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MUSIC MONDAY : Song IT IS ENOUGH by the band THE WAITING

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It is Enough – The Waiting

Published on Feb 26, 2014

John 3:16-17
King James Version (KJV)
16,For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.

17,For God sent not his Son into the world to condemn the world; but that the world through him might be saved.

Buy at itunes:
https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/the…

04. It Is Enough

The Waiting
by The Waiting

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Lyrics:There’s something about the sorrow showing on your face
Something so tender and contrite
I know you’re tired of being in this place
Your every daydream turns to night
And you’ve worked and strived and struggled
Until your fingers they’ve turned blue
From digging deep into the heart
Of what you can and cannot do
There’s something about the hesitation in your step
Something so beautiful and scared
There’s something hard about the truth that you accept
And still you find a Savior there
So don’t you despise the road
Should it drive straight to the Son
He’s got His reason to receive you
And doesn’t need another one
The Blood, it is enough
For every man, woman and child
To be reconciled
The Blood, it is enough
For those of every shade of skin
To begin again
There’s something about the way you cry yourself to sleep
Something so destitute and poor
Sweet is every tear that’s running down your cheek
How each one clears the way for more
So if it drives you to the Savior
Then don’t disconnect the pain
He’s got one excuse to hold you
And never let you go again
Everybody has tarried
In a barren land
Even in a devil’s den
But if the cross that you carry
Should slip from your hands
Get on your knees
And pick it up, pick it up, pick it up again

 

The Waiting (band)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Waiting
Origin Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Genres Pop rock
Years active 1991–2003, 2010–Present
Labels Inpop Records (previously Sparrow Records)
Website http://www.thewaiting.org
Members Brad Olsen
Todd Olsen
Clark Leake
Brandon Thompson

The Waiting is a Christian alternative pop rock band, consisting of Brad Olsen (vocals), Todd Olsen (guitar), Clark Leake (bass), and Brandon Thompson (drums, percussion, loops). Since the members focus time on other aspects of their lives and take their time recording the band does not produce and perform as frequently as some other bands.

Early albums by “The Waiting” were guitar driven alternative rock that drew fans with clever songwriting and introspective lyrics that stood out from most Christian rock of the day. The band’s later albums moved towards a more polished pop sound.

In August 2003, The Waiting hit the stage in Georgia where they played a sold out show after which they quit touring full-time to be at home more and pursue other endeavors. Even though they do not tour full-time, they never officially broke up. The Waiting still plays occasional spot dates.

In May 2009 Brad Olsen released his solo album titled The More I Think I Understand The Less I Can Explain, It was produced by “Oats”, aka Todd Olsen. Brad Olsen continues to write and record music. He resides in Atlanta, GA with his family. He is available for booking.

Todd Olsen also resides in Atlanta where he works as a music producer. In November 2011, he released a solo album under his nickname “Oats” entitled A Tear and a Sneer.

Clark Leake received a Masters in Theology from St. Vladimir Orthodox Seminary in May 2007. He lives in Louisville, KY with his wife.

Brandon Thompson resides in the Atlanta Georgia area with his wife and two sons and has produced a couple of bands in his home studio as well as taking a job at Mount Paran North Church of God in Marietta, GA, at which he remained until mid-2006. In 2006, Brandon moved to another local church, His Hands Church where he was the Technical Director. In 2011 Brandon became the main auditorium Production Director for Watermarke Church, which is a campus of Northpoint Ministries in Woodstock, GA. Brandon maintains and occasionally updates his personal website at BranThomps.com and can be found on Twitter at @BranThomps.

In 2010, The Waiting announced that they had been working on a new album and released a new single, “Name” and were playing limited spot dates. In 2011, the band released three more singles. In June 2012, the new album Mysteriet became fully funded by 119 backers on Kickstarter, when it was estimated to release in September 2012.[1] The band’s last Facebook entry (as of April 2016), written by Todd Olson on March 23rd, 2016 stated that Brad Olson is doing vocals for the album (Todd mailed him a mic). In 2013, Todd said, “our new album Mysteriet is written but we are still working on getting the music right- no surprise bc how does one make music that evokes the mystery and majesty of the Trinity? I can best describe what we are doing by saying what we are not doing. We are NOT making a follow up to wonderfully made or unfazed- tho unfazed was very successful. what we are attempting to do is make a follow up to the song Hands In The Air musically and spiritually. if we are making a follow up at all.”[2] “Mysteriet” is the Norwegian word for “The Mystery”. This is quite fitting, since the actual release date of the band’s first album in over twelve years has yet to be announced.[3]

Discography[edit]

  • Tillbury Town (1991)
  • Blue Belly Sky (1995) 11 tracks, color cover
  • The Waiting (1997)
  • Blue Belly Sky (1998 re-issue) 15 tracks, black and white cover
  • Unfazed (1998)
  • Wonderfully Made (2002)
  • Mysteriet (coming soon?)

Compilation Contributions[edit]

Year Compilation Album[4] Contributed Song(s) Original Album
1995 R.E.X. 95 (Sampler) “Israel” Blue Belly Sky
1995 The Simply Fabulous $1.99 New Music Sampler “Staring at a Bird” Blue Belly Sky
1997 The Simply Xcellent $1.99 New Music Sampler “Number 9”
“Hands in the Air”
The Waiting
1998 Cornerstone ’98 Sampler Disc “Number 9” The Waiting
1998 WWJD: What Would Jesus Do? “Put the Blame on Me” The Waiting
1999 Simply Spectacular $2.99 New Music Sampler “Unfazed” Unfazed
1999 No Lies “Unfazed” Unfazed
1999 Listen:Louder “At Your Feet”     —     (none)

References[edit]

  1. Jump up^ “Be a part of… Mysteriet”. Kickstarter. Retrieved 27 July 2014.
  2. Jump up^ “The Waiting Official Facebook Page”. Facebook. Retrieved 27 July 2014.
  3. Jump up^ “2014 releases”. Jesus Freak Hideout. Retrieved 27 July 2014.
  4. Jump up^ “The Waiting discography”. Jesus Freak Hideout. Retrieved 27 July 2014.

External links[edit]

  • [1] The official The Waiting FB page
  • [2] The official oats FB page
  • [3] The official Brad Olsen FB page
  • [4] Brad Olsen’s official website
  • [5] The official Twitter page for The Waiting
  • [6] ChristianityToday.com Artist Page
  • [7] Interview

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MUSIC MONDAY Religious Songs That Secular People Can Love: Bob Dylan, The Byrds, Sam Cooke, Johnny Cash & Your Favorites in Music, Religion| December 15th, 2015

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Religious Songs That Secular People Can Love: Bob Dylan, The Byrds, Sam Cooke, Johnny Cash & Your Favorites

Anyone with a deep affection for Western classical music probably has their share of favorite Christian music, whatever their personal beliefs. So, too, do fans of American folk, blues, and country. Some artists have covered the odd religious tune as part of a broad roots repertoire, like the Byrds’ cover of Bluegrass gospel legends the Louvin Brothers’ cornball “The Christian Life,” above, from 1968’s Sweetheart of the Rodeo. Though Gram Parsons, with the band for the recording of this album, had his traditional leanings, his musical religion was more “Cosmic American” than Christian. But before Parsons joined the band and turned ‘em full country rock for a time, the Byrds recorded another religious song, one of their biggest hits—Pete Seeger’s “Turn, Turn, Turn” (below), which cribs all of its lyrics verbatim from Chapter 3 of the Book of Ecclesiastes (easily the non-religious person’s favorite book of the Bible).

The Byrds – Turn! Turn! Turn!

Other American legends have turned to faith in dramatic conversions and have written earnest, original religious music. Most famously, we have the case of Bob Dylan, whose conversion to evangelical Christianity saw him proselytizing from the stage. He also wrote some beautiful songs like “Precious Angel,” at the top of the post, which he claimed was for the woman who brought him to Christianity (and which supposedly contains a dig at his ex-wife Sara for not converting him). Though it features some of the more disturbing lyrical turns Dylan has taken in his career, it’s one of my favorite tunes of his from this strange period, not least because of the brilliant guitar work of Mark Knopfler.

Farther Along – Sam Cooke & the Soul Stirrers

Whatever beliefs he’s claimed over the decades, Dylan’s music has always been religious in some sense, partly because of the American folk traditions he draws on. Almost all of the early R&B and rock and roll artists came from the folk gospel world, from Elvis to Little Richard to Jerry Lee Lewis. Notably, the golden-voiced Sam Cooke got his start as a gospel singer with several vocal groups, including his own The Soul Stirrers. The harmonies in their rendition of gospel classic “Farther Along” (above) give me chills every time I hear it, even though I don’t credit the song’s beliefs.

Johnny Cash – God’s Gonna Cut You Down

It’s a common feeling I get with American soul, blues, and country singers who moved in and out of the popular and gospel worlds. Then there are those artists who left gospel for outlaw stardom, then returned to the fold and embraced their church roots later in life. A prime example of this kind of spiritual, and musical, renewal is that of Johnny Cash. There are many sides of gospel Cash. Perhaps the most poignant of his religious recordings come from his final years. Though it suffers from some commercial overuse, Cash’s recording of blues classic “God’s Gonna Cut You Down” (often titled “Run On”), above, is equal parts menacing and haunting, a Christian-themed memento mori that caught on big with lots of secular music fans.

Soulsavers – Revival

The list of religious music that non-religious people love could go on and on. Though the examples here are explicitly Christian, they certainly don’t have to be. There’s Yusef Islam, formerly Cat Stevens, who came back to record stirring original music after his conversion to Islam, and whose powerful “Morning has Broken” moves believers and non-believers alike. There’s Bob Marley, or any number of popular Rastafarian reggae artists. Then there are more contemporary artists making religious music for largely secular audiences. One could reference indie darling Sufjan Stevens, whose religious beliefs are central to his songwriting. And there’s a favorite of mine, Mark Lanegan, former Screaming Trees singer and current rock and roll journeyman who often works with religious themes and imagery, most notably in the glorious “Revival,” above, with the Soulsavers project.

The love many non-religious people have for some religious music often comes from a religious upbringing, something singer/songwriter Iris Dement discussed in a recent interview on NPR’s Fresh Air. Dement has recorded one of the most moving renditions of a hymn I remember fondly from childhood church days: a powerfully spare version of “Leaning on the Everlasting Arms” from the 2010 True Grit soundtrack. She’s also written what may be one of the best religious songs for secular (or non-religious, or post-religious, whatever…) people. In “Let the Mystery Be,” above, Dement’s agnostic refrain expresses a very sensible attitude, in my view: “But no one knows for certain and so it’s all the same to me / I think I’ll just let the mystery be.”

These are but a few of the religious songs that move this mostly secular person. Whether you’re religious or not, what are some of your favorite religious songs that have broad crossover appeal? Feel free to name your favorites in the comments below.

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Josh Jones is a writer and musician based in Durham, NC. Follow him at @jdmagness

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MUSIC MONDAY Beatles last song FREE AS A BIRD

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The Beatles – Free As A Bird

Published on Apr 5, 2016

The Beatles Now Streaming. Listen to the Come Together Playlist here: http://smarturl.it/BeatlesCT
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Buy Anthology: http://smarturl.it/AnthologyPhys

The Beatles Anthology project was a huge undertaking and to complement the historical and archival material that was made available both on CD and on video, the band recorded two new tracks. Released in December 1995, ‘Free As A Bird’ was the first of the new songs. Instead of recording a completely new composition together, Paul, George and Ringo created a track based on John’s 1977 demo, recorded at his and Yoko’s home in the Dakota in New York City.

Jeff Lynne, a good friend of George Harrison’s and a fellow member of the Travelling Wilburys, was drafted in to help with production. The ‘Free As A Bird’ video had it’s first public outing on America’s ABC TV on Sunday November 19th 1995, and the track was subsequently aired on BBC Radio 1 the day after – the day before Anthology came out. The single release followed two weeks later and made No.2 on the UK charts, while in the US ‘Free As A Bird’ enjoyed an 11-week run on the best-seller list, peaking at No.5.

