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MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones 1972 Exile On Main Street full album

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Rolling Stones 1972 Exile On Main Street full album

Exile on Main St

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Exile on Main St
ExileMainSt.jpg
Studio album by The Rolling Stones
Released 12 May 1972
Recorded October 1970, June 1971 – March 1972
Studio Olympic Studios, London; Nellcôte, France; Sunset Sound Recorders, Los Angeles
Genre Rock and roll, hard rock[1]
Length 67:07
Language English
Label Rolling Stones
Producer Jimmy Miller
The Rolling Stones chronology
Sticky Fingers
(1971)
Exile on Main St
(1972)
Goats Head Soup
(1973)
Singles from Exile on Main St
  1. Tumbling Dice” / “Sweet Black Angel
    Released: 14 April 1972
  2. Happy” / “All Down the Line
    Released: 15 July 1972

Exile on Main St is a double album by English rock band the Rolling Stones, released on 12 May 1972 by Rolling Stones Records. It was their tenth studio album released in the United Kingdom.[2] The album’s music incorporates rock and roll, blues, soul, country, and gospel genres.[3] Although it originally received mixed reviews, Exile on Main St has since been considered to be the Rolling Stones’ best work while being ranked on various lists as one of the greatest albums of all time.

A remastered and expanded version of the album was released in Europe on 17 May 2010 and in the United States on 18 May 2010, featuring a bonus disc with 10 new tracks.[4]

Recording[edit]

Exile on Main St was written and recorded between 1969 and 1972. Mick Jagger said “After we got out of our contract with Allen Klein, we didn’t want to give him [those earlier tracks],” as they were forced to do with “Brown Sugar” and “Wild Horses” from Sticky Fingers (1971). Many tracks were recorded between 1969 and 1971 at Olympic Studios and Jagger’s Stargroves country house in England during sessions for Sticky Fingers.[5]

By the spring of 1971 the Rolling Stones had spent the money they owed in taxes and left Britain before the government could seize their assets. Mick Jagger settled in Paris with his new bride Bianca, and guitarist Keith Richards rented a villa, Nellcôte, in Villefranche-sur-Mer, near Nice. The other members settled in the south of France. As a suitable recording studio could not be found where they could continue work on the album, Richards’ basement at Nellcôte became a makeshift studio using the band’s mobile recording truck.

Nellcôte[edit]

Recording began in earnest sometime near the middle of June. Bassist Bill Wyman recalls the band working all night, every night, from eight in the evening until three the following morning for the rest of the month. Wyman said of that period, “Not everyone turned up every night. This was, for me, one of the major frustrations of this whole period. For our previous two albums we had worked well and listened to producer Jimmy Miller. At Nellcôte things were very different and it took me a while to understand why.” By this time Richards had begun a daily habit of using heroin. Thousands of pounds worth of heroin flowed through the mansion each week, along with visitors such as William S. Burroughs, Terry Southern, Gram Parsons and Marshall Chess (who was running the Rolling Stones’ new label).[6] Parsons was asked to leave Nellcôte in early July 1971, the result of his obnoxious behaviour and an attempt by Richards to clean the house of drug users as the result of pressure from the French police.[7]

Richards’ substance abuse prevented him from attending the sessions that continued in his basement, while Mick Jagger and Bill Wyman were often unable to attend sessions for other reasons. This often left the band in the position of having to record in altered forms. A notable instance was the recording of one of Richards’ most famous songs, “Happy”. Recorded in the basement, Richards said in 1982, “‘Happy’ was something I did because I was for one time early for a session. There was Bobby Keys and Jimmy Miller. We had nothing to do and had suddenly picked up the guitar and played this riff. So we cut it and it’s the record, it’s the same. We cut the original track with a baritone sax, a guitar and Jimmy Miller on drums. And the rest of it is built up over that track. It was just an afternoon jam that everybody said, ‘Wow, yeah, work on it'”.

The basic band for the Nellcôte sessions consisted of Richards, Bobby Keys, Mick Taylor, Charlie Watts, Miller (a skilled drummer in his own right who covered for the absent Watts on the aforementioned “Happy” and “Shine a Light”),[5] and Jagger when he was available. Wyman did not like the ambience of Richards’ villa and sat out many of the French sessions. Although Wyman is credited on only eight songs of the released album, he told Bass Player Magazine that the credits are incorrect and that he actually played on more tracks than that. The other bass parts were credited to Taylor, Richards and session bassist Bill Plummer. Wyman noted in his memoir Stone Alone that there was a division between the band members who freely indulged in drugs (Richards, Miller, Keys, Taylor, engineer Andy Johns) and those who abstained to varying degrees (Wyman, Watts and Jagger).[6]

Los Angeles[edit]

Work on other basic tracks (probably only “Rip this Joint”, “Shake Your Hips”, “Casino Boogie”, “Happy”, “Rocks Off”, “Turd on the Run” and “Ventilator Blues”)[5] began in the basement of Nellcôte and taken to Sunset Sound Recorders in Los Angeles, where overdubs (all piano and keyboard parts, all lead and backing vocals, all guitar and bass overdubs) were added during sessions that meandered from December 1971 until March 1972. Some tracks (such as “Torn and Frayed” and “Loving Cup”) were freshly recorded in Los Angeles.[5] Although Jagger was frequently missing from Nellcôte,[6] he took charge during the second stage of recording in Los Angeles, arranging for the keyboardists Billy Preston and Dr John and the cream of the city’s session backup vocalists to record layers of overdubs.[5] The final gospel-inflected arrangements of “Tumbling Dice”, “Loving Cup”, “Let It Loose” and “Shine a Light” were inspired by Jagger and Preston’s visit to a local evangelical church.[5]

The extended recording sessions and differing methods on the part of Jagger and Richards reflected the growing disparity in their personal lives.[6] During the making of the album, Jagger had married Bianca, followed closely by the birth of their only child, Jade, in October 1971. Richards was firmly attached to his girlfriend Anita Pallenberg, yet both were in the throes of heroin addiction,[6] which Richards would not overcome until the turn of the decade.

Music and lyrics[edit]

Even though the album is often described as being Richards’ finest moment, as Exile is often thought to reflect his vision for a raw, rootsy rock sound, Jagger was already expressing his boredom with rock and roll in several interviews at the time of the album’s release.[6] With Richards’ effectiveness seriously undermined by his dependence on heroin, the group’s subsequent 1970s releases—directed largely by Jagger—would experiment to varying degrees with other musical genres, moving away from the roots-based sound of Exile on Main St.[6] Music biographer John Perry wrote that the Rolling Stones had developed a style of hard rock for the album that was “entirely modern yet rooted in 1950s rock & roll and 1930s-1940s swing“.[8]

According to Robert Christgau, Exile on Main St expanded on the hedonistic themes the band had explored on previous albums such as Sticky Fingers: “It piled all the old themes—sex as power, sex as love, sex as pleasure, distance, craziness, release—on top of an obsession with time that was more than appropriate in men pushing 30 who were still committed to what was once considered youth music.”[9]

Packaging[edit]

For Exile on Main St, Mick Jagger wanted an album cover that reflected the band as “runaway outlaws using the blues as its weapon against the world”, showcasing “feeling of joyful isolation, grinning in the face of a scary and unknown future”.[10] As the band finished the album in Los Angeles, they approached designer John Van Hamersveld and his photographer partner Norman Seeff, and also invited documentary photographer Robert Frank. The same day Seeff photographed the Stones at their Bel Air mansion, Frank took Jagger for night photographs at Los Angeles’ Main Street. Still, Van Hamersveld and Jagger chose the cover image from an already existing Frank photograph, an outtake from his seminal 1958 book The Americans.[10][11] Named “Tattoo Parlor” but possibly taken from Hubert’s Dime museum in New York City, the image is a collage of circus performers and freaks,[12] such as “Three Ball Charlie”, a 1930s sideshow performer from Humboldt, Nebraska who holds three balls (a tennis ball, a golf ball, and a “5” billiard ball) in his mouth;[13] Joe “The Human Corkscrew” Allen, pictured in a postcard-style advertisement, a contortionist with the ability to wiggle and twist through a 13 1/2 inch hoop; [14] and Hezekiah Trambles, “The Congo Jungle Freak”, a man who dressed as an African savage, in a picture taken by the recently deceased Diane Arbus.[15] The Seeff pictures were repurposed as 12 perforated postcards inside the sleeve, while Frank’s Main Street photographs were used in the gatefold and back cover collage made by Van Hamersveld, which features other pictures Frank took of the band and their crew – including their assistant Chris O’Dell, a former acquaintance of Van Hamersveld who brought him to the Stones – and other The American outtakes.[11]

Release and reception[edit]

Professional ratings
Retrospective reviews
Review scores
Source Rating
AllMusic 5/5 stars[3]
The A.V. Club A[16]
Christgau’s Record Guide A+[17]
Encyclopedia of Popular Music 5/5 stars[18]
Entertainment Weekly A+[19]
MusicHound 5/5[20]
NME 10/10[21]
Q 5/5 stars[22]
The Rolling Stone Album Guide 5/5 stars[23]
Uncut 5/5 stars[24]

Preceded by the UK and US Top 10 hit “Tumbling Dice“, Exile on Main St was released in May 1972. It was an immediate commercial success, reaching No. 1 worldwide just as the band embarked on their celebrated 1972 American Tour. Their first American tour in three years, it featured many songs from the new album. “Happy”, sung by Richards, would be a Top 30 US hit later that summer.[citation needed]

Exile on Main St was not well received by most contemporary critics, who found the quality of the songs inconsistent.[18] In a review for Rolling Stone, Lenny Kaye said the record had “a tight focus on basic components of the Stones’ sound as we’ve always known it,” including blues-based rock music with a “pervading feeling of blackness” but, because of the uneven quality of songs, he felt that “the great Stones album of their mature period is yet to come”.[25] Richard Williams from Melody Maker was more enthusiastic and deemed it the band’s best album, writing that it would “take its place in history” as it “utterly repulses the sneers and arrows of outraged put down artists. Once and for all, it answers any questions about their ability as rock ‘n’ rollers.”[26] In a year-end list for Newsday, Christgau named it the year’s best album and wrote that “this fagged-out masterpiece” was the peak of rock music in 1972 as it “explored new depths of record-studio murk, burying Mick’s voice under layers of cynicism, angst and ennui”.[27]

Critics later reassessed Exile on Main St favourably,[18] and by the late 1970s they had come to view Exile on Main St as the Rolling Stones’ greatest record.[28] Bill Janovitz later called it “the greatest, most soulful, rock & roll record ever made” because it seamlessly distills “perhaps all the essential elements of rock & roll up to 1971, if not beyond”.[29] On the response to the album, Richards said, “When [Exile] came out it didn’t sell particularly well at the beginning, and it was also pretty much universally panned. But within a few years the people who had written the reviews saying it was a piece of crap were extolling it as the best frigging album in the world.”[30]

Legal issues with ABKCO[edit]

After the release of Exile on Main St, Allen Klein sued the Rolling Stones for breach of settlement because five songs on the album were composed while Jagger and Richards were under contract with his company, ABKCO: “Sweet Virginia“, “Loving Cup“, “All Down the Line“, “Shine a Light“, and “Stop Breaking Down” (written by Robert Johnson but re-interpreted by Jagger and Richards). ABKCO acquired publishing rights to the songs, giving it a share of the royalties from Exile on Main St, and was able to publish another album of Rolling Stones songs, More Hot Rocks (Big Hits & Fazed Cookies).[31]

Legacy[edit]

Band appraisal[edit]

At the time of Exile’s release, Jagger said, “This new album is fucking mad. There’s so many different tracks. It’s very rock & roll, you know. I didn’t want it to be like that. I’m the more experimental person in the group, you see I like to experiment. Not go over the same thing over and over. Since I’ve left England, I’ve had this thing I’ve wanted to do. I’m not against rock & roll, but I really want to experiment. The new album’s very rock & roll and it’s good. I mean, I’m very bored with rock & roll. The revival. Everyone knows what their roots are, but you’ve got to explore everywhere. You’ve got to explore the sky too.”[5]

In 2003, Jagger said, “Exile is not one of my favourite albums, although I think the record does have a particular feeling. I’m not too sure how great the songs are, but put together it’s a nice piece. However, when I listen to Exile it has some of the worst mixes I’ve ever heard. I’d love to remix the record, not just because of the vocals, but because generally I think it sounds lousy. At the time Jimmy Miller was not functioning properly. I had to finish the whole record myself, because otherwise there were just these drunks and junkies. Of course I’m ultimately responsible for it, but it’s really not good and there’s no concerted effort or intention.” Jagger also stated he did not understand the praise among Rolling Stones fans because the album did not yield many hits.[30] Of the 18 tracks on the album, only “Tumbling Dice”, “Happy” and “All Down The Line” got heavy rotation at concerts. “Sweet Black Angel”, “Ventilator Blues” and “Stop Breaking Down” were each performed live only once, while “Shake Your Hips”, “Casino Boogie”, “Turd on the Run”, “I Just Wanna See His Face”, “Let It Loose” and “Soul Survivor” have never been played live.[32]

Richards said, “Exile was a double album. And because it’s a double album you’re going to be hitting different areas, including ‘D for Down’, and the Stones really felt like exiles. We didn’t start off intending to make a double album; we just went down to the south of France to make an album and by the time we’d finished we said, ‘We want to put it all out.’ The point is that the Stones had reached a point where we no longer had to do what we were told to do. Around the time Andrew Oldham left us, we’d done our time, things were changing and I was no longer interested in hitting Number One in the charts every time. What I want to do is good shit—if it’s good they’ll get it some time down the road.”[30]

Accolades[edit]

Exile on Main St has been ranked on various lists as one of the greatest albums of all time.[33] According to Acclaimed Music, it is the eighth most ranked record on critics’ all-time lists.[34] In 1998, Q magazine readers voted Exile on Main St the 42nd greatest album of all time,[35] while in 2000 the same magazine placed it at number 3 in its list of the 100 Greatest British Albums Ever.[36] In 1987 it was ranked third on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the best 100 albums of the period 1967–1987.[37] In 1993, Entertainment Weeklynamed it No. 1 on their list of “100 Greatest CDs”.[38] In 2003, Pitchfork Media ranked it number 11 on their Top 100 Albums of the 1970s.[39] In 2001, the TV network VH1 placed it at number 22 on their best albums survey.[40] In 2003, the album was ranked 7th on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time, the highest Rolling Stones album ranked on the list.[41] In 2005, Exile on Main St was ranked number 286 in Rock Hard magazine’s book of The 500 Greatest Rock & Metal Albums of All Time.[42]The album was ranked number 19 on the October 2006 issue of Guitar World magazine’s list of the greatest 100 guitar albums of all time[citation needed]. In 2007, the National Association of Recording Merchandisers (NARM) and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame placed the album No. 6 on the “Definitive 200” list of albums that “every music lover should own.”[43] Its re-release has a highest normalised rating of 100 on Metacritic based on seven professional reviews, a distinction it shares with other re-releases such as London Callingby The Clash.[44] The album was also included in the book 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die.[45] In 2012, the album was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame.[46]

In popular culture[edit]

The album and its title have been referenced several times by other bands. For example, the British acid house group Alabama 3 titled its debut album Exile on Coldharbour Lane. Perhaps the most notable reference comes from indie singer/songwriter Liz Phair‘s debut album Exile in Guyville. Phair herself claims the album to be a direct song-by-song “response” of sorts to Exile on Main St. Confrontational garage-trash noise-rock band Pussy Galore released a complete cover of the album, titled Exile on Main St, that reflected their own personal and musical interpretations of the songs, as opposed to paying tribute to the original sound. Post-grunge band Matchbox Twenty paid homage to this album by titling their 2007 retrospective Exile on Mainstream. Industrial Rock band Chemlab named the leading track from their album East Side Militia, “Exile on Mainline”, in reference to the Rolling Stones album.

The Departed, a 2006 film by Martin Scorsese, features a scene in which Bill Costigan mails Madolyn Madden an Exile on Main St jewel case containing an incriminating recording of Colin Sullivan conspiring with crime boss Frank Costello. The same film also uses the song “Let It Loose” from the album.

On 31 October 2009, American rock band Phish covered Exile on Main St in its entirety as the “musical costume” for their Halloween show in Indio, California.

The first episode of the fourth season of the Showtime program Californication is called “Exile on Main St”. A later episode in the sixth season featured a guest character waking up next to her musician boyfriend who had died from an overdose in the night in room “1009,” a reference to the lyrics of “Shine a Light“. The same song was also played by Tim Minchin‘s character in the following episode.

The first episode of the sixth season of the hit CW show Supernatural is titled “Exile on Main Street”.

Re-release[edit]

In 1994, Exile on Main St was remastered and reissued by Virgin Records, along with the rest of the post-Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out catalogue, after the company acquired the masters to the band’s output on its own label. This remaster was initially released in a Collector’s Edition CD, which replicated in miniature many elements of the original vinyl album packaging, including the postcards insert.

Universal Music, which remastered and re-released the rest of the post-1970 Rolling Stones catalogue in 2009,[47] issued a new remastering of Exile on Main St in a deluxe package in May 2010.[48] Of the ten bonus tracks, only two are undoctored outtakes from the original sessions: an early version of “Tumbling Dice” entitled “Good Time Women”, and “Soul Survivor”, the last featuring a Richards lead vocal (with dummy/placeholder lyrics).[49] The other tracks received overdubs just prior to release on this package, with new lead vocals by Jagger on all except “I’m Not Signifying”, backing vocals in places by past and current Stones tour singers Cindy Mizelle and Lisa Fischer, and a new guitar part by Mick Taylor on “Plundered My Soul.”[49] On the selection of tracks, Richards said, “Well, basically it’s the record and a few tracks we found when we were plundering the vaults. Listening back to everything we said, ‘Well, this would be an interesting addition.'”.[50] All harmonica heard was added during 2010 sessions by Jagger, and Richards added a new guitar lead on ‘So Divine’. “Title 5” is not an actual outtake from the sessions for Exile, it is an outtake from early 1967 sessions. It features the MRB effect from a Vox Conqueror or Supreme amp, as used by Richards in 1967 and 1968. “Loving Cup” is an outtake from early June 1969, but is actually an edit from two outtakes. The first 2:12 minutes is the well known ‘drunk’ version, as has been available on bootlegs since the early 1990s, but the second part is spliced from a second, previously unknown take. “Following the River” features Jagger overdubs on a previously uncirculated track featuring Nicky Hopkins on piano.

Jimmy Fallon announced on his show, Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, that he would mark the re-release of the album with a week’s worth of musicians performing songs from the album.[51] Phish, who had played the album in its entirety live in concert before, were the first confirmed act to join the salute.

The re-released album entered at number one in the UK charts, almost 38 years to the week after it first occupied that position.[52] The album also re-entered at number two in the US charts selling 76,000 during the first week.[53] The bonus disc, available separately as Exile on Main St Rarities Edition exclusively in the US at Target also charted, debuting at number 27 with 15,000 copies sold.

It was released once again in 2011 by Universal Music Enterprises in a Japanese-only SHM-SACD version.

Track listing[edit]

All songs written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, except where noted.

Side one
No. Title Length
1. Rocks Off 4:31
2. Rip This Joint 2:22
3. Shake Your Hips” (Slim Harpo) 2:59
4. Casino Boogie 3:33
5. Tumbling Dice 3:45
Side two
No. Title Length
6. Sweet Virginia 4:27
7. Torn and Frayed 4:17
8. Sweet Black Angel 2:54
9. Loving Cup 4:25
Side three
No. Title Length
10. Happy 3:04
11. “Turd on the Run” 2:36
12. Ventilator Blues” (Jagger/Richards/Mick Taylor) 3:24
13. I Just Want to See His Face 2:52
14. Let It Loose 5:16
Side four
No. Title Length
15. All Down the Line 3:49
16. Stop Breaking Down” (Robert Johnson) 4:34
17. Shine a Light 4:14
18. “Soul Survivor” 3:49

Personnel[edit]

The Rolling Stones

Additional musicians

  • Nicky Hopkins – piano
  • Bobby Keyssaxophone; percussion on “Happy”
  • Jim Pricetrumpet, trombone, organ on “Torn and Frayed”
  • Ian Stewart – piano on “Shake Your Hips”, “Sweet Virginia” and “Stop Breaking Down”
  • Jimmy Miller – drums on “Tumbling Dice” (the outro), “Happy” and “Shine a Light”, percussion on “Sweet Black Angel”, “Loving Cup”, “I Just Want to See His Face” and “All Down the Line”
  • Bill Plummer – upright bass on “Rip This Joint”, “Turd on the Run”, “I Just Want to See His Face” and “All Down the Line”
  • Billy Preston – piano and organ on “Shine a Light”
  • Al Perkinspedal steel guitar on “Torn and Frayed”
  • Richard Washington – marimba on “Sweet Black Angel”
  • Clydie King, Venetta Fields – backing vocals on “Tumbling Dice”, “I Just Want to See His Face”, “Let It Loose” and “Shine a Light”
  • Joe Green – backing vocals on “Let It Loose” and “Shine a Light”
  • Gram Parsons – backing vocals on “Sweet Virginia”
  • Chris Shepard – tambourine on “Turd on the Run”
  • Jerry Kirkland – backing vocals on “I Just Want to See His Face” and “Shine a Light”
  • Mac Rebennack, Shirley Goodman, Tami Lynn – backing vocals on “Let It Loose”
  • Kathi McDonald – backing vocals on “All Down the Line”
  • Glyn – engineer
  • Andy Johns – engineer
  • Joe Zaganno – engineer
  • Jeremy Gee – engineer
  • Doug Sax – mastering
  • Robert Frank – cover photography and concept
  • John Van Hamersveld – layout design
  • Norman Seeff – layout design

Additional personnel on 2010 bonus disc

Charts[edit]

Weekly charts[edit]

Original release
Chart Position
Australian Kent Music Report[54] 2
Canadian RPM Albums Chart[55] 1
Dutch Albums Chart[56] 1
Italian Albums Chart[57] 4
Japanese Albums Chart[58] 7
Norwegian Albums Chart[59] 1
Spanish Albums Chart[60] 1
Swedish Kvällstoppen Chart[61] 2
UK Albums Chart[62] 1
US Billboard 200[63] 1
West German Media Control Albums Chart[64] 2
2010 reissue
Chart Position
Argentine Album Chart[56] 5
Australian ARIA Album Chart[65] 6
Austrian Albums Chart[66] 7
Belgian Albums Chart (Flanders)[67] 8
Belgian Albums Chart (Wallonia)[68] 9
Canadian RPM Albums Chart[55] 3
Czech Albums[63] 42
Finnish Albums[63] 25
French SNEP Albums Chart[69] 2
Danish Albums Chart[70] 5
Dutch Albums Chart[56] 2
Greek Albums Chart[71] 2
Irish Albums Chart[72] 11
Italian Albums Chart[72] 4
Japanese Albums Chart[73] 12
New Zealand Albums Chart[74] 4
Norwegian Albums Chart[59] 1
Scottish Singles and Albums Charts[75] 1
Korean Albums Gaon[63] 8
Spanish Albums Chart[76] 2
Swedish Albums Chart[77] 1
Swiss Albums Chart[78] 8
UK Albums Chart[62] 1
US Billboard 200[63] 2
German Media Control Albums Chart[64] 3

