THE MONEY AND RUN CELLO MARCHING BAND SCENE

Bananas
1971
Bananas (1971) – Trailer

2

Play it Again, Sam
1972

Play It Again, Sam trailer

1

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“Midnight in Paris” one of Woody Allen’s biggest movie hits in recent years, July 18, 2011 – 6:00 am

(Part 32, Jean-Paul Sartre)July 10, 2011 – 5:53 am

 (Part 29, Pablo Picasso) July 7, 2011 – 4:33 am

(Part 28,Van Gogh) July 6, 2011 – 4:03 am

(Part 27, Man Ray) July 5, 2011 – 4:49 am

(Part 26,James Joyce) July 4, 2011 – 5:55 am

(Part 25, T.S.Elliot) July 3, 2011 – 4:46 am

(Part 24, Djuna Barnes) July 2, 2011 – 7:28 am

(Part 23,Adriana, fictional mistress of Picasso) July 1, 2011 – 12:28 am

(Part 22, Silvia Beach and the Shakespeare and Company Bookstore) June 30, 2011 – 12:58 am

(Part 21,Versailles and the French Revolution) June 29, 2011 – 5:34 am

(Part 16, Josephine Baker) June 24, 2011 – 5:18 am

(Part 15, Luis Bunuel) June 23, 2011 – 5:37 am

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MUSIC MONDAY 1965 full album “The Rolling Stones No. 2”

The Rolling Stones – No. 2 [1965]

Published on Apr 14, 2016

Support us : http://bit.ly/1NveQuH

0:00 Everybody Needs Somebody To Love (Version 1)
5:04 Down Home Girl
9:18 You Can’t Catch Me
12:58 Time Is On My Side (Version 2)
15:58 What A Shame
19:05 Grown Up Wrong
21:11 Down The Road Apiece
24:07 Under The Boardwalk
26:55 I Can’t Be Satisfied
30:22 Pain In My Heart
32:35 Off The Hook
35:11 Susie Q
37:02 Surprise, Surprise
39:33 Everybody Needs Somebody To Love (Version 2)

The Rolling Stones Flip Wallet Case
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The Rolling Stones No. 2

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Rolling Stones No. 2
TheRollingStonesNumber2.jpg
Studio album by The Rolling Stones
Released 15 January 1965
Recorded 10–11 June 1964 Chess Studios, Chicago, Illinois, United States; 2 and 28–29 September 1964 Regent Sound Studios, London, United Kingdom; 2 November 1964 RCA Studios, Hollywood, California, United States; and 8 November 1964 Chess Studios, Chicago, Illinois, United States
Genre
Length 36:58
Language English
Label Decca
Producer Andrew Loog Oldham
The Rolling Stones British chronology
The Rolling Stones
(1964)
The Rolling Stones No. 2
(1965)
Out of Our Heads
(1965)
Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 4.5/5 stars[1]

The Rolling Stones No. 2 is the second UK album by the Rolling Stones released in 1965 following the massive success of 1964’s debut The Rolling Stones. It followed its predecessor’s tendency to largely feature R&Bcovers. However, it does contain three compositions from the still-developing Mick Jagger/Keith Richards songwriting team. On Dutch and German pressings of the album, the title is listed as The Rolling Stones Vol. 2 on the front cover, although the back of the album cover lists the title as The Rolling Stones No. 2.

Using the cover shot for 12 X 5, the second US-released album in October 1964, The Rolling Stones No. 2′s track listing would largely be emulated on the upcoming US release of The Rolling Stones, Now!. While Eric Easton was co-credited as producer alongside Andrew Loog Oldham on The Rolling Stones’ debut album, Oldham takes full production duties for The Rolling Stones No, 2, which was recorded sporadically in the UK and US during 1964.

A huge hit in the UK upon release, The Rolling Stones No. 2 spent 10 weeks at No. 1 in early 1965, becoming one of the year’s biggest sellers in the UK.

According to Bill Wyman in his book Stone Alone: The Story of a Rock’N’Roll Band, John Lennon said of The Rolling Stones No. 2: “The album’s great, but I don’t like five-minute numbers.”

Due to ABKCO’s preference towards the American albums, they overlooked both The Rolling Stones and The Rolling Stones No. 2 for CD release in 1986 and during its remastering series in 2002. Consequently, the album was out of print for many years and was thus widely bootlegged by collectors.

The Rolling Stones No. 2 was again made available to the public as part of a limited edition vinyl box set, titled “The Rolling Stones 1964–1969”, in November 2010 and (by itself) digitally at the same time. The original title was also re-instated as part of the ‘Rolling Stones in Mono’ cd box set, released on September 30th 2016.

Track listing[edit]

Side one
No. Title Writer(s) Length
1. Everybody Needs Somebody to Love Solomon Burke, Bert Berns, Jerry Wexler 5:03
2. “Down Home Girl” Jerry Leiber, Arthur Butler 4:11
3. You Can’t Catch Me Chuck Berry 3:38
4. Time Is on My Side” (the “guitar intro” version, not the “organ intro” version from 12 X 5) Norman Meade 2:58
5. “What a Shame” Mick Jagger, Keith Richards 3:03
6. “Grown Up Wrong” (originally released on 12 X 5) Mick Jagger, Keith Richards 1:50
Side two
No. Title Writer(s) Length
7. Down the Road Apiece Don Raye 2:55
8. Under the Boardwalk” (originally released on 12 X 5) Arthur Resnick, Kenny Young 2:48
9. “I Can’t Be Satisfied” Muddy Waters 3:26
10. “Pain in My Heart” Allen Toussaint 2:11
11. “Off the Hook” Mick Jagger, Keith Richards 2:38
12. Susie Q” (originally released on 12 X 5) Dale Hawkins, Stan Lewis, Eleanor Broadwater 1:51

Personnel[edit]

The Rolling Stones
Additional personnel

Chart positions[edit]

Year Chart Position
1965 UK Top 40 Albums[2] 1
1965 French SNEP Albums Charts[3] 45

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Beatles for Sale by The Beatles
Beatles for Sale by The Beatles
The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan by Bob Dylan
UK Albums Chart number-one album
6 February 1965 – 27 February 1965
6 March 1965 – 17 April 1965
24 April 1965 – 1 May 1965
Succeeded by
Beatles for Sale by The Beatles
The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan by Bob Dylan
Beatles for Sale by The Beatles

 

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MUSIC MONDAY The Rolling Stones 2nd album “12 x 5”

__

Rolling Stones 1964 12×5 2006 Japan MiniLP Remastered full album

12 X 5

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
12 X 5
12x5(Rolling Stones Album) coverart.jpg
Studio album by The Rolling Stones
Released 17 October 1964
Recorded 25 February, 12 May, 10–11 and 24–26 June, 2 and 28–29 September 1964; Chess, Chicago, Illinois, United States and Regent Sound Studios, London, United Kingdom
Genre Blues rock, rock
Length 31:10
Language English
Label London Decca, Abkco
Producer Andrew Loog Oldham
The Rolling Stones American chronology
The Rolling Stones (England’s Newest Hit Makers)
(1964)
12 X 5
(1964)
The Rolling Stones, Now!
(1965)

12 X 5 is the second American album by The Rolling Stones, released in 1964 following the massive success of their debut The Rolling Stones in the UK and the promising sales of its American substitute, The Rolling Stones (England’s Newest Hit Makers).

Composition[edit]

The album, like its predecessor, largely featured R&B covers; however, it does contain three compositions from the still-developing Mick Jagger/Keith Richards songwriting team, as well as two group compositions under the pseudonym of “Nanker Phelge“. 12 X 5 is notable for featuring the first, and less-often-heard, of the Stones’ two versions of Jerry Ragovoy‘s “Time Is on My Side“, with a prominent electronic organ part instead of the better-known version’s electric guitar.

After a series of sessions in Chicago in June 1964, The Rolling Stones’ UK label Decca Records released the five-song EP Five by Five. Because EPs were never a lucrative format in the US, London Records—their American distributor at the time—spread the EP songs across an entire album, adding seven new recordings to create a release of 12 songs by five musicians, hence the album’s title. The rest of the songs were singles “It’s All Over Now” and “Time Is on My Side” with their B-sides, plus three songs that were later included on The Rolling Stones No. 2 album. Decca would use the same cover (minus the lettering) for The Rolling Stones’ second UK album The Rolling Stones No. 2 in early 1965.

Remastered version[edit]

In August 2002, 12 X 5 was reissued in a new remastered CD and SACD digipak by ABKCO Records. This edition includes stereo versions of “Around and Around”, “Confessin’ the Blues”, “Empty Heart”, “It’s All Over Now”, an extended version of “2120 South Michigan Avenue”, and “If You Need Me”.[1]

Track listing[edit]

Side one
No. Title Writer(s) Length
1. Around and Around” (originally released on the Five by Five EP) Chuck Berry 3:03
2. “Confessin’ the Blues” (originally released on the Five by Five EP) Jay McShann, Walter Brown 2:46
3. “Empty Heart” (originally released on the Five by Five EP) Nanker Phelge 2:35
4. Time Is on My Side Norman Meade 2:50
5. “Good Times, Bad Times” Mick Jagger, Keith Richards 2:32
6. It’s All Over Now Bobby Womack, Shirley Womack 3:27
Side two
No. Title Writer(s) Length
7. 2120 South Michigan Avenue” (originally released on the Five by Five EP) Nanker Phelge 2:03
8. Under the Boardwalk Arthur Resnick, Kenny Young 2:48
9. “Congratulations” Mick Jagger, Keith Richards 2:28
10. “Grown Up Wrong” Mick Jagger, Keith Richards 2:04
11. If You Need Me” (originally released on the Five by Five EP) Robert Bateman, Wilson Pickett 2:03
12. Susie Q Eleanor Broadwater, Stan Lewis, Dale Hawkins 1:51

Note

  • The 2002 CD edition features an extended version of “2120 South Michigan Avenue”, at 3:41

Personnel[edit]

The Rolling Stones[edit]

Additional musicians[edit]

Chart positions[edit]

12 X 5 proved to be a faster seller than England’s Newest Hit Makers, reaching No. 3 and going gold quickly.

Album
Year Chart Position
1964 Billboard 200[3] 3
Singles
Year Single Chart Position
1964 “It’s All Over Now” Billboard Hot 100[3] 26
1964 “Time Is on My Side” Billboard Hot 100[3] 6

Certifications[edit]

Country Provider Certification
(sales thresholds)
United States RIAA Gold

References[edit]

  1. Jump up^ Walsh, Christopher (24 August 2002). “Super audio CDs: The Rolling Stones Remastered”. Billboard. Billboard. p. 27.
  2. Jump up^ If You Need Me – Lyrics
  3. ^ Jump up to:a b c “The Rolling Stones – Awards”. Allmusic. Retrieved 28 May 2013.

External links[edit]

 

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MUSIC MONDAY The Rolling Stones first album

__

The Rolling Stones Debut Album

Published on Aug 27, 2016

Released 16 April 1964
Recorded 3 January – 25 February 1964 at Regent Studios, London
Recorded at Regent Sound Studios in London over the course of five days in January and February 1964, The Rolling Stones was produced by then-managers Andrew Loog Oldham and Eric Easton. The album was originally released by Decca Records in the UK, while the US version appeared on the London Records label.

The majority of the tracks reflect the band’s love for R&B. Mick Jagger and Keith Richards (whose professional name until 1978 omitted the “s” in his surname) were fledgling songwriters during early 1964, contributing only one original composition to the album: “Tell Me (You’re Coming Back)”. Two songs are credited to “Nanker Phelge” – a pseudonym the band used for group compositions from 1963 to 1965. Phil Spector and Gene Pitney both contributed to the recording sessions, and are referred to as “Uncle Phil and Uncle Gene” in the subtitle of the Phelge instrumental “Now I’ve Got a Witness.”

First pressings of the album, with matrix numbers ending in 1A, 2A, 1B, and 2B, have a 2:52 version of “Tell Me (You’re Coming Back)”, which was pressed from the wrong master tape. Subsequent pressings include the 4:06 version. Early labels and covers also have misprints with the fourth track on side 1 listed as “Mona”, which was later changed to “I Need You Baby””, the subtitle of “Now I’ve Got a Witness” written “Like Uncle Gene and Uncle Phil”, the word ‘If’ omitted from “You Can Make It If You Try”, and ‘Dozier’ spelt ‘Bozier’. “Route 66” is listed as “(Get Your Kicks On) Route 66” on some versions of the album, and some later versions of the album have “I Need You Baby” listed as “Mona (I Need You Baby)” and the subtitles of “Now I’ve Got a Witness” and “Tell Me (You’re Coming Back)” removed entirely.