Joe Pytka, a talented American filmmaker who had made several music videos with Michael Jackson, directed the beautiful video. The visual concept was a ‘bird’s-eye-view’ of countless Beatles songs.

Free as a Bird

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This article is about the Beatles song. For the album by Supertramp, see Free as a Bird (album). For the Lynyrd Skynyrd song, see Free Bird. For the concept in Germanic law, see Vogelfrei.
“Free as a Bird”
Beatles-singles-freeasabird.jpg
Single by The Beatles
from the album Anthology 1
B-side Christmas Time (Is Here Again)
Released 4 December 1995 (UK)
12 December 1995 (US)
Format 7″, CD
Recorded
  • c. 1977
  • February–March 1994
Studio
Genre Rock
Length 4:26
Label Apple Records 58497
Writer(s) Original composition by Lennon; The Beatles version by Lennon, McCartney, Harrison and Starkey[1]
Producer(s) Jeff Lynne, John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, Ringo Starr
The Beatles singles chronology
Baby It’s You
(1995)
Free as a Bird
(1995)
Real Love
(1996)
Music video
“Free as a Bird” on YouTube
Music sample
MENU
0:00

Free as a Bird” is a song originally composed and recorded in 1977 as a home demo by John Lennon. In 1995, a studio version of the recording, incorporating contributions from Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr, was released as a single by The Beatles. It was released 25 years after the break-up of the band and 15 years after the death of Lennon.

The single was released as part of the promotion for The Beatles Anthology video documentary and the band’s Anthology 1 compilation album. For the Anthology project, McCartney asked Lennon’s widow Yoko Ono for unreleased material by Lennon to which the three remaining ex-Beatles could contribute. “Free as a Bird” was one of two such songs (along with “Real Love“) for which McCartney, Harrison, and Starr contributed additional instrumentation, vocals, and arrangements. Jeff Lynne of Electric Light Orchestra, who had worked with Harrison on Harrison’s album Cloud Nine and as part of the Traveling Wilburys, was asked to co-produce the record.

The music video for “Free as a Bird” was produced by Vincent Joliet and directed by Joe Pytka; from the point of view of a bird in flight, it depicts many references to Beatles songs, such as “Strawberry Fields Forever,” “Penny Lane“, “Paperback Writer“, “A Day in the Life“, “Eleanor Rigby“, “Revolution“, and “Helter Skelter“. “Free as a Bird” won the 1997 Grammy Award for Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal and was the Beatles’ 34th Top 10 single in the United States. The song secured the group at least one Top 40 hit in four different decades (1960s, 1970s, 1980s and 1990s).

Origins[edit]

The Dakota building, where Lennon lived and composed, and where he recorded a demo of the song on cassette

McCartney, Harrison and Starr originally intended to record some incidental background music, as a trio, for the Anthology project, but later realised, according to Starr, that they wanted to record “new music”.[2] According to Harrison, they had always agreed that if one of them was not in the band, the others would never replace them and, “… go out as the Beatles”, and that the “only other person that could be in it was John.”[3]

McCartney then asked Ono if she had any unreleased recordings by Lennon, so she sent him cassette tapes of four songs.[4] “Free as a Bird” was recorded by Lennon in 1977,[5] in his and Ono’s Dakota building apartment in New York City, but was not complete. Lennon introduced the song on the cassette by imitating a New York accent and saying, “Free—as a boid” (bird).[6][7][8] The other songs were “Grow Old With Me“, “Real Love“, and “Now and Then“.[9] Ono says that it was Harrison and former Beatles road manager Neil Aspinall who initially asked her about the concept of adding vocals and instrumentation to Lennon’s demo tapes. Ono stated: “People have said it was all agreed when Paul came over to New York to induct John into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, but it was all settled before then. I just used that occasion to hand over the tapes personally to Paul.”[10]

McCartney went to Ono’s home after the induction ceremony at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame to listen to, and receive, the Lennon demo tapes; he recalls the meeting with Ono:

She was there with Sean … and she played us a couple of tracks. There were two newies on mono cassettes which he did at home … [s]o I checked it out with Sean, because I didn’t want him to have a problem with it. He said, “Well, it’ll be weird hearing a dead guy on lead vocal. But give it a try.” I said to them both, “If it doesn’t work out, you can veto it.” When I told George and Ringo I’d agreed to that they were going, “What? What if we love it?” It didn’t come to that, luckily. I said to Yoko, “Don’t impose too many conditions on us, it’s really difficult to do this, spiritually. We don’t know, we may hate each other after two hours in the studio and just walk out. So don’t put any conditions, it’s tough enough.”[11]

During an interview for the Anthology project, McCartney revealed that he was surprised to learn that Lennon’s demos of “Grow Old With Me” and “Real Love” had already been released and were well known by Lennon fans.[6][12] Starr admitted that when he first listened to the recording he found it very emotional.[13]

Recording[edit]

George Martin, who had produced most of the Beatles’ 1960s recordings, turned down an invitation to produce “Free as a Bird” due to hearing problems (though he subsequently managed to produce and direct the Anthology series). Harrison, in turn, suggested Lynne as producer (co-producer of his 1987 album, Cloud Nine) and work commenced at McCartney’s studio in February 1994.[14] Geoff Emerick and Jon Jacobs were chosen to engineer the new tracks.

The original 1977 tape of Lennon singing the song was recorded on a mono cassette, with vocals and piano on the same track.[15] They were impossible to separate, so Lynne had to produce the track with voice and piano together, but commented that it was good for the integrity of the project, as Lennon was not only singing occasional lines, but also playing on the song.[16]

Although Lennon had died in 1980, Starr said that the three remaining Beatles agreed they would pretend that Lennon had “gone for lunch”, or had gone for a “cup of tea”.[17] The remaining Beatles recorded a track around Lennon’s basic song idea, but which had gaps they had to fill in musically.[18] Some chords were changed, and the arrangement was expanded to include breaks for McCartney and Harrison to sing extra lines. Harrison played slide guitar in the solo.[19]

The Beatles’ overdubs and production were recorded between February and March 1994 in Sussex, England, at McCartney’s home studio.[20] It ends with a slight coda including a strummed ukulele by Harrison (an instrument he was known to have played often) and the voice of John Lennon played backwards.[21] The message, when played in reverse, is “Turned out nice again”, which was the catchphrase of George Formby.[8] The final result sounds like “made by John Lennon”, which, according to McCartney, was unintentional and was only discovered after the surviving Beatles reviewed the final mix.[22] When Starr heard McCartney and Harrison singing the harmonies, and later the finished song, he said that it sounded just like them [the Beatles]. He explained his comment by saying that he looked at the project as “an outsider”.[23] Lynne fully expected the finished track to sound like the Beatles, as that was his premise for the project, but Harrison added: “It’s gonna sound like them if it is them… It sounds like them now.”[24]

McCartney, Harrison and Starr all agreed that the recording process was more pleasurable than when they later recorded “Real Love” (the second song chosen for release); as it was almost finished, they had very little input, and felt like sidemen for Lennon.[25]

Music video[edit]

The music video for “Free as a Bird” was produced by Vincent Joliet and directed by Joe Pytka and depicts, from the point of view of a bird in flight, many references to Beatles songs, such as “Penny Lane”, “Paperback Writer”, “A Day in the Life”, “Eleanor Rigby”, “Helter Skelter”, “Piggies”, “The Continuing Story of Bungalow Bill”, “Strawberry Fields Forever”, “Doctor Robert”, and “The Fool on The Hill”. Between 80 and 100 allusions to the Beatles’ story, music and lyrics in the video have been estimated.[26] Although the bird can be heard at the beginning of the video, it is never seen. Neil Aspinall (Apple Records executive at the time) said that this was because no-one could agree on what kind of bird it should be.[27] Pytka had to send his ideas to McCartney, Harrison and Starr, as well as Ono, to make sure they all agreed before he could proceed with the filming of the video. Derek Taylor (ex-Apple Records executive) sent a two-page letter to Pytka confirming that he could proceed, and personally encouraged and supported Pytka’s ideas.[28] The video was filmed in as many authentic locations as possible: Penny Lane was made by Pytka’s art department to look as it was in the 1950s, and other locations filmed were The Liver Building, and Liverpool Docks (as a reference to Lennon’s father Alfred Lennon).[29]

Although Pytka fixed the ideas on a storyboard, he abandoned it as soon as filming began, and followed ideas based on what angles and perspectives the steadycam camera produced. One instance was the filming of the car crash, which Pytka filmed for hours from above, but realised that a steadycam shot on the ground was a much better idea.[30] Archive footage was used by imposing it on scenes shot by Pytka, who utilised a greenscreen stage to digitally blend it into the finished film, such as Paul’s Old English Sheepdog in the graveyard, and the elephant in the ballroom procession scene.[31] The elephant was put in last, as Aspinall phoned Pytka and said that Starr liked the scene, but insisted an elephant be put in it, which Pytka later did, as he had already put a sitar in at the request of Harrison.[32] Apart from the steadycam shots, Pytka used a Russian-made Akil-crane for sweeping overhead shots, such as the Abbey Road zebra crossing shot at the end, as well as a remote-controlled toy helicopter with a camera added to it for intricate aerial shots.[33] To make it more interesting, two Blue Meanies make cameos.

Harrison played the ukulele in the studio for the song, and asked to appear as the ukulele player seen only from behind at the very end of the video. Pytka resisted this, as he felt it would be wrong for any contemporary members of the Beatles to appear on screen. Pytka later stated that it was “heartbreaking” that Harrison had not played the role, particularly after Harrison’s death in 2001 and upon discovering that the ukulele was not a sample of an old song as Pytka had assumed.[34] The video won the Grammy Award for Best Short Form Music Video in 1997.[8]

On 6 November 2015, Apple Records released a new deluxe version of the 1 album in different editions and variations (known as 1+). Most of the tracks on 1 have been remixed from the original multi-track masters by Giles Martin. Giles Martin, with Jeff Lynne also remixed “Free as a Bird” to accompany the music video for the DVD and Blu-ray releases. The remix of “Free as a Bird” cleans up Lennon’s vocal further, and uses a different take of Harrison’s vocal phrase, replacing the lyric “whatever happened to the life that we once knew” with “whatever happened to love that we once knew”. Towards the end of the track, this version also contains a clip of Lennon stating the phrase “turned out nice again” played forward – which was played backwards in the original mix of the song. McCartney’s lead vocal, buried in the original mix to serve as a double track for Lennon’s own vocal, can now be heard more prominently in the second verse.

Chart performance[edit]

“Free as a Bird” was premiered on BBC Radio 1 in the early hours of 20 November 1995.[35] It was released as a single in the UK on 4 December 1995, two weeks after its appearance on the Anthology 1 album. The single sold 120,000 copies in its first week, entering the UK Singles Chart at No. 2. It remained on the chart for eight weeks.[36] In the US, the song reached No. 6 on the Billboard Hot 100, becoming The Beatles’ 34th Top 10 single in America.[7][37] It was the group’s first Top 10 song in the U.S. in nineteen and a half years, the longest span for the group between Top 10 hits since first charting in America in 1964.

Critical reception[edit]

“Free as a Bird” marked the first time a single containing new material had been released under the Beatles’ name since “The Long and Winding Road” in the United States in 1970.[6][7] The promotional video was broadcast during episode one of The Beatles Anthology that aired on ITV in the UK and ABC in the US.[38][39]

“Free as a Bird” was greeted with mixed reviews. Its release was criticised by Caroline Sullivan in The Guardian as a publicity gimmick, exploiting the Beatles brand, and owing less to the Beatles than to Lynne.[40] Andy Gill in The Independent called the song “disappointingly low-key. … George’s guitar weeps gently enough when required, but the overall effect is of a dirge.”[41] Ian MacDonald, writer of Revolution in the Head, declared it to be a “dreary song” that stood no comparison with the Beatles’ sixties music.[14]Chris Carter, now the host of Breakfast with the Beatles, commented: “I would value any song (especially if it was great) performed by John, Paul, George and Ringo, no matter how (or when) it was recorded.”[42] “Free as a Bird” later won the 1997 Grammy Award for Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal.[7]

Personnel[edit]

According to Ian MacDonald:[43]

Track listings[edit]

All songs written by John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr, except where noted.