Year-end charts[edit]

Chart (1972) Position
Australian Albums Chart[54] 19
Dutch Albums Chart[79] 11
Italian Albums Chart[57] 36
U.S. Billboard Top Pop Albums[citation needed] 31
Chart (2010) Position
Dutch Albums Chart[80] 66
German Albums Chart[81] 84
Swedish Albums Chart[82] 72
US Billboard 200[83] 176

Certifications[edit]

Region Certification Certified units/Sales
Australia (ARIA)[84]
2010 release
Platinum 70,000^
Italy (FIMI)[85] Gold 50,000*
New Zealand (RMNZ)[86]
2010 release
Gold 7,500^
United Kingdom (BPI)[87]
2010 release
Platinum 300,000^
United States (RIAA)[88] Platinum 1,000,000^
^shipments figures based on certification alone

References[edit]

Footnotes
  1. Jump up^ Janovitz 2005, pp. 1, 61.
  2. Jump up^ “Rolling Stones: defining moments”. The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 18 June 2015.
  3. ^ Jump up to:a b Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. Exile on Main St at AllMusic. Retrieved 27 June 2004.
  4. Jump up^ Itzkoff, Dave (26 February 2010). “Seen Much Better Days: Rolling Stones Return to ‘Main Street'”. The New York Times. Retrieved 2 May 2010.
  5. ^ Jump up to:a b c d e f g “Exile on Main St”. timeisonourside.com. Retrieved 6 July 2006.
  6. ^ Jump up to:a b c d e f g Greenfield, Robert (21 September 2006). “Making Exile on Main St“. Rolling Stone (1009). p. 72. Posted on 8 September 2006 at “Making ‘Exile on Main St'”. rollingstone.com. Archived from the original on 1 October 2007. Retrieved 7 July 2007.
  7. Jump up^ Richards, Keith; Fox, James (2010). Life. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson. ISBN 978-0-297-85439-5.
  8. Jump up^ Perry, John (2000). Exile on Main Street: The Rolling Stones. Schirmer Books. p. 27. ISBN 0825671809.
  9. Jump up^ Christgau, Robert (1998). Grown Up All Wrong: 75 Great Rock and Pop Artists from Vaudeville to Techno. Harvard University Press. p. 81. ISBN 0674443187. Retrieved 5 October 2014.
  10. ^ Jump up to:a b Robert Frank: The Photographer Behind ‘Exile On Main St.’
  11. ^ Jump up to:a b Cover Story – The Rolling Stones’ “Exile on Main Street”, with artwork by John Van Hamersveld
  12. Jump up^ Tattoo Parlor
  13. Jump up^ Sideshow World, Sideshow Performers from around the world
  14. Jump up^ Pittsburgh Post-Gazette – Google News Archive Search
  15. Jump up^ I Put a Spell on You
  16. Jump up^ Hyden, Steven (25 May 2010). “The Rolling Stones: Exile On Main Street”. The A.V. Club. Chicago. Retrieved 9 July 2013.
  17. Jump up^ Christgau, Robert (1981). Christgau’s Record Guide: Rock Albums of the ’70s. Da Capo Press. p. 327. ISBN 0-306-80409-3.
  18. ^ Jump up to:a b c Larkin, Colin (2011). “Rolling Stones”. The Encyclopedia of Popular Music (5th ed.). Omnibus Press. pp. 2515, 2525. ISBN 0857125958.
  19. Jump up^ Collis, Clark (21 May 2010). “Exile on Main Street Review”. Entertainment Weekly (1103). Retrieved 9 July 2013.
  20. Jump up^ Rucker, Leland (1996). “The Rolling Stones”. In Graff, Gary. MusicHound Rock: The Essential Album Guide. Detroit: Visible Ink Press. ISBN 0787610372.
  21. Jump up^ NME. London: 43. 9 July 1994.
  22. Jump up^ Q. London: 137. June 2010.
  23. Jump up^ “The Rolling Stones > Album Guide”. rollingstone.com. Archived from the original on 12 April 2011. Retrieved 2 December 2011.
  24. Jump up^ Uncut. London: 104. June 2010.
  25. Jump up^ Kaye, Lenny (6 July 1972). “The Rolling Stones Exile on Main St > Album Review”. Rolling Stone (112). Archived from the original on 21 October 2006. Retrieved 15 June 2006. Posted on 21 January 1997.
  26. Jump up^ The Rolling Stones – Off The Record by Mark Paytress, Omnibus Press, 2005, page 211. ISBN 1-84449-641-4
  27. Jump up^ Christgau, Robert (31 December 1972). “Choice Bits From a “Sorry” Year”. Newsday. Retrieved 9 July 2013.
  28. Jump up^ Christgau, Robert (25 April 1977). “Too Strait Are the Gates of Eden: Morris Dickstein’s ‘Gates of Eden'”. The Village Voice. New York. Retrieved 21 June 2013.
  29. Jump up^ Janovitz 2005, p. 1.
  30. ^ Jump up to:a b c Loewenstein, Dora; Philip Dodd (2003). According to the Rolling Stones. San Francisco: Chronicle Books. ISBN 0-8118-4060-3.
  31. Jump up^ Goodman, Fred (2015). Allen Klein: The Man Who Bailed Out the Beatles, Made the Stones, and Transformed Rock & Roll. Boston, New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. pp. 235–236. ISBN 978-0-547-89686-1.
  32. Jump up^ Live debuts of each Rolling Stones song
  33. Jump up^ “‘Exile On Main St’ Concert Information”. CBS Pittsburgh. 20 April 2012. Retrieved 12 January 2014.
  34. Jump up^ http://www.acclaimedmusic.net/Current/genre420.htm
  35. Jump up^ ‘Q Readers All Time Top 100 Albums’. Q. February 1998. Retrieved 8 July 2007.
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  50. Jump up^ Greene, Andy (9 March 2010). “The Secrets Behind the Rolling Stones’ “Exile on Main Street” Reissue”. rollingstone.com. Retrieved 30 March 2010.
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  73. Jump up^ “ザ・ローリング・ストーンズ-リリース-ORICON STYLE-ミュージック” [Highest position and charting weeks of Exile on Main St by The Rolling Stones]. oricon.co.jp (in Japanese). Oricon Style. Retrieved 8 May 2013.
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  79. Jump up^ “Dutch charts jaaroverzichten 1972” (ASP) (in Dutch). Retrieved 2 April 2014.
  80. Jump up^ “Jaaroverzichten – Album 2010” (in Dutch). Retrieved 2 May2013.
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  86. Jump up^ “New Zealand album certifications – The Rolling Stones – Exile on Main St”. Recorded Music NZ. Retrieved 1 May 2012.
  87. Jump up^ “British album certifications – The Rolling Stones – Exile on Main St”. British Phonographic Industry. Retrieved 1 May2012. Enter Exile on Main St in the field Keywords. Select Title in the field Search by. Select album in the field By Format. Select Platinum in the field By Award. Click Search
  88. Jump up^ “American album certifications – The Rolling Stones – Exile on Main St”. Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved 1 May 2012. If necessary, click Advanced, then click Format, then select Album, then click SEARCH

Bibliography

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Bolan Boogie by T.Rex
UK Albums Chart number-one album
10–17 June 1972
Succeeded by
20 Dynamic Hits
by Various artists
Preceded by
Night Train by Keane
UK Albums Chart number-one album
23–30 May 2010
Succeeded by
Immersion by Pendulum
Preceded by
Thick as a Brick by Jethro Tull
Billboard 200 number-one album
17 June – 14 July 1972
Succeeded by
Honky Château by Elton John

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Rolling Stones 1971 Sticky Fingers full album

Sticky Fingers

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This article is about The Rolling Stones album. For other uses, see Sticky Fingers (disambiguation).
Sticky Fingers
RSSF71.jpg
Studio album by The Rolling Stones
Released 23 April 1971
Recorded 2–4 December 1969, Muscle Shoals Sound Studio, Sheffield, Alabama; 17 February, March – May, 17–31 October 1970, Olympic Studios, Trident Studios, London, UK; except “Sister Morphine“, 22–31 March 1969
Genre Hard rock[1]
Length 46:25
Label Rolling Stones
Producer Jimmy Miller
The Rolling Stones chronology
Let It Bleed
(1969)
Sticky Fingers
(1971)
Exile on Main St
(1972)
Spanish issue
Singles from Sticky Fingers
  1. Brown Sugar” / “Bitch
    Released: 16 April 1971
  2. Wild Horses” / “Sway
    Released: 12 June 1971

Sticky Fingers is the ninth British and 11th American studio album by the English rock band The Rolling Stones, released in April 1971. It is the band’s first album of the 1970s and its first release on the band’s newly formed label, Rolling Stones Records, after having been contracted since 1963 with Decca Records in the UK and London Records in the US. It is also Mick Taylor‘s first full-length appearance on a Rolling Stones album, the first Rolling Stones album not to feature any contributions from guitarist and founder Brian Jones and the first one on which singer Mick Jagger is credited with playing guitar.

Sticky Fingers is widely regarded as one of the Rolling Stones’ best albums. It achieved triple platinum certification in the US and contains songs such as the chart-topping “Brown Sugar“, the country ballad “Dead Flowers“,[2][3]Wild Horses“, “Can’t You Hear Me Knocking“, and the sweeping ballad “Moonlight Mile”.

History[edit]

With the end of their Decca/London association at hand, The Rolling Stones were finally free to release their albums (cover art and all) as they pleased. However, their departing manager Allen Klein dealt the group a major blow when they discovered that they had inadvertently signed over their entire 1960s copyrights to Klein and his company ABKCO, which is how all of their material from 1963’s “Come On” to Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out! The Rolling Stones in Concert has since been released solely by ABKCO Records. The band would remain incensed with Klein for decades for that act.

When Decca informed The Rolling Stones that they were owed one more single, they cheekily submitted a track called “Cocksucker Blues”,[4] which was guaranteed to be refused. Instead, Decca released the two-year-old Beggars Banquet track “Street Fighting Man” while Klein retained dual copyright ownership in conjunction with The Rolling Stones of “Brown Sugar” and “Wild Horses“.

Recording[edit]

Although sessions for Sticky Fingers began in earnest in March 1970, The Rolling Stones had been recording at Muscle Shoals Sound Studio in Alabama in December 1969. “Sister Morphine“, cut during Let It Bleeds sessions earlier in March of that year, had been held over from this release. Much of the recording for Sticky Fingers was made with The Rolling Stones’ mobile studio unit in Stargroves during the summer and autumn of 1970. Early versions of songs that would eventually appear on Exile on Main St. were also rehearsed during these sessions.[5]

Artwork[edit]

Standard version[edit]

The Rolling Stones posing in an ad with covers of Sticky Fingers, with the original artwork, in 1971, from left to right: Charlie Watts, Mick Taylor, Bill Wyman, Keith Richards, and Mick Jagger

The album’s artwork emphasises the suggestive innuendo of the Sticky Fingers title, showing a close-up of a jeans-clad male crotch with the visible outline of a large penis; the cover of the original (vinyl LP) release featured a working zipper and perforations around the belt buckle that opened to reveal a sub-cover image of cotton briefs. The vinyl release displayed the band’s name and album title along the image of the belt; behind the zipper the white briefs were seemingly rubber stamped in gold with the stylized name of American pop artist Andy Warhol, below which read “THIS PHOTOGRAPH MAY NOT BE—ETC.”[6] While the artwork was conceived by Warhol, photography was by Billy Name and design was by Craig Braun. Braun and his team had other ideas, such as wrapping the album in rolling paper – a concept later used by Cheech & Chong in Big Bambu – but Jagger was enthused by Warhol’s cover with a zipper. Execution was then handled as Warhol sent Braun Polaroid pictures of a model in tight jeans.[7]

The cover photo of a male model’s crotch clad in tight blue jeans was assumed by many fans to be an image of Mick Jagger, but the people actually involved at the time of the photo shoot claim that Warhol had several different men photographed (Jagger was not among them) and never revealed which shots he used. Among the candidates, Jed Johnson, Warhol’s lover at the time, denied it was his likeness, although his twin brother Jay is a possibility. Those closest to the shoot, and subsequent design, name Factory artist and designer Corey Tippin as the likeliest candidate. Warhol “superstar” Joe Dallesandro claims to have been the model.[8]

After retailers complained that the zipper was causing damage to the vinyl (from stacked shipments of the record), the zipper was “unzipped” slightly to the middle of the record, where damage would be minimised.[7]

The Rolling Stones’ logo, designed by John Pasche and modified by Craig Braun,[7] was introduced in 1971.

The album features the first usage of the “tongue & lips” logo of Rolling Stones Records, originally designed by John Pasche in 1970. Jagger suggested to Pasche that he copy the outstuck tongue of the Hindu goddess Kali, and while Pasche first felt it would date the image back to the Indian culture craze of the 1960s, seeing Kali made him change his mind. Before the end of that year his basic version was faxed to Craig Braun by Marshall Chess. The black & white copy was then modified by Braun and his team, resulting in today’s most popular red version, the slim one with the two white stripes on the tongue.[7] Critic Sean Egan has said of the logo, “Without using the Stones’ name, it instantly conjures them, or at least Jagger, as well as a certain lasciviousness that is the Stones’ own … It quickly and deservedly became the most famous logo in the history of popular music.”[9] The tongue and lips design was part of a package that, in 2003, VH1 named the “No. 1 Greatest Album Cover” of all time.[10]

Alternative version and covers[edit]

In Spain, the original cover was censored by the Franco regime and replaced with a “Can of fingers” cover, designed by John Pasche and Phil Jude,[11] and “Sister Morphine” was replaced by a live version of Chuck Berry’s “Let It Rock“. This version was released on the compilation album Rarities 1971–2003 in 2005.

In 1992, the LP release of the album in Russia featured a similar treatment as the original cover; but with Cyrillic lettering for the band name and album name, a colourised photograph of blue jeans with a zipper, and a Soviet Army uniform belt buckle that shows a hammer and sickle inscribed in a star. The model appears to be female.[12]

Release and reception[edit]

Professional ratings
Retrospective reviews
Review scores
Source Rating
AllMusic 5/5 stars[13]
Christgau’s Record Guide A[14]
Encyclopedia of Popular Music 4/5 stars[15]
MusicHound 4.5/5[15]
NME 9/10[16]
Pitchfork Media 10/10[17]
Q 5/5 stars[18]
Record Collector 5/5 stars[18]
The Rolling Stone Album Guide 5/5 stars[19]
Uncut 5/5 stars[20]

Sticky Fingers hit the number one spot on the British charts in May 1971, remaining there for four weeks before returning at number one for a further week in mid June. In the US, the album hit number one within days of release, and stayed there for four weeks. In Germany it was one of only two non-German albums to reach number one in 1971.[citation needed]

In a contemporary review for the Los Angeles Times, music critic Robert Hilburn said that although Sticky Fingers is one of the best rock albums of the year, it is only “modest” by the Rolling Stones’ standards and succeeds on the strength of songs such as “Bitch” and “Dead Flowers”, which recall the band’s previously uninhibited, furious style.[21] Jon Landau, writing in Rolling Stone, felt that it lacks the spirit and spontaneity of the Rolling Stones’ previous two albums and, apart from “Moonlight Mile”, is full of “forced attempts at style and control” in which the band sounds disinterested, particularly on formally correct songs such as “Brown Sugar”.[22] In a positive review, Lynn Van Matre of the Chicago Tribune viewed the album as the band “at their raunchy best” and wrote that, although it is “hardly innovative”, it is consistent enough to be one of the year’s best albums.[23]

Sticky Fingers was voted the second best album of the year in The Village Voices annual Pazz & Jop critics poll for 1971.[24] Lester Bangs voted it number one in the poll and said that it was his most played album of the year.[25] Robert Christgau, the poll’s creator, ranked the album 17th on his own year-end list.[26] In a 1975 article for The Village Voice, Christgau suggested that the release was “triffling with decadence”, but might be the Rolling Stones’ best album, approached only by Exile on Main St. (1972).[27] In his 1980 review of the album, he wrote that it reflected how unapologetic the band was after the Altamont Free Concert and that, despite the concession to sincerity with “Wild Horses”, songs such as “Can’t You Hear Me Knocking” and “I Got the Blues” are as “soulful” as “Good Times“, and their cover of “You Gotta Move” is on-par with their previous covers of “Prodigal Son” and “Love in Vain“.[14]

In 1994, Sticky Fingers was ranked number ten in Colin Larkin‘s All Time Top 1000 Albums. He stated, “Dirty rock like this has still to be bettered, and there is still no rival in sight.”[28] In a retrospective review, Q magazine said that the album was “the Stones at their assured, showboating peak … A magic formula of heavy soul, junkie blues and macho rock”.[18] NME wrote that it “captures the Stones bluesy swagger” in a “dark-land where few dare to tread”.[16] Record Collector magazine said that it showcases Jagger and Richards as they “delve even further back to the primitive blues that first inspired them and step up their investigations into another great American form, country.”[18] In his review for Goldmine magazine, Dave Thompson wrote that the album still is superior to “most of The Rolling Stones’ catalog”.[29] In 2003, Sticky Fingers was listed as No. 63 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.[30]

In 1994, Sticky Fingers was remastered and reissued by Virgin Records. This remaster was initially released in a Collector’s Edition CD, which replicated in miniature many elements of the original vinyl album packaging, including the zipper. Sticky Fingers was remastered again in 2009 by Universal Music Enterprises and in 2011 by Universal Music Enterprises in a Japanese-only SHM-SACD version.

In June 2015, the Rolling Stones reissued Sticky Fingers (in its 2009 remastering) in a variety of formats to coincide with a new concert tour, the Zip Code Tour. The Deluxe and Super Deluxe versions of the reissue featured previously unreleased bonus material (depending on the format): alternative takes of some songs, live tracks recorded on 14 March 1971 at the Roundhouse, London, and the complete 13 March 1971 show at Leeds University. It re-entered the UK Albums chart at #7, extending their UK Top 10 album chart span beyond 51 years and 2 months since their self-titled debuted at #7 on April 23, 1964.[31][32][33][34] It also re-entered the US Albums chart at #5, extending their US Top 10 album chart span beyond 50 years and 6 months since 12 x 5 on December 14, 1964.[31][32][33][34]

Track listing[edit]

All songs written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, except where noted.

Side one
No. Title Length
1. Brown Sugar 3:48
2. Sway 3:50
3. Wild Horses 5:42
4. Can’t You Hear Me Knocking 7:14
5. You Gotta Move” (Fred McDowell/Gary Davis) 2:32
Side two
No. Title Length
6. Bitch 3:38
7. I Got the Blues 3:54
8. Sister Morphine” (Jagger/Richards/Marianne Faithfull) 5:31
9. Dead Flowers 4:03
10. Moonlight Mile 5:56

2015 Deluxe edition bonus disc:

No. Title Length
1. Brown Sugar” (Alternate Version with Eric Clapton) 4:07
2. Wild Horses” (Acoustic version) 5:47
3. Can’t You Hear Me Knocking” (Alternate version) 3:24
4. Bitch” (Extended version) 5:53
5. Dead Flowers” (Alternate version) 4:18
6. “Live with Me” (Live at the Roundhouse, 1971) 4:22
7. Stray Cat Blues” (Live at the Roundhouse, 1971) 3:38
8. Love in Vain” (Live at the Roundhouse, 1971) 6:42
9. Midnight Rambler” (Live at the Roundhouse, 1971) 11:27
10. Honky Tonk Women” (Live at the Roundhouse, 1971) 4:14

2015 Super Deluxe edition bonus disc (Live at Leeds University, 1971):

No. Title Length
1. Jumpin’ Jack Flash” (Live at Leeds University, 1971) 3:42
2. “Live with Me” (Live at Leeds University, 1971) 3:33
3. “Dead Flowers” (Live at Leeds University, 1971) 4:03
4. “Stray Cat Blues” (Live at Leeds University, 1971) 4:37
5. “Love in Vain” (Live at Leeds University, 1971) 4:19
6. “Midnight Rambler” (Live at Leeds University, 1971) 9:15
7. “Bitch” (Live at Leeds University, 1971) 5:53
8. “Honky Tonk Women” (Live at Leeds University, 1971) 3:02
9. (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” (Live at Leeds University, 1971) 3:44
10. “Little Queenie” (Live at Leeds University, 1971) 4:26
11. “Brown Sugar” (Live at Leeds University, 1971) 3:48
12. Street Fighting Man” (Live at Leeds University, 1971) 3:15
13. “Let It Rock” (Live at Leeds University, 1971) 3:14

ROLLING STONES Sticky Fingers 2015 Superdeluxe Edition Disc 4

Published on Jul 15, 2015

1. 0:15 Dead Flowers; 2. 4:40 Stray Cat Blues; 3. 8:35 Love In Vain; 4. 14:50 Midnight Rambler; 5. 27:50 Bitch; 6. 32:00 Introduction; 7. 33:00 Honky Tonk Women; 8. 36:15 (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction; 9. 41:25 Little Queenie; 10. 46:05 Brown Sugar; 11. 50:20 Street Fighting Man; 12 54:40 Let It Rock (encore in stereo)

The Rolling Stones: all songs from the American 1972 Tour

Published on Jan 27, 2014

All songs that have been played during the American 1972 Tour (Stones Touring Party):
1. 0:00 Intro Keith Richards; 2. 0:18 Brown Sugar; 3. 3:42 Bitch; 4. 8:10 Rocks Off; 5. 11:55 Gimme Shelter; 6. 16:58 Dead Flowers; 7. 20:50 Sweet Black Angel; 8. 23:55 Happy; 9. 26:46 Honky Tonk Women; 10. 29:43 Tumbling Dice; 11. 34:15 Loving Cup; 12. 38:42 Torn and Frayed; 13. 43:34 Ventilator Blues; 14. 46:54 Love In Vain; 15. 52:50 Sweet Virginia; 16. 57:30 You Can’t Always Get What You Want; 17. 1:05:00 All Down The Line; 18. 1:08:58 Midnight Rambler; 19. 1:21:10 Band Introduction; 20. 1:21:59 Bye Bye Johnny; 21. 1:25:06 Don’t Lie To Me; 22. 1:27:25 Rip This Joint; 23. 1:29:38 Jumpin’ Jack Flash; 24. 1:33:11 Street Fighting Man; 25. 1:37:38 Uptight Satisfaction