The album cover photo was taken by Nicholas Wright. The cover bears no title or identifying information other than the photo and the Decca logo – an “unheard of” design concept originated by manager Andrew Oldham.[3][4]

Upon its release, The Rolling Stones became one of 1964’s biggest sellers in the UK, staying at No. 1 for twelve weeks.

The original British version is out-of-print on CD. In November 2010, it was made available as part of a limited edition vinyl box set titled The Rolling Stones 1964–1969, and by itself digitally at the same time. The album was only released in mono in both the UK and US; no true stereo mix was ever made.

The Rolling Stones (album)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
For the EP, see The Rolling Stones (EP).
The Rolling Stones
RS64.jpg
Studio album by The Rolling Stones
Released 16 April 1964
Recorded 3 January – 25 February 1964 at Regent Studios, London
Genre
Length 33:24
Language English
Label Decca
Producer Eric Easton, Andrew Loog Oldham
The Rolling Stones British chronology
The Rolling Stones
(1964)
The Rolling Stones No. 2
(1965)
Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 4.5/5 stars[1]

The Rolling Stones is the debut album by The Rolling Stones, released by Decca Records in the UK on 16 April 1964. The American edition of the LP, with a slightly different track list, came out on London Records on 30 May 1964, subtitled England’s Newest Hit Makers, which later became its official title.

The album is included in Robert Dimery’s 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die.[2]

Recording and releases[edit]

Recorded at Regent Sound Studios in London over the course of five days in January and February 1964, The Rolling Stones was produced by then-managers Andrew Loog Oldham and Eric Easton. The album was originally released by Decca Records in the UK, while the US version appeared on the London Records label.

The majority of the tracks reflect the band’s love for R&B. Mick Jagger and Keith Richards (whose professional name until 1978 omitted the “s” in his surname) were fledgling songwriters during early 1964, contributing only one original composition to the album: “Tell Me (You’re Coming Back)“. Two songs are credited to “Nanker Phelge” – a pseudonym the band used for group compositions from 1963 to 1965. Phil Spector and Gene Pitney both contributed to the recording sessions, and are referred to as “Uncle Phil and Uncle Gene” in the subtitle of the Phelge instrumental “Now I’ve Got a Witness.”

First pressings of the album, with matrix numbers ending in 1A, 2A, 1B, and 2B, have a 2:52 version of “Tell Me (You’re Coming Back)”, which was pressed from the wrong master tape. Subsequent pressings include the 4:06 version. Early labels and covers also have misprints with the fourth track on side 1 listed as “Mona”, which was later changed to “I Need You Baby””, the subtitle of “Now I’ve Got a Witness” written “Like Uncle Gene and Uncle Phil”, the word ‘If’ omitted from “You Can Make It If You Try“, and ‘Dozier’ spelt ‘Bozier’. “Route 66” is listed as “(Get Your Kicks On) Route 66” on some versions of the album, and some later versions of the album have “I Need You Baby” listed as “Mona (I Need You Baby)” and the subtitles of “Now I’ve Got a Witness” and “Tell Me (You’re Coming Back)” removed entirely.

The album cover photo was taken by Nicholas Wright. The cover bears no title or identifying information other than the photo and the Decca logo – an “unheard of” design concept originated by manager Andrew Oldham.[3][4]

Upon its release, The Rolling Stones became one of 1964’s biggest sellers in the UK, staying at No. 1 for twelve weeks.

The original British version is out-of-print on CD. In November 2010, it was made available as part of a limited edition vinyl box set titled The Rolling Stones 1964–1969, and by itself digitally at the same time. The original title was also re-instated as part of the Rolling Stones in Mono CD box set, released on September 30, 2016. The album was only released in mono in both the UK and US; no true stereo mix was ever made.

Track listing[edit]

Side one
No. Title Writer(s) Length
1. Route 66 Bobby Troup 2:20
2. I Just Want to Make Love to You Willie Dixon 2:17
3. “Honest I Do” Jimmy Reed 2:09
4. I Need You Baby Ellas McDaniel 3:33
5. “Now I’ve Got a Witness (Like Uncle Phil and Uncle Gene)” Nanker Phelge 2:29
6. Little by Little Nanker Phelge, Phil Spector 2:39
Side two
No. Title Writer(s) Length
7. I’m a King Bee James Moore 2:35
8. Carol Chuck Berry 2:33
9. Tell Me (You’re Coming Back) Mick Jagger, Keith Richards 4:05
10. Can I Get a Witness Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier, Eddie Holland 2:55
11. You Can Make It If You Try Ted Jarrett 2:01
12. Walking the Dog Rufus Thomas 3:10

American release[edit]

The Rolling Stones
(England’s Newest Hit Makers)
RollingStones.album.cover.jpg
Studio album by The Rolling Stones
Released 30 May 1964
Recorded 3 January – 25 February 1964, Regent Studios, London
Genre Rock and roll, rhythm and blues
Length 31:05
Language English
Label London
Producer Eric Easton and Andrew Loog Oldham
The Rolling Stones American chronology
The Rolling Stones (England’s Newest Hit Makers)
(1964)
12 X 5
(1964)
Singles from The Rolling Stones (England’s Newest Hit Makers)
  1. Not Fade Away“/”I Wanna Be Your Man“”
    Released: 6 March 1964
  2. Tell Me/”I Just Want to Make Love to You“”
    Released: 13 June 1964
Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 4.5/5 stars[1]

The American version of the album, originally subtitled but later officially called England’s Newest Hit Makers, is the band’s debut American album and was released by London Records on 30 May 1964, a month and a half after the British version.

The track “Not Fade Away” (the A-side of the band’s third UK single) replaced “I Need You Baby“,[5] and the titles of the tracks “Now I’ve Got a Witness (Like Uncle Phil and Uncle Gene)” and “Tell Me (You’re Coming Back)” were shortened to “Now I’ve Got a Witness” and “Tell Me” on most versions of the American release. Upon its release, The Rolling Stones reached No. 11 in the US, going gold in the process. To date, this is the Stones’ only American studio album that has failed to place in the top five on the Billboard album charts.[6]

In August 2002, the album, by now officially called England’s Newest Hit Makers, was reissued as a new remastered CD and SACD digipak by ABKCO.[7]

Track listing[edit]

Side one
No. Title Writer(s) Length
1. Not Fade Away Buddy Holly, Norman Petty 1:48
2. “Route 66” Bobby Troup 2:20
3. “I Just Want to Make Love to You” Willie Dixon 2:17
4. “Honest I Do” Jimmy Reed 2:09
5. “Now I’ve Got a Witness” Nanker Phelge 2:29
6. “Little by Little” Nanker Phelge, Phil Spector 2:39
Side two
No. Title Writer(s) Length
7. “I’m a King Bee” James Moore 2:35
8. “Carol” Chuck Berry 2:33
9. “Tell Me” Mick Jagger, Keith Richards 4:05
10. “Can I Get a Witness” Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier, Eddie Holland 2:55
11. “You Can Make It If You Try” Ted Jarrett 2:01
12. “Walking the Dog” Rufus Thomas 3:10

Personnel[edit]

The Rolling Stones
  • Mick Jagger – lead and backing vocals, harmonica on “Little by Little” and “I’m a King Bee”, percussion
  • Keith Richards – guitar, backing vocals
  • Brian Jones – guitar, harmonica, percussion, backing vocals, co-lead vocals on “Walking The Dog”
  • Bill Wyman – bass guitar, backing vocals
  • Charlie Watts – drums, percussion
Additional musicians

Charts and certifications[edit]

Charts[edit]

Album

Chart (1964–65) Peak
position
Australia (Kent Music Report)[8] 1
German Albums (Offizielle Top 100)[9] 2
UK Albums (OCC)[10] 1
US Billboard 200[11] 11

Singles

Year Single Chart Position
1964 “Not Fade Away” UK Singles (OCC)[10] 3
Billboard Hot 100[11] 48
“Tell Me” Billboard Hot 100[11] 24

Certifications[edit]

Region Certification Certified units/Sales
Canada (Music Canada)[12] Platinum 100,000^
United States (RIAA)[13] Gold 500,000^
*sales figures based on certification alone
^shipments figures based on certification alone

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jump up to:a b Richie Unterberger (1964-05-30). “The Rolling Stones (England’s Newest Hit Makers) – The Rolling Stones | Songs, Reviews, Credits, Awards”. AllMusic. Retrieved 2013-10-06.
  2. Jump up^ ^ Robert Dimery; Michael Lydon (23 March 2010). 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die: Revised and Updated Edition. Universe. ISBN 978-0-7893-2074-2.
  3. Jump up^ Wyman, Bill (2002). Rolling With the Stones. DK Publishing. p. 111. ISBN 0-7894-9998-3.
  4. Jump up^ Oldham, Andrew Loog (2000). Stoned. St. Martin’s Griffin. p. 327. ISBN 0-312-27094-1.
  5. Jump up^ McPherson, Ian. “The Rolling Stones’ Complete Discography Part I: 1963–1965”. Retrieved 25 February 2008.
  6. Jump up^ “The Rolling Stones – Chart History”. Billboard. Retrieved 26 March 2016.
  7. Jump up^ Walsh, Christopher (24 August 2002). “Super audio CDs: The Rolling Stones Remastered”. Billboard. Billboard. p. 27.
  8. Jump up^ Kent, David (1993). Australian Chart Book 1970–1992 (Illustrated ed.). St. Ives, N.S.W.: Australian Chart Book. ISBN 0-646-11917-6.
  9. Jump up^ Offiziellecharts.de – The Rolling Stones – The Rolling Stones” (in German). GfK Entertainment Charts. Retrieved 11 June 2016.
  10. ^ Jump up to:a b “Rolling Stones | Artist | Official Charts”. UK Albums Chart Retrieved 11 June 2016.
  11. ^ Jump up to:a b c “The Rolling Stones – Chart history” Billboard 200 for The Rolling Stones. Retrieved 11 June 2016.
  12. Jump up^ “Canadian album certifications – The Rolling Stones”. Music Canada. Retrieved 11 June 2016.
  13. Jump up^ “American album certifications – The Rolling Stones”. Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved 11 June 2016. If necessary, click Advanced, then click Format, then select Album, then click SEARCH

External links[edit]

Preceded by
With the Beatles by The Beatles
UK Albums Chart number-one album
2 May – 25 July 1964
Succeeded by
A Hard Day’s Night by The Beatles
Preceded by
A Hard Day’s Night by The Beatles
Australian Kent Music Report number-one album
16 January – 5 February 1965
Succeeded by
Beatles for Sale by The Beatles

 

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On the cover of Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band Album there were many individuals that were historical figures that changed history. Many of these individuals had died before the release June 1, 1967 of the album. Aldous Huxley was a major figure in the drug culture and he had died on November 22, 1963. Aleister […]

Religious Songs That Secular People Can Love: Bob Dylan, The Byrds, Sam Cooke, Johnny Cash & Your Favorites in Music, Religion| December 15th, 2015

Religious Songs That Secular People Can Love: Bob Dylan, The Byrds, Sam Cooke, Johnny Cash & Your Favorites

Anyone with a deep affection for Western classical music probably has their share of favorite Christian music, whatever their personal beliefs. So, too, do fans of American folk, blues, and country. Some artists have covered the odd religious tune as part of a broad roots repertoire, like the Byrds’ cover of Bluegrass gospel legends the Louvin Brothers’ cornball “The Christian Life,” above, from 1968’s Sweetheart of the Rodeo. Though Gram Parsons, with the band for the recording of this album, had his traditional leanings, his musical religion was more “Cosmic American” than Christian. But before Parsons joined the band and turned ‘em full country rock for a time, the Byrds recorded another religious song, one of their biggest hits—Pete Seeger’s “Turn, Turn, Turn” (below), which cribs all of its lyrics verbatim from Chapter 3 of the Book of Ecclesiastes (easily the non-religious person’s favorite book of the Bible).

The Byrds – Turn! Turn! Turn!