  • 7″ UK: R6422 / USA: NR-58497
  1. “Free as a Bird” – 2:42
  2. Christmas Time (Is Here Again)” – 3:02
  • CD UK: CDR6422 / USA: CDP 58497
  1. “Free as a Bird” – 4:26
  2. I Saw Her Standing There” (Lennon–McCartney) – 2:51
    • Recorded 11 February 1963 at EMI Studios, London
    • Produced by George Martin
    • This version (take 9) was recorded after the version released on the album Please Please Me (take 1). The introductory count-in from take 9 was edited onto the start of take 1 for the album.
  3. This Boy” (Lennon–McCartney) – 3:17
    • Recorded 17 October 1963 at EMI Studios, London
    • Produced by George Martin
    • Two incomplete versions (takes 12 and 13), which both break down into laughter.
  4. “Christmas Time (Is Here Again)” – 3:02

Charts and certifications[edit]

Charts[edit]

Chart (1995–96) Peak
position
Australia (ARIA)[44] 6
Austria (Ö3 Austria Top 40)[45] 32
Belgium (Ultratop 50 Flanders)[46] 11
Belgium (Ultratop 50 Wallonia)[47] 12
Finland (Suomen virallinen lista)[48] 7
France (SNEP)[49] 23
Germany (Official German Charts)[50] 37
Ireland (IRMA)[51] 5
Netherlands (Single Top 100)[52] 9
New Zealand (Recorded Music NZ)[53] 26
Norway (VG-lista)[54] 14
Sweden (Sverigetopplistan)[55] 3
Switzerland (Schweizer Hitparade)[56] 25
UK Singles (Official Charts Company)[57] 2
US Billboard Hot 100[58] 6

Certifications[edit]

Region Certification Certified units/Sales
United States (RIAA)[59] Gold 500,000^
United Kingdom (BPI)[60] Silver 200,000^
*sales figures based on certification alone
^shipments figures based on certification alone

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Free as a Bird
Free as a bird
It’s the next best thing to be
Free as a bird
La, la, la, la
Home and dry
Like a homing bird I fly
As a bird on wings
Whatever happened to the life that we once knew
Can we really live without each other?
Where did we lose the touch
That seemed to mean so much
It always made me feel so
Free as a bird
It’s the next best thing to be
Free as a bird
La, la, la, la
Home and dry
Like a homing bird I fly
As a bird on wings
Whatever happened to
The life that we once knew?
Always made me feel so free
Free as a bird
It’s the next best thing to be
Free as a bird
Free as a bird
Free as a bird
Ooh, ooh, ooh

____

 

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_______

MUSIC MONDAY Beatles 1995 song REAL LOVE

______

The Beatles – Real Love

_______

Real Love (Beatles song)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
“Real Love”
Song by John Lennon from the album Imagine: John Lennon
Released 10 October 1988
Recorded New York City
Length 2:48
Label
Writer(s) John Lennon
Producer(s)
“Real Love”
Real-love1.jpg
Single by The Beatles
from the album Anthology 2
B-side Baby’s in Black(Live)
Released 4 March 1996
Format
Recorded
Genre Rock
Length 3:54
Label Apple 58544
Writer(s) John Lennon
Producer(s) Jeff Lynne
The Beatles singles chronology
Free as a Bird
(1995)
Real Love
(1996)
Music sample
MENU
0:00
Music video
“Real Love” on YouTube

Real Love” is a song written by John Lennon, and recorded with overdubs by the three surviving Beatles in 1995 for release as part of The Beatles Anthology project. To date, it is the last released record of new material credited to the Beatles.

Lennon made six takes of the song in 1979 and 1980 with “Real Life”, a different song that merged with “Real Love”. The song was ignored until 1988 when the sixth take was used on the documentary soundtrack Imagine: John Lennon.

“Real Love” was subsequently reworked by the three surviving former members of the Beatles (Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr) in early 1995, an approach also used for another incomplete Lennon track, “Free as a Bird“. “Real Love” was released as a Beatles single in 1996 in the United Kingdom, United States and many other countries; it was the opening track on the Beatles’ Anthology 2 album. It is the last “new” credited Beatles song to originate and be included on an album. To date, it is the last single by the group to become a top 40 hit in the US.

The song reached number 4 and number 11, respectively, in the UK and US singles charts, and earned a gold record more quickly than a number of the group’s other singles. The song was not included on the BBC Radio 1 playlist, prompting criticism from fans and British members of parliament. After the release of “Free as a Bird” and “Real Love”, Starr commented: “Recording the new songs didn’t feel contrived at all, it felt very natural and it was a lot of fun, but emotional too at times. But it’s the end of the line, really. There’s nothing more we can do as the Beatles.”[1]

Early origins[edit]

According to Beatles biographer John T. Marck, “Real Love” originated as part of an unfinished stage play that Lennon was working on at the time titled “The Ballad of John and Yoko”. The song was first recorded in 1977 with a hand-held tape recorder on his piano at home. Eventually the work evolved under the title “Real Life”, a song Lennon would record at least six takes of in 1979 and 1980, and then abandoned. The song was eventually combined with elements of another Lennon demo, “Baby Make Love to You”.[2] In June 1978, Lennon and his wife Yoko Ono told the press that they were working on a musical, “The Ballad of John and Yoko”, which had been planned during the previous year.[3] Songs proposed to be included up to this point were “Real Love” and “Every Man Has a Woman Who Loves Him“.[3]

In later versions, Lennon altered portions of the song; for example, “no need to be alone / it’s real love / yes, it’s real love” became “why must it be alone / it’s real / well it’s real life.” Some takes included an acoustic guitar, while the eventual Beatles release features Lennon on piano, with rudimentary double-tracked vocals, and a tambourine. The version released in 1996 most closely reflected the lyrical structure of the early demo takes of the song.[4]

Lennon appears to have considered recording “Real Love” for his and Ono’s 1980 album Double Fantasy. A handwritten draft of the album’s running order places it as the possible opening track on side two.[5] The song remained largely forgotten until 1988, when the take 6 of “Real Love” appeared on the Imagine: John Lennon soundtrack album. The song was also released on the Acoustic album in 2004. The demo with just Lennon on piano was issued in 1998 on John Lennon Anthology and then later on Working Class Hero: The Definitive Lennon.

Reuniting the Beatles[edit]

Before the Anthology project, the closest the Beatles had come to reuniting on record (while all four members were still alive) was for Starr’s Ringo album in 1973, when Lennon, Harrison and Starr collaborated on “I’m the Greatest“. By the early 1990s, the idea of redoing some of Lennon’s old songs was inspired by former Beatles road manager Neil Aspinall and Harrison, who first requested some demos from Ono. In January 1994, McCartney went to New York City for Lennon’s induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. While there, he received at least four songs from Ono. According to Aspinall, it was “two cassettes” which “might have been five or six tracks”. Ono said of the occasion: “It was all settled before then, I just used that occasion to hand over the tapes personally to Paul. I did not break up the Beatles, but I was there at the time, you know? Now I’m in a position where I could bring them back together and I would not want to hinder that.”[6]

In an interview, McCartney remarked:

Yoko said “I’ve got a couple of tracks I’ll play you, you might be interested”. I’d never heard them before but she explained that they’re quite well known to Lennon fans as bootlegs. I said to Yoko, “Don’t impose too many conditions on us, it’s really difficult to do this, spiritually. We don’t know, we may hate each other after two hours in the studio and just walk out. So don’t put any conditions, it’s tough enough. If it doesn’t work out, you can veto it.” When I told George and Ringo I’d agreed to that, they were going, “What? What if we love it?” It didn’t come to that, luckily.[6]

McCartney, Harrison and Starr then focused their attention on four songs: “Free as a Bird“, “Real Love”, “Grow Old with Me” and “Now and Then“. Of these, they liked “Free as a Bird” the most, and worked hard on it. Eventually the song was released as the first new Beatles single since 1970. The remaining Beatles then turned their attention to “Real Love”, which, co-producer Jeff Lynne later remarked, at least “had a complete set of words”.[7]

Working in the studio[edit]

With George Martin declining to produce the new recording, the Beatles brought in Electric Light Orchestra‘s Jeff Lynne, who had worked extensively with Harrison, including as part of the Traveling Wilburys, and had already co-produced “Free as a Bird”.[1] The first problem that the team had to confront was the low quality of the demo, as Lennon had recorded it on a hand-held tape recorder. Lynne recalled:

We tried out a new noise reduction system, and it really worked. The problem I had with “Real Love” was that not only was there a 60 cycles mains hum going on, there was also a terrible amount of hiss, because it had been recorded at a low level. I don’t know how many generations down this copy was, but it sounded like at least a couple. So I had to get rid of the hiss and the mains hum, and then there were clicks all the way through it … We’d spend a day on it, then listen back and still find loads more things wrong … It didn’t have any effect on John’s voice, because we were just dealing with the air surrounding him, in between phrases. That took about a week to clean up before it was even usable and transferable to a DAT master. Putting fresh music to it was the easy part![1]

Although “Real Love” was more complete than “Free as a Bird”, which had required the addition of some lyrics by McCartney,[6] the song also suffered from problems with Lennon’s timing. Lynne recalled that “it took a lot of work to get it all in time so that the others could play to it.”[7] Lynne emphasised that the three remaining Beatles were keen to ensure the song sounded very “Beatles-y”: “What we were trying to do was create a record that was timeless, so we steered away from using state-of the-art gear. We didn’t want to make it fashionable.”[7]

As with “Free as a Bird”, the Beatles worked at McCartney’s studio in Sussex, with the intention of producing another single. Added to the demo were the sounds of a double bass (originally owned by Elvis Presley’s bassist, Bill Black), Fender Jazz bass guitar, a couple of Fender Stratocaster guitars, one of which was Harrison’s psychedelically-painted “Rocky” Strat (as seen in the “I Am the Walrus” video), as well as a Ludwig drum kit.[7] Other than their regular instruments, a Baldwin Combo Harpsichord (as played by Lennon on the Beatles song “Because“) and a harmonium (which appeared on the band’s 1965 hit single “We Can Work It Out“) were also used. During the recording process, it was decided to speed up the tape, thereby raising the key from D minor to E flat minor.[8]

As their sound engineer, the Beatles opted for Geoff Emerick, who had not only worked with them to a great extent in the 1960s, but is often credited with many of the Beatles’ audio inventions. The assistant engineer was Jon Jacobs, who had worked with McCartney and Emerick since the late 1970s. The attitude in the studio was very relaxed, according to Lynne: “Paul and George would strike up the backing vocals – and all of a sudden it’s the Beatles again! … I’d be waiting to record and normally I’d say, ‘OK, Let’s do a take’, but I was too busy laughing and smiling at everything they were talking about.” Starr said that the lightheartedness was key to ensuring he, Harrison and McCartney could focus on the task: “We just pretended that John had gone on holiday or out for tea and had left us the tape to play with. That was the only way we could deal with it, and get over the hurdle, because [it] was really very emotional.”[7]

Music video[edit]

The single’s video features shots of the three remaining Beatles recording in Sussex, mixed with shots of the Beatles taken during their career. Geoff Wonfor, who directed the Anthology documentary, filmed the Beatles recording in the studio with a handheld camcorder, as they did not want to be aware of the camera recording. Kevin Godley, who co-directed the music video, said that it was meant to be a “fly on the wall thing”.[1]

Two different versions of the video were made. The first version aired during the second installment of The Beatles Anthology television mini-series on ABC, at the end of the episode. The second version is the more common of the two, and appears on the Anthology DVD set. The most notable difference between the two is in the way the videos begin: the first is presented by a strawberry – possibly a reference to “Strawberry Fields Forever“, although also quite likely a nod to Godley’s “Strawberry Studios” – while the second opens with a piano (the piano chord at the beginning).