THE ROLLING STONE : Greatest hits – Collection HD/HQ

Published on Feb 27, 2016

01. Paint It Black
02. Sympathy For The Devil
03. Gimme Shelter
04. (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction
05. You Can’t Always Get What You Want
06. Jumpin’ Jack Flash
07. Angie
08. Start Me Up
09. Brown Sugar
10. Wild Horses
11. Under My Thumb
12. It’s Only Rock ‘n’ Roll
13. Ruby Tuesday
14. Can’t You Hear Me Knocking
15. Honky Tonk Women
16. Beast Of Burden
17. Shattered
18. Get Off My Cloud
19. Miss You
20. Tumbling Dice
21. Street Fighting Man
22. Rocks Off
23. As Tears Go By
24. Let It Loose
25. She’s A Rainbow
26. Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo (Heartbreaker)
27. Sweet Virginia

Personnel[edit]

The Rolling Stones
  • Mick Jagger – lead vocals; percussion on “Brown Sugar”; rhythm guitar on “Sway”; acoustic guitar on “Dead Flowers” and “Moonlight Mile”
  • Keith Richards – rhythm guitar, backing vocals; acoustic guitar on “Brown Sugar”, “You Gotta Move”, “I Got the Blues” and “Sister Morphine”; twelve string acoustic guitar on “Wild Horses”; lead guitar on “Brown Sugar”, “Wild Horses”, the first part of “Can’t You Hear Me Knocking” and “Bitch”; co-lead guitar on “Dead Flowers”
  • Mick Taylor – lead guitar; acoustic guitar on “Wild Horses”; rhythm guitar on the first part and lead guitar on “Can’t You Hear Me Knocking” and rhythm guitar on “Bitch”; slide guitar on “Sway” and “You Gotta Move”
  • Bill Wyman – bass guitar; electric piano on “You Gotta Move”
  • Charlie Watts – drums
Additional personnel

Charts[edit]

Weekly charts[edit]

Original release
Chart (1971) Peak
position
Australian Kent Music Report[35] 1
Canadian RPM Albums Chart[36] 1
Dutch Albums Chart[37] 1
French SNEP Albums Chart[38] 3
Italian Albums Chart[39] 5
Japanese Oricon LPs Chart[40] 9
Norwegian Albums Chart[41] 1
Spanish Albums Chart[42] 1
Swedish Kvällstoppen Chart[43] 1
UK Albums Chart[44] 1
US Billboard 200[45] 1
West German Media Control Albums Chart[46] 1
2015 Reissue
Chart Peak
Position
Argentine Albums (CAPIF)[47] 8
Australian Albums (ARIA)[48] 24
Austrian Albums (Ö3 Austria)[49] 9
Belgian Albums (Ultratop Flanders)[50] 7
Czech Albums (ČNS IFPI)[51] 17
French Albums (French SNEP Albums Chart) Chart[52] 11
German Albums (Offizielle Top 100)[53] 5
Greek Albums (IFPI)[54] 9
Irish Albums (IRMA)[55] 6
Italian Albums (FIMI)[56] 15
Dutch Albums (MegaCharts)[57] 2
New Zealand Albums (RMNZ)[58] 8
Norwegian Albums (VG-lista)[59] 16
Japanese Albums (Oricon)[60] 10
Portuguese Albums (AFP)[61] 25
Korean Albums (Gaon)[62] 64
Spanish Albums (PROMUSICAE)[63] 8
Swedish Albums (Sverigetopplistan)[64] 31
Swiss Albums (Schweizer Hitparade)[65] 16
UK Albums (OCC)[66] 7
US Billboard 200[45] 5
US Billboard 200 (Super Deluxe Edition)[45] 65

Year-end charts[edit]

Chart (1971) Position
Australian Albums Chart[35] 18
Dutch Albums Chart[67] 1
French Albums Chart[68] 24
Italian Albums Chart[39] 21
UK Albums Chart[69] 3
US Billboard 200[70] 21

Certifications[edit]

Region Certification Certified units/Sales
Australia (ARIA)[71] Gold 35,000^
France (SNEP)[72] Gold 109,400[73]
United Kingdom (BPI)[74] Gold 100,000dagger^
United States (RIAA)[75] 3× Platinum 3,000,000^
^shipments figures based on certification alone

dagger BPI certification awarded only for sales since 1994.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. Jump up^ Gilman, William (July 1971). “The Pick”. Gramophone. London. 49: 245. The music is hard rock and a reversion to this group’s earlier days prior to their “Beggars’ Banquet” album, which is about the most imaginative LP they have achieved.
  2. Jump up^ Elliot, Martin (2002). The Rolling Stones: Complete Recording Sessions 1962 – 2002. Cherry Red Books LTD. pp. 163–164. ISBN 1 901447 04 9.
  3. Jump up^ Wyman, Bill (2002). Rolling with the Stones. Dorling Kindersley Limited. p. 349. ISBN 0 7513 4646 2.
  4. Jump up^ Sanchez, Tony (1996). Up and Down with the Rolling Stones, p. 195. Da Capo Press. ISBN 0-306-80711-4.
  5. Jump up^ Greenfield, Robert (2006). Exile on Main Street: A Season in Hell with the Rolling Stones, pp. 95–96. Da Capo Press. ISBN 0-306-81433-1.
  6. Jump up^ “Images for Rolling Stones, The – Sticky Fingers”. Discogs.com. Retrieved 2015-06-10.
  7. ^ Jump up to:a b c d “Art of The Rolling Stones: Behind that zipper and that tongue”. New York Times. Retrieved 2015-06-11.
  8. Jump up^ “Album Cover Joe”. Joedallesandro.com. Archived from the original on 13 July 2011. Retrieved 12 May 2013.
  9. Jump up^ Egan 2013.
  10. Jump up^ Goldstein, Mike. “UnCovered Interview – The Rolling Stones Lips & Tongue logo, with designs by Ernie Cefalu”. RockPoP Gallery. RockPoP Gallery. Retrieved 22 November 2014.
  11. Jump up^ “Rare Spanish version of Sticky Fingers to be reissued on vinyl”. Rollingstones.com. Retrieved 2015-06-19.
  12. Jump up^ “Dust & Grooves – Adventures in Record Collecting. A book about vinyl records collectors » DB Burkeman – Brooklyn, NY”. Dustandgrooves.com. Retrieved 2015-06-10.
  13. Jump up^ Stephen Thomas Erlewine (1971-04-23). “Sticky Fingers – The Rolling Stones | Songs, Reviews, Credits, Awards”. AllMusic. Retrieved 2015-06-10.
  14. ^ Jump up to:a b Christgau, Robert (1981). Christgau’s Record Guide: Rock Albums of the Seventies. Ticknor & Fields. p. 329. ISBN 0899190251.
  15. ^ Jump up to:a b “Sticky Fingers”. Acclaimed Music. Retrieved 10 October2015.
  16. ^ Jump up to:a b “Review: Sticky Fingers”. NME. London: 43. 9 July 1994.
  17. Jump up^ “The Rolling Stones: Sticky Fingers”. Pitchfork Media. 19 June 2015. Retrieved 2 July 2015.
  18. ^ Jump up to:a b c d “Rolling Stones – Sticky Fingers CD Album”. Rakuten.com. Muze. Archived from the original on 11 July 2013. Retrieved 21 June 2013.
  19. Jump up^ Moon, Tom (2004). “The Rolling Stones”. In Brackett, Nathan; Hoard, Christian. The New Rolling Stone Album Guide. London: Fireside. pp. 695–699. ISBN 0-7432-0169-8. Portions posted at “The Rolling Stones > Album Guide”. rollingstone.com. Retrieved 2 December 2011.
  20. Jump up^ Cavanagh, David. “Album Reviews: The Rolling Stones Reissues”. Uncut. London. Retrieved 11 July 2013.
  21. Jump up^ Hilburn, Robert (9 May 1971). “The Survival of ‘Sticky Fingers'”. Los Angeles Times. p. Q37. Retrieved 11 July 2013.(subscription required)
  22. Jump up^ Landau, Jon (23 April 1971). “Sticky Fingers”. Rolling Stone. New York. Retrieved 11 July 2013.
  23. Jump up^ Van Matre, Lynn (30 April 1971). “‘Stones’ at their raunchy best”. Chicago Tribune. section 2, p. B12. Retrieved 11 July2013. (subscription required)
  24. Jump up^ “The 1971 Pazz & Jop Critics Poll”. The Village Voice. New York. 10 February 1972. Retrieved 11 July 2013.
  25. Jump up^ Christgau, Robert (17 February 1972). “Pazz & Jop Critics Poll: What Does It All Mean?”. The Village Voice. New York. Retrieved 11 July 2013.
  26. Jump up^ Christgau, Robert (10 February 1972). “Pazz & Jop 1971: Dean’s List”. The Village Voice. New York. Retrieved 11 July2013.
  27. Jump up^ “It Isn’t Only Rock and Roll”. The Village Voice. New York. 30 June 1975. Retrieved 11 July 2013.
  28. Jump up^ Larkin, Colin (1994). Guinness Book of Top 1000 Albums (1 ed.). Gullane Children’s Books. p. 10. ISBN 978-0-85112-786-6.
  29. Jump up^ Thompson, Dave (9 May 2011). “True 5-Star Albums: Rolling Stones’ ‘Sticky Fingers'”. Goldmine. Retrieved 11 July 2013.
  30. Jump up^ “500 Greatest Albums of All Time”. Rolling Stone. New York: 113. 11 December 2003.
  31. ^ Jump up to:a b “The Rolling Stones’ Sticky Fingers lives again!”. http://www.rollingstones.com. 31 March 2015. Retrieved 9 April 2015.
  32. ^ Jump up to:a b “Sticky Fingers Rerelease: Out 8/9 June”. http://www.rollingstones.com. 9 April 2015. Retrieved 9 April 2015.
  33. ^ Jump up to:a b “The Rolling Stones are rereleasing their classic 1971 album Sticky Fingers, along with previously unreleased material and alternative re-workings of beloved album tracks.”. http://www.rollingstones.com. April 2015. Retrieved 9 April 2015.
  34. ^ Jump up to:a b “The Rolling Stones – Sticky Fingers”. http://www.rollingstones.com. April 2015. Retrieved 9 April 2015.
  35. ^ Jump up to:a b Kent, David (1993). Australian Chart Book 1970–1992. St Ives, NSW: Australian Chart Book. ISBN 0-646-11917-6.
  36. Jump up^ “Top Albums/CDs – Volume 15, No. 17”. RPM. 12 June 1971. Retrieved 5 May 2013.
  37. Jump up^ “dutchcharts.nl The Rolling Stones – Sticky Fingers (ASP). Hung Medien (in Dutch). MegaCharts. Retrieved 1 May 2012.
  38. Jump up^ “InfoDisc : Tous les Albums classés par Artiste > Choisir Un Artiste Dans la Liste” (in French). infodisc.fr. Archived from the original on 26 January 2016. Retrieved 1 June 2013.Note: user must select ‘The Rolling Stones’ from drop-down.
  39. ^ Jump up to:a b “Hit Parade Italia – Gli album più venduti del 1971” (in Italian). hitparadeitalia.it. Retrieved 1 May 2012.
  40. Jump up^ Oricon Album Chart Book: Complete Edition 1970-2005. Roppongi, Tokyo: Oricon Entertainment. 2006. ISBN 4-87131-077-9.
  41. Jump up^ “norwegiancharts.com The Rolling Stones – Sticky Fingers(ASP). Retrieved 1 May 2012.
  42. Jump up^ Salaverri, Fernando (September 2005). Sólo éxitos: año a año, 1959–2002 (1st ed.). Spain: Fundación Autor-SGAE. ISBN 84-8048-639-2.
  43. Jump up^ “Swedish Charts 1969–1972 / Kvällstoppen – Listresultaten vecka för vecka > Maj 1971 > 18 Maj” (PDF). hitsallertijden.nl(in Swedish). Retrieved 13 February 2014.Note: Kvällstoppencombined sales for albums and singles in the one chart; Sticky Fingers peaked at the number-two on the list, behind “Chirpy Chirpy Cheep Cheep” by Middle of the Road.
  44. Jump up^ “The Rolling Stones > Artists > Official Charts”. UK Albums Chart. Retrieved 1 May 2013.
  45. ^ Jump up to:a b c “Allmusic: Sticky Fingers : Charts & Awards : Billboard Albums”. allmusic.com. Retrieved 1 May 2013.
  46. Jump up^ “Album Search: The Rolling Stones – Sticky Fingers (ASP)(in German). Media Control. Retrieved 1 May 2013.
  47. Jump up^ The Rolling Stones – Sticky Fingers”. Argentine Albums. CAPIF. On Fecha, select {{{date}}} to see the correspondent chart. Retrieved 12 June 2015.
  48. Jump up^ Australiancharts.com – The Rolling Stones – Sticky Fingers”. Hung Medien. Retrieved 12 June 2015.
  49. Jump up^ Austriancharts.at – The Rolling Stones – Sticky Fingers” (in German). Hung Medien. Retrieved 17 June 2015.
  50. Jump up^ Ultratop.be – The Rolling Stones – Sticky Fingers” (in Dutch). Hung Medien. Retrieved 17 June 2015.
  51. Jump up^ Czech Albums – Top 100″. ČNS IFPI. Note: On the chart page, select {{{date}}} on the field besides the word “Zobrazit”, and then click over the word to retrieve the correct chart data. Retrieved 12 June 2015.
  52. Jump up^ “InfoDisc : Classement officiel des ventes d’albums en France” (in French). chartsinfrance.net. Retrieved 15 June2015.
  53. Jump up^ Longplay-Chartverfolgung at Musicline” (in German). Musicline.de. Phononet GmbH. Retrieved 12 June 2015.
  54. Jump up^ Greekcharts.com – The Rolling Stones – Sticky Fingers”. Hung Medien. Retrieved 12 June 2015.
  55. Jump up^ GFK Chart-Track Albums: Week {{{week}}}, {{{year}}}”. Chart-Track. IRMA. Retrieved 12 June 2015.
  56. Jump up^ Italiancharts.com – The Rolling Stones – Sticky Fingers”. Hung Medien. Retrieved 18 June 2015.
  57. Jump up^ Dutchcharts.nl – The Rolling Stones – Sticky Fingers” (in Dutch). Hung Medien. Retrieved 12 June 2015.
  58. Jump up^ Charts.org.nz – The Rolling Stones – Sticky Fingers”. Hung Medien. Retrieved 12 June 2015.
  59. Jump up^ Norwegiancharts.com – The Rolling Stones – Sticky Fingers”. Hung Medien. Retrieved 12 June 2015.
  60. Jump up^ “Oricon Top 50 Albums: {{{date}}}” (in Japanese). Oricon. Retrieved 12 June 2015.
  61. Jump up^ Portuguesecharts.com – The Rolling Stones – Sticky Fingers”. Hung Medien. Retrieved 12 June 2015.
  62. Jump up^ “South Korea Gaon Album Chart”. On the page, select “{{{date}}}” to obtain the corresponding chart. Gaon ChartRetrieved 12 June 2015.
  63. Jump up^ Spanishcharts.com – The Rolling Stones – Sticky Fingers”. Hung Medien. Retrieved 12 June 2015.
  64. Jump up^ Swedishcharts.com – The Rolling Stones – Sticky Fingers”. Hung Medien. Retrieved 12 June 2015.
  65. Jump up^ Swisscharts.com – The Rolling Stones – Sticky Fingers”. Hung Medien. Retrieved 17 June 2015.
  66. Jump up^ “The Rolling Stones | Artist | Official Charts”. UK Albums Chart Retrieved 12 June 2015.
  67. Jump up^ “Dutch charts jaaroverzichten 1971” (ASP) (in Dutch). Retrieved 2 April 2014.
  68. Jump up^ “Les Albums (CD) de 1971 par InfoDisc” (PHP) (in French). infodisc.fr. Retrieved 1 February 2014.
  69. Jump up^ “The Official UK Charts Company : ALBUM CHART HISTORY”. Archived from the original on 17 December 2007. Retrieved 17 December 2007.
  70. Jump up^ 1971 Year-end Albums – The Billboard Pop Albums. Retrieved 3 October 2011.
  71. Jump up^ “ARIA Charts – Accreditations – 2015 Albums”. Australian Recording Industry Association. Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  72. Jump up^ “French album certifications – The Rolling Stones – Sticky Fingers” (in French). InfoDisc. Retrieved 1 June 2012. SelectTHE ROLLING STONES and click OK
  73. Jump up^ “Les Albums Or”. infodisc.fr. SNEP. Retrieved 3 July 2011.
  74. Jump up^ “British album certifications – The Rolling Stones – Sticky Fingers”. British Phonographic Industry. Retrieved 1 May 2012.Enter Sticky Fingers in the field Keywords. Select Title in the field Search by. Select album in the field By Format. Select Gold in the field By Award. Click Search
  75. Jump up^ “American album certifications – The Rolling Stones – Sticky Fingers”. Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved 1 May 2012. If necessary, click Advanced, then click Format, then select Album, then click SEARCH

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]

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_______

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____________

Pattie Boyd with George Harrison

______________

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_________________

_____________

_______________

Paul McCartney and Jane Asher – Paul McCartney presents his new girlfriend on mike’s mccartney’s wedding.

___________

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“Why Don’t We Do It In The Road?”

Why don’t we do it in the road? Mm
Why don’t we do it in the road? Ah
Why don’t we do it in the road? Mm
Why don’t we do it in the road? Mm
No one will be watching us
Why don’t we do it in the road?Why don’t we do it in the road?
Why don’t we do it in the road?
Why don’t we do it in the road?
Why don’t we do it in the road?
No one will be watching us
Why don’t we do it in the road? OohWhy don’t we do it in the road?
Why don’t we do it in the road?
Why don’t we do it, do it in the road?
Why don’t we do it in the road?
No one will be watching us
Why don’t we do it in the road?

________________

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File:'King Solomon and the Iron Worker' by Christian Schussele, 1863.JPG

I have written on the Book of Ecclesiastes and the subject of the meaning of our lives on several occasions on this blog. In this series on Ecclesiastes I hope to show how secular humanist man can not hope to find a lasting meaning to his life in a closed system without bringing God back into the picture. This is the same exact case with Solomon in the Book of Ecclesiastes. Three thousand years ago, Solomon took a look at life “under the sun” in his book of Ecclesiastes. Christian scholar Ravi Zacharias has noted, “The key to understanding the Book of Ecclesiastes is the term ‘under the sun.’ What that literally means is you lock God out of a closed system, and you are left with only this world of time plus chance plus matter.” 

HERE BELOW IS SOLOMON’S SEARCH IN THE AREA OF THE 6 “L” WORDS. He looked into  learning (1:16-18), laughter, ladies, luxuries,  and liquor (2:1-3, 8, 10, 11), and labor (2:4-6, 18-20). TODAY WE WANT TO LOOK AT SOLOMON’S SEARCH INTO THE WORD “LADIES.” 

Ecclesiastes 2:8-10The Message (MSG)

I piled up silver and gold,
        loot from kings and kingdoms.
I gathered a chorus of singers to entertain me with song,
    and—most exquisite of all pleasures—
    voluptuous maidens for my bed.

9-10 Oh, how I prospered! I left all my predecessors in Jerusalem far behind, left them behind in the dust. What’s more, I kept a clear head through it all. Everything I wanted I took—I never said no to myself. I gave in to every impulse, held back nothing. I sucked the marrow of pleasure out of every task—my reward to myself for a hard day’s work!

1 Kings 11:1-3 English Standard Version (ESV)

11 Now King Solomon loved many foreign women, along with the daughter of Pharaoh: Moabite, Ammonite, Edomite, Sidonian, and Hittite women, from the nations concerning which the Lord had said to the people of Israel, “You shall not enter into marriage with them, neither shall they with you, for surely they will turn away your heart after their gods.” Solomon clung to these in love. He had 700 wives, who were princesses, and 300 concubines. And his wives turned away his heart.

Francis Schaeffer observed concerning Solomon, “You can not know woman but knowing 1000 women.”

William Buckley Interviews Hugh Hefner on Firing Line (1966) Part 1

______________

King Solomon in Ecclesiastes 2:11 sums up his search for meaning in the area of the Sexual Revolution with these words, “…behold, all was vanity and a striving after wind, and there was nothing to be gained under the sun.”

(Hugh Hefner pictured above with William Buckley in 1966)

William Buckley Interviews Hugh Hefner on Firing Line (1966) Part 2

How about today’s most well known playboy Hugh Hefner? Schaeffer said that Hefner’s goal with the “playboy mentality is just to smash the puritanical ethnic.” About 30 years ago my pastor, Adrian Rogers of Bellevue Baptist Church in Memphis, Tennessee noticed an article where Hugh Hefner said he would be willing to trade all of his riches for the experience of just falling in love with one girl of his dreams and getting married. Rogers went on to say that the playboy lifestyle was bankrupt of lasting satisfaction and that God’s plan of marriage was best. In fact, the Book of Ecclesiastes shows that Solomon came to the conclusion that nothing in life gives true satisfaction without God including knowledge (1:16-18), ladies and liquor (2:1-3, 8, 10, 11), and great building projects (2:4-6, 18-20). You can only find a lasting meaning to your life by looking above the sun and bring God back into the picture.

Solomon’s experiment was a search for meaning to life “under the sun.” Then in last few words in the Book of Ecclesiastes he looks above the sun and brings God back into the picture: “The conclusion, when all has been heard, is: Fear God and keep His commandments, because this applies to every person. For God will bring every act to judgment, everything which is hidden, whether it is good or evil.”

The answer to find meaning in life is found in putting your faith and trust in Jesus Christ. The Bible is true from cover to cover and can be trusted. Below is a piece of that evidence given by Francis Schaeffer concerning the accuracy of the Bible.

TRUTH AND HISTORY (chapter 5 of WHATEVER HAPPENED TO THE HUMAN RACE?, under footnote #94)

So the story goes on. We have stopped at only a few incidents in the sweep back to the year 1000 B.C. What we hope has emerged from this is a sense of the historical reliability of the Bible’s text. When the Bible refers to historical incidents, it is speaking about the same sort of “history” that historians examine elsewhere in other cultures and periods. This borne out by the fact that some of the incidents, some of the individuals, and some of the places have been confirmed by archaeological discoveries in the past hundred years has swept away the possibility of a naive skepticism about the Bible’s history. And what is particularly striking is that the tide has built up concerning the time before the year 1000 B.C. Our knowledge about the years 2500 B.C. to 1000 B.C. has vastly increased through discoveries sometimes of whole libraries and even of hitherto unknown people and languages.

There was a time, for example, when the Hittite people, referred to in the early parts of the Bible, were treated as fictitious by critical scholars. Then came the discoveries after 1906 at Boghaz Koi (Boghaz-koy) which not only gave us the certainty of their existence but stacks of details from their own archives!