Other American legends have turned to faith in dramatic conversions and have written earnest, original religious music. Most famously, we have the case of Bob Dylan, whose conversion to evangelical Christianity saw him proselytizing from the stage. He also wrote some beautiful songs like “Precious Angel,” at the top of the post, which he claimed was for the woman who brought him to Christianity (and which supposedly contains a dig at his ex-wife Sara for not converting him). Though it features some of the more disturbing lyrical turns Dylan has taken in his career, it’s one of my favorite tunes of his from this strange period, not least because of the brilliant guitar work of Mark Knopfler.

Farther Along – Sam Cooke & the Soul Stirrers

Whatever beliefs he’s claimed over the decades, Dylan’s music has always been religious in some sense, partly because of the American folk traditions he draws on. Almost all of the early R&B and rock and roll artists came from the folk gospel world, from Elvis to Little Richard to Jerry Lee Lewis. Notably, the golden-voiced Sam Cooke got his start as a gospel singer with several vocal groups, including his own The Soul Stirrers. The harmonies in their rendition of gospel classic “Farther Along” (above) give me chills every time I hear it, even though I don’t credit the song’s beliefs.

Johnny Cash – God’s Gonna Cut You Down

It’s a common feeling I get with American soul, blues, and country singers who moved in and out of the popular and gospel worlds. Then there are those artists who left gospel for outlaw stardom, then returned to the fold and embraced their church roots later in life. A prime example of this kind of spiritual, and musical, renewal is that of Johnny Cash. There are many sides of gospel Cash. Perhaps the most poignant of his religious recordings come from his final years. Though it suffers from some commercial overuse, Cash’s recording of blues classic “God’s Gonna Cut You Down” (often titled “Run On”), above, is equal parts menacing and haunting, a Christian-themed memento mori that caught on big with lots of secular music fans.

Soulsavers – Revival

The list of religious music that non-religious people love could go on and on. Though the examples here are explicitly Christian, they certainly don’t have to be. There’s Yusef Islam, formerly Cat Stevens, who came back to record stirring original music after his conversion to Islam, and whose powerful “Morning has Broken” moves believers and non-believers alike. There’s Bob Marley, or any number of popular Rastafarian reggae artists. Then there are more contemporary artists making religious music for largely secular audiences. One could reference indie darling Sufjan Stevens, whose religious beliefs are central to his songwriting. And there’s a favorite of mine, Mark Lanegan, former Screaming Trees singer and current rock and roll journeyman who often works with religious themes and imagery, most notably in the glorious “Revival,” above, with the Soulsavers project.

The love many non-religious people have for some religious music often comes from a religious upbringing, something singer/songwriter Iris Dement discussed in a recent interview on NPR’s Fresh Air. Dement has recorded one of the most moving renditions of a hymn I remember fondly from childhood church days: a powerfully spare version of “Leaning on the Everlasting Arms” from the 2010 True Grit soundtrack. She’s also written what may be one of the best religious songs for secular (or non-religious, or post-religious, whatever…) people. In “Let the Mystery Be,” above, Dement’s agnostic refrain expresses a very sensible attitude, in my view: “But no one knows for certain and so it’s all the same to me / I think I’ll just let the mystery be.”

These are but a few of the religious songs that move this mostly secular person. Whether you’re religious or not, what are some of your favorite religious songs that have broad crossover appeal? Feel free to name your favorites in the comments below.

Related Content:

The Religions of Bob Dylan: From Delivering Evangelical Sermons to Singing Hava Nagila With Harry Dean Stanton

Guitar Stories: Mark Knopfler on the Six Guitars That Shaped His Career

Atheist Ira Glass Believes Christians Get the Short End of the Media Stick

Josh Jones is a writer and musician based in Durham, NC. Follow him at @jdmagness

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George Harrison’s best album is possibly ALL THINGS MUST PASS

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George Harrison – ”All Things Must Pass” [Full Album]

All Things Must Pass

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This article is about the album. For other uses, see All Things Must Pass (disambiguation).
“Apple Jam” redirects here. For jam made from apples, see apple jam and apple sauce.
All Things Must Pass
All Things Must Pass 1970 cover.jpg
Studio album by George Harrison
Released 27 November 1970
Recorded 26 May–late October 1970
Studio Abbey Road Studios, London; Trident Studios, London; Apple Studio, London
Genre
Length 105:59
Label Apple
Producer George Harrison, Phil Spector
George Harrison chronology
Electronic Sound
(1969)
All Things Must Pass
(1970)
The Concert for Bangladesh
(1971)
Singles from All Things Must Pass
  1. My Sweet Lord
    Released: 23 November 1970 (US); 15 January 1971 (UK)
  2. What Is Life
    Released: 15 February 1971 (US)
Alternative cover

Album artwork of the 2001 re-release of All Things Must Pass

All Things Must Pass is a triple album by English musician George Harrison. Recorded and released in 1970, the album was Harrison’s first solo work since the break-up of the Beatles in April that year, and his third solo album overall. It includes the hit singles “My Sweet Lord” and “What Is Life“, as well as songs such as “Isn’t It a Pity” and the title track that had been turned down for inclusion on releases by the Beatles. The album reflects the influence of Harrison’s musical activities with artists such as Bob Dylan, the Band, Delaney & Bonnie and Billy Preston during 1968–70, and his growth as an artist beyond his supporting role to former bandmates John Lennon and Paul McCartney. All Things Must Pass introduced Harrison’s signature sound, the slide guitar, and the spiritual themes that would be present throughout his subsequent solo work. The original vinyl release consisted of two LPs of songs and a third disc of informal jams, titled Apple Jam. Several commentators interpret Barry Feinstein‘s album cover photo, showing Harrison surrounded by four garden gnomes, as a statement on his independence from the Beatles.

Production began at London’s Abbey Road Studios in May 1970, with extensive overdubbing and mixing continuing through October. Among the large cast of backing musicians were Eric Clapton and Delaney & Bonnie’s Friends band – three of whom formed Derek and the Dominos with Clapton during the recording – as well as Ringo Starr, Gary Wright, Preston, Klaus Voormann, John Barham, Badfinger and Pete Drake. The sessions produced a double album’s worth of extra material, most of which remains unissued.

All Things Must Pass was critically and commercially successful on release, with long stays at number 1 on charts around the world. The album was co-produced by Phil Spector and employs his Wall of Sound production technique to notable effect; Ben Gerson of Rolling Stone described the sound as “Wagnerian, Brucknerian, the music of mountain tops and vast horizons”.[1] Reflecting the widespread surprise at the assuredness of Harrison’s post-Beatles debut, Melody Makers Richard Williams likened the album to Greta Garbo‘s first role in a talking picture and declared: “Garbo talks! – Harrison is free!”[2] According to Colin Larkin, writing in the 2011 edition of his Encyclopedia of Popular Music, All Things Must Pass is “generally rated” as the best of all the former Beatles’ solo albums.[3]

During the final year of his life, Harrison oversaw a successful reissue campaign to mark the 30th anniversary of the album’s release. Following this reissue, in March 2001, the set was certified six-times platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America. Among its appearances in critics’ best-album lists, All Things Must Pass was ranked 79th on The Times “The 100 Best Albums of All Time” in 1993, while Rolling Stone currently places it 433rd on the magazine’s “500 Greatest Albums of All Time“. In January 2014, All Things Must Pass was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame.

Background[edit]

Music journalist John Harris has identified the start of George Harrison‘s “journey” to making All Things Must Pass as his visit to America in late 1968, following the acrimonious sessions for the BeatlesWhite Album.[4] While in Woodstock in November,[5] Harrison established a long-lasting friendship with Bob Dylan[4] and experienced a creative equality among the Band that contrasted sharply with John Lennon and Paul McCartney‘s domination in the Beatles.[6][7] Coinciding with this visit was a surge in Harrison’s songwriting output,[8] following his renewed interest in the guitar, after three years spent studying the Indian sitar.[9][10] As well as being one of the few musicians to co-write songs with Dylan,[4] Harrison had recently collaborated with Eric Clapton on “Badge“,[11] which became a hit single for Cream in the spring of 1969.[12]

Billboard ad for Harrison’s Wonderwall Music soundtrack (1968)

Once back in London, and with his compositions continually overlooked for inclusion on releases by the Beatles,[13][14] Harrison found creative fulfilment in extracurricular projects that, in the words of his musical biographer, Simon Leng, served as an “emancipating force” from the restrictions imposed on him in the band.[15] His activities during 1969 included producing Apple signings Billy Preston and Doris Troy, two American singer-songwriters whose soul and gospel roots proved as influential on All Things Must Pass as the music of the Band.[16] He also recorded with artists such as Leon Russell[17] and Jack Bruce,[18] and accompanied Clapton on a short tour with Delaney Bramlett‘s soul revue, Delaney & Bonnie and Friends.[19] In addition, Harrison identified his involvement with the Hare Krishna movement as providing “another piece of a jigsaw puzzle” that represented the spiritual journey he had begun in 1966.[20] As well as embracing the Vaishnavist branch of Hinduism, Harrison produced two hit singles during 1969–70 by the UK-based devotees, credited as Radha Krishna Temple (London).[21] In January 1970,[22] Harrison invited American producer Phil Spector to participate in the recording of Lennon’s Plastic Ono Band single “Instant Karma![23][24] This association led to Spector being given the task of salvaging the Beatles’ Get Back rehearsal tapes, released officially as the Let It Be album (1970),[25][26] and later co-producing All Things Must Pass.[27]

Harrison first discussed the possibility of making a solo album of his unused songs during the ill-tempered Get Back sessions, held at Twickenham Film Studios in January 1969.[28][29][nb 1] At Abbey Road Studios on 25 February, his 26th birthday,[32] Harrison recorded demos of “All Things Must Pass” and two other compositions that had received little interest from Lennon and McCartney at Twickenham.[33][34] With the inclusion of one of these songs – “Something” – and “Here Comes the Sun” on the Beatles’ Abbey Road album in September 1969, music critics acknowledged that Harrison had bloomed into a songwriter to match Lennon and McCartney.[35][36] Although he began talking publicly about recording his own album from the autumn of 1969,[37][38] it was only after McCartney announced that he was leaving the Beatles, in April 1970, signalling the band’s break-up,[39] that Harrison committed to the idea.[40] Despite having already made Wonderwall Music (1968), a mostly instrumental soundtrack album, and the experimental Electronic Sound (1969),[41] Harrison considered All Things Must Pass to be his first solo album.[42][nb 2]

Content[edit]

Main body[edit]

I went to George’s Friar Park … and he said, “I have a few ditties for you to hear.” It was endless! He had literally hundreds of songs and each one was better than the rest. He had all this emotion built up when it was released to me.[47]

– Phil Spector, on first hearing Harrison’s backlog of songs in early 1970

Spector first heard Harrison’s stockpile of unreleased compositions early in 1970, when visiting his recently purchased home, Friar Park.[47] “It was endless!” Spector later recalled of the recital, noting the quantity and quality of Harrison’s material.[47] Harrison had accumulated songs from as far back as 1966; both “Isn’t It a Pity” and “Art of Dying” date from that year.[48] He co-wrote at least two songs with Dylan while in Woodstock,[49] one of which, “I’d Have You Anytime“, appeared on All Things Must Pass.[50] Harrison wrote “Let It Down” in late 1968 also.[51]

He introduced the Band-inspired[52] “All Things Must Pass”, along with “Hear Me Lord” and “Let It Down”, at the Beatles’ Get Back rehearsals, only to have them rejected by Lennon and McCartney.[53][54][nb 3] The tense atmosphere at Twickenham fuelled another All Things Must Pass song, “Wah-Wah“,[58] which Harrison wrote in the wake of his temporary departure from the band on 10 January 1969.[59]Run of the Mill” followed soon afterwards, its lyrics focusing on the failure of friendships within the Beatles[60] amid the business problems surrounding their Apple organisation.[61] Harrison’s musical activities outside the band during 1969 inspired other compositions on the album: “What Is Life” came to him while driving to a London session that spring for Preston’s That’s the Way God Planned It album;[62]Behind That Locked Door” was Harrison’s message of encouragement to Dylan,[63] written the night before the latter’s comeback performance at the Isle of Wight Festival;[64] and Harrison began “My Sweet Lord” as an exercise in writing a gospel song[65] during Delaney & Bonnie’s stopover in Copenhagen in December 1969.[66][nb 4]