Release[edit]

Although “Real Love” was released as single in both the UK and US on 4 March 1996, the first time the song was publicly aired was on 22 November 1995, when the American television network, the American Broadcasting Company (ABC) aired the second episode of The Beatles Anthology. The single debuted on the British charts on 16 March 1996 at number 4, selling 50,000 copies in its first week.[9] The single’s chart performance was subsequently hindered by BBC Radio 1‘s exclusion of “Real Love” from its playlist. Reuters, which described Radio 1 as “the biggest pop music station in Britain”, reported that the station had declared: “It’s not what our listeners want to hear … We are a contemporary music station.”[10]

Beatles spokesman Geoff Baker responded by saying that the band’s response was “Indignation. Shock and surprise. We carried out research after the Anthology was launched and this revealed that 41% of the buyers were teenagers.”[11] The station’s actions contrasted strongly with what had occurred at the launch of “Free as a Bird” the year before, when Radio 1 became the first station to play the song on British airwaves. The exclusion of “Real Love” provoked a fierce reaction from fans also, and elicited comment from two members of parliament (MPs). Conservative MP Harry Greenway called the action censorship, and urged the station to reverse what he called a ban.[10]

An angry McCartney wrote an 800-word article for British newspaper The Daily Mirror about the alleged ban, in which he stated: “the Beatles don’t need our new single, ‘Real Love’, to be a hit. It’s not as if our careers depend on it … It’s very heartening to know that, while the kindergarten kings of Radio 1 may think the Beatles are too old to come out to play, a lot of younger British bands don’t seem to share that view. I’m forever reading how bands like Oasis are openly crediting the Beatles as inspiration, and I’m pleased that I can hear the Beatles in a lot of the music around today.” The letter was published on 9 March, the day after Radio 1 announced the “ban”.[11][dead link]

The station’s controller, Matthew Bannister, denied that the failure to include “Real Love” was a ban, saying that it merely meant that the song had not been included on the playlist of each week’s 60 most regularly featured songs.[citation needed] The station also hit back by devoting a “Golden Hour” to the group’s music as well as music by bands influenced by the Beatles. This “Golden Hour” concluded with a playing of “Real Love”.[12]

“Real Love” fell out of the British charts in seven weeks, never topping its initial position of number 4. In the US, the single entered the charts on 30 March, and peaked at number 11.[13] After four months, 500,000 copies had been sold in the US.[9][14] The Beatles’ compilation album Anthology 2, which included the song, eventually topped the British and American albums charts.[15][16]

John Lennon’s solo versions appear on several Lennon compilations, the film Imagine: John Lennon, and also in a 2007 ad campaign for J. C. Penney.[17] On 6 November 2015, Apple Records released a new deluxe version of the 1 album in different editions and variations (known as 1+). Most of the tracks on 1 have been remixed from the original multi-track masters by Giles Martin. Martin and Jeff Lynne also remixed “Real Love” for the DVD and Blu-ray releases. The remix of “Real Love” cleans up Lennon’s vocal further, and reinstates a several deleted elements originally recorded in 1995, such as lead guitar phrases and drum fills, as well as making the harpsichord and harmonium more prominent in the mix.

Lyrics and melody[edit]

The song’s lyrics have been interpreted by one reviewer to be conveying the message that “love is the answer to loneliness” and “that connection is the antidote to unreality.”[18]

The song has been sped up 12% from the demo, apparently to “effect the … snappy tempo” as Alan W. Pollack has speculated. The tune is nearly completely pentatonic, comprising primarily the notes E, F, G, B and C. The refrain is higher than the verse; while the verse covers a full octave, the refrain, at its peak, is a fifth higher.[19]

The instrumental intro is four measures long, and the verse and refrain are eight measures. The introduction occurs in parallel E minor,[20] with the main thrust of the song being in E major. There are several other occasions where Lennon moves to a chord from the parallel minor, e.g. in the chorus where the progression moves from a major tonic (I) chord to a minor subdominant (iv) chord. The move to minor harmony happens on the words ‘alone’ and ‘afraid’. This combination of lyrics and harmony turning at the same point is a common Beatles device, and helps give the song a wistful feeling. The outro largely comprises the last half of the refrain repeated seven times, slowly fading out.[19]

Personnel[edit]

Sixth take
Beatles version

According to Ian MacDonald[21] and Mark Lewisohn:[22]

Track listings[edit]

All tracks written by Lennon–McCartney, except where noted.

7″ (R6425)
  1. “Real Love” (Lennon) – 3:54
    • Recorded at The Dakota, New York City, circa 1979 (original demo) and at The Mill Studio, Sussex, in February 1995.
  2. Baby’s in Black” – 3:03
    • Recorded live at the Hollywood Bowl on 29 August 1965 (spoken introduction by Lennon) and 30 August 1965 (song performance).
CD (CDR6425)
  1. “Real Love” (Lennon) – 3:54
  2. “Baby’s in Black” – 3:03
  3. Yellow Submarine” – 2:48
    • Recorded at EMI Studios, London, on 26 May and 1 June 1966. A new remix with a previously unreleased “marching” introduction with the sound effects mixed higher in volume throughout.
  4. Here, There and Everywhere” – 2:23
    • Recorded at EMI Studios, London, on 16 June 1966. This is a combination of take 7 (a mono mix of the basic track with McCartney’s guide vocal) with a 1995 stereo remix of the harmony vocals as overdubbed onto take 13 superimposed at the end.

Charts and certifications[edit]

Charts[edit]

Chart (1996) Peak
position
Australia (ARIA)[24] 6
Belgium (Ultratop 50 Flanders)[25] 50
Germany (Official German Charts)[26] 45
Finland (Suomen virallinen lista)[27] 4
France (SNEP)[28] 36
Ireland (IRMA)[29] 8
Netherlands (Single Top 100)[30] 21
Sweden (Sverigetopplistan)[31] 2
Switzerland (Schweizer Hitparade)[32] 26
UK Singles (Official Charts Company)[33] 4
US Billboard Hot 100[34] 11
US Cash Box Top 100[35] 10

Certifications[edit]

Region Certification Certified units/Sales
United States (RIAA)[36] Gold 500,000^
*sales figures based on certification alone
^shipments figures based on certification alone

Tom Odell version[edit]

“Real Love”
Real-Love-by-Tom-Odell.jpg
Single by Tom Odell
Released 6 November 2014
Format Digital download
Genre Pop
Length 2:21
Label Sony
Writer(s) John Lennon
Tom Odell singles chronology
I Know
(2013)
Real Love
(2014)
Wrong Crowd
(2016)

In 2014, English singer-songwriter Tom Odell released a cover version of the song. It was released on 6 November 2014 in the United Kingdom as a digital download through Sony. The song was selected as the soundtrack to the John Lewis 2014 Christmas advertisement and was later included on the “Spending All My Christmas With You” EP released in 2016.

Chart performance

On 9 November 2014 (week ending 15 November 2014), “Real Love” debuted at number 21 in the UK Singles Chart with only 3 days of sales, and then reached a new peak of number 7 the following week.

Track listing
Digital download
No. Title Length
1. “Real Love” 2:21

Chart performance[edit]

Weekly charts
Chart (2014) Peak
position
Ireland (IRMA)[37] 16
Netherlands (Single Top 100)[38] 89
Scotland (Official Charts Company)[39] 9
UK Singles (Official Charts Company)[33] 7
Release history
Region Date Format Label
United Kingdom 6 November 2014 Digital download Sony

Other versions[edit]

Regina Spektor recorded a cover version of “Real Love” for Instant Karma: The Amnesty International Campaign to Save Darfur, released in June 2007. She performed that cover at Bonnaroo the same month.[40]

Adam Sandler performed the song in the 2009 film Funny People. This version is also found on the film’s soundtrack.

The Last Royals released a cover version of “Real Love” on September 1, 2015 [41][42]

 External links[edit]

____

Real Love
All my little plans and schemes
Lost like some forgotten dreams
Seems that all I really was doing
Was waiting for you
Just like little girls and boys
Playing with their little toys
Seems like all they really were doing
Was waiting for love
Don’t need to be alone
No need to be alone
It’s real love, it’s real
Yes, it’s real love, it’s real
From this moment on I know
Exactly where my life will go
Seems that all I really was doing
Was waiting for love
Don’t need to be afraid
No need to be afraid
It’s real love, it’s real
Yes, it’s real love, it’s real
Thought I’d been in love before
But in my heart, I wanted more
Seems like all I really was doing
Was waiting for you
Don’t need to be alone
Don’t need to be alone
It’s real love, it’s real
It’s real love, it’s real
Yes, it’s real love, it’s real
It’s real love, it’s real
Yes, it’s real love, it’s real
It’s real love, it’s real
Yes, it’s real love, it’s real
It’s real love, it’s real

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A longtime LINKIN PARK fan responds to Chester Bennington’s suicide and some suggestions from a Christian perspective to those who feel depressed and suicidal

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I have been a longtime LINKIN PARK fan and was very sad to hear of Chester Bennington’s suicide. My favorite song from LINKIN PARK is SOMEWHERE I BELONG and I think that Chester never really found that out for himself. I am hopeful that people will rise up and try to reach those around them that are suffering with depression and help them. Here are some of those lyrics:

I wanna heal, I wanna feel what I thought was never real
I wanna let go of the pain I’ve felt so long
(Erase all the pain till it’s gone)
I wanna heal, I wanna feel like I’m close to something real
I wanna find something I’ve wanted all along
Somewhere I belong

I like the way Colin Foreman put it because I think he is right about Christianity having the answer to the meaning of life (and more on that at the end of this post) :

I firmly believe God will use this generation to revive his body the church on these shores and beyond. I personally have experienced the power of prayer, and know it was the prayers of my family and commuted Christians in my school that saved my soul and brought me to repentance and faith in Christ from the depths of sin. And God can do likewise for the many lost prodigals who are desperately searching for meaning in life.

As Linkin Park put it :
“ I WANT TO HEAL; I WANT TO FEEL;
LIKE I’M CLOSE TO SOMETHING REAL;
I WANT TO FIND SOMETHING I’VE WANTED ALL ALONG;
SOMEWHERE I BELONG”

Young people are searching for somewhere to belong throughout this land and beyond, if only the church would hear their cry.

Somewhere I Belong (Official Video) – Linkin Park

__________

 

Crawling (Official Video) – Linkin Park

Linkin Park singer Chester Bennington dies at 41 from apparent suicide

 

 

_-

Leave Out All The Rest (Official Video) – Linkin Park

New Divide (Official Video) – Linkin Park

In The End (Official Video) – Linkin Park

New Details Emerge in Death of Linkin Park’s Chester Bennington

Linkin Park Chester Bennington
Kathy Flynn, WickedGoddessPhotography.com

 

In the aftermath of the death of Linkin Park singer Chester Bennington, more details on his death are coming to light. We warn readers before moving forward that the details concern the manner in which he apparently took his own life.

What I’ve Done (Official Video) – Linkin Park

According to TMZ, law enforcement officials explained that Bennington committed suicide by hanging. The musician was discovered hanging from a door separating his bedroom from his closet. The rocker reportedly was found with a belt around his neck and sources state that there was a partially empty bottle of alcohol in the room where Chester died, but no evidence of drugs. Bennington has spoken frankly in the past about his issues with drugs and alcohol. The singer reportedly left no suicide note.