Archaeology and the Old Testament

Article contributed by Probe Ministries
Visit Probe’s website

Understanding Archaeology

Christianity is a historical faith based on actual events recorded in the Bible. Archaeology has therefore played a key role in biblical studies and Christian apologetics in several ways.

First, archaeology has confirmed the historical accuracy of the Bible. It has verified many ancient sites, civilizations, and biblical characters whose existence was questioned by the academic world and often dismissed as myths. Biblical archaeology has silenced many critics as new discoveries supported the facts of the Bible.

Second, archaeology helps us improve our understanding of the Bible. Although we do not have the original writings of the authors, thousands of ancient manuscripts affirm that we have an accurate transmission of the original texts.1 Archaeology can also help us to understand more accurately the nuances and uses of biblical words as they were used in their day.

Third, archaeology helps illustrate and explain Bible passages. The events of the Bible occurred at a certain time, in a particular culture, influenced by a particular social and political structure. Archaeology gives us insights into these areas. Archaeology also helps to supplement topics not covered in the Bible. Much of what we know of the pagan religions and the intertestamental period comes from archaeological research.

As we approach this study we must keep in mind the limits of archaeology. First, it does not prove the divine inspiration of the Bible. It can only confirm the accuracy of the events. Second, unlike other fields of science, archaeology cannot re-create the process under study. Archaeologists must study and interpret the evidence left behind. All conclusions must allow for revision and reinterpretation based on new discoveries. Third, how archaeological evidence is understood depends on the interpreter’s presuppositions and worldview. It is important to understand that many researchers are skeptics of the Bible and hostile to its world view.

Fourth, thousands of archives have been discovered, but an enormous amount of material has been lost. For example, the library in Alexandria held over one million volumes, but all were lost in a seventh century fire.

Fifth, only a fraction of available archaeological sites have been surveyed, and only a fraction of surveyed sites have been excavated. In fact, it is estimated that less than two percent of surveyed sites have been worked on. Once work begins, only a fraction of an excavation site is actually examined, and only a small part of what is examined is published. For example, the photographs of the Dead Sea Scrolls were withheld from the public for forty years after they were uncovered.

It is important to understand that the Scriptures remain the primary source of authority. We must not elevate archaeology to the point that it becomes the judge for the validity of Scripture. Randall Price states, “There are indeed instances where the information needed to resolve a historical or chronological question is lacking from both archaeology and the Bible, but it is unwarranted to assume the material evidence taken from the more limited content of archaeological excavations can be used to dispute the literary evidence from the more complete content of the canonical scriptures.”2 The Bible has proven to be an accurate and trustworthy source of history.

Noted archaeologist Nelson Glueck writes, “As a matter of fact, however, it may be clearly stated categorically that no archeological discovery has ever controverted a single biblical reference. Scores of archeological findings have been made which confirm in clear outline or exact detail historical statements in the Bible.”3

The Discovery of the Hittites

The Hittites played a prominent role in Old Testament history. They interacted with biblical figures as early as Abraham and as late as Solomon. They are mentioned in Genesis 15:20 as people who inhabited the land of Canaan. 1 Kings 10:29 records that they purchased chariots and horses from King Solomon. The most prominent Hittite is Uriah the husband of Bathsheba. The Hittites were a powerful force in the Middle East from 1750 B.C. until 1200 B.C. Prior to the late 19th century, nothing was known of the Hittites outside the Bible, and many critics alleged that they were an invention of the biblical authors.

In 1876 a dramatic discovery changed this perception. A British scholar named A. H. Sayce found inscriptions carved on rocks in Turkey. He suspected that they might be evidence of the Hittite nation. Ten years later, more clay tablets were found in Turkey at a place called Boghaz-koy. German cuneiform expert Hugo Winckler investigated the tablets and began his own expedition at the site in 1906.

Winckler’s excavations uncovered five temples, a fortified citadel and several massive sculptures. In one storeroom he found over ten thousand clay tablets. One of the documents proved to be a record of a treaty between Ramesses II and the Hittite king. Other tablets showed that Boghaz-koy was the capital of the Hittite kingdom. Its original name was Hattusha and the city covered an area of 300 acres. The Hittite nation had been discovered!

Less than a decade after Winckler’s find, Czech scholar Bedrich Hronzny proved the Hittite language is an early relative of the Indo-European languages of Greek, Latin, French, German, and English. The Hittite language now has a central place in the study of the history of the Indo-European languages.

The discovery also confirmed other biblical facts. Five temples were found containing many tablets with details of the rites and ceremonies that priests performed. These ceremonies described rites for purification from sin and purification of a new temple. The instructions proved to be very elaborate and lengthy. Critics once criticized the laws and instructions found in the books of Leviticus and Deuteronomy as too complicated for the time it was written (1400 B.C.). The Boghaz-koy texts along with others from Egyptian sites and a site along the Euphrates called Emar have proven that the ceremonies described in the Jewish Pentateuch are consistent with the ceremonies of the cultures of this time period.

The Hittite Empire made treaties with civilizations they conquered. Two dozen of these have been translated and provide a better understanding of treaties in the Old Testament. The discovery of the Hittite Empire at Boghaz-koy has significantly advanced our understanding of the patriarchal period. Dr. Fred Wright summarizes the importance of this find in regard to biblical historicity:

Now the Bible picture of this people fits in perfectly with what we know of the Hittite nation from the monuments. As an empire they never conquered the land of Canaan itself, although the Hittite local tribes did settle there at an early date. Nothing discovered by the excavators has in any way discredited the Biblical account. Scripture accuracy has once more been proved by the archaeologist.4

The discovery of the Hittites has proven to be one of the great archaeological finds of all time. It has helped to confirm the biblical narrative and had a great impact on Middle East archaeological study. Because of it, we have come to a greater understanding of the history of our language, as well as the religious, social, and political practices of the ancient Middle East.

Sodom and Gomorrah

The story of Sodom and Gomorrah has long been viewed as a legend. Critics assume that it was created to communicate moral principles. However, throughout the Bible this story is treated as a historical event. The Old Testament prophets refer to the destruction of Sodom on several occasions (Deut. 29:23, Isa. 13:19, Jer. 49:18), and these cities play a key role in the teachings of Jesus and the Apostles (Matt. 10:15, 2 Pet. 2:6 and Jude 1:7). What has archaeology found to establish the existence of these cities?

Archaeologists have searched the Dead Sea region for many years in search of Sodom and Gomorrah. Genesis 14:3 gives their location as the Valley of Siddim known as the Salt Sea, another name for the Dead Sea. On the east side six wadies, or river valleys, flow into the Dead Sea. Along five of these wadies, ancient cities were discovered. The northern most is named Bab edh-Drha. In 1924, renowned archaeologist Dr. William Albright excavated at this site, searching for Sodom and Gomorrah. He discovered it to be a heavily fortified city. Although he connected this city with one of the biblical “Cities of the Plains,” he could not find conclusive evidence to justify this assumption.

More digging was done in 1965, 1967, and 1973. The archaeologists discovered a 23-inch thick wall around the city, along with numerous houses and a large temple. Outside the city were huge grave sites where thousands of skeletons were unearthed. This revealed that the city had been well populated during the early Bronze Age, about the time Abraham would have lived.

Most intriguing was evidence that a massive fire had destroyed the city. It lay buried under a coating of ash several feet thick. A cemetery one kilometer outside the city contained charred remains of roofs, posts, and bricks turned red from heat.

Dr. Bryant Wood, in describing these charnel houses, stated that a fire began on the roofs of these buildings. Eventually the burning roof collapsed into the interior and spread inside the building. This was the case in every house they excavated. Such a massive fiery destruction would match the biblical account that the city was destroyed by fire that rained down from heaven. Wood states, “The evidence would suggest that this site of Bab edh-Drha is the biblical city of Sodom.”5

Five cities of the plain are mentioned in Genesis 14: Sodom, Gomorrah, Admah, Zoar, and Zeboiim. Remnants of these other four cities are also found along the Dead Sea. Following a southward path from Bab edh-Drha there is the city called Numeria. Continuing south is the city called es-Safi. Further south are the ancient cities of Feifa and Khanazir. Studies at these cities revealed that they had been abandoned at the same time about 24502350 B.C. Many archaeologists believe if Bab ed-Drha is Sodom, Numeria is Gomorrah, and es-Safi is Zoar.

What fascinated the archaeologists is that these cities were covered in the same ash as Bab ed-Drha. Numeria, believed to be Gomorrah, had seven feet of ash in some places. In every one of the destroyed cities ash deposits made the soil a spongy charcoal, making it impossible to rebuild. According to the Bible, four of the five cities were destroyed, leaving Lot to flee to Zoar. Zoar was not destroyed by fire, but was abandoned during this period.

Although archaeologists are still disputing these findings, this is one discovery we will be hearing more about in years to come.

The Walls of Jericho

According to the Bible, the conquest of Jericho occurred in approximately 1440 B.C. The miraculous nature of the conquest has caused some scholars to dismiss the story as folklore. Does archaeology support the biblical account? Over the past century four prominent archaeologists have excavated the site: Carl Watzinger from 1907-1909, John Garstang in the 1930’s, Kathleen Kenyon from 1952-1958, and currently Bryant Wood. The result of their work has been remarkable.

First, they discovered that Jericho had an impressive system of fortifications. Surrounding the city was a retaining wall fifteen feet high. At its top was an eight-foot brick wall strengthened from behind by an earthen rampart. Domestic structures were found behind this first wall. Another brick wall enclosed the rest of the city. The domestic structures found between the two walls is consistent with Joshua’s description of Rahab’s quarters (Josh. 2:15). Archeologists also found that in one part of the city, large piles of bricks were found at the base of both the inner and outer walls, indicating a sudden collapse of the fortifications. Scholars feel that an earthquake, which may also explain the damming of the Jordan in the biblical account, caused this collapse. The collapsed bricks formed a ramp by which an invader might easily enter the city (Josh. 6:20).

Of this amazing discovery Garstang states, “As to the main fact, then, there remains no doubt: the walls fell outwards so completely, the attackers would be able to clamber up and over the ruins of the city.”6 This is remarkable because when attacked city walls fall inward, not outward.

A thick layer of soot indicates that the city was destroyed by fire as described in Joshua 6:24. Kenyon describes it this way. “The destruction was complete. Walls and floors were blackened or reddened by fire and every room was filled with fallen bricks.”7 Archaeologists also discovered large amounts of grain at the site. This is again consistent with the biblical account that the city was captured quickly. If it had fallen as a result of a siege, the grain would have been used up. According to Joshua 6:17, the Israelites were forbidden to plunder the city, but had to destroy it totally.

Although the archaeologists agreed Jericho was violently destroyed, they disagreed on the date of the conquest. Garstang held to the biblical date of 1400 B.C. while Watzinger and Kenyon believed the destruction occurred in 1550 B.C. In other words, if the later date is accurate, Joshua arrived at a previously destroyed Jericho. This earlier date would pose a serious challenge to the historicity of the Old Testament.

Dr. Bryant Wood, who is currently excavating the site, found that Kenyon’s early date was based on faulty assumptions about pottery found at the site. His later date is also based on the discovery of Egyptian amulets in the tombs northwest of Jericho. Inscribed under these amulets were the names of Egyptian Pharaohs dating from 1500-1386 B.C., showing that the cemetery was in use up to the end of the late Bronze Age (1550-1400 B.C.). Finally, a piece of charcoal found in the debris was carbon-14 dated to be 1410 B.C. The evidence leads Wood to this conclusion. “The pottery, stratigraphic considerations, scarab data and a carbon-14 date all point to a destruction of the city around the end of the Late Bronze Age, about 1400 BCE.”8

Thus, current archeological evidence supports the Bible’s account of when and how Jericho fell.

House of David

One of the most beloved characters in the Bible is King David. Scripture says that he was a man after God’s own heart. He is revered as the greatest of all Israelite kings and the messianic covenant is established through his lineage. Despite his key role in Israel’s history, until recently no evidence outside the Bible attested to his existence. For this reason critics questioned the existence of a King David.

In the summer of 1993, an archaeologist made what has been labeled as a phenomenal and stunning discovery. Dr. Avraham Biran and his team were excavating a site labeled Tell Dan, located in northern Galilee at the foot of Mt. Hermon. Evidence indicates that this is the site of the Old Testament land of Dan.

The team had discovered an impressive royal plaza. As they were clearing the debris, they discovered in the ruins the remains of a black basalt stele, or stone slab, containing Aramaic inscriptions. The stele contained thirteen lines of writing but none of the sentences were complete. Some of the lines contained only three letters while the widest contained fourteen. The letters that remained were clearly engraved and easy to read. Two of the lines included the phrases “The King of Israel” and “House of David.”

This is the first reference to King David found outside of the Bible. This discovery has caused many critics to reconsider their view of the historicity of the Davidic kingdom. Pottery found in the vicinity, along with the construction and style of writing, lead Dr. Biran to argue that the stele was erected in the first quarter of the ninth century B.C., about a century after the death of King David.

The translation team discovered that the inscription told of warfare between the Israelites and the Arameans, which the Bible refers to during this period. In this find, a ruler of the Arameans probably Hazael is victorious over Israel and Judah. The stele was erected to celebrate the defeat of the two kings. In 1994 two more pieces were found with inscriptions which refer to Jehoram, the son of Ahab, ruler over Israel, and Ahaziah, who was the ruler over the “House of David” or Judah. These names and facts correspond to the account given in chapters 8 and 9 of 2 Kings. Dr. Hershel Shanks of Biblical Archaeological Review states, “The stele brings to life the biblical text in a very dramatic way. It also gives us more confidence in the historical reality of the biblical text.”9

The find has confirmed a number of facts. First, the use of the term “House of David” implies that there was a Davidic dynasty that ruled Israel. We can conclude, then, that a historic King David existed. Second, the kingdoms of Judah and Israel were prominent political entities as the Bible describes. Critics long viewed the two nations as simply insignificant states.

Dr. Bryant Wood summarizes the importance of this find this way. “In our day, most scholars, archaeologist and biblical scholars would take a very critical view of the historical accuracy of many of the accounts in the Bible. . . . Many scholars have said there never was a David or a Solomon, and now we have a stele that actually mentions David.”10

Although many archeologists remain skeptical of the biblical record, the evidence for the historical accuracy of the Bible continues to build.

Notes

1. See Are the Biblical Documents Reliable?.

2. Randall Price, The Stones Cry Out (Eugene, OR.: Harvest House Publishers, 1997), 46.

3. Nelson Glueck, Rivers in the Desert, (New York: Farrar, Strous and Cudahy, 1959), 136.

4. Fred Wright, Highlights of Archaeology in the Bible Lands, (Chicago: Moody Press, 1955), 94-95.

5. Price, 118.

6. John Garstang, The Foundations of Bible History; Joshua, Judges (London: Constable, 1931), 146.

7. Kathleen Kenyon and Thomas Holland, Excavations at Jericho Vol. 3: The Architecture and Stratigraphy of the Tell, (London: BSA), 370.

8. Bryant Wood, “Did the Israelites Conquer Jericho?” Biblical Archaeological Review,March/April, 1990, 57.

9. John Wilford, “Archaeologists say Evidence of House of David Found.” Dallas Morning News, 6 August 1993, 1A

10. Price, 173.

Bibliography

1. Biblical Archaeological Review, March/April 1994, “David Found at Dan,” 26-39.

2. Bryce, Trevor. The Kingdom of the Hittites. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1998.

3. Freedman, Noel and Geoghegan, Jeffrey. “House of David Is There!” Biblical Archaeological Review. March/April,1995, 78-79.

4. Garstang, John. The Foundations of Bible History; Joshua, Judges. London: Constable, 1931.

5. _______. The Land of the Hittites. London: Constable and Company, 1910.

6. Geisler, Norman. When Skeptics Ask. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1989.

7. Glueck, Nelson. Rivers in the Desert. New York: Farrar, Strous and Cudahy, 1959.

8. Hoerth, Alfred. Archaeology and the Old Testament. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Book House, 1998.

9. Kenyon, Kathleen and Holland, Thomas. Excavations at Jericho Vol. 3: The Architecture and Stratigraphy of the Tell. London: BSA 370.

10. _______. Digging Up Jericho. New York: Fredrick Praeger Publisher, 1957.

11. Lemonick, Michael. “Score One for the Bible.” Time Magazine, 5 March 1990, 59.

12. _______. “Are the Bible Stories True?” Time Magazine, December 18, 1995, 62-70.

13. McDowell, Josh. Evidence That Demands a Verdict. San Bernadino: Here’s Life Publishers, 1979.

14. _______. More Evidence That Demands a Verdict. San Bernadino: Here’s Life Publishers, 1975.

15. Merrill, Eugene. “The Very Stones Cry Out: A New Witness to an Ancient Record.” Gospel Herald at the Sunday School Times. Fall 1995, 54-55, 59.

16. Millard, Alan. Nelson’s Illustrated Wonders and Discoveries of the Bible. Nashville: Thomas Nelson Publishers, 1997.

17. Price, Randall. The Stones Cry Out. Eugene, OR.: Harvest House Publishers, 1997.

18. Wilford, John. “Archaeologists say Evidence of House of David Found.” Dallas Morning News, 6 August 1993, 1A and 11A.

19. Wood, Bryant. “Did the Israelites Conquer Jericho?” Biblical Archaeological Review, Vol. 16:2, 1990.

20. Wright, Fred. Highlights of Archaeology in the Bible Lands. Chicago: Moody Press, 1955.

21. Yamauchi, Edwin, The Stones and the Scriptures. Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott Company, 1972.

© 2000 Probe Ministries.

The original version of this article is found at https://www.probe.org/archaeology-and-the-old-testament/. Articles and answers on lots of topics at Probe.org.

Related Topics: Apologetics, Archaeology

3 That Changed The World – Boghazkoi Clay Tablets

Posted in Current Affairs, History, India, Media, politics, Religion by Anuraag Sanghi on December 25, 2007

Egyptian temple complex of Abu Simbel, Southern Egypt. (Photograph by David S. Boyer, Courtesy – National Geographic). Click for larger photograph.

Ramesses-II goes to war

1301 BC. An Egyptian land army, numbering more than 20,000, (divided in 4 divisions), set out on a campaign, lead by Pharoah Ramesses-II of the XIX Dynasty.

Ramesses-II, lived for more than 90 years, was probably the Pharaoh at the time of Exodus of Hebrews under Moses.

Ramesses-II is known in history for the construction during his reign. Most notably, the Temple Of Abu Simbel, Temple Of Nefertari. How would Abu Simbel read in Sanskrit – ‘abu’ is elephant, ‘simba’ is sinh i.e. lion and ‘bal’ is strength.

Cause of War Of Kadesh

Of the two warring sides, one was the Egyptian Pharoah RamessesII (1279-1212 BCE). With a land army of 20,000, and a naval Egyptian force set sail, in ships, to reach Byblos and squeeze the Hittites in the world’s first pincer movement. Ramesses-II set out to punish a small kingdom. Of Hittites, for trying to lure the Amurrus, Egyptian vassals, to the Hittite side.

Bedouin Slaves Being Beaten – Battle Of Kadesh

A lesser known (to modern history) element, were the Hittites led by Muwutalli-II, who had cobbled an alliance of small kingdoms.

Both these kingdoms were interested in the Syria and Palestine areas through which trade was carried out with India. Syriac and Palestinian lands were controlled by theAmurru – who were Egyptian vassals. The Hittites were a liberalising element in the Middle East /West Asia and possibly the Amurrus had defected to protect their political identity.

The campaign

During the march, leading to the Kadesh battle, the Egyptian army captured two Bedouin “spies”. These “spies”, after being sufficiently beaten, “revealed” to the Pharoah important information – giving confidence to the Pharoah that the Hittites feared the approaching Egyptian army. The truth was the opposite.

Battle Of Kadesh

The Greatest Chariot Battle In History

What followed was a historic chariot battle.

The awaiting Hittites ambushed the Egyptian army. These spies, in fact, were Hittites – sent to misinform the Egyptians!! An estimated 2500 Hittite (Ramesses’ estimate) chariots saw action. For two days the battle of Kadesh raged. Fought on the banks of the Orontes River in Syria.

The Egyptian king was saved at the last minute by the appearance of his reserve troops.

The Historic Treaty

After this battle, the Egyptians and the Hittites sat down and wrote their versions of this battle – which makes it rather unique. One of the few times in ancient history, where we get both versions of the battle. Two copies of the treaty were made. One, in Egyptian hieroglyphics and the other, in Hittite-Akaddian, and both survived. Only one difference in both the copies – the Egyptian version (recorded on a silver plaque) states that the Hittite king who wanted peace. In the Hittite copy, it was Ramesses-II who sent emissaries.

Queen Nefertari (Photograph by Kenneth Garrett 1997, NGM, From Treasures of Egypt, 2003.).

The two queens – critical factor

Peace broke when the queens of Hatti and Egypt, Puduhepa and Nefertari, sent one another congratulatory gifts and letters. Over the next 15 years, they arrived at modus vivendi and drafted a peace treaty. Puduhepa continued to be an active diplomat, co-signatory to the treaty of  Ulmi-Teshub treaty.

This peace treaty is the first in recorded history. A replica of this peace pact, in cuneiform tablet, found at Hattusas, Boghazkoi, hangs above the Security Council Chamber, United Nations, in New York, – a demonstration to modern nations the power of peace through international treaties. At Boghazkoi otherHiitite treaties have been found.

Another Treaty

The second discovery in the West Asian history, is the Treaty between the Mitannis and Hittites. In 1450 BC, Suppiluliuma I of the Hittites entered into a treaty with the Mitannis. The Mittanis of the Amarna Tablets fame were linked to the significant power in the region – Egypt. As already outlined, the Mittanis were the closely associated with the Egyptian Pharaohs by marriage. And the Mittanis were also Indo-Aryans.

What Is Special About This Treaty

In this treaty, Vedic Gods like Indra, Varuna, The Ashwini twins were invoked to bless and witness the treaty. The Hittites who had become past masters at treaties did not invoke these Gods with any other kingdom – except the Mitannis. Hittites and Mitannis were Indo- Aryan kingdoms – in full presence, with their Vedic Gods and culture.

The Zannanzas Puzzle

The 3rd interesting link between the Mitannis and the Hittites was the Zannanzas affair. After the death of Tutankhamen, (The Boy King) the XVIIIth Dynasty of Egypt was without a ruler. Tutankhamen’s queen,Ankhesenamun, a princess of Mitanni descent, needed a husband to continue the dynasty and protect the throne. She sent some urgent missives to the Hittite King, Suppiluliuma – asking him to send his son, to her as a husband, and become the King Of Egypt. The suspicious Hittite king ignored the missive. A second missive followed – and then a young prince was sent to Thebes (the capital was moved from Amarna back to Thebes).

The young prince never reached Egypt. He was possibly killed en route. And Tutankhamen’s Queen? Never been heard of since then.