I Dig Love” resulted from Harrison’s early experiments with slide guitar, a technique that Bramlett had introduced him to,[65] in order to cover for guitarist Dave Mason‘s departure from the Friends line-up.[69] Other songs on All Things Must Pass, all written during the first half of 1970, include “Awaiting on You All“, which reflected Harrison’s adoption of chanting through his involvement with the Hare Krishna movement;[70][71]Ballad of Sir Frankie Crisp (Let It Roll)“, a tribute to the original owner of Friar Park;[72] and “Beware of Darkness“.[73] The latter was another composition influenced by Harrison’s association with the Radha Krishna Temple,[74] and was written while some of the devotees were staying with him at Friar Park.[75]

Shortly before beginning work on All Things Must Pass, Harrison attended a Dylan session in New York on 1 May 1970,[76] during which he acquired a new song of Dylan’s, “If Not for You“.[58] Harrison wrote “Apple Scruffs“, which was one of a number of Dylan-influenced compositions on the album,[77] towards the end of production on All Things Must Pass, as a tribute to the diehard fans who had kept a vigil outside the studios where he was working.[71][78]

According to Leng, All Things Must Pass represents the completion of Harrison’s “musical-philosophical circle”, in which his 1966–68 immersion in Indian music found a Western equivalent in gospel music.[79] While identifying hard rock, country and western, and Motown among the other genres on the album, Leng writes of the “plethora of new sounds and influences” that Harrison had absorbed through 1969 and now incorporated, including “Krishna chants, gospel ecstasy, Southern blues-rock [and] slide guitar”.[80] The melodies of “Isn’t It a Pity” and “Beware of Darkness” have aspects of Indian classical music, and on “My Sweet Lord”, Harrison combined the Hindu bhajan tradition with gospel.[81] The recurrent lyrical themes on the album are Harrison’s spiritual quest, as it would be throughout his solo career,[82] and friendship, particularly the failure of relationships among the Beatles.[83][84] Rob Mitchum of Pitchfork Media describes the album as “dark-tinged Krishna folk-rock”.[85]

Apple Jam[edit]

On the original LP‘s third disc, entitled Apple Jam, four of the five tracks – “Out of the Blue”, “Plug Me In”, “I Remember Jeep” and “Thanks for the Pepperoni” – are improvised instrumentals built around minimal chord changes,[86] or in the case of “Out of the Blue”, a single-chord riff.[87] The title for “I Remember Jeep” originated from the name of Clapton’s dog, Jeep,[88] and “Thanks for the Pepperoni” came from a line on a Lenny Bruce comedy album.[89] In a December 2000 interview with Billboard magazine, Harrison explained: “For the jams, I didn’t want to just throw [them] in the cupboard, and yet at the same time it wasn’t part of the record; that’s why I put it on a separate label to go in the package as a kind of bonus.”[90][nb 5]

The only vocal selection on Apple Jam is “It’s Johnny’s Birthday”, sung to the tune of Cliff Richard‘s 1968 hit “Congratulations“, and recorded as a gift from Harrison to Lennon to mark the latter’s 30th birthday.[92] Like all the “free” tracks on the bonus disc,[93] “It’s Johnny’s Birthday” carried a Harrison songwriting credit on the original UK release of All Things Must Pass,[94] while on the first US copies, the only songwriting information on the record’s face labels was the standard inclusion of a performing rights organisation, BMI.[95] In December 1970, “Congratulations” songwriters Bill Martin and Phil Coulter claimed for royalties,[92] with the result that the composer’s credit for Harrison’s track was swiftly changed to acknowledge Martin and Coulter.[88]

Demo tracks and outtakes[edit]

Aside from the seventeen compositions issued on discs one and two of the original album,[96] Harrison recorded at least twenty other songs – either in demo form for Spector’s benefit, just before recording got officially under way in late May, or as outtakes from the sessions.[97][98] In a 1992 interview, Harrison commented on the volume of material: “I didn’t have many tunes on Beatles records, so doing an album like All Things Must Pass was like going to the bathroom and letting it out.”[99][nb 6] As well as “Wah-Wah”, “Art of Dying” and others that would soon be developed in a band setting, Harrison’s solo performance for Spector included the following songs,[100] all of which remain unreleased:[29][nb 7]

  • “Window, Window” – another composition turned down by the Beatles in January 1969[102]
  • “Everybody, Nobody” – the melody of which Harrison adapted for “Ballad of Sir Frankie Crisp”[100]
  • “Nowhere to Go” – a second Harrison–Dylan collaboration from November 1968, originally known as “When Everybody Comes to Town”[103]
  • “Cosmic Empire”, “Mother Divine” and “Tell Me What Has Happened to You”.[29][104]

Also from this performance were two tracks that Harrison returned to in later years.[97]Beautiful Girl” appeared on his 1976 album Thirty Three & 1/3,[29] and the Dylan-written “I Don’t Want to Do It” was Harrison’s contribution to the soundtrack for Porky’s Revenge! (1985).[58]

During the main sessions for All Things Must Pass, Harrison taped or routined early versions of “You“, “Try Some, Buy Some” and “When Every Song Is Sung“.[105][106] Harrison offered these three songs to Ronnie Spector in February 1971 for her proposed (and soon abandoned) solo album on Apple Records.[107] After releasing his own versions of “Try Some, Buy Some” and “You” between 1973 and 1975,[108] he offered “When Every Song Is Sung” (since retitled “I’ll Still Love You”) to former bandmate Ringo Starr for his 1976 album Ringo’s Rotogravure.[109]Woman Don’t You Cry for Me“, written in December 1969 as his first slide-guitar composition,[110] was another song that Harrison revisited on Thirty Three & 1/3.[69] Harrison included “I Live for You” as the only all-new bonus track on the 2001 reissue of All Things Must Pass.[111] “Down to the River” remained unused until he reworked it as “Rocking Chair in Hawaii[112] for his final studio album, the posthumously released Brainwashed (2002).[113]

Harrison recorded the following compositions during the All Things Must Pass sessions but they have never received an official release:[106]

Contributing musicians[edit]

That was the great thing about [the Beatles] splitting up: to be able to go off and make my own record … And also to be able to record with all these new people, which was like a breath of fresh air.[29]

– George Harrison, December 2000

The precise line-up of contributing musicians is open to conjecture.[116][117] Due to the album’s big sound and the many participants on the sessions, commentators have traditionally referred to the grand, orchestral nature of this line-up.[118][119][120] In 2002, music critic Greg Kot described it as “a who’s who of the decade’s rock royalty”,[53] while Harris writes of the cast taking on “a Cecil B. De Mille aspect”.[58]

Jim Gordon, Carl Radle, Bobby Whitlock and Eric Clapton formed Derek and the Dominos while participating in the sessions for All Things Must Pass.

The musicians included Bobby Whitlock, Jim Gordon, Carl Radle, Bobby Keys, Jim Price and Dave Mason,[121] all of whom had recently toured with Delaney & Bonnie.[122] Along with Eric Clapton, there were also musicians whose link with Harrison went back some years, such as Ringo Starr and Billy Preston, and German bassist Klaus Voormann,[123] formerly of Manfred Mann and a friend since the Beatles’ years in Hamburg.[124] Handling much of the keyboard work with Whitlock was Gary Wright,[116] who went on to collaborate regularly with Harrison throughout the 1970s.[125]

From within Apple’s stable of musicians, Harrison recruited the band Badfinger, future Yes drummer Alan White, and Beatles assistant Mal Evans on percussion.[126][127] Badfinger drummer Mike Gibbins‘ powerful tambourine work led to Spector giving him the nickname “Mr Tambourine Man”, after the Dylan song,[58] while bandmates Pete Ham, Tom Evans and Joey Molland provided rhythm acoustic-guitar parts that, in keeping with Spector’s Wall of Sound principles, were to be “felt but not heard”.[71] Orchestral arranger John Barham also sat in on the sessions, occasionally contributing on harmonium and vibraphone.[128] Other guests included Nashville pedal steel player Pete Drake, Procol Harum‘s Gary Brooker and a pre-Genesis Phil Collins.[129] An uncredited Peter Frampton played acoustic guitar on the country tracks featuring Drake.[130]

For contractual reasons, on UK pressings of All Things Must Pass, Clapton’s participation on the first two discs of the album remained unacknowledged for many years,[119][131] although he was listed among the musicians appearing on the Apple Jam disc in Britain.[132][133][nb 8] Harrison was unaware of Collins’s contribution until putting together the 30th anniversary reissue of the album in 2000,[139] at which point he offered Collins his belated thanks.[140] Clapton’s former bandmate in Cream and Blind Faith, Ginger Baker, participated in the session for “I Remember Jeep” only, according to the album’s sleeve notes.[106]

Simon Leng consulted Voormann, Barham, Molland and Delaney Bramlett for his chapter covering the making of All Things Must Pass and credits Tony Ashton as one of the keyboard players on both versions of “Isn’t It a Pity”.[141][nb 9] Unsubstantiated claims exist regarding possible guest appearances from John Lennon,[144] Maurice Gibb[145] and Pink Floyd‘s Richard Wright.[146][147] In addition, for some years after the album’s release, rumours claimed that the Band backed Harrison on the country-influenced “Behind That Locked Door”.[148]

Production[edit]

Initial recording[edit]

You could feel after the first few sessions that it was going to be a great album.[149]

– Klaus Voormann, 2003

The date for Harrison’s run-through of songs for Spector, at Abbey Road Studios, is generally thought to have been 20 May 1970, the same day as the Let It Be film’s world premiere,[150] with recording sessions beginning on 26 May.[29][98][151][nb 10] With assistance from former Beatles engineers Ken Scott and Phil McDonald,[126] Spector recorded most of the album’s backing tracks live,[153] in some cases featuring multiple drummers and keyboard players, and as many as five rhythm guitarists.[58][139]

Abbey Road Studios, where Harrison recorded much of All Things Must Pass

According to authors Chip Madinger and Mark Easter, the majority of these backing tracks were taped on 8-track at Abbey Road, with the first batch of sessions taking place from late May through to the second week of June.[154] The first song recorded was “Wah-Wah”;[155] “What Is Life”, versions one and two of “Isn’t It a Pity”, and the songs on which Drake participated, such as “All Things Must Pass” and “Ballad of Sir Frankie Crisp”, were among the other tracks taped then.[156][nb 11] The Apple Jam instrumentals “Thanks for the Pepperoni” and “Plug Me In”, featuring Harrison, Clapton and Mason each taking extended guitar solos,[160] were recorded later in June, at the Beatles’ Apple Studio, and marked the formation of Clapton, Whitlock, Radle and Gordon’s short-lived band Derek and the Dominos.[161] Harrison also contributed on guitar to both sides of the band’s debut single, “Tell the Truth[162] and “Roll It Over”,[163] which were produced by Spector and recorded at Apple on 18 June.[161][164] The eleven-minute “Out of the Blue” featured contributions from Keys and Price,[165] both of whom began working with the Rolling Stones around this time.[166]

Although Harrison had estimated in a New York radio interview that the solo album would take no more than eight weeks to complete,[167][168] recording, overdubbing and mixing on All Things Must Pass lasted for five months, until late October.[161][169] Part of the reason for this was Harrison’s need to make regular visits to Liverpool to tend to his mother, who had been diagnosed with cancer.[170][171] Participants at the recording sessions identify Spector’s erratic behaviour as another factor affecting progress on the album.[58][161][172] Harrison later referred to Spector needing “eighteen cherry brandies” before he could start work, a situation that forced much of the production duties onto Harrison alone.[58][171] In July 1970, by which time sessions had resumed at Trident Studios,[97] Spector fell over in the studio and broke his arm.[149] Early that month, work on All Things Must Pass was temporarily brought to a halt as Harrison headed north to see his dying mother for the last time.[173][nb 12] EMI‘s growing concerns regarding studio costs added to the pressure on Harrison,[149] and a further complication, John Harris notes, was that Clapton had become infatuated with Harrison’s wife, Pattie Boyd, and adopted a heroin habit as a means of coping with his guilt.[58][nb 13]

Overdubbing[edit]

In Spector’s absence, Harrison had completed the album’s backing tracks and preliminary overdubs by 12 August.[161] He then sent early mixes of many of the songs to his co-producer, who was convalescing in Los Angeles,[126] and Spector replied by letter dated 19 August with suggestions for further overdubs and final mixing.[161] Among Spector’s comments were detailed suggestions regarding “Let It Down”,[60] the released recording of which Madinger and Easter describe as “the best example of Spector running rampant with the ‘Wall of Sound'”, and an urging that he and Harrison carry out further work on the songs at the superior, 16-track Trident Studios facility.[178] Spector then returned to oversee conversion of the 8-track recordings to 16-track masters,[171] a process that allowed for more freedom when overdubbing new instruments.[126]