Faint (Official Video) – Linkin Park

TMZ’s article points out the similarities between Bennington’s death and that of his close friend, Chris Cornell, who died in a hanging incident after a show in Detroit earlier this year. Bennington’s death coincided with the date of Cornell’s birthday.

Numb (Official Video) – Linkin Park

As previously reported, Bennington was discovered by a housekeeper and police were called to the scene. It’s been reported that one of his Linkin Park bandmates arrived at his residence shortly after police arrived as he was picking Bennington up to head to a photo shoot.

One Step Closer (Official Video) – Linkin Park

__

Where do we go from here? We can’t bring Chester back but we can help those around us who are dealing with depression and drug addiction.

 

I don’t want to dismiss the problems of alcohol and drug addiction, because they certainly can contribute to depression which can lead to suicide. Rather I want to concentrate in this post to how a person can respond to depression. Sadly Chester  chose suicide because he felt there was no other way like so many others today  depression can overwhelm people.  It is sad that this is such a pressing problem. I think of songs that point this out: Adam’s Song, The Last Resort, etc.

There are two usual approaches to this problem that young people take.

First, you have the worm approach. They crawl into the ground because they don’t want to be close to anyone.

Second, the puppy approach. They do anything they can to get people to like them.

The better approach is to act like the child of God that you are. Feeling loved and accepted starts with your relationship with Christ who is the only one able to meet the deepest needs of your life. (Fast forward to the end of this post if you need a relationship with Christ.) Talking to Jesus and reading his Word- The Bible – are steps to strengthening your friendship with him. He laid down his life for you, so it is obvious that he regards you as a friend worth dying for (John 15:13) That is powerful comfort when you wonder if anyone cares.

Portions of the above post were taken from the excellent devotional book by Josh McDowell, and Ed Stewart “Youth Devotions 2,” published in 2003 by Tyndale. Back then my kids were 17, 14, 9 and 7 and we went through several of these devotions together. Just recently I got the book out of the garage and three of my kids have been meeting with me at 5:30 am every morning and we are going through some of these same devotions again. I thank God for kids who came to me and asked to start meeting with me every morning to spend 30 minutes studying Bible applications and praying together. To God be the glory.

Papa Roach – Last Resort (Censored Version)

This series of posts concerns the song “The Last Resort.”

Amy Winehouse died a few years ago and it was a tragic loss. That really troubled me that she did not seek spiritual help instead of turning to drugs and alcohol. This post today will give hope to those who feel like it is all hopeless.

The band’s place in the pop music landscape was established with the release of their breakout single, “Last Resort,” which was quickly picked up by MTV and nominated for a “Best New Artist Video” award at the 2000 Video Music Awards. The song is a gut-wrenching first-person chronicle of hopelessness that’s gone so deep the singer is seriously contemplating suicide.   But the band is adamant about the fact that the song is about fighting to survive by overcoming depression, rather than allowing it to lead to suicide. “It’s not saying I can’t go on living. It’s saying I can’t go on living this way,” says Dick (Spin, 10/00).

I know there are some curse words in the following song. I have eliminated both times the curse word is used. I really think that there needs to be a response to the young people who are saying things like the words in this song Here are some of the words:

Do you even care if I die pleading, Would it be wrong, would it be right, If I took my life tonight, Chances are that I might, and I’m contimplating suicide, ‘Cause I’m losing my sight, losing my mind, Wish somebody would tell me I’m fine, Nothing’s alright, nothing is fine, I’m running and I’m crying, I never realized I was spread too thin, Till it was too late andI was empty within, Hungry, feeding on my chaos and living in sin, Downward spiral, where do i begin, It all started when i lost my mother, No love for myself and no love for another,Searching to find a love upon a higher level, finding nothing but QUESTIONS AND DEVILS, I can’t go on living this way, Cut my life into pieces, This is my last resort.

My response to these words:”Do you even care if I die pleading, Would it be wrong, would it be right, If I took my life tonight, Chances are that I might, and I’m contimplating suicide” is that you should plead to someone who can do something about your situation and that is Christ!!!!

Below David Powlison asserts:

How do you get the living hope that God offers you in Jesus? By asking. Jesus said, “Ask and it will be given to you; seek and you will find; knock and the door will be opened to you. For everyone who asks receives; he who seeks finds; and to him who knocks, the door will be opened” (Matthew 7:7-8).

Suicide operates in a world of death, despair, and aloneness. Jesus Christ creates a world of life, hope, and community. Ask God for help, and keep on asking. Don’t stop asking. You need Him to fill you every day with the hope of the resurrection.

Below is a portion of the article “Papa Roach—Infesting and reflecting youth culture by Walt Mueller. 

Papa Roach’s Music

In a day and age where the walls are crumbling between what had been a variety of distinctive popular music genres, Papa Roach is like many other chart-topping bands whose music combines sounds that were once distinct. Coby Dick’s raspy and throat-wrenching vocals join with music that incorporates sounds of rap, rock, thrash, funk and metal. Listeners familiar with popular music will hear the influence of Faith No More, the band Dick cites as one of his early favorites. Similar contemporary bands include Korn, Limp Bizkit, The Deftones and P.O.D.

Reviewer Tim Kennedy of Spin describes the resulting sound as “an amalgam of below-the-belt guitar riffage, punk-rock urgency, and half-sung, half-rapped vocals (10/00). Rolling Stone’s Anthony Bozza says listening to Papa Roach is “like standing on a precipice—sustained tension and the threat of a tumble” (8/31/00).

The sound combines with Dick’s lyrics in a powerful and emotional blend that addresses the reality of life for kids who have been burned over and over again. Tobin Esperance says, “We write about things that have happened to our singer, specifically, and friends around us. It’s real life stuff. We’re not writing about s___ that we don’t know about, like girls and cars and money … we only know real life bulls___ that happens” (nyrock.com). Coby Dick says of his autobiographical music, “I’m venting my emotions. It’s blunt” (Rolling Stone, 8/31/00). He says “Papa Roach, lyrically, is my counseling” (Billboard,6/10/00). 

Infest (2000)

Papa Roach released the album they now consider their first in April of 2000. The album quickly began to sell as a result of radio and MTV exposure, went gold after two months thanks to scoring with MTV’s Total Request Live audience, and had gone double platinum by September 2000.

Papa Roach offers an introduction to their music, mission, message and intentions on the album’s title cut. After introducing himself to his listeners, Coby Dick informs them his “God-given talent is to rock all the nations.” In this, the band’s “first manifesto,” the group lays out their plan to “infest” the world and young minds (“wrap you in my thoughts”) with an angry musical message of anarchy and rebellion against a messed-up world that’s let them down: “We’re going to infest/We’re getting in your head/What is wrong with the world today/The government, media or your family.” Institutions and people are not to be trusted. In fact, “First they shackle your feet/Then they stand you in a line/Then they beat you like meat/Then they grab you by your mind … people are the problem today.” Dick admits the struggle so many young people feel: “the game of life is crazy.” Alone in this sea of brokenness and hopelessness, Dick asks, “Would you cry if I died today/I think it be better if you did not say.”

The band’s place in the pop music landscape was established with the release of their breakout single, “Last Resort,” which was quickly picked up by MTV and nominated for a “Best New Artist Video” award at the 2000 Video Music Awards. The song is a gut-wrenching first-person chronicle of hopelessness that’s gone so deep the singer is seriously contemplating suicide. (See lyrics on page 7.) The fact that “Last Resort” is part of the mainstream pop music landscape indicates it is connecting with more and more kids who see it as an expression of their own inner struggles. For casual listeners, the song is very confusing. Listening to the song reveals the criticisms claiming the song promotes suicide could certainly be warranted. Kids who are riding the fence because of numerous other problems in their lives could interpret the song in a way that would give them permission to go over the edge, especially if they don’t know the story behind the song. But the band is adamant about the fact that the song is about fighting to survive by overcoming depression, rather than allowing it to lead to suicide. “It’s not saying I can’t go on living. It’s saying I can’t go on living this way,” says Dick (Spin, 10/00). He also says, “Last Resort” has “a positive edge to it, as far as like, ‘Don’t succumb to it. Keep yourself afloat.’ With these problems in your life, find a friend you can confide in” (Sonicnet.com). Based on the band’s resolve to survive like a roach, one would have to take them at their word. The song chronicles the suicide attempt of one of Coby Dick’s former roommates. After his “unsuccessful” attempt, the young man “turned to God” … Dick claims the attempt was what killed the rotting part of his roommate’s soul. The song has definitely connected. “We’ve gotten so many e-mails from people who tell us ‘Last Resort’ saved their lives,” says Dick. “It makes some people feel less alone” (Rolling Stone,8/31/00).

The album’s third cut is equally powerful. Released as a single and put in heavy rotation on MTV, “Broken Home” (See lyrics) is an overt lyrical, sonic and visual cry from the heart of one whose young life has been shattered by family breakdown. Written by Dick about his feelings after his parents’ divorce, the song offers listeners an emotional window into the reality of kids beaten up by our current culture of divorce. Every parent considering divorce should sit and watch this video. It is powerful.

“Dead Cell” has been called “a darkly sarcastic paean to Columbine kids the world over” (Alternative Press, 10/00). If that’s the case, the sarcasm is not easily heard. The dead cells are described as “born with no soul/lack of control/cut from the mold of the anti-social … sick in the head/living but dead.” Loud, angry and fast, the song could be interpreted by some who are young and angry as a call to arms: “I’m telling ya the kids are getting singled out/Let me hear the dead cells shout.”

“Between Angels and Insects” is an insightful rant against American greed and materialism. Dick says he wrote the song to remind himself that the things the band’s success will bring are not the things that make one happy. The lyrics are powerful and excerpts could serve to spark discussion with teens about the false promises of materialism: “Diamond rings get you nothing/But a life-long lesson/And your pocketbook stressin’/You’re a slave to the system/Working jobs that you hate/For s___ that you don’t need/It’s too bad the world is based on greed/Step back and stop thinking ‘bout yourself … ‘cause everything is nothing/And emptiness is in everything … Possessions they are never gonna fill the void … the things you own, own you.” When discussing the message of the song Buckner says, “all the worldly things that people equate with happiness—do they necessarily make you happy? You can have Rolexes and diamond rings and cars and houses … but really the things that make you happy are peace of mind and passion in your life” (Alternative Press, 10/00).

Relational selfishness and greed are the subject of “Blood Brothers,” a song offering powerful evidence of the depth of sin’s hold on humanity: “It’s our nature to destroy ourselves/It’s our nature to kill ourselves/It’s our nature to kill each other/It’s in our nature to kill, kill, kill.” The song speaks about allegiance in a world where you can’t trust anybody and you’ve got to watch your back. The lyrics leave one thinking the song could serve as an anthem for a street gang or other fringe subculture: “Blood brothers keep it real to the end.”

Themes of severe relational breakdown and the resulting pain continue in “Revenge,” a song about a girl who was “abused with forks, knives and razorblades” and who finally left the man who abused her in fits of rage. Listeners who have been abused will identify with the song’s mention of the ever-present and visible emotional scars they so often feel: “Chaos is what she saw in the mirror/Scared of herself/And the power that was in her/It took over and weighed heavily on her shoulders/Militant insanity is now what controlled her.” The song indicates that she exacts revenge on him, although the method and outcome is unclear.

Backstabbers are the subject of “Snakes,” an angry and threatening rant at those who betray friends. The song reflects the distrust so many kids feel because of the parade of letdowns they’ve experienced. The chorus asks, “Do you like how it feels to be bit in the neck by the snake that kills?/Do you know how it feels to be stabbed in the back then watch the blood spill?/I don’t like how it feels.”

Coby Dick chronicles his wrestling match with alcohol on “Binge,” a song that serves as a personal confession. “All I need is a bottle/And I don’t need no friends/Now wallow in my pain/I swallow as I pretend/To act like I’m happy when I drink till no end/I’m losing all my friends, I’m losing in the end … When I’m sober, life bores me/So I get drunk again.” The song is a heart cry about what drives the binge drinker, how he really feels inside and his desire to see it end. In the song’s final lines, Dick sings, “I wish things would change/Wish they’d rearrange.”