How Do We Know All This

In 1906-07, an Turkish archeologist , Theodore Makridi-Bey, started excavations at Boghazkoi, (now identified as the ancient city of Hattusas) in Cappadocia, 150-200 kms from Ankara, Turkey. The name of the Hittite city, Hattusas, is possibly derived from the Sanskrit word, hutashan, हुताशन meaning ‘”sacred sacrificial fire.”

He was joined by Hugo Winckler, a German archaeologist, specialising in Assyria. They unearthed more than 10,000 clay tablets which proved to be of tremendous interest. A Czech cryptographer, born in Poland, working in Germany,Friedrich (or Bedrich) Hrozny, working in Germany cracked this code over the next 15 years – and that set off a furore amongst archaeologists.

What do the Boghaz koi tablets show

Deciphered cuneiform tablets show Hittite worship of Varuna, Mitra and Indra – Gods worshipped by Indo-Aryans. Rulers and Kings had names likes Shutruk (Shatrughna), Tushrutta meaning “of splendid chariots” (similar to Dashratha; Master of Ten Chariots) Rama-Sin (Assyrian Moon Good was Sin; in Hindi Ramachandra), Warad (Bharat). One of the Hittite allies against Ramesses II was Rimisharrinaa, रामशरण the King of Aleppo. (One of my grand uncles is also named as रामशरण – a common Indian name 4000 years later, 4000 kilometers apart).

These Hittites ruled immediately before and after Hammurabi – the much proclaimed western world’s first law giver. Hammurabi’s legal concepts of vengeful laws and retributive justice are the basis of laws in the 3 ‘desert religions.’

The Elam culture had a language which is similar to Dravidian languages. The Mitannite, Kikkuli, wrote on how to manage chariot horses. Egyptian king, Amenhotep I, married a Mittanite princesses. Elamites were founders of the first kingdom in the Iranian geography.

Some archaeologists await the discovery of tombs to establish the identity of kings. They may never find them. In Vedic cultures, there are no tombs – like the Pyramids, or the Catacombs, or Mausoluems. Vedic Indo Aryans cremate their dead. They do not build memorials or mausoluems.

Religious freedom

The Hittite kingdom came to be known as the “kingdom of thousands of gods.” Like the Mittani, the Hittites too, added the gods of the conquered people to their own list of gods – instead of imposing the Hittite religion on the conquered peoples.

Why does this sound familiar?

This is significant as the Western concept of slavery was to deprive the captured of their religions (for instance, The Wends and their religion). This is another display of slave reform by Indics 3000 years ago.

Valued 3000 years later

These inscriptions were held sacred by the locals, 3000 years later and William Wright, an European investigator, had difficulty in noting these inscriptions. In 1870 The Hittites were named, by William Wright and Oxford University linguist A. H. Saycebased on Biblical short references, as one of the tribes of Palestine in the first millennium BC. It was a “son of Heth—a Hittite—who sold the Prophet Abraham the land to bury his much-loved wife, Sarah”. Modern view is Hattusas-Hittites (Yazilikaya/Boghazkoi/Carchemish) have nothing to do with the Biblical Hittites.

The Boghazkoi tablets changed modern history. From a completely Greco-Roman (read Euro-centric) history, the pendulum had swung to the other end. Boghazkoi showed Indian presence in the thick of West Asia in the year 2000BC with their culture and technology. This has pushed Indian history back by at least by 2000 years – to 4000 BC.

The Amarna letters and the Boghazkoi tablets have given archaeological proof of the Indo Aryan spread. Earlier, theories were retro-fitted, based on Biblical dates (Max Mueller’s, (specialist in “Compartive Theology”); main aim – “save” Indian pagans; make them see “the light” of Christian belief), colonial propaganda (Max Mueller, though a German, was a British employee) and racism. Hazy systems like philology, linguistics, comparative linguistics were used to define history. Now hard archaeological proof shows something else. Written texts, deciphered and decrpyted give us a new theory.

These discoveries and their implications have been buried under a mound of silence. Although well known in academic circles, these discoveries have not been used to update popular history. In the next (and last instalment of this series) I will trace how DNA testing is the third major tool used to reveal history!

PS – One of the big hits in Japan is the manga comic series “Red River” by Chie Shinohara. The entire series is based on this interaction between the Hittites and The Egyptians. The Red River is a work of fiction – so it cannot be taken as history – but the intrigue, silence, drama obviously inspired the author.

The Bible and Archaeology – Is the Bible from God? (Kyle Butt 42 min)

You want some evidence that indicates that the Bible is true? Here is a good place to start and that is taking a closer look at the archaeology of the Old Testament times. Is the Bible historically accurate? Here are some of the posts I have done in the past on the subject: 1. The Babylonian Chronicleof Nebuchadnezzars Siege of Jerusalem2. Hezekiah’s Siloam Tunnel Inscription. 3. Taylor Prism (Sennacherib Hexagonal Prism)4. Biblical Cities Attested Archaeologically. 5. The Discovery of the Hittites6.Shishak Smiting His Captives7. Moabite Stone8Black Obelisk of Shalmaneser III9A Verification of places in Gospel of John and Book of Acts., 9B Discovery of Ebla Tablets10. Cyrus Cylinder11. Puru “The lot of Yahali” 9th Century B.C.E.12. The Uzziah Tablet Inscription13. The Pilate Inscription14. Caiaphas Ossuary14 B Pontius Pilate Part 214c. Three greatest American Archaeologists moved to accept Bible’s accuracy through archaeology.

September 19, 2011

By Elvis Costello

I first heard of the Beatles when I was nine years old. I spent most of my holidays on Merseyside then, and a local girl gave me a bad publicity shot of them with their names scrawled on the back.

This was 1962 or ’63, before they came to America. The photo was badly lit, and they didn’t quite have their look down; Ringo had his hair slightly swept back, as if he wasn’t quite sold on the Beatles haircut yet.

I didn’t care about that; they were the band for me. The funny thing is that parents and all their friends from Liverpool were also curious and proud about this local group. Prior to that, the people in show business from the north of England had all been comedians. The Beatles even recorded for Parlophone, which was a comedy label, as if they believed they might be a passing novelty act.

I was exactly the right age to be hit by them full-on. My experience — seizing on every picture, saving money for singles and EPs, catching them on a local news show — was repeated over and over again around the world. It wasn’t the first time anything like this had happened, but the Beatles achieved a level of fame and recognition known previously only to Charlie Chaplin, Brigitte Bardot and Elvis Presley, along with a little of the airless exclusivity of astronauts, former presidents and other heavyweight champions.

Every record was a shock. Compared to rabid R&B evangelists like the Rolling Stones, the Beatles arrived sounding like nothing else. They had already absorbed Buddy Holly, the Everly Brothers and Chuck Berry, but they were also writing their own songs. They made writing your own material expected, rather than exceptional.

And John Lennon and Paul McCartney were exceptional songwriters; McCartney was, and is, a truly virtuoso musician; George Harrison wasn’t the kind of guitar player who tore off wild, unpredictable solos, but you can sing the melodies of nearly all of his breaks. Most important, they always fit right into the arrangement. Ringo Starr played the drums with an incredibly unique feel that nobody can really copy, although many fine drummers have tried and failed. Most of all, John and Paul were fantastic singers.

Lennon, McCartney and Harrison had stunningly high standards as writers. Imagine releasing a song like “Ask Me Why” or “Things We Said Today” as a B side. They made such fantastic records as “Paperback Writer” b/w “Rain” or “Penny Lane” b/w “Strawberry Fields Forever” and only put them out as singles. These records were events, and not just advance notice of an album. Then they started to really grow up: simple love lyrics to adult stories like “Norwegian Wood,” which spoke of the sour side of love, and on to bigger ideas than you would expect to find in catchy pop lyrics.

They were the first group to mess with the aural perspective of their recordings and have it be more than just a gimmick. Engineers like Geoff Emerick invented techniques that we now take for granted, in response to the group’s imagination. Before the Beatles, you had guys in lab coats doing recording experiments, but you didn’t have rockers deliberately putting things out of balance, like a quiet vocal in front of a loud track on “Strawberry Fields Forever.” You can’t exaggerate the license that this gave to everyone from Motown to Jimi Hendrix.

My absolute favorite albums are Rubber Soul and Revolver. On both records you can hear references to other music — R&B, Dylan, psychedelia — but it’s not done in a way that is obvious or dates the records. When you picked up Revolver, you knew it was something different. Heck, they are wearing sunglasses indoors in the picture on the back of the cover and not even looking at the camera . . . and the music was so strange and yet so vivid. If I had to pick a favorite song from those albums, it would be “And Your Bird Can Sing” . . . no, “Girl” . . . no, “For No One” . . . and so on, and so on. . . .

Their breakup album, Let It Be, contains songs both gorgeous and jagged. I suppose ambition and human frailty creeps into every group, but they delivered some incredible performances. I remember going to Leicester Square and seeing the film of Let It Be in 1970. I left with a melancholy feeling.

Someone recently gave me an assembly of newsreel footage, which illustrates how swiftly the band was drained of the bright and joyful wit presented as a public face.

In one early sequence, McCartney tells reporters that they will soon appear on The Ed Sullivan Show and then points into the camera: “There he is, hi, Ed, and Mrs. Ed” — “and Mr. Ed,” chimes Ringo. It might have been practiced, but it plays entirely off-the-cuff.

Just a year later, they are seen at a press conference in Los Angeles for their final tour. Suits and ties are a thing of the past. Staring down a series of dismal attempts at provocation from the press corps, they look exhausted and disenchanted.

When probed by one blowhard to respond to a Time magazine critique that “Day Tripper” was about a prostitute and “Norwegian Wood” about a lesbian, McCartney responds, “We were just trying to write songs about prostitutes and lesbians.” In the laughter that follows, he mutters, “Cut.” They were giving the impression that the game was up, but in truth, they were just getting started.

The word “Beatlesque” has been in the dictionary for quite a while now. You hear them in Harry Nilsson’s melodies; in Prince’s Around the World in a Day; in the hits of ELO and Crowded House and in Ron Sexsmith’s ballads. You can hear that Kurt Cobain listened to the Beatles and mixed their ideas with punk and metal. They can be heard in all sorts of one-off wonders from the Knickerbockers’ “Lies” and the Flamin’ Groovies’ “Shake Some Action.” The scope and license of the White Album has permitted everyone from OutKast to Radiohead to Green Day to Joanna Newsom to roll their picture out on a broader, bolder canvas.

Now, I’ll admit that I’ve stolen my share of Beatles licks, but around the turn of the Nineties, I got to co-write 12 songs with Paul McCartney and even dared to propose that he too reference some of the Beatles’ harmonic signatures — as, astonishingly, he had made up another musical vocabulary for Wings and during his solo career.

In 1999, a little time after Linda McCartney’s passing, Paul performed at the Concert for Linda, organized by Chrissie Hynde. During the rehearsal, I was singing harmony on a Ricky Nelson song with him, and Paul called out the next tune: “All My Loving.”

I said, “Do you want me to take the harmony line the second time round?” And he said, “Yeah, give it a try.” I’d only had 35 years to learn the part. There was inevitably a poignant feeling to this song, written long before he had even met Linda:

Close your eyes and I’ll kiss you
Tomorrow I’ll miss you
Remember I’ll always be true.

At the show, it was very different. The second Paul sang the opening lines, the crowd’s reaction was so intense that it all but drowned the song out. It was very thrilling, but also disconcerting.

Perhaps I understood in that moment one of the reasons why the Beatles had to stop performing. The songs weren’t theirs anymore. They belonged to everybody.

This is an updated version of an essay that appeared in RS 946.

The Beatles – The Long and Winding Road (LIVE – 90´s)

Uploaded on Mar 27, 2007

The Beatles together again playing one of their most beaultiful songs.
Can you imagine they together again in a concert?

The Beatles – “The Long And Winding Road”

Uploaded on Jun 1, 2011

The Beatles “The Long And Winding Road” album “The Beatles Anthology 3”

90

‘The Long and Winding Road’

the beatles 100 greatest songs
Evening Standard/Getty Images

Main Writer: McCartney
Recorded: January 26 and 31, 1969; April 1, 1970
Released: May 11, 1970
10 weeks; No. 1

McCartney wrote “The Long and Winding Road” as he watched the Beatles begin to spin out of control. In early 1969, creative and financial issues were fracturing the band. Lennon had already told the others that he was quitting, Starr had gone on a hiatus, and Harrison and McCartney disappeared for weeks. “It’s a sad song, because it’s all about the unattainable,” McCartney said. “I was a bit flipped out and tripped out at the time.”

Months after recording the poignant piano ballad, McCartney got a rude surprise: Producer Phil Spector, who had been given the tapes by Lennon, had reworked his take, adding a layer of strings and a choir. “It was an insult to Paul,” engineer Geoff Emerick recalled. “It was his record. And someone takes it out of the can and starts to overdub things without his permission.” Soon after, the acrimony became too much: In April 1970, McCartney released his first solo album and issued a statement announcing the end of the Beatles.

Appears On: Let It Be

89

‘Good Day Sunshine’

the beatles 100 greatest songs
Evening Standard/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Main Writer: McCartney
Recorded: June 8 and 9, 1966
Released: August 8, 1966
Not released as a single

“Good Day Sunshine” was McCartney’s attempt, one hot summer afternoon, to write a song in the vein of the Lovin’ Spoonful’s idyllic, old-fashioned “Daydream.” “That was our favorite record of theirs,” McCartney said.

The song benefits from one of George Martin’s ingenious studio devices: recording specific parts at different tape speeds. Though McCartney handles the piano chords on “Good Day Sunshine,” Martin — an accomplished keyboardist who contributed to a number of Beatle recordings — is responsible for the slowed-down honky-tonk piano solo that follows the abbreviated second verse.

The result is a peppy break that sounds organic even though it’s the product of tape-manipulation trickery. Martin’s nuanced approach to recording technology — using it to serve the music, not as a gimmick — is arguably his biggest contribution to Revolver and everything that followed. “George Martin [was] quite experimental for who he was, a grown-up,” said McCartney.

Appears On: Revolver

Photographer Bob Gomel featured today:

_________________________________


Houston photographer shares never-before-seen pictures of The Beatles

Doug Miller, KHOU 11 News11:10 p.m. CDT July 7, 2015

Never-before-seen pictures of The Beatles revealed

HOUSTON – Have you ever met somebody who tells such fascinating stories, you feel like you could spend hours just listening? Bob Gomel is one of those people. What’s especially interesting is that his stories come with pictures.

As a photographer for Life magazine, he befriended legendary figures like Muhammed Ali.

Hanging in his hallway is a picture he took at a dinner with Marilyn Monroe, around the time she supposedly was having an affair with another one of his acquaintances, President Kennedy.

“Charisma is a word that possibly was invented for John Kennedy,” he’ll tell you, right before he launches into a story about watching a ballgame with JFK inside his Georgetown home.

Then there was the time he hung out with The Beatles.

Fifty years ago this summer, The Beatles played to screaming crowds in a coliseum in downtown Houston. A little more than a year earlier, during this week in 1964, “A Hard Day’s Night” premiered in London.

Now, more than a half-century after Beatlemania exploded across the Atlantic, the Houston photographer is sharing a private treasure: His stash of photographs of The Beatles, many of them never before seen by the public.

“Their stardom, although it had already begun, had not affected their personalities,” Gomel said. “They were quite humble.”

As always with Gomel, there’s an interesting story behind the pictures.

Life magazine’s editors, he recalled, didn’t quite grasp the phenomenal popularity of The Beatles when they first appeared on “The Ed Sullivan Show” in February 1964.

Nonetheless, they deployed a team of photographers to shoot pictures of the lads from Liverpool as they traveled to their second Sullivan show, which was broadcast from Miami Beach.

Gomel flew to Florida on the same plane, taking photographs from the door of the aircraft as the band beheld a crowd of thousands gathered to greet them.

“It was pandemonium, because some local radio disc jockey had informed that The Beatles were coming in at such and such a time,” Gomel said.

Looking back at his pictures, Gomel is struck by how well-dressed the teenagers were back then. Boys wore coats and ties, girls wore dresses and pearls.

They had hoped to shoot a layout showing John, Paul, George and Ringo clowning around in a swimming pool, but their hotel was mobbed by teenaged fans.

Gomel remembers complaining about his problem to Myron Cohen, a comedian scheduled to appear on the same Sullivan show.

Somehow, Gomel said, Cohen hooked him up with somebody who was willing to lend his private pool for a photo shoot.

That’s how Life magazine ended up with a series of what became famous photographs of The Beatles singing in a swimming pool.

One of those photos, taken not by Gomel but by one of his colleagues, eventually wound up on the magazine’s cover.

But Gomel has kept a cache of unpublished photographs from the same session: John Lennon wraps a towel around his head, Paul McCartney splashes in the water, George Harrison apparently shivers and Ringo Starr wears his rings in the pool.

“They were the whitest white people I had ever met,” Gomel said. “When they took their shirts off, living a life in nightclubs in Hamburg and London, it was blinding.”

The visitors from Britain wanted to visit a Florida beach, so they headed out and hoped for the best. But crowds quickly gathered around them, chasing them into the water.

Gomel caught a shot of a young woman stealing a kiss from McCartney.

“They enjoyed their stay,” Gomel said. “And of course, the show was a big hit. And off they went.”

_____________

______________

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones 1969 Let It Bleed full album

_

Rolling Stones 1969 Let It Bleed full album

Let It Bleed

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This article is about the 1969 album by The Rolling Stones. For other uses, see Let It Bleed (disambiguation).
Let It Bleed
LetitbleedRS.jpg
Studio album by The Rolling Stones
Released 5 December 1969
Recorded November 1968, February–July, October-November 1969
Studio Olympic Studios, London; Elektra Studios, Los Angeles
Genre Hard rock, blues, country rock
Length 42:21
Label Decca (UK)
London (US)
Producer Jimmy Miller
The Rolling Stones chronology
Beggars Banquet
(1968)
Let It Bleed
(1969)
Sticky Fingers
(1971)
Singles from Let It Bleed
  1. Let It Bleed“/”You Got the Silver
    Released: January 1970 (Japan only)

Let It Bleed is the eighth British and tenth American album by the English rock band the Rolling Stones, released in December 1969 by Decca Records in the United Kingdom and London Records in the United States. Released shortly after the band’s 1969 American Tour, it is the follow-up to 1968’s Beggars Banquet and the last album by the band to feature Brian Jones as well as the first to feature Mick Taylor.

Background[edit]

Although the Stones had begun the recording of “You Can’t Always Get What You Want” in November 1968, before Beggars Banquet had been released, recording for Let It Bleed began in earnest in February 1969 and continued sporadically until early November.[1] Brian Jones performs on only two tracks: playing the autoharp on “You Got the Silver“, and percussion on “Midnight Rambler“. His replacement, Mick Taylor, plays guitar on two tracks, “Country Honk” and “Live with Me“, as well as on “Honky Tonk Women” which was recorded during the Let It Bleed sessions. Keith Richards, who had already shared vocal duties with Mick Jagger on “Connection” and sung separate lead vocals on parts of “Something Happened to Me Yesterday” and “Salt of the Earth“, sang his first solo lead vocal on a Rolling Stones recording with “You Got the Silver“.[2] The London Bach Choir sang on “You Can’t Always Get What You Want” but publicly disassociated itself from the album, citing what author Stephen Davis terms its “relentless drug ambience”.[3]

Let It Bleed was originally scheduled for release in July 1969. Although “Honky Tonk Women” was released as a single that month, the album itself suffered numerous delays and was eventually released in December 1969, after the band’s US tour for it had already completed.[citation needed] The majority of the album was recorded at Olympic Studios in London, with further work taking place at Elektra Sound Recorders Studios, 962 La Cienega Boulevard, Los Angeles, California, 90069, while the Stones prepared for the tour.[4] The Los Angeles-recorded portions included overdubs by guest musicians Merry Clayton (on “Gimme Shelter“), Byron Berline(on “Country Honk”),[5] and Bobby Keys and Leon Russell (on “Live with Me”).[6] Finally, an unreleased version of “I Don’t Know The Reason Why (a. k. a. Hillside Blues)” was also recorded there in October, 1969 with Mick Taylor.

Music and lyrics[edit]

Style and influences[edit]

Like Beggars Banquet the year before, as well as the subsequent two releases, the album marks a return to the group’s more blues-based approach that was prominent in the pre-Aftermath period of their career. The main inspiration during this string of albums was American roots music and Let It Bleed is no exception, drawing heavily from gospel (evident in “Gimme Shelter” and “You Can’t Always Get What You Want“), Hank Williams and Jimmie Rodgers tributes (“Country Honk“),[7] Chicago blues (“Midnight Rambler“),[8] as well as country blues (“You Got The Silver“, “Love In Vain“) and country rock (“Let It Bleed“).[9]


Problems playing this file? See media help.

According to Don Heckman from The New York Times, Let It Bleed was a “heavy” and “passionately erotic” album of hard rock and blues, influenced by African-American music.[10] Richie Unterberger, writing for AllMusic, said it “extends the rock and blues feel of Beggars Banquet into slightly harder-rocking, more demonically sexual territory.”[11] Mojo magazine’s James McNair felt the record had an emphasis on “earthy” country blues.[12]

Thanks to their experimentation during the mid-1960s, the band had acquired a very eclectic taste when it came to arrangements. Slide guitar playing is very prominent (played entirely by Richards, except “Country Honk“, which was performed by newcomer Mick Taylor), as it is featured on all songs except “Gimme Shelter“, “Live With Me” and “You Can’t Always Get What You Want“, giving the album an authentic blues feel throughout. Beyond that, there is an array of session musicians that embellish the songs with various instruments. Along the usual piano duties (Ian Stewart, Nicky Hopkins), the record included fiddle (Byron Berline),[7] mandolin (Ry Cooder),[13] organ and French horn (Al Kooper),[14] as well as vibes (Bill Wyman)[15] and autoharp (Wyman,[16] Jones[17]). Even more important, however, was the double debut of renowned saxophonist Bobby Keys on “Live With Me“, a musician who was integral at giving the group’s arrangements a soul/jazz background, as well as guitarist Mick Taylor, who specialized on lead, technically proficient playing, giving the band a harder rock sound during the late 1960s/early 1970s.[18]

Lyrics[edit]

Generally, the album’s lyrics deal with 1960s life; there is social commentary on the Vietnam War (“Gimme Shelter“), as well as the hippie movement, drug culture and politics (“You Can’t Always Get What You Want“), but at the same time there are love-related topics, ranging from desolate (“Love In Vain“, written by Robert Johnson), to heartwarming (“You Got The Silver“, written by Richards), sensual, innuendo-filled (“Let It Bleed“), and humorous (“Live With Me“). Moreover, “Monkey Man” satirizes and comments the band’s public image and lifestyle while “Midnight Rambler” has a very cinematic, suspenseful approach, talking about its titular serial killer (inspired by Albert DeSalvo) in the third-person before Jagger slowly assumes the role after the first half of the song.