John Barham’s orchestrations were recorded during the next phase of the album’s production,[155] starting in early September, along with many further contributions from Harrison, such as his lead vocals, slide guitar parts and multi-tracked backing vocals (the latter credited to “the George O’Hara-Smith Singers”).[179] Leng recognises Barham’s arrangements on “pivotal” songs such as “Isn’t It a Pity”, “My Sweet Lord”, “Beware of Darkness” and “All Things Must Pass” as important elements of the album’s sound,[115] while Spector has praised Harrison’s guitar and vocal work on the overdubs, saying: “Perfectionist is not the right word. Anyone can be a perfectionist. He was beyond that …”[47] Harrison’s style of slide guitar playing incorporated aspects of both Indian music and the blues tradition;[52] from its introduction on All Things Must Pass, Leng writes, Harrison’s slide guitar became his musical signature – “as instantly recognisable as Dylan’s harmonica or Stevie Wonder‘s”.[180]

Mixing and mastering[edit]

If I were doing [All Things Must Pass] now, it would not be so produced. But it was the first record … And anybody who’s familiar with Phil [Spector]’s work – it was like Cinemascope sound.[42]

– George Harrison, January 2001

On 9 October, while carrying out final mixing at Abbey Road, Harrison presented Lennon with the recently recorded “It’s Johnny’s Birthday”.[181][nb 14] The track featured Harrison on vocals, harmonium and all other instruments, and vocal contributions from Mal Evans and assistant engineer Eddie Klein.[92] That same month, Harrison finished his production work on Starr’s 1971 single “It Don’t Come Easy“, the basic track for which they had recorded with Voormann in March at Trident.[183] Aside from his contributions to projects by Starr, Clapton, Preston and Ashton during 1970, over the following year Harrison would reciprocate the help that his fellow musicians on All Things Must Pass had given him by contributing to albums by Whitlock, Wright, Badfinger and Keys.[184][nb 15]

On 28 October, Harrison and Boyd arrived in New York, where he and Spector carried out final preparation for the album’s release, such as sequencing.[126] Harrison harboured doubts about whether all the songs they had finished were worthy of inclusion; Allan Steckler, Apple Records’ US manager, was “stunned” by the quality of the material and assured Harrison that he should issue all the songs.[29] Spector’s signature production style gave All Things Must Pass a heavy, reverb-oriented sound, which Harrison came to regret with the passage of time.[186][187][188] Outtakes from the recording sessions became available on bootlegs in the 1990s.[189] One such unofficial release, the three-disc The Making of All Things Must Pass,[190] contains multiple takes of some of the songs on the album, providing a work-in-progress on the sequence of overdubs onto the backing tracks.[155]

Artwork[edit]

Harrison commissioned Tom Wilkes to design a hinged box in which to house the three vinyl discs, rather than have them packaged in a triple gatefold cover.[88] Apple insider Tony Bramwell later recalled: “It was a bloody big thing … You needed arms like an orang-utan to carry half a dozen.”[134] The packaging caused some confusion among retailers, who, at that time, associated boxed albums with opera or classical works.[134]

The stark black-and-white cover photo was taken on the main lawn at Friar Park[71] by Wilkes’ Camouflage Productions partner, Barry Feinstein.[88] Commentators interpret the photograph – showing Harrison seated in the centre of, and towering over, four comical-looking garden gnomes – as representing his removal from the Beatles’ collective identity.[191][192] The gnomes had recently been delivered to Friar Park and placed on the lawn;[193] seeing the four figures there, and mindful of the message in the album’s title, Feinstein immediately drew parallels with Harrison’s former band.[134] Author and music journalist Mikal Gilmore has written that Lennon’s initial negativity regarding All Things Must Pass was possibly because he was “irritated” by this cover photo;[170] Harrison biographer Elliot Huntley attributes this reaction to envy on Lennon’s part during a time when “everything [Harrison] touched turned to gold”.[194][nb 16]

Apple included a poster with the album, showing Harrison in a darkened corridor of his home, standing in front of an iron-framed window.[198] Wilkes had designed a more adventurous poster, but according to Beatles author Bruce Spizer, Harrison was uncomfortable with the imagery.[199][nb 17] Some of the Feinstein photographs that Wilkes had incorporated into this original poster design appeared instead on the picture sleeves for the “My Sweet Lord” single and its follow-up, “What Is Life”.[88]

Release[edit]

Music should be used for the perception of God, not jitterbugging.[170]

– George Harrison, January 1971

EMI and its US counterpart, Capitol Records, had originally scheduled the album for release in October 1970, and advance promotion began in September.[161] An “intangible buzz” had been “in the air for months” regarding Harrison’s solo album, according to Alan Clayson, and “for reasons other than still-potent loyalty to the Fab Four”.[200] Harrison’s stature as an artist had grown over the past year through the acclaim afforded his songs on Abbey Road,[201][202] as well as the speculation caused by his and Dylan’s joint recording session in New York.[203] Noting also Harrison’s role in popularising new acts such as the Band and Delaney & Bonnie, and his association with Clapton and Cream, NME critic Bob Woffinden concluded in 1981: “All in all, Harrison’s credibility was building to a peak.”[201]

Trade ad for the “What Is Life” single, February 1971

All Things Must Pass was released on 27 November 1970 in the United States, and on 30 November in Britain,[197] with the rare distinction of having the same Apple catalogue number (STCH 639) in both countries.[93] Often credited as rock‘s first triple album,[170] it was the first triple set of previously unissued music by a single act, the multi-artist Woodstock live album having preceded it by six months.[171] Adding to the commercial appeal of Harrison’s songs, Clayson writes, All Things Must Pass appeared at a time when religion and spirituality had become “a turn-of-the-decade craze” among Western youth, just as the Twist had been in 1960.[204] Another factor behind the album’s first weeks of release was Harrison’s meeting with McCartney in New York,[197] the failure of which led to McCartney filing suit in London’s High Court to dissolve the Beatles’ legal partnership.[205]

Apple issued “My Sweet Lord” as the album’s first single, as a double A-side with “Isn’t It a Pity” in the majority of countries.[206] It was highly successful,[202] topping singles charts around the world during the first few months of 1971,[71]on its way to becoming the most performed song of that year.[207][nb 18] Discussing the song’s cultural impact, Gilmore credits “My Sweet Lord” with being “as pervasive on radio and in youth consciousness as anything the Beatles had produced”.[170] Issued in February 1971, the second single, “What Is Life” backed with “Apple Scruffs”,[209] was also successful.[210]

All Things Must Pass was number 1 on the UK’s official albums chart for eight weeks, although until 2006, chart records incorrectly stated that it had peaked at number 4.[211][nb 19] On Melody Makers national chart, the album was also number 1 for eight weeks, from 6 February to 27 March, six of which coincided with “My Sweet Lord” topping the magazine’s singles chart.[212] In America, All Things Must Pass spent seven weeks at number 1 on the Billboard Top LP’s chart, from 2 January until 20 February, and a similarly long period atop the listings compiled by Cash Box and Record World;[213] for three of those weeks, “My Sweet Lord” held the top spot on the Billboard Hot 100.[214] Writing in the April 2001 issue of Record Collector, managing editor Peter Doggett described Harrison as “arguably the most successful rock star on the planet” at the start of 1971, with All Things Must Pass “easily outstripping other solo Beatles projects later in the year, such as [McCartney’s] Ram and [Lennon’s] Imagine“.[215] Harrison’s so-called “Billboard double” – whereby one artist simultaneously holds the top positions on the magazine’s albums and singles listings – was a feat that none of his former bandmates equalled until Paul McCartney and Wings repeated the achievement in June 1973.[216][nb 20] At the 1972 Grammy Awards, All Things Must Pass was nominated for Album of the Year and “My Sweet Lord” for Record of the Year, but Harrison lost out in both categories to Carole King.[218][219]

All Things Must Pass was awarded a gold disc by the Recording Industry Association of America on 17 December 1970[220] and it has since been certified six times platinum.[213][221] According to John Bergstrom of PopMatters, as of January 2011, All Things Must Pass had sold more than Imagine and McCartney and Wings’ Band on the Run (1973) combined.[222] Also writing in 2011, Lennon and Harrison biographer Gary Tillery describes it as “the most successful album ever released by an ex-Beatle”.[223] In his 2004 book The 100 Best-Selling Albums of the 70s, Hamish Champ ranks it as the 36th best-selling album of that decade.[224]

Critical reception[edit]

Contemporary reviews[edit]

All Things Must Pass received almost universal critical acclaim on release – as much for the music and lyrical content as for the fact that, of all the former Beatles, it was the work of supposed junior partner George Harrison.[2][187][225] Beatles author Robert Rodriguez has written of critics’ attention being centred on “a major talent unleashed, one who’d been hidden in plain sight all those years” behind Lennon and McCartney.[226] “That the Quiet Beatle was capable of such range,” Rodriguez continues, “from the joyful ‘What Is Life’ to the meditative ‘Isn’t It a Pity’ to the steamrolling ‘Art of Dying’ to the playful ‘I Dig Love’ – was revelatory.”[226] Most reviewers tended to discount the third disc of studio jams, accepting that it was a “free” addition to justify the set’s high retail price,[86][132]although Anthony DeCurtis recognises Apple Jam as further evidence of the album’s “bracing air of creative liberation”.[227]

Ben Gerson of Rolling Stone deemed All Things Must Pass “both an intensely personal statement and a grandiose gesture, a triumph over artistic modesty” and referenced the three-record set as an “extravaganza of piety and sacrifice and joy, whose sheer magnitude and ambition may dub it the War and Peace of rock and roll”.[1] Gerson also lauded the album’s production as being “of classic Spectorian proportions, Wagnerian, Brucknerian, the music of mountain tops and vast horizons”.[1] In the NME, Alan Smith referred to Harrison’s songs as “music of the mind”, adding: “they search and they wander, as if in the soft rhythms of a dream, and in the end he has set them to words which are often both profound and profoundly beautiful.”[94] Billboard magazine hailed All Things Must Pass as “a masterful blend of rock and piety, technical brilliance and mystic mood, and relief from the tedium of everyday rock”.[228]

Melody Makers Richard Williams summed up the surprise many felt at Harrison’s apparent transformation: All Things Must Pass, he said, provided “the rock equivalent of the shock felt by pre-war moviegoers when Garbo first opened her mouth in a talkie: Garbo talks! – Harrison is free!”[2] In another review, for The Times, Williams opined that, of all the Beatles’ solo releases thus far, Harrison’s album “makes far and away the best listening, perhaps because it is the one which most nearly continues the tradition they began eight years ago”.[225][nb 21] William Bender of Time magazine described it as an “expressive, classically executed personal statement … one of the outstanding rock albums in years”, while Don Heckman wrote in The New York Times: “If anyone had any doubts that George Harrison was a major talent, they can relax … This is a release that shouldn’t be missed.”[231]

That the album sounded so contemporary in 1970 contributed to All Things Must Pass seeming dated and faddish later in the decade.[131] Village Voice critic Robert Christgau, having bemoaned in 1971 that the album was characterised by “overblown fatuity” and uninteresting music,[232] wrote in a 1981 review of its “featurelessness”, “right down to the anonymity of the multitracked vocals”.[233] In their book The Beatles: An Illustrated Record, Roy Carr and Tony Tyler were likewise lukewarm in their assessment, criticising the “homogeneity” of the production and “the lugubrious nature of Harrison’s composing”.[132] Writing in The Beatles Forever in 1977, however, Nicholas Schaffner praised the album as the “crowning glory” of Harrison and Spector’s careers, and highlighted “All Things Must Pass” and “Beware of Darkness” as the “two most eloquent songs … musically as well as lyrically”.[234]

Retrospective reviews and legacy[edit]

Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
AllMusic 5/5 stars[45]
Blender 5/5 stars[235]
Christgau’s Record Guide C[233]
Encyclopedia of Popular Music 4/5 stars[236]
Mojo 5/5 stars[188]
MusicHound 5/5[237]
Pitchfork Media 9.0/10[238]
Q 5/5 stars[239]
Rolling Stone 4.5/5 stars[227]
Uncut 5/5 stars[240]