“Never Enough” is another cry for help from a confused and tortured young soul that is deeply longing for redemption. “Life’s been sucked out of me/And this routine’s killing me … somebody put me out of my misery,” Dick sings. The song will resonate with kids who are lost, purposeless and without peace. The song’s conclusion is a loud cry for help: “I feel as if I’m running/Life will knock me down.”

“Thrown Away” offers a view of life through the eyes of a kid struggling with ADD, something Coby Dick knows well as he watched his brother’s personal struggle with the disorder. “My heart is bleeding and the pain will not pass … I want to be thrown away … I am a mess, I’ve made a huge mess/I can’t control myself/I’m losing it, I’ve lost it/I’ve spilt all my marbles … sometimes I want to be thrown away.”

The album concludes with an unlisted hidden cut called “Tightrope.” The track is stylistically unlike any other cuts on the album as it is done in reggae style. The lyrics are a confusing mix of thoughts where Dick calls his words “weapons in which I murder you.” The song offers a confession regarding the ethical dilemmas faced by kids in these confusing times: “there is a thin line between what’s good and what is evil/I will tiptoe down that line/But I feel unstable/My life is a circus and I’m tripping down the tightrope/There’s nothing left to save me now so I will not look down.”

Help for the Suicidal

God offers you true, living hope–not a false hope based on your death.
By David Powlison

WHAT YOU NEED TO DO

It’s easy to see the risk factors for suicide—depression, suffering, disillusioning experiences, failure—but there are also ways to get your life back on track by building protective factors into your life.

Ask for help

How do you get the living hope that God offers you in Jesus? By asking. Jesus said, “Ask and it will be given to you; seek and you will find; knock and the door will be opened to you. For everyone who asks receives; he who seeks finds; and to him who knocks, the door will be opened” (Matthew 7:7-8).

Suicide operates in a world of death, despair, and aloneness. Jesus Christ creates a world of life, hope, and community. Ask God for help, and keep on asking. Don’t stop asking. You need Him to fill you every day with the hope of the resurrection.

At the same time you are asking God for help, tell other people about your struggle with hopelessness. God uses His people to bring life, light, and hope. Suicide, by definition, happens when someone is all alone. Getting in relationship with wise, caring people will protect you from despair and acting out of despair.

But what if you are bereaved and alone? If you know Jesus, you still have a family—His family is your family. Become part of a community of other Christians. Look for a church where Jesus is at the center of teaching and worship. Get in relationship with people who can help you, but don’t stop with getting help. Find people to love, serve, and give to. Even if your life has been stripped barren by lost relationships, God can and will fill your life with helpful and healing relationships.

Grow in godly life skills

Another protective factor is to grow in godly living. Many of the reasons for despair come from not living a godly, fruitful life. You need to learn the skills that make godly living possible. What are some of those skills?

    • Conflict resolution. Learn to problem-solve by entering into human difficulties and growing through them. (See Ask the Christian Counselor article, “Fighting the Right Way.”)
    • Seek and grant forgiveness. Hopeless thinking is often the result of guilt and bitterness.
    • Learn to give to others. Suicide is a selfish act. It’s a lie that others will be better off without you. Work to replace your faulty thinking with reaching out to others who are also struggling. Take what you have learned in this article and pass it on to at least one other person. Whatever hope God gives you, give to someone who is struggling with despair.

Live for God

When you live for God, you have genuine meaning in your life. This purpose is far bigger than your suffering, your failures, the death of your dreams, and the disillusionment of your hopes. Living by faith in God for His purposes will protect you from suicidal and despairing thoughts. God wants to use your personality, your skills, your life situation, and even your struggle with despair to bring hope to others.

He has already prepared good works for you to do. Paul says, “For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them” (Ephesians 2:10). As you step into the good works God has prepared for you—you will find that meaning, purpose, and joy.

Adrian Rogers: Dealing with Depression [#1150] (Audio)

Published on Jun 1, 2016

None of us are immune to depression. And if you’re always burning the candle at both end, frazzled and stretched too thin, you’re a prime target for Satan’s attacks. Even great men of God have struggled with depression. Find out today how God lovingly dealt with them and how you can regain victory over this debilitating emotion.

Scripture References: Numbers 11:15; 1 Kings 19:4
Series: Getting a Handle on Your Emotions
This Message: https://www.lwf.org/products/1150CD
This Series: https://www.lwf.org/products/CDA112
1. Dealing with Doubt [#1148]
2. Dealing with Depression [#1150]
3. Dealing with Loneliness [#1151]
4. Dealing with Stress [#1153]
5. Inferiority [#1155]
6. The Blight of Bitterness [#1136]
7. God’s Answer to Anger [#1009]
8. How to Handle Your Fear [#1225]

If you would like more information please visit these following websites:
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Call: (901) 382-7900

Somewhere I Belong (Official Video) – Linkin Park

[Verse 1: Mike Shinoda (and Chester Bennington)]
(When this began)
I had nothing to say
And I get lost in the nothingness inside of me
(I was confused)
And I let it all out to find
That I’m not the only person with these things in mind
(Inside of me)
But all the vacancy the words revealed
Is the only real thing that I’ve got left to feel
(Nothing to lose)
Just stuck, hollow and alone
And the fault is my own, and the fault is my own

[Hook: Chester and (Mike)]
I wanna heal, I wanna feel what I thought was never real
I wanna let go of the pain I’ve felt so long
(Erase all the pain till it’s gone)
I wanna heal, I wanna feel like I’m close to something real
I wanna find something I’ve wanted all along
Somewhere I belong

[Verse 2: Mike and (Chester)]
And I’ve got nothing to say
I can’t believe I didn’t fall right down on my face

(I was confused)
Looking everywhere only to find
That it’s not the way I had imagined it all in my mind

(So what am I?)
What do I have but negativity?
’Cause I can’t justify the way, everyone is looking at me
(Nothing to lose)
Nothing to gain, hollow and alone
And the fault is my own, and the fault is my own

[Hook: Chester and (Mike)]
I wanna heal, I wanna feel what I thought was never real
I wanna let go of the pain I’ve felt so long
(Erase all the pain till it’s gone)
I wanna heal, I wanna feel like I’m close to something real
I wanna find something I’ve wanted all along
Somewhere I belong

 

We are looking for somewhere we belong. The first thing we have to resolve is our relationship with our Creator.

Adrian Rogers: Salvation #2067

Published on Nov 23, 2016

SALVATION: What is the greatest need of humanity? Salvation through faith in Jesus Christ. That may sound old-fashioned, but one day it will make a huge difference in your life. Learn what you gain by your salvation.
_

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Chris Cornell Remembered by Linkin Park’s Chester Bennington

Casey Curry/Invision/AP
Chris Cornell poses for a portrait to promote his latest album, “Higher Truth,” at The Paramount Ranch in Agoura Hills, Calif. on July 29, 2015.

Chris Cornell was good friends with Linkin Park’s Chester Bennington. When he toured with Linkin Park in the late-’00s, Bennington would join Cornell to sing Temple of the Dog’s “Hunger Strike” and Cornell would repay the favor and help sing “Crawling.”

On Thursday (May 18), in light of Chris Cornell’s death, Bennington has shared a note to remember his friend. Read it below:

 

Dear Chris,

I dreamt about the Beatles last night. I woke up with Rocky Raccoon playing in my head and a concerned look on my wife’s face. She told me my friend has just passed away. Thoughts of you flooded my mind and I wept. I’m still weeping, with sadness, as well as gratitude for having shared some very special moments with you and your beautiful family. You have inspired me in many ways you could never have known. Your talent was pure and unrivaled. Your voice was joy and pain, anger and forgiveness, love and heartache all wrapped up into one. I suppose that’s what we all are. You helped me understand that. I just watched a video of you singing ‘ A day in the life ‘ by the Beatles and thought of my dream. I’d like to think you were saying goodbye in your own way. I can’t imagine a world without you in it. I pray you find peace in the next life. I send my love to your wife and children, friends and family. Thank you for allowing me to be a part of your life.

With all of my love.
Your friend,
Chester Bennington

Chris Cornell * A Day In The Life (Beatles Cover) Live HD

 

SGT. PEPPER’S LONELY HEARTS CLUB BAND ALBUM was the Beatles’ finest work and in my view it had their best song of all-time in it. The revolutionary song was A DAY IN THE LIFE which both showed the common place part of everyday life and also the sudden unexpected side of life.  The shocking part of the song included the story of TARA BROWNE. You can read more about Tara Browne later in this post and another fine article on him was written by GLENYS ROBERTS in 2012 called, “A Day in the Life: Tragic true story behind one of the Beatles’ most famous hits revealed in new book.”

(Francis Schaeffer pictured below)

Francis Schaeffer noted that King Solomon said that death can arrive unexpectedly at anytime in Ecclesiastes 9:11-13: 

11 Again I saw that under the sun the race is not to the swift, nor the battle to the strong, nor bread to the wise, nor riches to the intelligent, nor favor to those with knowledge, but time and chance happen to them all. 12 For man does not know his time. Like fish that are taken in an evil net, and like birds that are caught in a snare, so the children of man are snared at an evil time, when it suddenly falls upon them. 13 I have also seen this example of wisdom under the sun, and it seemed great to me.

______

Death can come at anytime. Albert Camus in a speeding car with a pretty girl, then Camus dead. Lawrence of Arabia coming over the crest of a hill at 100 mph on his motorcycle and some boy stands in the road and Lawrence turns aside and dies.  

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The Beatles reached out to those touched by this reality. No wonder in the video THE AGE OF NON-REASON (at 14 min mark) Schaeffer noted,  ” Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band…for a time it became the rallying cry for young people throughout the world. It expressed the essence of their lives, thoughts and their feelings.”

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Let’s get back to Solomon and his search  for meaning in life in what I call the 6 big L words in the Book of Ecclesiastes. He looked into  learning (1:16-18), laughter, ladies, luxuries,  and liquor (2:1-3, 8, 10, 11), and labor (2:4-6, 18-20). After searching in all these areas just like Chris Cornell and Chester Bennington he found them to be  “vanity and a striving after the wind.”

Ecclesiastes 2:7-11 English Standard Version (ESV)

7I had also great possessions of herds and flocks, more than any who had been before me in Jerusalem. 8 I also gathered for myself silver and gold and the treasure of kings and provinces. So I became great and surpassed all who were before me in Jerusalem…10 And whatever my eyes desired I did not keep from them. 11 Then I considered all that my hands had done and the toil I had expended in doing it, and behold, all was vanity and a striving after wind, and there was nothing to be gained UNDER THE SUN.

“For what does it profit a man to gain the whole world and forfeit his soul?” Mark 8:36 (Christ’s words)

God put Solomon’s story in Ecclesiastes in the Bible with the sole purpose of telling people that without God in the picture they will find out the emptiness one feels when possessions or anything else BELOW THE SUN are trying to fill the void that God can only fill.

Then in the last chapter of Ecclesiastes Solomon returns to looking above the sun and he says that obeying the Lord is the proper way to live your life. The  answer to find meaning in life is found in putting your faith and trust in Jesus Christ. The Bible is true from cover to cover and can be trusted. If you need more evidence then go to You Tube and watch the short videos  “Francis Schaeffer – The Biblical Flow of History & Truth (1),“(3 min, 5 sec) and “Dr. Francis Schaeffer – The Biblical Flow of Truth & History (part 2),” (10 min, 46 sec).