The lyricism found on Let It Bleed is often noted for its violent and cynical undercurrents. Jann S. Wenner, in a 1995 Rolling Stone interview with Jagger, described the album’s songs as “disturbing” the scenery as “ugly” and asked Jagger if the Vietnam War played a role in the album’s worldview. Jagger said: “I think so. Even though I was living in America only part time, I was influenced. All those images were on television. Plus, the spill out onto campuses”.

Artwork[edit]

The album cover displays a surreal sculpture designed by Robert Brownjohn.[19] The image consists of the Let It Bleed record being played by the tone-arm of an antique phonograph, and a record-changer spindle supporting several items stacked on a plate in place of a stack of records: a film canister labelled Stones – Let It Bleed, a clock dial, a pizza, a tyre and a cake with elaborate icing topped by figurines representing the band. The cake parts of the construction were prepared by then-unknown cookery writer Delia Smith.[20] The reverse of the LP sleeve[21] shows the same “record-stack” melange in a state of disarray. The artwork was inspired by the working title of the album, which was Automatic Changer.[22]

The album cover for Let It Bleed was among the ten chosen by the Royal Mail for a set of “Classic Album Cover” postage stamps issued in January 2010.[23][24]

Jagger originally asked artist M. C. Escher to design a cover for the album; Escher declined.[25][26]

Release and reception[edit]

Professional ratings
Retrospective reviews
Review scores
Source Rating
AllMusic 5/5 stars[27]
Encyclopedia of Popular Music 5/5 stars[28]
Entertainment Weekly A[29]
The Great Rock Discography 9/10[28]
MusicHound Rock 5/5[30]
NME 9/10[31]
Rolling Stone 5/5 stars[32]
The Rolling Stone Album Guide 5/5 stars[33]

Released in December, Let It Bleed reached number 1 in the UK (temporarily demoting The BeatlesAbbey Road) and number 3 on the Billboard Top LPs chart in the US, where it eventually went 2x platinum. In a contemporary review for Rolling Stone magazine, music critic Greil Marcus said that the middle of the album has “great” songs, but “Gimme Shelter” and “You Can’t Always Get What You Want” “seem to matter most” because they “both reach for reality and end up confronting it, almost mastering what’s real, or what reality will feel like as the years fade in.”[34]

Let It Bleed was the Stones’ last album to be released in an official mono version, which is rare and highly sought-after today. The album was released in US as an LP record, reel to reel tape and 8-track cartridge in 1969, and as a remastered CD in 1986. In August 2002, it was reissued in a remastered CD and SACD digipak by ABKCO Records, and once more in 2010 by Universal Music Enterprises in a Japanese only SHM-SACDversion.[35]

According to Rolling Stone, Let It Bleed is the second of the Stones’ run of four studio LPs that are generally regarded as among their greatest achievements artistically, equalled only by the best of their great 45’s from that decade. The other three albums are Beggars Banquet (1968), Sticky Fingers (1971) and Exile on Main St. (1972).[36] In a retrospective review, NME magazine said that the album “tugs and teases” in various musical directions and called it “a classic”.[31] In his 2001 Stones biography, Stephen Davis said of the album “No rock record, before or since, has ever so completely captured the sense of palpable dread that hung over its era.”[3]In a five-star review for Rolling Stone in 2004, Gavin Edwards praised Keith Richard’s guitar playing throughout the album and stated, “Whether it was spiritual, menstrual or visceral, the Stones made sure you went home covered in blood.”[32] Jason McNeil of PopMatters wrote that Beggars Banquet and Let It Bleed are “the two greatest albums the band’s (or anyone’s) ever made”.[37]

In 2000, Q magazine ranked it at number 28 in its list of “The 100 Greatest British Albums Ever”. In 2001, the TV network VH1 placed Let It Bleed at 24th on their “100 Greatest Albums of R ‘n’ R” survey. In 1997, it was voted the 27th “Best Album Ever” by The Guardian.[28] In 2003, Rolling Stone ranked it at number 32 on the magazine’s list of the “500 Greatest Albums of All Time“.[38]

Track listing[edit]

The track listing on the back of the album jacket did not follow the one on the album itself. According to Brownjohn, he altered it purely for visual reasons; the correct order was shown on the record’s label. Additionally, “Gimme Shelter” is rendered as “Gimmie Shelter” on the jacket. Some releases have “Gimmie Shelter” on the cover, the inner sleeve and the LP label.

All songs written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, except “Love in Vain” by Robert Johnson. Early US editions of the album credit the song to Woody Payne, a pseudonym used by a music publisher of the songs of Robert Johnson.

Side one
No. Title Length
1. Gimme Shelter 4:31
2. Love in Vain 4:19
3. Country Honk 3:09
4. Live with Me 3:33
5. Let It Bleed 5:26
Side two
No. Title Length
1. Midnight Rambler 6:52
2. You Got the Silver 2:51
3. Monkey Man 4:12
4. You Can’t Always Get What You Want 7:28

Personnel[edit]

The Rolling Stones[edit]

Additional personnel[edit]

Charts[edit]

Chart (1969–70) Peak
position
Australia (Kent Music Report)[39] 2
Canada Top Albums/CDs (RPM)[40] 4
Dutch Albums (MegaCharts)[41] 1
German Albums (Offizielle Top 100)[42] 3
Norwegian Albums (VG-lista)[43] 2
UK Albums (OCC)[44] 1
US Billboard 200[45] 3
Chart (2007) Peak
position
Swedish Albums (Sverigetopplistan)[46] 37
Chart (2012) Peak
position
French Albums (SNEP)[47] 138

Certifications[edit]

Region Certification Certified units/Sales
Canada (Music Canada)[48] Platinum 100,000^
United Kingdom (BPI)[49] Platinum 300,000^
United States (RIAA)[50] 2× Platinum 2,000,000^
*sales figures based on certification alone
^shipments figures based on certification alone

References[edit]

  1. Jump up^ Egan, Sean (2005). Rolling Stones and the making of Let It Bleed. Unanimous Ltd. pp. 206–. ISBN 1 90331 877 7.
  2. Jump up^ Decca. “Inner sleeve credits”. Retrieved 13 July 2012.
  3. ^ Jump up to:a b Davis, Stephen (2001). Old Gods Almost Dead: The 40-Year Odyssey of the Rolling Stones. New York, NY: Broadway Books. p. 306. ISBN 0-7679-0312-9.
  4. Jump up^ Bonanno, Massimo (1990). The Rolling Stones Chronicle. London: Plexus Publishing. pp. 86, 93. ISBN 0-207-16940-3.
  5. Jump up^ Wyman, Bill (2002). Rolling with the Stones. London: Dorling Kindersley. p. 356. ISBN 0-7513-4646-2.
  6. Jump up^ Davis, Stephen (2001). Old Gods Almost Dead: The 40-Year Odyssey of the Rolling Stones. New York, NY: Broadway Books. pp. 304, 305. ISBN 0-7679-0312-9.
  7. ^ Jump up to:a b McPherson, Ian. “Country Honk”. http://www.timeisonourside.com. Retrieved 2016-10-25.
  8. Jump up^ McPherson, Ian. “Midnight Rambler”. http://www.timeisonourside.com. Retrieved 2016-10-25.
  9. Jump up^ Ian. “Let It Bleed”. http://www.timeisonourside.com. Retrieved 2016-10-25.
  10. Jump up^ Heckman, Don (28 December 1969). “Pop: No, The Rolling Stones are Not Fascists; Mick’s Not Fascist”. The New York Times. p. D24. Retrieved 21 June 2013. (subscription required)
  11. Jump up^ Unterberger, Richie. “Let It Bleed”. AllMusic. Retrieved 17 June 2015.
  12. Jump up^ “The Rolling Stones Top 10 Albums” > “2. Let It Bleed”. mojo4music.com. Retrieved 11 September 2015.
  13. Jump up^ McPherson, Ian. “Love In Vain”. http://www.timeisonourside.com. Retrieved 2016-10-25.
  14. Jump up^ McPherson, Ian. “You Can’t Always Get What You Want”. http://www.timeisonourside.com. Retrieved 2016-10-25.
  15. Jump up^ McPherson, Ian. “Monkey Man”. http://www.timeisonourside.com. Retrieved 2016-10-25.
  16. Jump up^ McPherson, Ian. “Let It Bleed”. http://www.timeisonourside.com. Retrieved 2016-10-25.
  17. Jump up^ McPherson, Ian. “You Got the Silver”. http://www.timeisonourside.com. Retrieved 2016-10-25.
  18. Jump up^ McPherson, Ian. “Live with Me”. http://www.timeisonourside.com. Retrieved 2016-10-25.
  19. Jump up^ Robert Brownjohn from the Design Museum website
  20. Jump up^ Delia Smith from loog2stoned.com
  21. Jump up^ Back cover image from the Design Museum website
  22. Jump up^ Wyman, Bill. 2002. Rolling With the Stones
  23. Jump up^ “Classic Album Covers: Issue Date – 7 January 2010”. Royal Mail. Retrieved 8 January 2010.
  24. Jump up^ Michaels, Sean (8 January 2010). “Coldplay album gets stamp of approval from Royal Mail”. The Guardian. London. Retrieved 8 January 2010.
  25. Jump up^ “Review: The Amazing World of MC Escher”. Herald Scotland. Retrieved 21 April 2016.
  26. Jump up^ Higgins, Chris. “How Mick Jagger Got Dissed By M.C. Escher”. Mental Floss. Retrieved 21 April 2016.
  27. Jump up^ Unterberger, Richie. “Let It Bleed”. AllMusic. Retrieved 17 June 2015.
  28. ^ Jump up to:a b c “The Rolling Stones Let It Bleed. Acclaimed Music. Retrieved 15 November 2014.
  29. Jump up^ “Let It Bleed CD”. Muze Inc. Retrieved 21 June 2008.
  30. Jump up^ Graff, Gary; Durchholz, Daniel (eds) (1999). MusicHound Rock: The Essential Album Guide. Farmington Hills, MI: Visible Ink Press. pp. 950, 952. ISBN 1-57859-061-2.
  31. ^ Jump up to:a b “Review: Let It Bleed”. NME. London: 46. 8 July 1995.
  32. ^ Jump up to:a b Edwards, Gavin (2 September 2004). “Review: Let It Bleed”. Rolling Stone. New York: 147.
  33. Jump up^ “The Rolling Stones: Album Guide”. rollingstone.com. Archived version retrieved 15 November 2014.
  34. Jump up^ “Album Reviews: The Rolling Stones – Let it Bleed”. Rolling Stone. Retrieved 31 October 2009.
  35. Jump up^ Walsh, Christopher (24 August 2002). “Super audio CDs: The Rolling Stones Remastered”. Billboard. p. 27.
  36. Jump up^ Steven Van Zandt. “The Immortals – The Greatest Artists of All Time: 4) The Rolling Stones”. The RollingStone. Retrieved 31 October2009.
  37. Jump up^ MacNeil, Jason (23 August 2004). “The Rolling Stones: Beggars Banquet / Let it Bleed”. PopMatters. Archived from the original on 19 October 2012. Retrieved 31 October 2009.
  38. Jump up^ Let It Bleed. Rolling Stone. January 2003. Retrieved 21 August 2011.
  39. Jump up^ Kent, David (1993). Australian Chart Book 1970-1992. St Ives, N.S.W.: Australian Chart Book. ISBN 0-646-11917-6.
  40. Jump up^ Top RPM Albums: Issue 6114.” RPM. Library and Archives Canada. Retrieved 11 June 2016.
  41. Jump up^ Dutchcharts.nl – The Rolling Stones – Let It Bleed” (in Dutch). Hung Medien. Retrieved 11 June 2016.
  42. Jump up^ Offiziellecharts.de – The Rolling Stones – Let It Bleed” (in German). GfK Entertainment Charts. Retrieved 11 June 2016.
  43. Jump up^ Norwegiancharts.com – The Rolling Stones – Let It Bleed”. Hung Medien. Retrieved 11 June 2016.
  44. Jump up^ “Rolling Stones | Artist | Official Charts”. UK Albums Chart Retrieved 11 June 2016.
  45. Jump up^ “The Rolling Stones – Chart history” Billboard 200 for The Rolling Stones. Retrieved 11 June 2016.
  46. Jump up^ Swedishcharts.com – The Rolling Stones – Let It Bleed”. Hung Medien. Retrieved 11 June 2016.
  47. Jump up^ Lescharts.com – The Rolling Stones – Let It Bleed”. Hung Medien. Retrieved 11 June 2016.
  48. Jump up^ “Canadian album certifications – The Rolling Stones”. Music Canada. Retrieved 11 June 2016.
  49. Jump up^ “British album certifications – The Rolling Stones”. British Phonographic Industry. Retrieved 11 June 2016. Enter The Rolling Stones in the field Search. Select Artist in the field Search by. Select album in the field By Format. Select Platinum in the field By Award. Click Search
  50. Jump up^ “American album certifications – The Rolling Stones”. Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved 11 June 2016. If necessary, click Advanced, then click Format, then select Album, then click SEARCH

External links[edit]

 

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MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones 1968 Beggars Banquet full album

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Rolling Stones 1968 Beggars Banquet full album

Beggars Banquet

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This article is about the Rolling Stones album. For the record label, see Beggars Banquet Records. For the story collection by Ian Rankin, see Beggars Banquet (book).
Beggars Banquet
BeggarsBanquetLP.jpg
Studio album by The Rolling Stones
Released 6 December 1968
Recorded March – July 1968
Studio Olympic Studios, London[1] and Sunset Sound, Los Angeles
Genre Roots rock,[2] country blues[3]
Length 39:44
Label Decca (UK)
London (US)
Producer Jimmy Miller
The Rolling Stones chronology
Their Satanic Majesties Request
(1967)
Beggars Banquet
(1968)
Let It Bleed
(1969)
Alternate cover

The originally planned “toilet” cover was rejected by both Decca and London in 1968. It was later featured on most Compact Discreissues.[4][5]
Singles from Beggars Banquet
  1. Street Fighting Man“/”No Expectations
    Released: 31 August 1968 (US)

Beggars Banquet is the seventh British and ninth American studio album by English rock band The Rolling Stones. It was released in December 1968 by Decca Records in the United Kingdom and London Records in the United States. The album was a return to roots rock for the band following the psychedelic pop of their 1967 album Their Satanic Majesties Request.[2] It was the last Rolling Stones album to be released during Brian Jones‘ lifetime.

Background[edit]

Glyn Johns, the album’s recording engineer and longtime collaborator of the band, said that Beggars Banquet signaled “the Rolling Stones’ coming of age … I think that the material was far better than anything they’d ever done before. The whole mood of the record was far stronger to me musically.”[5] Producer Jimmy Miller described guitarist Keith Richards as “a real workhorse” while recording the album, mostly due to the infrequent presence of Brian Jones. When he did show up at the sessions, Jones behaved erratically due to his drug use and emotional problems.[5] Miller said that Jones would “show up occasionally when he was in the mood to play, and he could never really be relied on:

When he would show up at a session—let’s say he had just bought a sitar that day, he’d feel like playing it, so he’d look in his calendar to see if the Stones were in. Now he may have missed the previous four sessions. We’d be doing let’s say, a blues thing. He’d walk in with a sitar, which was totally irrelevant to what we were doing, and want to play it. I used to try to accommodate him. I would isolate him, put him in a booth and not record him onto any track that we really needed. And the others, particularly Mick and Keith, would often say to me, ‘Just tell him to piss off and get the hell out of here’.[5]

Jones played sitar[6] and tanpura on “Street Fighting Man”,[7] slide guitar on “No Expectations”,[8][9][10] harmonica on “Parachute Woman”, “Dear Doctor” and “Prodigal Son”,[11] and Mellotron on “Jig-Saw Puzzle” and “Stray Cat Blues”.[12] Jones is sometimes mistakenly credited for playing the slide guitar on “Jig-Saw Puzzle”; both guitars are played by Keith Richards.[13][14] The basic track of “Street Fighting Man” was recorded on an early Philips cassette deck at London’s Olympic Sound Studios, where Richards played a Gibson Hummingbird acoustic guitar, and Charlie Watts played on an antique, portable practice drum kit.[15] Richards and Mick Jaggerwere mistakenly credited as writers on “Prodigal Son”, a cover of Robert Wilkins‘s Biblical blues song of the same name.[5] According to Keith Richards the name Beggars Banquet “comes from a cat called Christopher Gibbs“.[16]

On 7 June 1968, a photoshoot for the album, with photographer Michael Joseph, was held at Sarum Chase, a mansion in Hampstead, London.[17] Previously unseen images from the shoot were exhibited at the Blink Gallery in London in November and December 2008.[18] The album’s original cover art, depicting a bathroom wall covered with graffiti, was rejected by the band’s record company, and their unsuccessful dispute delayed the album’s release for months.[5]

On 11–12 December 1968 the band filmed a television extravaganza titled The Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus featuring John Lennon, Eric Clapton, The Who, Jethro Tull and Marianne Faithfull among the musical guests.[19][20] One of the original aims of the project was to promote Beggars Banquet, but the film was shelved by the Rolling Stones until 1996, when their former manager, Allen Klein, gave it an official release.[21]

Critical reception[edit]

Contemporary reviews[edit]

Beggars Banquet received a highly favourable response from music critics,[22][23] who considered it a return to form for the Stones.[24][25] Author Stephen Davis writes of its impact: “[The album was] a sharp reflection of the convulsive psychic currents coursing through the Western world. Nothing else captured the youthful spirit of Europe in 1968 like Beggar’s Banquet.”[23] The album was also a commercial success, reaching number 3 in the UK and number 5 in the US (on the way to eventual platinum status).[citation needed]

According to music journalist Anthony DeCurtis, the “political correctness” of “Street Fighting Man”, particularly the ambivalent lyrics “What can a poor boy do/’Cept sing in a rock and roll band”, sparked intense debate in the underground media.[5] In the description of author and critic Ian MacDonald, French director Jean-Luc Godard‘s filming of the sessions for “Sympathy for the Devil” contributed to the band’s image as “Left Bank heroes of the European Maoist underground”, with the song’s “Luciferian iconoclasm” interpreted as a political message.[26]

Time magazine described the Stones as “England’s most subversive roisterers since Fagin’s gang in Oliver Twist” and added: “In keeping with a widespread mood in the pop world, Beggars Banquet turns back to the raw vitality of Negro R&B and the authentic simplicity of country music.”[27] Jann Wenner of Rolling Stone considered that the band’s regeneration marked the return of rock’n’roll, while the Chicago Sun-Times declared: “The Stones have unleashed their rawest, ludest, most arrogant, most savage record yet. And it’s beautiful.”[28]

Less impressed, the writer of Melody Makers initial review dismissed Beggars Banquet as “mediocre” and said that, since “The Stones are Mick Jagger”, it was only the singer’s “remarkable recording presence that makes this LP”.[29] Geoffrey Cannon of The Guardian found that the album “demonstrates [the group’s] primal power at its greatest strength” and wrote admiringly of Jagger’s ability to fully engage the listener on “Sympathy for the Devil”, saying: “We feel horror because, at full volume, he makes us ride his carrier wave with him, experience his sensations, and awaken us to ours.”[30] In his ballot for Jazz & Pop magazine’s annual critics poll, Robert Christgau ranked it as the third best album of the year, and “Salt of the Earth” the best pop song of the year.[31]

Retrospective assessment and legacy[edit]

Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
AllMusic 5/5 stars[24]
Boston Herald 4/4 stars[32]
eMusic 4.5/5 stars[33]
Encyclopedia of Popular Music 5/5 stars[34]
Entertainment Weekly A[35]
The Great Rock Discography 10/10[36]
MusicHound 4.5/5[37]
NME 8/10[38]
Rolling Stone 5/5 stars[5]
The Rolling Stone Album Guide 5/5 stars[39]

In a retrospective review for eMusic, Ben Fong-Torres called Beggars Banquet “an album flush with masterful and growling instant classics”, and said that it “responds more to the chaos of ’68 and to themselves than to any fellow artists … the mood is one of dissolution and resignation, in the guise of a voice of an ambivalent authority.”[33] Colin Larkin, in his Encyclopedia of Popular Music (2006), viewed the album as “a return to strength” which included “the socio-political ‘Street Fighting Man’ and the brilliantly macabre ‘Sympathy for the Devil’, in which Jagger’s seductive vocal was backed by hypnotic Afro-rhythms and dervish yelps”.[34] Writing for MusicHound in 1999, Greg Kot opined that the same two songs were the “weakest cuts”, adding: “Otherwise, the disc is a tour de force of acoustic-tinged savagery and slumming sexuality, particularly the gleefully flippant ‘Stray Cat Blues.'”[37] Larry Katz from the Boston Herald called Beggars Banquet “both a return to basics and leap forward”.[32]

In his 1997 review for Rolling Stone, DeCurtis said the album was “filled with distinctive and original touches”, and remarked on its legacy: “For the album, the Stones had gone to great lengths to toughen their sound and banish the haze of psychedelia, and in doing so, they launched a five-year period in which they would produce their very greatest records.”[5] Author Martin C. Strong similarly considers Beggars Banquet to be the first album in the band’s “staggering burst of creativity” over 1968–72 that ultimately comprised four of the best rock albums of all time.[36] Writing in 2007, Daryl Easlea of BBC Music said that although in places it fails to maintain the quality of its opening song, Beggars Banquet was the album where the Rolling Stones gained their enduring status as “the Greatest Rock ‘n’ Roll Band in the World”.[40]

In 2003, the album was ranked at number 58 on Rolling Stones list of the 500 greatest albums of all time.[41] In the same year, the TV network VH1 named Beggars Banquet the 67th greatest album of all time. The album is also featured in the book 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die.[42]

Reissue[edit]

In August 2002, ABKCO Records reissued Beggars Banquet as a newly remastered LP and SACD/CD hybrid disk.[43] This release corrected an important flaw in the original album by restoring each song to its proper, slightly faster speed. Due to an error in the mastering, Beggars Banquet was heard for over thirty years at a slower speed than it was recorded. This had the effect of altering not only the tempo of each song, but the song’s key as well. These differences were subtle but important, and the remastered version is about 30 seconds shorter than the original release.

Also in 2002 the Russian label CD-Maximum unofficially released the limited edition Beggars Banquet + 7 Bonus,[44] which was also bootleged on a German counterfeit-DECCA label as Beggars Banquet (the Mono Beggars).[45]

It was released once again in 2010 by Universal Music Enterprises in a Japanese only SHM-SACD version;[46] and on 24 November 2010 ABKCO Records released a SHM-CD version.[47]

On 28 May 2013 ABKCO Records reissued the LP on vinyl.[48]

Track listing[edit]

All songs written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, except “Prodigal Son” by Robert Wilkins.