AllMusic‘s Richie Unterberger views All Things Must Pass as “[Harrison’s] best … a very moving work”,[45] while Roger Catlin of MusicHound describes the set as “epic and audacious”, its “dense production and rich songs topped off by the extra album of jamming”.[237] Q magazine considers it to be an exemplary fusion of “rock and religion”, as well as “the single most satisfying collection of any solo Beatle”.[239] Filmmaker Martin Scorsese has written of the “powerful sense of the ritualistic on the album”, adding: “I remember feeling that it had the grandeur of liturgical music, of the bells used in Tibetan Buddhist ceremonies.”[241] Writing for Rolling Stone in 2002, Greg Kot described this grandeur as an “echo-laden cathedral of rock in excelsis” where the “real stars” are Harrison’s songs;[53] in the same publication, Mikal Gilmore labelled the album “the finest solo work any ex-Beatle ever produced”.[242] In his July 2001 feature for Mojo, John Harris called it “the inaugural solo album that still stands as the best Beatles solo record”,[4] while earlier that year the magazine’s album review read in part: “This remains the best Beatles solo album … oozing both the goggle-eyed joy of creative emancipation and the sense of someone pushing himself to the limit …”[243]

George Harrison confronted the breakup head-on, with the graceful, philosophical All Things Must Pass. A series of elegies, dream sequences, and thoughts on the limits of idealism, it is arguably the most fully realized solo statement from any of the Beatles.[244]

– Author Tom Moon, in 1,000 Recordings to Hear Before You Die (2008)

In his PopMatters review, John Bergstrom likens All Things Must Pass to “the sound of Harrison exhaling”, noting: “He was quite possibly the only Beatle who was completely satisfied with the Beatles being gone.”[222] Bergstrom credits the album with heavily influencing bands such as ELO, My Morning Jacket, Fleet Foxes and Grizzly Bear, as well as helping bring about the dream pop phenomenon.[222] Another Rolling Stone critic, James Hunter, commented in 2001 on how All Things Must Pass “helped define the decade it ushered in”, in that “the cast, the length, the long hair falling on suede-covered shoulders … foretold the sprawl and sleepy ambition of the Seventies.”[245] In The Rolling Stone Album Guide (2004), Mac Randall writes that the album is exceptional, but “a tad overrated” by those critics who tend to overlook how its last 30 minutes comprise “a bunch of instrumental blues jams that nobody listens to more than once”.[246] Unterberger similarly cites the inclusion of Apple Jam as “a very significant flaw”, while recognising that its content “proved to be of immense musical importance”, with the formation of Derek and the Dominos.[45] Writing for Pitchfork Media in 2016, Jayson Green said that Harrison was the only former Beatle who “changed the terms of what an album could be” since, although All Things Must Pass was not the first rock triple LP, “in the cultural imagination, it is the first triple album, the first one released as a pointed statement.”[247]

Among Harrison’s biographers, Simon Leng views All Things Must Pass as a “paradox of an album”: as eager as Harrison was to break free from his identity as a Beatle, Leng suggests, many of the songs document the “Kafkaesque chain of events” of life within the band and so added to the “mythologized history” he was looking to escape.[248] Ian Inglis notes 1970’s place in an era marking “the new supremacy of the singer-songwriter”, through such memorable albums as Simon & Garfunkel‘s Bridge Over Troubled Water, Neil Young‘s After the Gold Rush, Van Morrison‘s Moondance and Joni Mitchell‘s Ladies of the Canyon, but that none of these “possessed the startling impact” of All Things Must Pass.[249] Harrison’s triple album, Inglis writes, “[would] elevate ‘the third Beatle’ into a position that, for a time at least, comfortably eclipsed that of his former bandmates”.[249]

All Things Must Pass features in music reference books such as The Mojo Collection: The Greatest Albums of All Time,[250] Robert Dimery’s 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die[251] and Tom Moon’s 1,000 Recordings to Hear Before You Die.[252] In 1999, All Things Must Pass appeared at number 9 on The Guardians “Alternative Top 100 Albums” list, where the editor described it as the “best, mellowest and most sophisticated” of all the Beatles’ solo efforts.[253] In 2006, Pitchfork Media placed it at number 82 on the site’s “Top 100 Albums of the 1970s”.[85] Six year later, it was voted 433rd on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the “500 Greatest Albums of All Time“.[254] According to the website Acclaimed Music, All Things Must Pass has also appeared in the following critics’ best-album books and lists, among others: Paul Gambaccini‘s The World Critics Best Albums of All Time (1977; ranked number 79), The Times “100 Best Albums of All Time” (1993; number 79), Allan Kozinn‘s The 100 Greatest Pop Albums of the Century (published in 2000), Qs “The 50 (+50) Best British Albums Ever” (2004), Mojos “70 of the Greatest Albums of the 70s” (2006), the NMEs “100 Greatest British Albums Ever” (2006; number 86), Paste magazine’s “The 70 Best Albums of the 1970s” (2012; number 27), and Craig Mathieson and Toby Creswell‘s The 100 Best Albums of All Time (2013).[251] In January 2014, All Things Must Pass was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame,[255] an award bestowed by the Recording Academy “to honor recordings of lasting qualitative or historical significance that are at least 25 years old”.[256]

Subsequent releases[edit]

2001[edit]

Front cover of the 2001 album booklet, reflecting Harrison’s environmental concerns at the start of the 21st century; copyright Gnome Records

To mark the 30th anniversary of the album’s release, Harrison supervised a remastered edition of All Things Must Pass, which was issued in January 2001, less than a year before his death from cancer at the age of 58.[257][nb 22] The reissue appeared on Gnome Records, a label specifically set up by him for the project.[259] Harrison oversaw revisions to Wilkes and Feinstein’s album artwork,[140] which included a colorised “George & the Gnomes” front cover[140]and, on the two CD sleeves and the album booklet, further examples of this cover image showing an imaginary, gradual encroachment of urbanisation on the Friar Park landscape.[91][nb 23] The latter series served to illustrate Harrison’s dismay at “the direction the world seemed headed at the start of the millennium”, Gary Tillery observes, a direction that was “so far afield from the Age of Aquarius that had been the dream of the sixties”.[260][nb 24] Harrison launched a website dedicated to the reissue, which offered, in the description of Chuck Miller of Goldmine magazine, “graphics and sounds and little Macromedia-created gnomes dancing and giggling and playing guitars in a Terry Gilliam-esque world”.[262] As a further example of his willingness to embrace modern media,[263] Harrison prepared an electronic press kit, which he described as “not exactly an EPK but it is a threat to world order as we know it”.[264]

Titled All Things Must Pass: 30th Anniversary Edition, the new album contained five bonus tracks, including “I Live For You”,[265] two of the songs performed for Spector at Abbey Road in May 1970 (“Beware of Darkness” and “Let It Down“) and “My Sweet Lord (2000)“, a partial re-recording of Harrison’s biggest solo hit.[266] In addition, Harrison resequenced the content of Apple Jam so that the album closed with “Out of the Blue”, as he had originally intended.[90][140] Assisting Harrison with overdubs on the bonus tracks were his son, Dhani Harrison, singer Sam Brown and percussionist Ray Cooper,[90] all of whom contributed to the recording of Brainwashed around this time.[267]

With Harrison undertaking extensive promotional work, the 2001 reissue was a critical and commercial success.[268] Having underestimated the album’s popularity, Capitol faced a back order of 20,000 copies in America.[269] There, the reissue debuted at number 4 on Billboards Top Pop Catalog Albums chart[270] and topped the magazine’s Internet Album Sales listings.[271] In the UK, it peaked at number 68 on the national albums chart.[272] Writing in Record Collector, Doggett described this success as “a previously unheard-of achievement for a reissue”.[273]

Following Harrison’s death on 29 November 2001, All Things Must Pass returned to the US charts, climbing to number 6 and number 7, respectively, on the Top Pop Catalog and Internet Album Sales charts.[274] With the release on iTunes of much of the Harrison catalogue, in October 2007,[275] the album re-entered the US Top Pop Catalog chart, peaking at number 3.[276]

2010[edit]

For the 40th anniversary of All Things Must Pass, EMI reissued the album in its original configuration, in a limited-edition box set of three vinyl LPs.[277][278] Available via participating Record Store Day retailers, with each copy individually numbered,[279] the release took place on 26 November 2010.[280] In what Bergstrom notes as a contrast to the more aggressive marketing campaign run simultaneously by John Lennon’s estate, to commemorate Lennon’s 70th birthday,[222] a digitally remastered 24-bit version of the album was made available for download from Harrison’s official website.[277][278] The reissue coincided with the Harrison estate’s similarly low-key[281] release of the Ravi Shankar–George Harrison box set Collaborations[282] and East Meets West Music‘s reissue of Raga, the long-unavailable documentary on Shankar that Harrison had helped release through Apple Films in 1971.[283][284]

2014[edit]

All Things Must Pass was remastered again for inclusion in the eight-disc Harrison box set The Apple Years 1968–75,[285] issued in September 2014.[286] Also available as a separate, double CD release, the reissue reproduces Harrison’s 2001 liner notes[287] and includes the same five bonus tracks that appeared on the 30th anniversary edition.[285] In addition, the box set’s DVD contains the promotional film created for the 2001 reissue.[288]

Track listing[edit]

All tracks written by George Harrison, except where noted.

Original release[edit]

Side one

  1. I’d Have You Anytime” (Harrison, Bob Dylan) – 2:56
  2. My Sweet Lord” – 4:38
  3. Wah-Wah” – 5:35
  4. Isn’t It a Pity (Version One)” – 7:10

Side two

  1. What Is Life” – 4:22
  2. If Not for You” (Dylan) – 3:29
  3. Behind That Locked Door” – 3:05
  4. Let It Down” – 4:57
  5. Run of the Mill” – 2:49

Side three

  1. Beware of Darkness” – 3:48
  2. Apple Scruffs” – 3:04
  3. Ballad of Sir Frankie Crisp (Let It Roll)” – 3:48
  4. Awaiting on You All” – 2:45
  5. All Things Must Pass” – 3:44

Side four

  1. I Dig Love” – 4:55
  2. Art of Dying” – 3:37
  3. Isn’t It a Pity (Version Two)” – 4:45
  4. Hear Me Lord” – 5:46

Side five (Apple Jam)

  1. “Out of the Blue” – 11:14
  2. “It’s Johnny’s Birthday” (Bill Martin, Phil Coulter, Harrison) – 0:49
  3. “Plug Me In” – 3:18

Side six (Apple Jam)

  1. “I Remember Jeep” – 8:07
  2. “Thanks for the Pepperoni” – 5:31

2001 remaster[edit]

Disc one

Tracks 1–9 as per sides one and two of original issue, with the following additional tracks:

  1. I Live for You” – 3:35
  2. Beware of Darkness” (acoustic demo) – 3:19
  3. Let It Down” (alternate version) – 3:54
  4. What Is Life” (backing track/alternate mix) – 4:27
  5. My Sweet Lord (2000)” – 4:57

Disc two

Tracks 1–9 as per sides three and four of original issue, followed by the reordered Apple Jam tracks, for which all participants are believed to now be credited as composers also.[nb 25]

  1. “It’s Johnny’s Birthday” (Martin, Coulter; new lyrics by Mal Evans, Harrison, Eddie Klein) – 0:49
  2. “Plug Me In” (Eric Clapton, Jim Gordon, Harrison, Dave Mason, Carl Radle, Bobby Whitlock) – 3:18
  3. “I Remember Jeep” (Ginger Baker, Clapton, Harrison, Billy Preston, Klaus Voormann) – 8:07
  4. “Thanks for the Pepperoni” (Clapton, Gordon, Harrison, Mason, Radle, Whitlock) – 5:31
  5. “Out of the Blue” (Al Aronowitz, Clapton, Gordon, Harrison, Bobby Keys, Jim Price, Radle, Whitlock, Gary Wright) – 11:16

Personnel[edit]

The following musicians are either credited on the 2001 reissue of All Things Must Pass[289] or are acknowledged as having contributed after subsequent research:[292]

Accolades[edit]

Grammy Awards[edit]

Year Nominee/work Award Result
1972 All Things Must Pass Album of the Year[218] Nominated
“My Sweet Lord” Record of the Year[218] Nominated
2014 All Things Must Pass Hall of Fame Award[256] Won

Charts[edit]

Weekly charts[edit]

Original release
Chart (1970–71) Position
Australian Kent Music Report[295] 1
Canadian RPM 100 Albums[296] 1
Dutch MegaCharts Albums[297] 1
Italian Albums Chart[298] 2
Japanese Oricon LP Chart[299] 4
Norwegian VG-lista Albums[300] 1
Spanish Albums Chart[301] 1
Swedish Kvällstoppen Chart[302] 1
UK Albums Chart[272] 1
US Billboard Top LP’s[271] 1
West German Media Control Albums Chart[303] 10
Reissue
Chart (2001) Position
French SNEP Albums Chart[304] 68
Japanese Oricon Albums Chart[299] 46
UK Albums Chart[272] 68
US Billboard Top Pop Catalog Albums[276] 3

Year-end charts[edit]

Chart (1971) Position
Australian Kent Music Report[295] 5
Dutch Albums Chart[305] 11
Italian Albums Chart[298] 18
US Billboard Year-End[306] 18

Certifications[edit]

Region Certification Certified units/Sales
Canada (Music Canada)[307] Gold 50,000^
United Kingdom (BPI)[308] Gold 100,000^
United States (RIAA)[309] 6× Platinum 6,000,000^
*sales figures based on certification alone
^shipments figures based on certification alone

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George Harrison’s song MY SWEET LORD and what the word GOD actually means according to Francis Schaeffer

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Image result for beatles in india

George Harrison is the only member of the Beatles who stuck with Hinduism while the other three abandoned it shortly after their one trip to India.  Francis Schaeffer noted, ” The younger people and the older ones tried drug taking but then turned to the eastern religions. Both drugs and the eastern religions seek truth inside one’s own head, a negation of reason. The central reason of the popularity of eastern religions in the west is a hope for a nonrational meaning to life and values. The reason the young people turn to eastern religion is simply the fact as we have said and that is that man having moved into the area of nonreason could put anything up there and the heart of the eastern religions  is a denial of reason just exactly as the idealistic drug taking was.”