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MUSIC MONDAY George Harrison – Isn’t It A Pity

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George Harrison – Isn’t It A Pity [Remastered]

Isn’t It a Pity

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
For the song by George Gershwin, see Isn’t It a Pity?
“Isn’t It a Pity”
Isn't It A Pity US picture sleeve.jpg
Single by George Harrison
from the album All Things Must Pass
A-side My Sweet Lord
(double A-side)
Released 23 November 1970
Format 7-inch vinyl
Genre Folk rock
Length 7:10
Label Apple
Writer(s) George Harrison
Producer(s) George Harrison, Phil Spector
George Harrison singles chronology
My Sweet Lord“/
Isn’t It a Pity
(1970)
What Is Life
(1971)
All Things Must Pass track listing
“Isn’t It a Pity (Version Two)”
Song by George Harrison from the album All Things Must Pass
Published Harrisongs
Released 27 November 1970
Genre Folk rock
Length 4:45
Label Apple
Writer(s) George Harrison
Producer(s) George Harrison, Phil Spector

Isn’t It a Pity” is a song by English musician George Harrison from his 1970 solo album All Things Must Pass. It appears in two variations there: one the well-known, seven-minute version; the other a reprise, titled “Isn’t It a Pity (Version Two)“. Harrison wrote the song in 1966, but it was rejected for inclusion on releases by the Beatles. In many countries around the world, the song was also issued on a double A-side single with “My Sweet Lord“. In America, Billboard magazine listed it with “My Sweet Lord” when the single topped the Hot 100 chart, while in Canada, “Isn’t It a Pity” reached number 1 as the preferred side.

An anthemic ballad and one of Harrison’s most celebrated compositions, “Isn’t It a Pity” has been described as the emotional and musical centrepiece of All Things Must Pass[1] and “a poignant reflection on The Beatles’ coarse ending”.[2] Co-produced by Phil Spector, the recording employs multiple keyboard players, rhythm guitarists and percussionists, as well as orchestration by arranger John Barham. In its extended fadeout, the song references the closing refrain of the Beatles’ 1968 hit “Hey Jude“. Other musicians on the recording include Ringo Starr, Billy Preston, Gary Wright and the band Badfinger, while the reprise version features Eric Clapton on lead guitar.

The song appeared as the closing track on Harrison’s career-spanning compilation Let It Roll (2009), and a live version, from his 1991 tour with Clapton, was included on Live in Japan (1992). Clapton and Preston performed the song together at the Concert for George tribute in November 2002. “Isn’t It a Pity” has been covered by numerous artists, including Nina Simone, Matt Monro, Cowboy Junkies, Paul Young, Elliott Smith, Galaxie 500, Jonathan Wilson and Graham Nash, Tedeschi Trucks Band, and Roberta Flack.

Background and composition[edit]

While no longer the “really tight” social unit they had been throughout the chaos of Beatlemania[3] – or the “four-headed monster”, as Mick Jagger famously called them[4][5] – the individual Beatles were still bonded by genuine friendship during their final, troubled years as a band,[6] even if it was now more of a case of being locked together at a deep psychological level after such a sustained period of heightened experience.[7] Eric Clapton has described this bond as being just like that of a typical family, “with all the difficulties that entails”.[8] When the band finally split, in April 1970 – a “terrible surprise” for the outside world, in the words of author Mark Hertsgaard, “like the sudden death of a beloved young uncle”[9] – even the traditionally most disillusioned Beatle, George Harrison, suffered a mild bereavement.[10]

[Following the Beatles’ break-up], he wasn’t covered with a blanket anymore. You see, George played me a bunch of songs when he was with me, and I kept saying, “Why aren’t some of these on those Beatles records, George?” … I didn’t think he had much to develop – he was ready. How much development does a man need?[11]

– Musician Delaney Bramlett, 2003, commenting on Harrison’s largely unrealised potential as a songwriter during the Beatles‘ career

Towards the end of May that year, among the dozens of tracks that would be considered and/or recorded for his All Things Must Pass triple album, Harrison returned to a number of unused songs that he had written during the late 1960s.[12] “Isn’t It a Pity” was one of these, having most recently been rejected by the Beatles during the January 1969 Get Back sessions that resulted in their final album, Let It Be.[13][14] According to Abbey Road engineer Geoff Emerick, however, the song had been offered for inclusion on 1967’s Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, while Mark Lewisohn, the band’s acknowledged recording historian, has stated that it was first presented during sessions for the previous year’s Revolver.[15] Lewisohn’s opinion appears to tally with a bootlegged conversation from the Get Back sessions, where Harrison reveals that John Lennon had vetoed “Isn’t It a Pity” three years before, and that he (Harrison) considered offering the song to Frank Sinatra.[16] (Harrison had recently met Sinatra in Los Angeles while working there with Apple signing Jackie Lomax.[17])

Harrison considered giving “Isn’t It a Pity” to American singer Frank Sinatra (pictured in New York in 1947)

Despite its relative antiquity by 1970, the song’s lyrics lent themselves well to the themes of spiritual salvation and friendship that define All Things Must Pass,[18][19] being consistent with the karmic subject matter of much of the album.[20] In his 1980 autobiography, Harrison explains: “‘Isn’t It a Pity’ is about whenever a relationship hits a down point … It was a chance to realise that if I felt somebody had let me down, then there’s a good chance I was letting someone else down.”[21] His lyrics adopt a nonjudgmental tone throughout:[22]

Isn’t it a pity, isn’t it a shame
How we break each other’s hearts, and cause each other pain
How we take each other’s love without thinking any more
Forgetting to give back, now isn’t it a pity.

Harrison biographer Ian Inglis has referred to the song’s “surprisingly complex” lyrics, which in one sense can be seen as a personal observation on a “failed love affair” yet at the same time serve as a comment on “the universal love for, and among, humankind”.[23] This theme had featured in previous Harrison songs such as “Within You Without You” and “While My Guitar Gently Weeps” and would remain prominent in much of his subsequent compositions.[24] The same parallels regarding the universality of love in Harrison’s work has been noted by Dale Allison, author of the first “spiritual biography” on the ex-Beatle; “When George asks, ‘Isn’t It A Pity?’,” Allison writes, “the scope of his question is vast: it embraces almost everything.”[25]

Speaking to Billboard editor-in-chief Timothy White in 2000, Harrison said of “Isn’t It a Pity”: “It’s just an observation of how society and myself were or are. We take each other for granted – and forget to give back. That was really all it was about.”[26]

Recording[edit]

Two contrasting versions of the song were recorded in London in mid 1970 during the sessions for All Things Must Pass,[27] both of which were intended for release, from the outset.[28] According to Harrison, after recording the first version, he had decided he was unhappy with it, and the second version came about by chance “weeks later”, when one of the backing musicians began playing the song during a session.[29] The so-called “Isn’t It a Pity (Version Two)” is noticeably slower than the better known, seven-minute “epic” reading of the song.[30] Eric Clapton‘s lead guitar fills, phased piano from Tony Ashton, and John Barham-arranged woodwinds dominate Version Two,[30] which is also more in keeping with the Beatles’ earlier attempts on the track; as with “Ballad of Sir Frankie Crisp“, it features extensive use of the Leslie speaker sound so familiar from the band’s Abbey Road album.[31]

Studio Two, Abbey Road Studios

Inside Studio Two at EMI’s Abbey Road Studios

Like the concurrently recorded “My Sweet Lord“, the album’s other “Isn’t It a Pity” betrays the influence of co-producer Phil Spector more so than the comparatively sedate Version Two.[30][31] It is also the most extreme example of Harrison’s stated intention to allow some of the songs on All Things Must Pass to run longer and feature instrumentation to a greater degree than had been possible within the confines of the more pop-oriented Beatles approach to recording.[19] “Isn’t It a Pity” (Version One, in its All Things Must Pass context) starts small and builds[32] – “and it builds and it builds”, NMEs Alan Smith would soon write.[33] Taping of the backing track took place at Abbey Road Studios on 2 June,[34] and judging by Spector’s comments regarding Harrison’s early mixes, the orchestral arrangement was not added until late August at the earliest.[28] The first slide-guitar break on the released recording, quite possibly overdubbed some time after the June sessions also, would adopt a near-identical melody to the one Harrison had vocalised when routining the song for the other Beatles on 26 January 1969[34] – reflecting a quality admired by Elton John in the latter’s 2002 tribute to Harrison: “All his solos are very melodic – you can almost sing his solos.”[35] Inglis writes that the effect of Harrison’s “elaborate patterns” on slide guitar is to “counterbalance the underlying atmosphere of pessimism with shafts of beauty”, similar to the “notes of light and dark” provided by Pete Drake‘s pedal steel on the song “All Things Must Pass“.[36]

Now in the key of G (two semitones down from the Get Back performance), “Isn’t It a Pity” begins “dirge”-like[37] with a two-note pedal point provided by layers of keyboards and acoustic guitars.[22] Only at the one-minute mark, at the start of verse two, does the rhythm section come in, after which the instruments begin to “break out of their metronomic straitjacket to attain an almost ecstatic release”, as Beatles Forever author Nicholas Schaffner put it in 1977.[37] The “balmy” slide guitar passage, supported by Barham’s string section,[22] follows this second verse, and from that point on – around 2:38 – the same, circular chord structure continues for the remaining four-and-a-half minutes of the song.[24][32] The long fade-out sees what Schaffner termed the “pseudo-symphonic tension” burst into a frenzy of brass and timpani, further bottleneck soloing, and the “What a pitymantra joined by “Hey Jude“-style “Na-na-na-na” chorus.[22][37]

One of the most obvious examples of what Rolling Stone magazine’s album reviewer later termed “the music of mountain tops and vast horizons”,[38] “Isn’t It a Pity” featured the largest line-up of musicians found on the album – including three or four keyboard players, a trio of extra rhythm guitarists, the orchestral strings, brass and tympani, and a male choir.[39][40] Harrison’s former bandmate Ringo Starr and two musicians with well-established links to the Beatles, Klaus Voormann and Billy Preston, were among the participants, on drums, bass and organ, respectively.[22] Members of Apple band Badfinger provided the “felt but not heard” acoustic guitars (behind Harrison’s), consistent with Spector’s criteria for his Wall of Sound technique,[37] while author Bruce Spizer has suggested that Peter Frampton may have been among the rhythm guitarists also.[34] Pianist Gary Wright, who would go on to collaborate regularly with Harrison over the subsequent decades,[41][42] recalls the session for “Isn’t It a Pity” as being his first with Harrison.[43] Bobby Whitlock, the other main keyboard player on All Things Must Pass, with Wright,[44] recalls playing a “phase-shifted pump organ, or harmonium” on the track.[45] Another possible participant is Maurice Gibb, Starr’s Highgate neighbour at the time,[46]who claimed to have played piano on the song.[47]

Release[edit]

Originally, the intention had been to release “Isn’t It a Pity” as the lead single from All Things Must Pass in October 1970,[28] until Spector and others persuaded Harrison that “My Sweet Lord” was the most obvious choice.[48] The full, seven-minute “Isn’t It a Pity” was therefore issued as a double A-side with “My Sweet Lord” on 23 November in the United States and Canada (as Apple 2995), four days before the album’s release there.[49][50] Reflecting the equal status of the two tracks, both sides of the single’s picture sleeve featured the same Barry Feinstein-shot photo of Harrison, the only differences being the song title below Harrison’s name and the fact that the green Apple Records logo and catalogue number appeared only on the side for “My Sweet Lord”.[51]

The single was phenomenally successful in North America, and around the world.[37][52][53] Both songs were listed at number 1 on America’s Billboard Hot 100 chart,[54][55] for four weeks starting on 26 December.[56][57] On the Cash Box chart, which listed single sides separately, it peaked at number 46.[58] In Canada, “Isn’t It a Pity” was the lead side when the single topped the RPM 100 chart for five weeks, through to mid January 1971.[59] “Isn’t It a Pity” was issued on All Things Must Pass as the final track on side one of the LP format, providing, in biographer Elliot Huntley’s words, an “elegiac, plaintive song of reconciliation” after the angry “Wah-Wah“.[32] Author Robert Rodriguez writes of the public’s perception of “Isn’t It a Pity” on release: “All Things Must Pass was replete with songs that could easily be interpreted as commentary on the Beatles’ breakup; though this particular song predated the events of 1969–1970, the subtext [wasn’t] diminished in the least.”[60] “Isn’t It a Pity (Version Two)” appeared as the penultimate track on side four of the original three-record set,[61] thus serving as what Rodriguez terms “a bookend to a nearly completed journey”.[62]

Despite the song’s commercial success, and its standing as one of the most-covered compositions among Harrison’s post-Beatles output,[63] “Isn’t It a Pity” was omitted from EMI/Capitol‘s The Best of George Harrison in November 1976.[64] It was included on the 2009 compilation Let It Roll: Songs by George Harrison, however.[20] A demo version of the song, recorded during the Get Back sessions, is also available on Let It Roll as an iTunes Store exclusive.