Side one
No. Title Length
1. Sympathy for the Devil 6:18
2. No Expectations 3:56
3. Dear Doctor 3:28
4. Parachute Woman 2:20
5. Jigsaw Puzzle 6:06
Side two
No. Title Length
6. Street Fighting Man 3:16
7. “Prodigal Son” 2:51
8. Stray Cat Blues 4:38
9. Factory Girl 2:09
10. Salt of the Earth 4:48

Personnel[edit]

The Rolling Stones
Additional personnel

[49] [50] [51] [52]

Charts and certifications[edit]

Charts[edit]

Album
Chart (1968–69) Peak
position
Australia (Kent Music Report)[53] 3
Canada Top Albums/CDs (RPM)[54] 3
German Albums (Offizielle Top 100)[55] 8
Norwegian Albums (VG-lista)[56] 2
UK Albums (OCC)[57] 3
US Billboard 200[58] 5
Chart (2007) Peak
position
Swedish Albums (Sverigetopplistan)[59] 43
Chart (2007) Peak
position
French Albums (SNEP)[60] 197
Singles
Year Single Chart Position
1968 “Street Fighting Man” Billboard Hot 100[58] 48
Austrian Singles[61] 7
Dutch Singles[62] 5
German Singles[63] 8
Swiss Singles[64] 4
1971 UK Singles (OCC)[57] 62

Certifications[edit]

Region Certification Certified units/Sales
Canada (Music Canada)[65] Gold 50,000^
United Kingdom (BPI)[66] Gold 100,000^
United States (RIAA)[67] Platinum 1,000,000^
*sales figures based on certification alone
^shipments figures based on certification alone

References[edit]

  1. Jump up^ Brown, Phill (July 2000). “Phill Brown, Recording the Rollig Stones’ Classic, Beggar’s Banquet”. tapeop.com. TapeOp.
  2. ^ Jump up to:a b Lester, Paul (10 July 2007). “These albums need to go to rehab”. guardian.co.uk. London: Guardian News and Media Limited. Retrieved 21 July 2013.
  3. Jump up^ Dimery, Robert, ed. (2011). 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die. London: Cassell. p. 130. ISBN 978-1-84403-699-8.
  4. Jump up^ 45 Years Ago: The Rolling Stones Court Controversy Over ‘Beggars Banquet’ Cover
  5. ^ Jump up to:a b c d e f g h i DeCurtis, Anthony (17 June 1997). “Review: Beggars Banquet”. Rolling Stone. New York. Archived from the original on 31 January 2002. Retrieved 9 July 2013.
  6. Jump up^ Karnbach, James; Bernson, Carol (1997). The Complete Recording Guide to the Rolling Stones. Aurum Press Limited. p. 234. ISBN 1-85410-533-7.
  7. Jump up^ Elliot, Martin (2002). The Rolling Stones: Complete Recording Sessions 1962–2002. Cherry Red Books LTD. p. 131. ISBN 1-901447-04-9.
  8. Jump up^ Elliot, Martin (2002). The Rolling Stones: Complete Recording Sessions 1962–2002. Cherry Red Books LTD. p. 142. ISBN 1-901447-04-9.
  9. Jump up^ Egan, Sean (2005). Rolling Stones and the making of Let It Bleed. Unanimous Ltd. p. 64. ISBN 1-903318-77-7.
  10. Jump up^ Wyman, Bill (2002). Rolling with the Stones. Dorling Kindersley Limited. p. 314. ISBN 0-7513-4646-2.
  11. Jump up^ Clayson, Alan (2008). The Rolling Stones: Beggars Banquet. Billboard Books. pp. 165, 186, 245, 246. ISBN 978-0-8230-8397-8.
  12. Jump up^ Clayson, Alan (2008). The Rolling Stones: Beggars Banquet. Billboard Books. pp. 192, 246. ISBN 978-0-8230-8397-8.
  13. Jump up^ Elliot, Martin (2002). The Rolling Stones: Complete Recording Sessions 1962–2002. Cherry Red Books LTD. p. 129. ISBN 1-901447-04-9.
  14. Jump up^ Clayson, Alan (2008). The Rolling Stones: Beggars Banquet. Billboard Books. p. 187. ISBN 978-0-8230-8397-8.
  15. Jump up^ The Wall Street Journalhttp://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702303497804579238550068715652. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  16. Jump up^ Egan (ed), Sean (2013). Keith Richards on Keith Richards interviews and encounters (1st ed.). Chicago: Chicago Review Press. p. 79. ISBN 978-1-61374-791-9.
  17. Jump up^ Hayward, Mark; Evans, Mike (7 September 2009). The Rolling Stones: On Camera, Off Guard 1963–69. Pavilion. pp. 156–. ISBN 978-1-86205-868-2. Retrieved 17 July 2011.
  18. Jump up^ “Our Work”. Metro Imaging. Retrieved 17 July 2011.
  19. Jump up^ Norman, Philip (2001). The Stones. London: Sidgwick & Jackson. pp. 322–23. ISBN 0-283-07277-6.
  20. Jump up^ Bockris, Victor (1992). Keith Richards: The Unauthorised Biography. London: Hutchinson. p. 116. ISBN 0-09-174397-4.
  21. Jump up^ Davis, Stephen (2001). Old Gods Almost Dead: The 40-Year Odyssey of the Rolling Stones. New York, NY: Broadway Books. pp. 278–79, 536. ISBN 0-7679-0312-9.
  22. Jump up^ Norman, Philip (2001). The Stones. London: Sidgwick & Jackson. p. 322. ISBN 0-283-07277-6.
  23. ^ Jump up to:a b Davis, Stephen (2001). Old Gods Almost Dead: The 40-Year Odyssey of the Rolling Stones. New York, NY: Broadway Books. p. 275. ISBN 0-7679-0312-9.
  24. ^ Jump up to:a b AllMusic review
  25. Jump up^ Salewicz, Chris (2002). Mick & Keith. London: Orion. p. 154. ISBN 0-75281-858-9.
  26. Jump up^ MacDonald, Ian (November 2002). “The Rolling Stones: Play With Fire”. Uncut. Available at Rock’s Backpages (subscription required).
  27. Jump up^ Wyman, Bill (2002). Rolling with the Stones. London: Dorling Kindersley. p. 315. ISBN 0-7513-4646-2.
  28. Jump up^ Wyman, Bill (2002). Rolling with the Stones. London: Dorling Kindersley. pp. 314–15. ISBN 0-7513-4646-2.
  29. Jump up^ Uncredited writer (30 November 1968). “The Rolling Stones: Beggars Banquet (Decca)”. Melody Maker. Available at Rock’s Backpages (subscription required).
  30. Jump up^ Cannon, Geoffrey (10 December 1968). “The Rolling Stones: Beggars’ Banquet (Decca SKL 4955)”. The Guardian. Available at Rock’s Backpages (subscription required).
  31. Jump up^ Christgau, Robert (1969). “Robert Christgau’s 1969 Jazz & Pop Ballot”. Jazz & Pop. Retrieved 17 April 2014.
  32. ^ Jump up to:a b Katz, Larry (16 August 2002). “Music; Stoned again; Band’s early albums reissued in time for tour”. Boston Herald. Scene section, p. S.21. Retrieved 9 July 2013. (subscription required)
  33. ^ Jump up to:a b Fong-Torres, Ben (2 April 2008). “The Rolling Stones, Beggars Banquet”. eMusic. Archived from the original on 23 October 2014. Retrieved 9 July 2013.
  34. ^ Jump up to:a b Larkin, Colin (2006). The Encyclopedia of Popular Music. 7(4th ed.). Oxford University Press. p. 119. ISBN 0-19-531373-9.
  35. Jump up^ Browne, David (20 September 2002). “Satisfaction?”. Entertainment Weekly. New York (673): 103. Retrieved 9 July2013.
  36. ^ Jump up to:a b Strong, Martin C. (2004). The Great Rock Discography (7th ed.). Canongate U.S. pp. 1292, 1294. ISBN 1-84195-615-5.
  37. ^ Jump up to:a b Graff, Gary; Durchholz, Daniel (eds) (1999). MusicHound Rock: The Essential Album Guide. Farmington Hills, MI: Visible Ink Press. p. 950. ISBN 1-57859-061-2.
  38. Jump up^ “Review: Beggars Banquet”. NME. London: 46. 8 July 1995.
  39. Jump up^ “The Rolling Stones: Album Guide”. rollingstone.com. Archived version retrieved 15 November 2014.
  40. Jump up^ Easlea, Daryl (2007). “The Rolling Stones Beggars BanquetReview”. BBC Music. Retrieved 11 March 2016.
  41. Jump up^ Beggars Banquet. Rolling Stone. January 2003. Retrieved 21 August 2011.
  42. Jump up^ Dimery, Robert, ed. (2011). 1001 Albums: You Must Hear Before You Die. Preface by Michael Lydon. Octopus. p. 22. ISBN 978-1-84403-714-8.
  43. Jump up^ Walsh, Christopher (24 August 2002). “Super audio CDs: The Rolling Stones Remastered”. Billboard. p. 27.
  44. Jump up^ discogs – Beggars Banquet + 7 Bonus 2002 Russian limited edition
  45. Jump up^ discogs – Beggars Banquet (the Mono Beggars) 2002 German bootleg
  46. Jump up^ discogs – Beggars Banquet 2010 Universal International ref# UIGY 9038
  47. Jump up^ discogs – Beggars Banquet 2010 ABKCO ref# UICY-20001
  48. Jump up^ discogs – Beggars Banquet 2013 Vinyl reissue
  49. Jump up^ The Rolling Stones | Official Website
  50. Jump up^ Stone Alone – Bill Wyman
  51. Jump up^ Rolling With The Stones – Bill Wyman
  52. Jump up^ Satanic Sessions – Midnight Beat – CD box sets
  53. Jump up^ Kent, David (1993). Australian Chart Book 1970-1992. St Ives, N.S.W.: Australian Chart Book. ISBN 0-646-11917-6.
  54. Jump up^ Top RPM Albums: Issue 5887.” RPM. Library and Archives Canada. Retrieved 11 June 2016.
  55. Jump up^ Offiziellecharts.de – The Rolling Stones – Beggars Banquet”(in German). GfK Entertainment Charts. Retrieved 11 June 2016.
  56. Jump up^ Norwegiancharts.com – The Rolling Stones – Beggars Banquet”. Hung Medien. Retrieved 11 June 2016.
  57. ^ Jump up to:a b “Rolling Stones | Artist | Official Charts”. UK Albums Chart Retrieved 11 June 2016.
  58. ^ Jump up to:a b “The Rolling Stones – Chart history” Billboard 200 for The Rolling Stones. Retrieved 11 June 2016.
  59. Jump up^ Swedishcharts.com – The Rolling Stones – Beggars Banquet”. Hung Medien. Retrieved 11 June 2016.
  60. Jump up^ Lescharts.com – The Rolling Stones – Beggars Banquet”. Hung Medien. Retrieved 11 June 2016.
  61. Jump up^ “The Rolling Stones – Street Fighting Man”. austriancharts.at. Archived from the original on 14 April 2016. Retrieved 11 June 2016.
  62. Jump up^ “The Rolling Stones – Street Fighting Man”. dutchcharts.nl. Archived from the original on 15 August 2016. Retrieved 11 June 2016.
  63. Jump up^ “Offizielle Deutsche Charts”. Gfk Entertainment. Retrieved 11 June 2016.
  64. Jump up^ “The Rolling Stones – Street Fighting Man”. swisscharts.com. Archived from the original on 17 August 2016. Retrieved 11 June 2016.
  65. Jump up^ “Canadian album certifications – The Rolling Stones”. Music Canada. Retrieved 11 June 2016.
  66. Jump up^ “British album certifications – The Rolling Stones”. British Phonographic Industry. Retrieved 11 June 2016. Enter The Rolling Stones in the field Search. Select Artist in the fieldSearch by. Select album in the field By Format. Select Gold in the field By Award. Click Search
  67. Jump up^ “American album certifications – The Rolling Stones”. Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved 11 June2016. If necessary, click Advanced, then click Format, then selectAlbum, then click SEARCH

External links[edit]

 

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MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones 1967 Between The Buttons US full album

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Rolling Stones 1967 Between The Buttons US full album

Between the Buttons

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Between the Buttons
BetweenthebuttonsUK.jpg
Studio album by The Rolling Stones
Released 20 January 1967
Recorded 3–11 August, 8–26 November, and 13 December 1966
Genre
Length 38:51
Language English
Label Decca
Producer Andrew Loog Oldham
The Rolling Stones British chronology
Aftermath
(1966)
Between the Buttons
(1967)
Their Satanic Majesties Request
(1967)

Between the Buttons is the fifth British and seventh American studio album by The Rolling Stones, released on 20 January 1967 in the UK and 11 February in the US as the follow-up to Aftermath. It was the beginning of the Stones’ brief foray into psychedelia. In 2012, the American version of Between the Buttons, which included “Ruby Tuesday” and “Let’s Spend the Night Together“, was ranked #357 on Rolling Stone magazine’s 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.[1]

Recording and background[edit]

Sessions for the album began on 3 August 1966 and lasted until the 11th at Los Angeles‘ RCA Studios during the Rolling Stones’ 1966 American Tour. David Hassinger was the engineer for the album. Several songs were worked on; the backing tracks of six songs that would appear on the album were recorded, as were those of “Let’s Spend the Night Together” and “Who’s Driving Your Plane?”, B-side of “Have You Seen Your Mother, Baby, Standing in the Shadow?“, released as a single in late September. During this time, Brian Wilson of The Beach Boys was invited down to RCA Studios during the recording of “My Obsession”, which remains one of his favourite Rolling Stones songs.

The band returned to London and sessions continued at IBC Studios from 31 August until 3 September. “Have You Seen Your Mother, Baby, Standing in the Shadow?” was completed to be released on 23 September before the Stones embarked on their seventh British tour which lasted into early October and was their last UK tour until 1971.

The second block of recording sessions for Between the Buttons began on 8 November at the newly opened Olympic Sound Studios in Barnes, London, alternating between Olympic and Pye Studios until 26 November. During this time the bulk of the album was completed including vocal and other overdubs on the previously recorded backing tracks and mixing. “Ruby Tuesday” was also completed.

Around the same time producer Andrew Loog Oldham was also preparing the US-only live album Got Live If You Want It!, a contractual requirement from London Records that contained live performances from their recent British tour as well as studio tracks overdubbed with audience noise. After that album’s release on 10 December, a final overdubbing session for Buttons was held at Olympic Studio on 13 December 1966 before Oldham took the tapes back to RCA Studios in Hollywood for final mixing and editing.

The album was recorded using 4-track machines, with the initial sessions pre-mixed to make room on the remaining tracks for overdubs. Mick Jagger felt this process lost the clarity of the songs, commenting during an interview that “we bounced it back to do overdubs so many times we lost the sound of it. [The songs] sounded so great, but later on I was really disappointed with it.”[2] He commented further: “I don’t know, it just isn’t any good. ‘Back Street Girl’ is about the only one I like.”[3] In an interview with New Musical Express, he even called the rest of the album “more or less rubbish.”[4]

Between the Buttons was the last album wholly produced by Oldham, with whom the Stones fell out in mid-1967 during the recording sessions for Their Satanic Majesties Request.

Artwork[edit]

The photo shoot for the album cover took place in November 1966 on Primrose Hill in North London. The photographer was Gered Mankowitz, who also shot the band photos for the cover of Out of Our Heads. The shoot took place at 5:30 in the morning following an all night recording session at Olympic Studios. Using a home-made camera filter constructed of black card, glass and Vaseline, Mankowitz created the effect of the Stones dissolving into their surroundings. The goal of the shoot was, in Mankowitz’s words, “to capture the ethereal, druggy feel of the time; that feeling at the end of the night when dawn was breaking and they’d been up all night making music, stoned.”[5] Brian Jones‘ dishevelled and ghostly appearance on the cover disturbed many of his fans, and critic David Dalton wrote that he looked “like a doomed albino raccoon.”[2]

“Brian [Jones] was lurking in his collar,” Mankowitz commented years later, “I was frustrated because it felt like we were on the verge of something really special and he was messing it up. But the way Brian appeared to not give a shit is exactly what the band was about.”[6] Outtakes from this photo session were later used for the cover and inner sleeves of the 1972 ABKCO compilation release More Hot Rocks (Big Hits & Fazed Cookies).

The back cover of Between the Buttons is dominated by a six-panel cartoon accompanied by a rhythmic poem drawn by drummer Charlie Watts. When Watts asked Oldham what the title of the album would be, he told him it was “between the buttons”, a term meaning “undecided”. Watts gave the phrase to the title of his cartoon which in turn became the title of the album.[2]

Release and reception[edit]

Professional ratings
Retrospective reviews
Review scores
Source Rating
AllMusic 5/5 stars[7]
Entertainment Weekly A[8]
NME 7/10[9]
The Rolling Stone Album Guide 5/5 stars[10]

Between the Buttons, like many British long-players, differed between its UK and US versions. The UK edition (in the form Oldham and the Stones intended it) was issued on 20 January 1967 (Mono, LK 4852; Stereo, SKL 4852) on Decca Records, concurrently with a separate single, “Let’s Spend the Night Together” b/w “Ruby Tuesday.” As was common in the British record industry at the time, the single did not appear on the album. Between the Buttons reached #3 in the UK.

In August 2002 both editions of Between the Buttons were reissued in a new remastered CD and SACD digipak by ABKCO Records.[11] Almost all reissues of the album since 1968 have been in stereo; in 2016, the album’s mono release was reissued on CD, vinyl, and digital download as part of The Rolling Stones in Mono. While most reissues have used the US track-listing to maximise profit by featuring the two hit singles, the UK version was re-issued by ABKCO in 2003 on 180 gram vinyl in the US.

According to Robert Christgau, Between the Buttons was “among the greatest rock albums”,[12] and AllMusic‘s Richie Unterberger hailed it as one of the Rolling Stones’ “strongest, most eclectic LPs”.[7] In a retrospective review for Entertainment Weekly, David Browne called the album “a cheeky set of sardonic Swinging London vaudeville rock”,[8] while Billboard magazine’s Christopher Walsh wrote that “it’s brimming with overlooked gems, the band delivering a captivating blend of folky, Beatles-esque pop and tough bluesy rockers.”[11] Tom Moon wrote in The Rolling Stone Album Guide (2004) that the album was “lighter and thinner” than Aftermath and, “having belatedly discovered pop melody, Jagger and Richards were suddenly overdosing on the stuff.”[10] Jim DeRogatis included Between the Buttons in his 2003 list of the essential psychedelic rock albums.[13]

Track listing[edit]

All songs written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards.

Side one
No. Title Length
1. Yesterday’s Papers 2:04
2. “My Obsession” 3:17
3. Back Street Girl 3:27
4. Connection 2:08
5. “She Smiled Sweetly” 2:44
6. “Cool, Calm & Collected” 4:17
Side two
No. Title Length
7. “All Sold Out” 2:17
8. Please Go Home 3:17
9. “Who’s Been Sleeping Here?” 3:55
10. “Complicated” 3:15
11. “Miss Amanda Jones” 2:48
12. Something Happened to Me Yesterday 4:55

American release[edit]

Between the Buttons
BetweenthebuttonsUK.jpg
Studio album by The Rolling Stones
Released 11 February 1967
Recorded 3–11 August, 8–26 November, and 13 December 1966
Genre Rock, pop, psychedelic rock
Length 38:42
Language English
Label London
Producer Andrew Loog Oldham
The Rolling Stones American chronology
Aftermath
(1966)
Between the Buttons
(1967)
Flowers
(1967)
Singles from Between the Buttons
  1. Ruby Tuesday” / “Let’s Spend the Night Together
    Released: 14 January 1967 (US)

In the US, the album was released by London Records on 11 February 1967 (mono, LL 3499; stereo, PS 499). “Let’s Spend the Night Together” and “Ruby Tuesday” were slotted onto the album while “Back Street Girl” and “Please Go Home” were removed (these would be included on the following US odds-and-ends release, Flowers, in July 1967). With “Ruby Tuesday” reaching #1, Between the Buttons shot to #2 in the US, going gold.

In 2012, the American version of the album was ranked #357 on Rolling Stone magazine’s 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.[1]

Track listing[edit]

All songs written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards.

Side one
No. Title Length
1. Let’s Spend the Night Together 3:38
2. Yesterday’s Papers 2:01
3. Ruby Tuesday 3:16
4. Connection 2:08
5. “She Smiled Sweetly” 2:44
6. “Cool, Calm & Collected” 4:17
Side two
No. Title Length
7. “All Sold Out” 2:17
8. “My Obsession” 3:20
9. “Who’s Been Sleeping Here?” 3:55
10. “Complicated” 3:15
11. “Miss Amanda Jones” 2:48
12. Something Happened to Me Yesterday 4:55

Personnel[edit]

The Rolling Stones
Additional musicians

[14] [15] [16]

Chart positions[edit]

Album
Year Chart Position
1967 UK Albums Chart 3[17]
1967 Billboard 200 2[18]
1967 French SNEP Albums Charts 25[19]
Singles
Year Single Chart Position
1967 “Let’s Spend the Night Together/Ruby Tuesday” UK Top 40 Singles 3[17]
1967 “Let’s Spend the Night Together” The Billboard Hot 100 55[20]
1967 “Ruby Tuesday” The Billboard Hot 100 1[20]

Certifications[edit]

Country Provider Certification
(sales thresholds)
United States RIAA Gold

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jump up to:a b Between the Buttons. rollingstone.com. January 2012. Retrieved 11 February 2016.
  2. ^ Jump up to:a b c Davis, Stephen (2001). Old Gods Almost Dead: The 40-year Odyssey of the Rolling Stones. Broadway Books. ISBN 978-0-7679-0956-3.
  3. Jump up^ Torres, Ben Fong (1981). The Rolling Stone Interviews: 1967-1980. New York: Rolling Stone Press. pp. 48–49. ISBN 0-312-03486-5.
  4. Jump up^ Bronson, Fred (2003). The Billboard Book of Number 1 Hits (5th ed.). New York: Billboard Books. p. 1301. ISBN 0-8230-7677-6.
  5. Jump up^ Craske, Oliver (2004). Rock Faces – The World’s Top Rock ‘n’ Roll Photographers and Their Greatest Images. Rotovision. p. 89. ISBN 978-2-88046-781-4.
  6. Jump up^ Woolridge, Max (2002). Rock ‘N’ Roll London. Singapore: New Holland Publishers. p. 72. ISBN 0-312-30442-0.
  7. ^ Jump up to:a b Allmusic review
  8. ^ Jump up to:a b Browne, David (20 September 2002). “Satisfaction?”. Entertainment Weekly. New York (673). Retrieved 17 October 2014.
  9. Jump up^ NME. London (8 July): 46. 1995. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  10. ^ Jump up to:a b Moon, Tom (2004). “The Rolling Stones”. In Brackett, Nathan; Hoard, Christian. The New Rolling Stone Album Guide. London: Fireside. pp. 695–699. ISBN 0-7432-0169-8.
  11. ^ Jump up to:a b Walsh, Christopher (24 August 2002). “Super audio CDs: The Rolling Stones Remastered”. Billboard. Billboard. p. 27. Retrieved 17 October 2014.
  12. Jump up^ The Rolling Stones. Robert Christgau. Retrieved 17 October 2014.
  13. Jump up^ DeRogatis, Jim (2003). Turn on Your Mind: Four Decades of Great Psychedelic Rock. Hal Leonard Corporation. p. 568. ISBN 0634055488.
  14. Jump up^ The Rolling Stones | Official Website
  15. Jump up^ Stone Alone – Bill Wyman
  16. Jump up^ Rolling With The Stones – Bill Wyman
  17. ^ Jump up to:a b http://www.everyhit.com/ Type in “Rolling Stones” under “Name of Artist”
  18. Jump up^ http://www.allmusic.com/artist/p5298/charts-awards/billboard-albums
  19. Jump up^ Tous les Albums classés par Artiste, Note : user must select The Rolling Stones in the list
  20. ^ Jump up to:a b http://www.allmusic.com/artist/p5298/charts-awards/billboard-singles

External links[edit]

 

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MUSIC MONDAY Aftermath (The Rolling Stones album)

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Mother’s Little Helper The Rolling Stones

Aftermath (The Rolling Stones album)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Aftermath
RSAftermathUK.jpg
Studio album by The Rolling Stones
Released 15 April 1966
Recorded 3–8 December 1965, 6–9 March 1966
Studio RCA Studios, Hollywood, California
Genre Rock, pop
Length 53:20
Label Decca (UK)
Producer Andrew Loog Oldham
The Rolling Stones British chronology
Out of Our Heads
(1965)
Aftermath
(1966)
Between the Buttons
(1967)

Aftermath, released April 1966 by Decca Records, is the fourth British studio album by the Rolling Stones. It was released in the United States in June 1966 by London Records as their sixth American album. The album is considered an artistic breakthrough for the band: it is the first to consist entirely of Mick Jagger/Keith Richards compositions, while Brian Jones played a variety of instruments not usually associated with their music, including sitar, Appalachian dulcimer,[1] marimbas, and Japanese koto, as well as guitar, harmonica and keyboards, though much of the music is still rooted in Chicago electric blues. It was the first Rolling Stones album to be recorded entirely in the US, at the RCA Studios in California, and their first album released in true stereo. It is also one of the earliest Rock albums to eclipse the 50-minute mark, and contains one of the earliest Rock songs to eclipse the 10-minute mark (“Goin’ Home”).