_

George Harrison My Sweet Lord

Francis Schaeffer in his book HOW SHOULD WE THEN LIVE? (page 191 Vol 5) asserted:

But this finally brings them to the place where the word GOD merely becomes the word GOD, and no certain content can be put into it. In this many of the established theologians are in the same position as George Harrison (1943-) (the former Beatles guitarist) when he wrote MY SWEET LORD (1970). Many people thought he had come to Christianity. But listen to the words in the background: “Krishna, Krishna, Krishna.” Krishna is one Hindu name for God. This song expressed  no content, just a feeling of religious experience. To Harrison, the words were equal: Christ or Krishna. Actually, neither the word used nor its content was of importance. 

This problem has been around for a long time because people need to clarify what they mean when they say the word GOD. Many years ago Charles Darwin even had to clarify this same issue when he responded to different letters. Recently I read the online book  Charles Darwin: his life told in an autobiographical chapter, and in a selected series of his published letters, and in it I noticed that Francis Darwin wrote In 1879 Charles Darwin was applied to by a German student, in a similar manner. The letter was answered by a member of my father’s family, who wrote:–

“Mr. Darwin…considers that the theory of Evolution is quite compatible with the belief in a God; but that you must remember that different persons have different definitions of what they mean by God.” 

Francis Schaeffer commented:

You find a great confusion in Darwin’s writings although there is a general structure in them. Here he says the word “God” is alright but you find later what he doesn’t take is a personal God. Of course, what you open is the whole modern linguistics concerning the word “God.” is God a pantheistic God? What kind of God is God? Darwin says there is nothing incompatible with the word “God.”

(Francis Schaeffer pictured below)

“My Sweet Lord”

I really want to know you
Really want to go with you
Really want to show you lord
That it won’t take long, my lord (hallelujah)
Hm, my lord (hallelujah)
My, my, my lord (hare krishna)
My sweet lord (hare krishna)
My sweet lord (krishna krishna)
My lord (hare hare)
Hm, hm (Gurur Brahma)
Hm, hm (Gurur Vishnu)
Hm, hm (Gurur Devo)
Hm, hm (Maheshwara)
My sweet lord (Gurur Sakshaat)
My sweet lord (Parabrahma)
My, my, my lord (Tasmayi Shree)
My, my, my, my lord (Guruve Namah)
My sweet lord (Hare Rama)Look at the first two lines above, “I really want to know you, Really want to go with you.” Is this just a mumbo jumbo kind of talk or did krishna, Gurur Brahma, Vishnu,  Devo, Maheshwara, Parabrahma, Tasmayi Shree, Namah and Rama all speak of a historical faith rooted in history that can be researched?

Thought Snack: What Christian Faith Really Is

“Suppose we are climbing in the Alps and are very high on the bare rock, and suddenly the fog shuts down. The guide turns to us and says that the ice is forming and there is no hope; before morning we will all freeze to death here on the shoulder of the mountain. Simply to keep warm the guide keeps us moving in the dense fog further out on the shoulder until none of us have any idea where we are. After an hour or so, someone says to the guide, ‘Suppose I dropped and hit a ledge ten feet down in the fog. What would happen then?’ The guide would say that you might make it until the morning and thus live. So, with absolutely no knowledge or any reason to support his action, one of the group hangs and drops into the fog. This would be one kind of faith, a leap of faith.Suppose, however, after we have worked out on the shoulder in the midst of the fog and the growing ice on the rock, we had stopped and we heard a voice which said, ‘You cannot see me, but I know exactly where you are from your voices. I am on another ridge. I have lived in these mountains, man and boy, for over sixty years and I know every foot of them. I assure you that ten feet below you there is a ledge. If you hang and drop, you can make it through the night and I will get you in the morning.’I would not hang and drop at once, but would ask questions to try to ascertain if the man knew what he was talking about and if he was not my enemy. In the Alps, for example, I would ask him his name. If the name he gave me was the name of a family from that part of the mountains, it would count a great deal to me. In the Swiss Alps there are certain family names that indicate mountain families of that area. In my desperate situation, even though time would be running out, I would ask him what to me would be the adequate and sufficient questions, and when I became convinced by his answers, then I would hang and drop.This is faith, but obviously it has no relationship to the other use of the word. As a matter of fact, if one of these is called faith, the other should not be designated by the same word. The historic Christian faith is not a leap of faith in the post-Kierkegaardian sense because [God] is not silent, and I am invited to ask the adequate and sufficient questions, not only in regard to details, but also in regard to the existence of the universe and its complexity and in regard to the existence of man. I am invited to ask adequate and sufficient questions and then believe Him and bow before Him metaphysically in knowing that I exist because He made man, and bow before Him morally as needing His provision for me in the substitutionary, propitiatory death of Christ.” – Francis Schaeffer, Francis A. Schaeffer Trilogy: The God Who Is There, Escape From Reason, He Is There and He Is Not Silent__________________________

In the 1960’s when so many young people from the USA jumped into eastern religions Francis Schaeffer called it a leap into non-reason and Schaeffer also asserted:

The universe was created by an infinite personal God and He brought it into existence by spoken word and made man in His own image. When man tries to reduce [philosophically in a materialistic point of view] himself to less than this [less than being made in the image of God] he will always fail and he will always be willing to make these impossible leaps into the area of nonreason even though they don’t give an answer simply because that isn’t what he is. He himself testifies that this infinite personal God, the God of the Old and New Testament is there. 

Instead of making a leap into the area of non-reason the better choice would be to investigate the claims that the Bible is a historically accurate book and that God created the universe and reached out to humankind with the Bible. Below is a piece of that evidence given by Francis Schaeffer concerning the accuracy of the Bible.

TRUTH AND HISTORY (chapter 5 of WHATEVER HAPPENED TO THE HUMAN RACE?, under footnote #95)

Two things should be mentioned about the time of Moses in Old Testament history.

The form of the covenant made at Sinai has remarkable parallels with the covenant forms of other people at that time. (On covenants and parties to a treaty, the Louvre; and Treaty Tablet from Boghaz Koi (i.e., Hittite) in Turkey, Museum of Archaeology in Istanbul.) The covenant form at Sinai resembles just as the forms of letter writings of the first century after Christ (the types of introductions and greetings) are reflected in the letters of the apostles in the New Testament, it is not surprising to find the covenant form of the second millennium before Christ reflected in what occurred at Mount Sinai. God has always spoken to people within the culture of their time, which does not mean that God’s communication is limited by that culture. It is God’s communication but within the forms appropriate to the time.

The Pentateuch tells us that Moses led the Israelites up the east side of the Dead Sea after their long stay in the desert. There they encountered the hostile kingdom of Moab. We have firsthand evidence for the existence of this kingdom of Moab–contrary to what has been said by critical scholars who have denied the existence of Moab at this time. It can be found in a war scene from a temple at Luxor (Al Uqsor). This commemorates a victory by Ramses II over the Moabite nation at Batora (Luxor Temple, Egypt).

Also the definite presence of the Israelites in west Palestine (Canaan) no later than the end of the thirteenth century B.C. is attested by a victory stela of Pharaoh Merenptah (son and successor of Ramses II) to commemorate his victory over Libya (Israel Stela, Cairo Museum, no. 34025). In it he mentions his previous success in Canaan against Aschalon, Gize, Yenom, and Israel; hence there can be no doubt the nation of Israel was in existence at the latest by this time of approximately 1220 B.C. This is not to say it could not have been earlier, but it cannot be later than this date.

Merneptah Stele, Israel 1200 BC

____

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The song IF NOT FOR YOU written by Bob Dylan

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Bob Dylan – If Not For You

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George Harrison – If Not For You – Lyrics

If Not for You

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
For other uses, see If Not for You (disambiguation).
“If Not For You”
If Not For You single cover.jpg

Artwork for some continental European countries (Dutch vinyl single pictured)
Single by Bob Dylan
from the album New Morning
B-side “New Morning”
Released October 19, 1970
Recorded August 12, 1970
Genre Country rock
Length 2:39
Label Columbia
Writer(s) Bob Dylan
Producer(s) Bob Johnston
Bob Dylan singles chronology
Wigwam
(1970)
If Not For You
(1971)
Watching the River Flow
(1971)

If Not for You” is a song by Bob Dylan, recorded for his 1970 album New Morning. Dylan recorded the album version in August 1970, having first recorded the song in a session with George Harrison on May 1 of that year. In addition to appearing on the album in October 1970, the August recording was released as a single in Europe; the May recording remained unreleased until its inclusion on The Bootleg Series Volumes 1–3 (Rare & Unreleased) in 1991.

In November 1970, a month after Dylan’s original had appeared, George Harrison released a version of the song on his triple album All Things Must Pass. Another well-known cover of the song was recorded by Olivia Newton-John, who had the only U.S. charting version of the song in 1971.

Bob Dylan’s version[edit]

Release[edit]

Bob Dylan recorded “If Not for You” for his album New Morning, on August 12, 1970. The song was released as a single in Europe. It was later included on the Dylan compilations Bob Dylan’s Greatest Hits Vol. II (1971),[1]Masterpieces (1978),[2] Biograph (1985),[3] The Essential Bob Dylan (2000),[4] The Very Best of Bob Dylan (2000),[5] Best of Bob Dylan Vols 1 & 2 (2001),[6] Greatest Hits Vol 1–3 (2003),[7] The Best of Bob Dylan (2005),[8] Dylan (2007),[9] Playlist: The Very Best of Bob Dylan ’70s (2009),[10] and The Real… (2012),[11] as well as on the various artist compilation The Best Year of My Life: 1970 (2011).[12]

A June 2, 1970 outtake of “If Not for You,” featuring only vocal, piano, and violin, is included on The Bootleg Series Vol. 10 – Another Self Portrait (1969–1971).

A previously unreleased version was included on the 2015 album Dylan, Cash, and The Nashville Cats: A New Music City.