In August 2002 both editions of Aftermath were reissued in a new remastered CD and SACD digipak by ABKCO Records, with the UK version containing an otherwise unavailable stereo mix of “Mother’s Little Helper”.[2] In the same year the US edition of Aftermath was ranked No. 109 on the List of Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.[3] The album was included in Robert Dimery’s 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die.[4]

Creation[edit]

According to Bill Wyman in Rolling With The Stones, the album was originally conceived as the soundtrack for the never filmed feature Back, Behind And In Front.[citation needed] The whole deal fell off, though, when Jagger met with the potential director, Nicholas Ray, but didn’t like him. These recording sessions were also very busy for the group, as they recorded 21 Jagger/Richards compositions while in Los Angeles. They were also much more comfortable during that album’s sessions, as they had room and time for experimenting and polishing the arrangements, something they weren’t able to do on earlier albums due to the “rushed” way these sessions were done.

The main engineer for the album was also pivotal in making the group feel comfortable during the sessions as he, according to Wyman, let them experiment with instrumentals and teaming up with session musicians like Jack Nitzsche to variegate their sound. Wyman also stated that he and Brian Jones would pick up instruments that were in the studio and experiment with various sounds for each song. This album is also notable for being the first LP to feature completely original material for the group, as Jagger and Richards were growing not only as songwriters, but as arrangers as well. In 2003, Jagger recalled that Richards was writing a lot of melodies and the group would perform them in a number of different ways which were mainly thought out in the studio, as opposed to the strict arranging and recording planning of other groups of the epoch.

Brian Jones was very important in shaping the album’s tone and arrangements, as he experimented with a vast array of ethnic instruments such as the marimba, sitar, Appalachian dulcimer, and organ, which contrasted with the folk, pop, country, blues and rock compositions, thus resulting in a very diverse melting pot of musical styles. Aftermath was also the first record on which the majority of the guitar playing was left to Richards due to Jones’ multi-instrumentalism, a habit that served as an intense training period for Richards’ craftmanship which culminated in his playing almost all of the guitars on Let It Bleed.[5]

Critical reception[edit]

At the time of its release, the album was well received, with Keith Altman of the New Musical Express stating that “those masterminds behind the electric machines – The Rolling Stones – have produced the finest value for money ever on their new LP”.[5] In retrospect the album is considered a milestone in the group’s career, with Allmusic writer Ritchie Unterberg giving it five stars, and praising the combination of different influences found there, but nevertheless opining that “some of the material is fairly ho-hum, to be honest, as Mick Jagger and Keith Richards were still prone to inconsistent songwriting; “Goin’ Home,” an 11-minute blues jam, was remarkable more for its barrier-crashing length than its content”.

Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic (UK) 5/5 stars[6]
Allmusic (US) 5/5 stars[7]
Blender 5/5 stars[8]

Sputnikmusic has an aggregate score of 4/5 out of 376 votes, while the feature review states that the album is recommended for fans as well as newcomers to the group.[9] On its top 10 Rolling Stones albums list, NMElisted Aftermath at no.6, while stating that “1966’s ‘Aftermath’ saw the Stones at once rejecting and redefining rock’n’roll lore. The first all-originals Stones album, it’s so classic-packed their reputation as sub-Beatles hopefuls never recovered”[10]

Release history[edit]

As with all the Stones pre-1967 LPs, different editions were released in the UK and the US. This was a common feature of British pop albums at that time—the same practice was applied to all the Beatles albums prior to Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Heart’s Club Band—because UK albums typically did not include tracks that had already been released as singles.

British version[edit]

The original British version of Aftermath was issued in April 1966 as a fourteen-track LP. Issued between the non-LP single releases of “19th Nervous Breakdown” and “Paint It Black“, Aftermath was a major hit in the UK, spending eight weeks at No. 1 on the UK album chart.

Track listing[edit]

All tracks written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards.

Side one
No. Title Length
1. Mother’s Little Helper 2:45
2. Stupid Girl 2:56
3. Lady Jane 3:08
4. Under My Thumb 3:41
5. “Doncha Bother Me” 2:41
6. Goin’ Home 11:13
Side two
No. Title Length
7. “Flight 505” 3:27
8. “High and Dry” 3:08
9. Out of Time 5:37
10. “It’s Not Easy” 2:56
11. I Am Waiting 3:11
12. Take It or Leave It 2:47
13. Think 3:09
14. “What to Do” 2:32

North American version[edit]

Aftermath
Aftermath.rollingstones.usalbum.cover.jpg
Studio album by The Rolling Stones
Released 20 June 1966
Recorded 3–8 December 1965, 6–9 March 1966
Genre Rock, pop, rhythm and blues, psychedelic rock
Length 42:31
Label London (US)
Producer Andrew Loog Oldham
The Rolling Stones American chronology
December’s Children (And Everybody’s)
(1965)
Aftermath
(1966)
Between the Buttons
(1967)
Singles from Aftermath
  1. Paint It, Black” / “Stupid Girl
    Released: 7 May 1966

The American version featured different cover art and a shorter running order that eliminated “Out of Time“, “Take It or Leave It“, “What to Do”, and “Mother’s Little Helper“. All four tracks were later issued in the US on other compilations, and “Mother’s Little Helper” was also issued as a single in 1966, peaking at No. 8 on the Billboard charts.[11] In their place, the album substituted their current No. 1 hit “Paint It, Black“. The revamped Aftermath still reached No. 2 in the US, eventually going platinum.[12]

Track listing[edit]

All tracks written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards.

Side one
No. Title Length
1. Paint It Black 3:22
2. “Stupid Girl” 2:56
3. “Lady Jane” 3:08
4. “Under My Thumb” 3:41
5. “Doncha Bother Me” 2:41
6. “Think” 3:09
Side two
No. Title Length
7. “Flight 505[1] 3:27
8. “High and Dry” 3:08
9. “It’s Not Easy” 2:56
10. “I Am Waiting” 3:11
11. “Goin’ Home” 11:13

Other songs[edit]

Title Length Notes
“19th Nervous Breakdown” Single
“Sad Day” “19th Nervous Breakdown” B-side
“Long Long While” “Paint It, Black” B-side

Could You Walk on the Water[edit]

Several of the songs on the album were initially meant for the US release Could You Walk on the Water. This LP was rejected by Rolling Stones’ American record company, London Records, who instead opted for the greatest hits package Big Hits (High Tide and Green Grass). The track list for the shelved album includes “Take It or Leave It”, “Mother’s Little Helper”, “Think”, “Goin’ Home” (short edit) and “Doncha Bother Me”. Of these, all five would be released on the UK version of Aftermath, three on the US version. Of the remaining tracks, “19th Nervous Breakdown” and “Sad Day” were released as a single, “Sittin’ on the Fence” and “Ride On, Baby” were later to be released on the US album Flowers, along with “Mother’s Little Helper” and “Take It or Leave It”. “Looking Tired” remains unreleased to this day.

Personnel[edit]

The Rolling Stones

Additional personnel

Charts[edit]

Album

Year Chart Position
1966 UK Albums Chart 1[13]
1966 Billboard 200 2[14]
1966 French SNEP Albums Charts 25[15]
Preceded by
The Sound of Music by Original Soundtrack
UK Albums Chart number-one album
30 April – 25 June 1966
Succeeded by
The Sound of Music by Original Soundtrack

Singles

Year Single Chart Position
1966 “Paint It, Black” UK Singles Chart 1[13]
1966 “Paint It, Black” Billboard Hot 100 1[11]
1966 “Mother’s Little Helper” Billboard Hot 100 8[11]
1966 “Lady Jane” Billboard Hot 100 24[11]
1990 “Paint It, Black” UK Singles Chart 63[13]
2007 “Paint It, Black” UK Singles Chart 70[13]
2010 “Paint It, Black” Billboard Rock Digital Songs 25[11]

Certifications[edit]

Country Provider Certification
(sales thresholds)
United States RIAA Platinum

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jump up to:a b Mick Jagger interviewed on the Pop Chronicles (1969)
  2. Jump up^ Walsh, Christopher (24 August 2002). “Super audio CDs: The Rolling Stones Remastered”. Billboard. p. 27.
  3. Jump up^ Aftermath. Rolling Stone. January 2003. Retrieved 21 August 2011.
  4. Jump up^ ^ Robert Dimery; Michael Lydon (23 March 2010). 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die: Revised and Updated Edition. Universe. ISBN 978-0-7893-2074-2.
  5. ^ Jump up to:a b “Aftermath”. http://www.timeisonourside.com. Retrieved 2015-10-23.
  6. Jump up^ Allmusic review (UK)
  7. Jump up^ Allmusic review (US)
  8. Jump up^ Blender review Archived 16 August 2009 at the Wayback Machine.
  9. Jump up^ “The Rolling Stones – Aftermath (album review ) | Sputnikmusic”. http://www.sputnikmusic.com. Retrieved 2015-10-23.
  10. Jump up^ “The Rolling Stones’ Top 10 Albums – Ranked | NME.COM”. NME.COM. Retrieved 2015-10-23.
  11. ^ Jump up to:a b c d e Billboard Singles”. All Media Guide / Billboard. Retrieved 23 March 2010.
  12. Jump up^ “RIAA searchable certification database”. Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved 23 March 2010.
  13. ^ Jump up to:a b c d “UK charts rchive”. chartstats.com. Retrieved 23 March 2010.
  14. Jump up^ Billboard Albums”. All Media Guide / Billboard. Retrieved 23 March 2010.
  15. Jump up^ Tous les Albums classés par Artiste, Note : user must select The Rolling Stones in the list

External links[edit]

  • Link to Patti Smith piece for Creem, January 1973, detailing her response to the Rolling Stones and Aftermath
  1. Jump up^ http://www.rollingstones.com/
  2. Jump up^ Stone Alone – Bill Wyman
  3. Jump up^ Rolling With The Stones – Bill Wyman

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MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones 1965 December’s Children And Everybody’s full album

Rolling Stones 1965 December’s Children And Everybody’s full album

December’s Children (And Everybody’s)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
December’s Children (And Everybody’s)
DecChLP.jpg
Studio album by The Rolling Stones
Released 4 December 1965 (United States)
Recorded 5–6 September 1965, except “You Better Move On”: 8 August 1963, “Look What You’ve Done”: 11 June 1964, “Route 66” and “I’m Moving On”: 5–7 March 1965, “As Tears Go By”: 26 October 1965
Genre Rock and roll
Length 29:04
Language English
Label London
Producer Andrew Loog Oldham
The Rolling Stones American chronology
Out of Our Heads
(1965)
December’s Children (And Everybody’s)
(1965)
Aftermath
(1966)
Singles from December’s Children
(And Everybody’s)
  1. Get Off of My Cloud” / “I’m Free
    Released: 25 September 1965
  2. As Tears Go By” / “Gotta Get Away”
    Released: 18 December 1965
Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 4.5/5 stars[1]

December’s Children (And Everybody’s) is the fifth American studio album by The Rolling Stones, released in late 1965. Drawn largely from two days of sessions recorded in September to finish the British edition of Out of Our Heads and to record their new single—”Get Off of My Cloud“—December’s Children (And Everybody’s) also included tracks recorded as early as 1963.

Half of the songs appearing on the album were written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards; they penned album cuts such as “I’m Free” and “The Singer Not the Song” as well as such major hits as “As Tears Go By” and “Get off of My Cloud“.

December’s Children (And Everybody’s) reached No. 4 in the US and went gold.[2] Bassist Bill Wyman quotes Jagger in 1968 calling the record “[not] an album, it’s just a collection of songs.” Accordingly, it is only briefly detailed in Wyman’s otherwise exhaustive book Rolling with the Stones.

In August 2002 December’s Children (And Everybody’s) was reissued in a new remastered CD and SACD digipak by ABKCO Records with “Look What You’ve Done” again being the album’s only cut issued in true stereo.

The title of the album came from the band’s manager, Andrew Loog Oldham (who facetiously credits it to “Lou Folk-Rock Adler” in his liner notes on the back cover). According to Jagger, it was Oldham’s idea of hip, Beatpoetry.[3]

Track listing[edit]

All tracks written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, unless otherwise noted.

Side one
No. Title Writer(s) Length
1. “She Said Yeah” (from UK version of “Out of Our Heads“) Sonny Bono/Roddy Jackson 1:34
2. Talkin’ About You” (from UK version of “Out of Our Heads“) Chuck Berry 2:32
3. You Better Move On” (from UK release “The Rolling Stones EP“) Arthur Alexander 2:41
4. “Look What You’ve Done” McKinley Morganfield 2:16
5. “The Singer, Not the Song” (UK b-side of “Get Off of My Cloud“) 2:22
6. Route 66” (from UK release “Got Live If You Want It! EP” (Live)) Bobby Troup 2:39
Side two
No. Title Writer(s) Length
7. Get Off of My Cloud” (single) 2:54
8. I’m Free” (from UK version of “Out of Our Heads“) 2:23
9. As Tears Go By” (single) Jagger/Richards/Andrew Loog Oldham 2:45
10. “Gotta Get Away” (from UK version of “Out of Our Heads“) 2:06
11. Blue Turns to Grey 2:30
12. I’m Moving On” (from UK release “Got Live If You Want It! EP“) (Live) Hank Snow 2:13

Personnel[edit]

The Rolling Stones
Additional personnel

Chart positions[edit]

Album
Year Chart Position
1966 Billboard 200[4] 4
Singles
Year Single Chart Position
1965 “Get Off of My Cloud” Billboard Hot 100[4] 1
1966 “As Tears Go By” Billboard Hot 100[4] 6

Certifications[edit]

Country Provider Certification
(sales thresholds)
United States RIAA Gold

References[edit]

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MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones album “Out of Our Heads”

__

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Out of Our Heads

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
For the Sheryl Crow song, see Out of Our Heads (song).
Out of Our Heads
Out+of+Our+Heads+-UK-.jpg
Studio album by The Rolling Stones
Released 24 September 1965
Recorded 2 November 1964 – 6 September 1965
Genre
Length 29:36
Language English
Label Decca
Producer Andrew Loog Oldham
The Rolling Stones British chronology
The Rolling Stones No. 2
(1965)
Out of Our Heads
(1965)
Aftermath
(1966)
Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 4.5/5 stars[1]
NME 7/10[2]

Out of Our Heads is the Rolling Stones‘ third British album and their fourth in the United States. It was released in 1965 through London Records in the US on 30 July 1965 (in both mono—catalogue number LL3429; and in stereo—PS429), and Decca Records in the UK on 24 September 1965 (mono—LK 4733; stereo—SKL 4733), with significant track listing differences between territories.

Music[edit]

Most of Out of Our Heads comprises rhythm and blues cover songs.[3] According to music critic Richie Unterberger, the album’s US release largely had soul covers and its “classic rock singles”, including “The Last Time”, “Play with Fire”, and “Satisfaction”, still drew on the band’s R&B and blues roots, but were updated to “a more guitar-based, thoroughly contemporary context.”[1] Kent H. Benjamin of The Austin Chronicle wrote that the album was “the culmination of the Stones’ early soul/R&B sound”[4] In his review of the album’s UK edition, Allmusic‘s Bruce Eder characterised it as rock and roll and R&B.[5]

Recording and releases[edit]

The British Out of Our Heads – with a different cover – added songs that would surface later in the US on December’s Children (And Everybody’s) and others that had not been released in the UK thus far (such as “Heart of Stone“) instead of the already-released live track and recent hit singles (as singles rarely featured on albums in the UK in those times). Issued later that September, Out of Our Heads reached No. 2 in the UK charts behind the BeatlesHelp!. It was The Rolling Stones’ last UK album to rely upon R&B covers; the forthcoming Aftermath was entirely composed by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards.

In August 2002 both the US and UK editions of Out of Our Heads were reissued in a new remastered CD and SACD digipak by ABKCO Records.[6]

Track listing[edit]

Side one
No. Title Writer(s) Length
1. She Said “Yeah” Sonny Bono, Roddy Jackson 1:34
2. Mercy, Mercy Don Covay, Ronnie Miller 2:45
3. Hitch Hike Marvin Gaye, Clarence Paul, William “Mickey” Stevenson 2:25
4. That’s How Strong My Love Is Roosevelt Jamison 2:25
5. Good Times Sam Cooke 1:58
6. “Gotta Get Away” Mick Jagger, Keith Richards 2:06
Side two
No. Title Writer(s) Length
7. Talkin’ ‘Bout You Chuck Berry 2:31
8. Cry to Me Bert Russell 3:09
9. “Oh, Baby (We Got a Good Thing Going)” (Originally released on The Rolling Stones, Now!) Barbara Lynn Ozen 2:08
10. Heart of Stone” (Originally released on The Rolling Stones, Now!) Mick Jagger, Keith Richards 2:50
11. “The Under Assistant West Coast Promotion Man” Nanker Phelge 3:07
12. I’m Free Mick Jagger, Keith Richards 2:24

American release[edit]

Out of Our Heads
RollingStonesOutofourHeadsalbumcover.jpg
Studio album by The Rolling Stones
Released 30 July 1965
Recorded 2 November 1964 – 12 May 1965
Genre Rock
Length 33:24
Language English
Label London
Producer Andrew Loog Oldham
The Rolling Stones American chronology
The Rolling Stones, Now!
(1965)
Out of Our Heads
(1965)
December’s Children (And Everybody’s)
(1965)
Singles from Out of Our Heads
  1. The Last Time” / “Play with Fire
    Released: 13 March 1965
  2. (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” / “The Spider and the Fly
    Released: 6 June 1965

Initially issued in July 1965 in the US Out of Our Heads (featuring a shot from the same photo session that graced the cover of 12 X 5 and The Rolling Stones No. 2) was a mixture of recordings made over a six-month period, including the Top 10 hit “The Last Time” and the worldwide number 1 “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” with B-sides as well as a track from the UK-only live EP Got Live If You Want It!. Six songs would be included in the UK version of the album. “One More Try” is an original that was not released in the UK until 1971’s Stone Age. Riding the wave of “Satisfaction”‘s success, Out of Our Heads became The Rolling Stones’ first US No. 1 album, eventually going platinum.

In 2003 the US edition was listed as number 116 on the list of Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.

Track listing[edit]

Nanker Phelge” was a pseudomyn used by the Stones for group compositions.

Side one
No. Title Writer(s) Length
1. Mercy, Mercy Don Covay, Ronnie Miller 2:45
2. Hitch Hike Marvin Gaye, Clarence Paul, William “Mickey” Stevenson 2:25
3. The Last Time Mick Jagger, Keith Richards 3:41
4. That’s How Strong My Love Is Roosevelt Jamison 2:25
5. Good Times Sam Cooke 1:58
6. “I’m All Right” (originally released on Got Live If You Want It! EP) Ellas McDaniel 2:25
Side two
No. Title Writer(s) Length
7. (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction Jagger, Richards 3:42
8. Cry to Me Bert Russell 3:09
9. “The Under Assistant West Coast Promotion Man” Nanker Phelge 3:07
10. Play with Fire Phelge (Brian Jones, Jagger, Richards, Charlie Watts, Bill Wyman) 2:13
11. The Spider and the Fly Jagger, Richards 3:39
12. “One More Try” Jagger, Richards 1:58

Personnel[edit]

The Rolling Stones
Additional personnel

Chart positions[edit]

Album
Year Chart Position
1965 UK Top 20 Albums[7] 2
1965 Billboard 200[1] 1
1965 French SNEP Albums Charts[8] 7
Singles
Year Single Chart Position
1965 “The Last Time” UK Top 40 Singles[7] 1
1965 “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” UK Top 40 Singles[7] 1
1965 “The Last Time” The Billboard Hot 100[9] 9
1965 “Play with Fire” The Billboard Hot 100[9] 96
1965 “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” The Billboard Hot 100[9] 1
1965 “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” Billboard R&B Singles[10] 19

Certifications[edit]

Country Provider Certification
(sales thresholds)
United States RIAA Platinum
Preceded by
Beatles VI by The Beatles
Billboard 200 number-one album
21 August – 10 September 1965
Succeeded by
Help! by The Beatles

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jump up to:a b c Allmusic review (US)
  2. Jump up^ “Review: Out of Our Heads”. NME. London: 46. 8 July 1995.
  3. Jump up^ Strickler, Yancey (2 April 2008).