Live performances[edit]

Dylan performed “If Not for You” with George Harrison during rehearsals for the Concert for Bangladesh in New York in 1971, but did not perform the song at the concert itself. Since then, however, Dylan has performed the song over 80 times.[13]

Charts[edit]

Chart Peak
position
Dutch Single Top 100 30[14]

George Harrison’s version[edit]

“If Not for You”
Song by George Harrison from the album All Things Must Pass
Released 27 November 1970
Genre Folk rock
Length 3:29
Label Apple
Writer(s) Bob Dylan
Producer(s) George Harrison, Phil Spector
All Things Must Pass track listing

George Harrison had sat in on a session for Dylan’s New Morning album, on May 1, 1970, at Columbia’s Studio B in New York, where he had played on an early take of “If Not for You” (later included on the Bob Dylan box set The Bootleg Series Volumes 1–3 (Rare & Unreleased)).[15] News of the collaboration between Dylan and the recently ex-Beatle caused great excitement in the music press, even though Columbia Records had made a point of announcing that neither artist deemed the results worthy of release.[16]

Over the following months, and despite having a wealth of extra material of his own, Harrison thought enough of the song to record it in London for his All Things Must Pass set. His was a characteristically melody-centric version of the track, which more clearly defined the song’s verse and bridge sections and eschewed the Dylan preference for spontaneity.[17] Harrison’s “If Not for You” immediately met with favour from critics and album reviewers: Mikal Gilmore describes it as “surprisingly beautiful”,[18] while to musical biographer Simon Leng, it’s a “gleaming pop creation”.[17]

Live performances[edit]

The following year, Dylan and Harrison duetted on “If Not for You” during a soundcheck for the historic Concert for Bangladesh in New York.[19] Judging by this, and from Harrison’s early notes for a possible setlist,[20] the pair had considered performing it at the UNICEF benefit later that day. (This soundcheck performance was later released on the 2005 remastered DVD of The Concert for Bangladesh.)

Harrison finally got a chance to perform “If Not for You” live, again at Madison Square Garden, on 16 October 1992 during the all-star concert celebrating Dylan’s first three decades in the music industry.[21] Backed by the house band for the night, Harrison performed “startling versions” of “If Not for You” and “Absolutely Sweet Marie“,[22] but only the latter found its way onto the officially released album the following August.

Personnel[edit]

The musicians who performed on Harrison’s studio version of the song are believed to be as follows:[17]

Olivia Newton-John version[edit]

“If Not For You”
Single by Olivia Newton-John
from the album If Not For You
B-side “The Biggest Clown”
Released May 1971
Format 7″
Genre Country, pop
Length 2:50
Label Uni 55281
Writer(s) Bob Dylan
Producer(s) Bruce Welch, John Farrar
Olivia Newton-John singles chronology
“Till You Say You’ll Be Mine”
(1966)
If Not For You
(1971)
“Banks of the Ohio”
(1971)

Basing her version on the Harrison arrangement rather than Dylan’s,[23] Australian singer Olivia Newton-John enjoyed considerable international success with “If Not for You”. It was the title track of her debut album, and became her first hit single, reaching the Top 10 in several countries. In addition, the single spent three weeks at No. 1 on the United States Easy Listening charts.[24][25]

Chart performance[edit]

Weekly charts[edit]

Chart (1971) Peak
position
Australia[26] 7
Belgium[27] 29
Canadian RPM Top Singles[28] 18
Netherlands[29] 11
New Zealand Listener[30] 8
Norway[31] 6
UK[32] 7
U.S. Billboard Hot 100[33] 25
U.S. Billboard Easy Listening[25] 1
U.S. Cash Box Top 100[34] 23

Year-end charts[edit]

Chart (1971) Rank
Australia[35] 71
UK 84
U.S.[36] 76

Other cover versions[edit]

Numerous other artists have covered “If Not For You”. These include Rod Stewart,[37] Bryan Ferry,[38] Richie Havens,[39] Sarah Vaughan,[40] Glen Campbell,[41] Barb Jungr,[42] Katie Buckhaven,[43] Susan McKeown and Lindsey Horner,[44] Phil Keaggy,[45] Lee Everton, Karl Blau, Ed Kuepper,[46] and the Flatmates.[47]Melinda Schneider and Beccy Cole covered the song on their album Great Women of Country (2014).

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. Jump up^ Erlewine (Bob Dylan’s Greatest Hits, Vol. 2 Review)
  2. Jump up^ Ruhlmann
  3. Jump up^ Erlewine (Biograph Review)
  4. Jump up^ Erlewine (The Essential Bob Dylan Review)
  5. Jump up^ Leggett (The Very Best of Bob Dylan Review)
  6. Jump up^ Best of Bob Dylan Vols. 1 & 2 Overview
  7. Jump up^ Jurek
  8. Jump up^ Erlewine (Best of Bob Dylan Review)
  9. Jump up^ Erlewine (Dylan (2007) Review)
  10. Jump up^ Leggett (Playlist: The Very Best of Bob Dylan ’70s Review)
  11. Jump up^ The Real… Overview
  12. Jump up^ The Best Year of My Life: 1970 Overview
  13. Jump up^ If Not For You: Discover
  14. Jump up^ Bob Dylan – If Not for You
  15. Jump up^ Badman 2001, p. 7
  16. Jump up^ Harrison (Rolling Stone Press/Simon & Schuster), pp. 179–180
  17. ^ Jump up to:a b c Leng 2006, p. 88
  18. Jump up^ Harrison (Rolling Stone Press/Simon & Schuster), p. 40
  19. Jump up^ Leng 2006, p. 120
  20. Jump up^ Harrison 2011, p. 288
  21. Jump up^ Leng 2006, p. 273
  22. Jump up^ Harrison (Rolling Stone Press/Simon & Schuster), p. 48
  23. Jump up^ Clayson 2003, p. 296
  24. Jump up^ Whitburn 2002, p. 181
  25. ^ Jump up to:a b Top 40 Easy Listening
  26. Jump up^ Steffen Hung. “Forum – 1970 (ARIA Charts: Special Occasion Charts)”. Australian-charts.com. Archived from the originalon 2016-06-02. Retrieved 2016-10-03.
  27. Jump up^ Olivia Newton-John – If Not For You (Ultratop)
  28. Jump up^ Top Singles – Volume 16, No. 4, September 11, 1971
  29. Jump up^ Top 40 (1971-04-03)
  30. Jump up^ “flavour of new zealand – search listener”. Flavourofnz.co.nz. Retrieved 2016-10-03.
  31. Jump up^ Olivia Newton-John – If Not For You (Norwegiancharts.com)
  32. Jump up^ Olivia Newton-John: Singles
  33. Jump up^ Olivia Newton-John Billboard Singles
  34. Jump up^ “Archived copy”. Archived from the original on 2016-03-04. Retrieved 2016-06-03.
  35. Jump up^ David Kent’s “Australian Chart Book 1970-1992” ArchivedMarch 5, 2016, at the Wayback Machine.
  36. Jump up^ Whitburn, Joel (1999). Pop Annual. Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin: Record Research Inc. ISBN 0-89820-142-X.
  37. Jump up^ Erlewine (Still the Same: Great Rock Classics of Our Time Overview)
  38. Jump up^ Erlewine (Dylanesque Review)
  39. Jump up^ Eder (Sings Beatles & Dylan Review)
  40. Jump up^ Eder (Time in My Life Review)
  41. Jump up^ Worbois
  42. Jump up^ Swihart
  43. Jump up^ Katie Buckhaven Overview
  44. Jump up^ Mighty Rain Overview
  45. Jump up^ Acoustic Cafe Overview
  46. Jump up^ Out-Takes, Castaways, Pirate Women and Takeaways Overview
  47. Jump up^ Sendra

References[edit]

External links[edit]

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MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 2 Review The Rolling Stones’ new blues album is an amplified death wheeze. And it rules

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 1 Review: The Rolling Stones Reinvigorate the Blues on ‘Blue and Lonesome’ Our take on rock legends’ first LP since 2005

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 1 The Rolling Stones – Ride ‘Em On Down Published on Dec 1, 2016 Taken from Blue & Lonesome, the brand new album out now. Buy it at http://www.rollingstones.com/blueandl…. Directed by François Rousselet http://www.riffrafffilms.tv/video/dir… Produced by Natalie Arnett Riff Raff Films http://www.riffrafffilms.tv http://www.rollingstones.com/http://www.facebook.com/therollingstones http://twitter.com/RollingStoneshttp://www.rollingstones.com/newsletter Rolling Stones […]

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MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 8 Blue & Lonesome is the album any Rolling Stones fan would have wished for – review Neil McCormick, music critic

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 8

Rolling Stones – Hoo Doo Blues

Evergreen: The Rolling Stones perform in Cuba earlier this year
Evergreen: The Rolling Stones perform in Cuba earlier this year CREDIT: REX FEATURES

The Rolling Stones have got the blues. I wonder what took them so long? This is the album any Stones fan could have wished for, on which the Glimmer Twins gleam again.

It is a swaggering, heartfelt blast of dense, deft blues rock, with Charlie Watts swinging on the back beat, Keith Richards spilling slippery chords and magic licks, and Mick Jagger wailing on the blues harp like the last lonely survivor of an apocalyptic flood on the Mississippi delta. Even Ronnie Wood keeps his end up, breaking out crusty riffs and sputtering leads that mesh and weave with Richards’s ever-shifting rhythm guitar, combining in a thick, pliable electric groove that is uniquely the Stones’ own.

Being aficionados of the genre, choices are eclectic and immaculate

It is amazing they haven’t made this album before. Holed up in Mark Knopfler’s British Grove studios last December to start work on original material, they warmed up with an old blues cover and just kept going. Knocking out one old favourite after another, they recorded enough for a whole album in just three days.

It is the Stones’s first album to completely comprise cover versions. Even their 1964 debut had a trio of originals (some credited to the pseudonymous Nanker Phelge because Jagger and Richards weren’t ready to call themselves songwriters). But this has to be viewed as an overdue act of love, not a retreat to safe harbours.

The Rolling Stones are 'the world’s greatest and longest serving rock band'
The Rolling Stones are ‘the world’s greatest and longest serving rock band’

Being aficionados of the genre, choices are eclectic and immaculate, off the beaten path but straight down the blues line. They rip up Howling Wolf’s Commit A Crime, breathe steamy vigour into Memphis Slim’s Blue and Lonesome and play Magic Sam’s All Of Your Love as if they are down on their knees begging for one last chance at happiness.

There is no attempt to slavishly recreate original arrangements, the modus operandi seems to be to get the chord changes down and then play the damn thing for the sheer thrill of it. And it is a thrill because there are not many bands left who could actually do what they do in a modern studio: just set up, face each other and play with such connection and commitment that the record is essentially a performance so alive to the music it needs no adornment or improvement.

It would be wrong to say that Jagger is a revelation, because we all know what he can do, but it is a pleasure to hear him do it so well. Richards has always loved Jagger’s harmonica playing and here it is almost the featured item, with the singer taking everything he has learned from Little Walter, Howlin’ Wolf and Jimmy Reed and applying it with instinct and emotion. It is as if, unburdened by the self-consciousness that can inhabit his attempts to keep up with the kids, the frontman is free to just enjoy himself.

Mick Jagger and Keith Richards
Mick Jagger and Keith Richards

Jagger has never had a lovely voice, but his phrasing and delivery, his sheer commitment and bravery in going for notes he has absolutely no right to reach is perfectly glorious. He conjures up a dirty, growling old shaman on Otis Hicks’s sleazy Hoo Doo Blues whilst on Buddy Johnson’s Just Your Fool, the 73-year-old singer sounds like exactly like the rocking young rooster of yore, only now he’s kicking it with a band of veteran’s utterly at ease and in charge of the material (ably supported in the studio by longstanding live touring members Darryl Jones on bass and Chuck Leavell on keyboards).

Their raw take on Little Johnny Taylor’s Everybody Knows About My Good Thing is sensational

If you have seen the Stones on recent tours, you will know they are playing better than at any time since their Seventies glory. The truth is they have never really been outstanding virtuosos but they have the secret to locking tight as a unit and keeping things shifting.

This selection of covers allows them to just do what they do so well and not overthink it. That said, when Eric Clapton guests on two tracks (because he just happened to be mixing in the same studio complex), his nimble, sensitive playing really does switch things up a gear.

Their raw take on Little Johnny Taylor’s Everybody Knows About My Good Thing is sensational, while Clapton’s soloing on Willie Dixon’s I Can’t Quit You Baby ends with the band breaking out in spontaneous applause. Perennial new boy Ronnie Wood might be getting a bit nervous about job security. The Stones have shown they are not averse to changing the line-up, and he has only been with them 41 years.

Hopefully this will serve as a palette cleanser for the album of originals the Stones are still threatening to eventually deliver. But that would have to go some way to beat Blue And Lonesome for sheer pleasure. It may not be the kind of definitive album statement that will rock the music world to its foundations but it more than demonstrate that the world’s greatest and longest serving rock band have still got what it takes.

The Rolling Stones: Blue and Lonesome is out on December 2

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