A live version from December 1991, again with Clapton, appears on the album Live in Japan.[20]

Reception[edit]

“Isn’t It a Pity” remains one of Harrison’s most popular songs with critics and fans alike. AllMusic calls it “deeply moving and powerful”,[20] while in their book on the solo Beatles’ recording history, Eight Arms to Hold You, Chip Madinger and Mark Easter declare: “If any George Harrison song can be called ‘majestic’, ‘Isn’t It a Pity’ would be the one.”[28] In his December 1970 album review for the NME, Alan Smith described it as a track that “catches the mood of aching tolerance of pain, which Harrison can do so well” and “a ballad which will stand out from the album with the passing of the years”.[33] While reviewing the song’s pairing with “My Sweet Lord”, Billboard magazine wrote of a “powerhouse two-sided winner” with “equally potent lyric lines and infectious rhythms”.[65]

Simon Leng identifies the song as musically “sumptuous” and praises Harrison’s melody and “unique” use of notes beyond the key signature, as well as John Barham’s “evocative, suspended orchestration”.[66] He notes also the similarity of their combined musical counterbalance with elements of Indian raga, in the number of swaras (tones) in both ascending and descending scales.[66] To Leng, “Isn’t It a Pity” is the “pivotal song”, the “essence” of All Things Must Pass, encapsulating the album’s struggle between “gospel ecstasy and the failure of human relationships”.[1] He concludes: “Ever bittersweet, ‘Isn’t It a Pity’ records the last dying echoes of the Beatles.”[66]

Writing in the late 1970s, Nicholas Schaffner noted the song’s “towering simplicity” and the “endlessly repetitive fade-out that somehow manages to be hypnotic instead of boring”.[37] Like Leng and Schaffner, a number of commentators have remarked on the significance of “Isn’t It a Pity” in the context of the Beatles’ demise,[2][24][67][68] starting with the song’s length: 7:10 – just a second under “Hey Jude“.[19][37] Ben Gerson, in his 1971 Rolling Stone review, described the song as a “lament … whose beginning is the broken thirds of John’s ‘I Am the Walrus‘ and whose end is the decadent, exultant last half of Paul’s ‘Hey Jude'”.[38] Peter Doggett considers “Isn’t It a Pity” a “remarkably non-judgemental commentary on the disintegration of the Beatles’ spirit”.[69]

Elliot Huntley has complained of the song’s enforced period in hibernation: “[It] simply beggars belief that the track was rejected by Martin, Lennon and McCartney – three men whose reputations rested on their ability to spot a good tune when they heard one.”[70]Huntley views “Isn’t It a Pity” as worthy of “fully fledged standard” status, with Barham’s “soaring” strings and Harrison’s “sublime” slide guitar combining to take the song “into the heavens, where it stays”.[32] Mojo contributor John Harris highlights the song in his review of one of the few “truly essential” solo albums by a former Beatle, writing: “The faster songs [on All Things Must Pass] (eg Wah Wah) are delightful; the slowies (Isn’t It A Pity, Beware Of Darkness) simply jaw-dropping.”[71]

Speaking in 2001 during promotion for the 30th anniversary reissue of All Things Must Pass, Harrison named the song among his three favourite tracks on the album,[72] along with “Run of the Mill” and “Awaiting on You All“.[73] In 2010, AOL Radio listeners voted “Isn’t It a Pity” seventh in a poll to find the ten best post-Beatles George Harrison songs.[74] Both Eric Clapton[75] and Tom Petty have named “Isn’t It a Pity” among their favourite two Harrison compositions, Petty calling the song “a masterpiece”.[76] According to Acclaimed Music, “Isn’t It a Pity” is featured in Bruce Pollock’s 2005 book The 7,500 Most Important Songs of 1944–2000, while in 2013, Holland’s Radio 2 program Het Theater van het Sentiment listed the song at number 1 (ahead of Lennon’s “Imagine“)[77] in its “Top 40 Songs by Year” for 1971.[78]

Personnel[edit]

The musicians who performed on the two All Things Must Pass versions of “Isn’t It a Pity” are believed to be as follows.[22]

Version One

Version Two

Chart positions[edit]

Chart (1970–71) Peak
position
Canadian RPM 100 Singles Chart[59] 1
US Billboard Hot 100[54] 1
US Cash Box Top 100[58] 46

Cover versions[edit]

  • In May 1971, singer Matt Monro released a UK single of “Isn’t It a Pity” (produced by George Martin).[63]
  • Nicky Thomas recorded the song for his 1971 album Tell It Like It Is.[80]
  • Ireland’s 1970 Eurovision Song Contest winner, Dana, covered the song in 1971, a rendition that has been described as a “poignant” commentary to the political upheaval then gripping Ulster.[63]
  • The Three Degrees recorded “Isn’t It a Pity” during their period on Roulette Records in 1970–72, later released on the 1995 compilation The Roulette Years.[81]
  • Nina Simone‘s “intense”, eleven-minute reworking of “Isn’t It a Pity” was released on her 1972 album Emergency Ward!, a statement on the Vietnam War which also includes a cover of “My Sweet Lord”.[82] A six-minute version of “Isn’t It a Pity” was issued on the 51-track compilation The Essential Nina Simone in 1993.[83] In his autobiography, Harrison says he was influenced by Simone’s treatment when he came to record his song “The Answer’s at the End” in 1975.[84]
  • Galaxie 500 covered the song on their On Fire album in 1989.[85]
  • A version by Pete Drake appeared on his eponymous solo album, released in 1997.[86]
  • The song appears on Television Personalities‘ 1998 album Don’t Cry Baby … It’s Only a Movie.[85]
  • In March 2001, 18th Dye contributed a version of “Isn’t It a Pity” to Snowstorm – A Tribute to Galaxie 500.[80]
  • At the Concert for George on 29 November 2002, a year to the day after Harrison’s death, Eric Clapton and Billy Preston performed the song with backing from Dhani Harrison, Jeff Lynne, Gary Brooker, Jim Keltner, Ray Cooper, Jim Horn, Tom Scott and others.[87]
  • Jay Bennett and Edward Burch recorded “Isn’t It a Pity” for Songs from the Material World: A Tribute to George Harrison, a multi-artist compilation released in February 2003.[88]
  • Classical guitarist Joseph Breznikar recorded a version of the song for his 2003 tribute album George Harrison Remembered: A Touch of Class.[89]
  • Cowboy Junkies covered the song on their Early 21st Century Blues album in 2005.[80]
  • Joel Harrison recorded “Isn’t It a Pity” for his album Harrison on Harrison: Jazz Explanations of George Harrison, released in October 2005.[90]
  • A cover version by Les Fradkin was released in 2005 on his Something for George tribute album.[91]
  • Spanish singer Rafo de la Cuba covered the song in December 2005.[92]
  • A version by Paul Young was included on his 2006 album Rock Swings.[85]
  • Pedro Aznar covered the song as “No Es Una Pena?”, with Spanish lyrics, on his album Quebrado in 2008.[93]
  • In September 2008, members of Heard of Buffalo performed the song for the Jerry Lewis MDA Telethon.[94]
  • “Isn’t It a Pity” was among a number of Harrison and Beatle covers recorded or performed by Elliott Smith;[95] a version appears on the 1998-08-12: Hoboken, NJ, USA album.[85]
  • Soul singer Bettye LaVette covered the song on Interpretations: The British Rock Songbook in 2010.[96]
  • David McAlmont and Bernard Butler’s performance of “Isn’t It a Pity” was released on the Live From Leicester Square album in February 2011.[80]
  • A version by Jonathan Wilson and Graham Nash appeared on Harrison Covered,[97] a tribute CD accompanying the November 2011 issue of Mojo magazine.[98]
  • Also in November 2011, marking the ten-year anniversary of Harrison’s death, Keane recorded a version of the song.[99]
  • Roberta Flack covered “Isn’t It a Pity” on her album Let It Be Roberta – Roberta Flack Sings The Beatles, released in February 2012.[80]
  • My Morning Jacket have included “Isn’t It a Pity” in their live performances; when playing the song at the Forecastle Festival in July 2012, they were joined on stage by Dean Wareham of Galaxie 500.[100]

All Things Must Pass 10 ( 1970 )
I’d Have You Anytime / My Sweet Lord / Wah-Wah / Isn’t It A Pity / What Is Life / If Not For You / Behind That Locked Door / Let It Down / Run Of The Mill / Beware Of Darkness / Apple Scruffs / Ballad Of Sir Frankie Crisp (Let It Roll) / Awaiting On You All / All Things Must Pass / I Dig Love / Art Of Dying / Isn’t It A Pity #2 / Hear Me Lord / It’s Johnny’s Birthday / Plug Me In / I Remember Jeep / Thanks For The Pepperoni / Out Of The Blue

Nobody would have predicted George Harrison arriving as the most popularly acclaimed ex-beatle in the immediate aftermath of their split. Nobody did predict that. Whilst Paul seemed to be running away, whilst John seemed to be deliberately aiming two fingers at his past, George merely set about releasing not one, but two albums to follow ‘that’. Paul has often said “How do you follow ‘that’?”, referring to The Beatles, of course. John learned a lesson, as ‘Plastic Ono Band’ was a relatively poor seller and amid Paul seemingly not even trying, George emerged as the biggest selling ex-beatle, circa 1970. The Phil Spector production works brilliantly here, a masterpiece of production. George never had as pretty a voice as Paul or as expressive a voice as John. Whilst the Spector production of Lennon solo albums sometimes attracted complaints and/or controversy, here, everything is perfect. The band of supporting muscians take nothing away from the immense spirituality this albums evokes. You don’t have to share George’s particular beliefs, just wallow in the feel this record produces. As Brian Wilson and The Beach Boys never nailed their mast openly, just wrote spiritual songs such as ‘God Only Knows’ – George Harrison wrote a whole bunch of songs for ‘All Things Must Pass’. True, some were initially thrown as possible Beatles songs, and unfairly ignored, but nevermind. George could have written all but, let’s say, four of the songs on ‘Abbey Road’, and if he had, it would have been a better album of actual songs than it was. But, ‘Abbey Road’ was barely about songs, it was about creating a mood. That second side? George had little to no involvement in that.

Listening to the first disc, here. It’s flawless, absolutely flawless. You’ve songs that have been name-dropped and recommended and repeated. You’ve songs that haven’t, but are equally as compelling. Buried towards the end of the first disc ( on cd ) is the beautiful ‘Behind That Locked Door’. Before that, you’ve got the name-dropped songs. The huge hit ‘My Sweet Lord’. ‘Isn’t It A Pity’ which out-epics both ‘Hey Jude’ and ‘Let It Be’ and emerges as a better song than either. Imagine ‘Isn’t It A Pity’ released as a new Beatles song, circa 1970? Aint too hard to do, aint too hard to imagine it selling trillions of copies. As a George Harrison song, it was a b-side to one of his singles. You know? Oh, ‘Isn’t It A Pity’ is one of the most ‘Beatles’ sounding songs here, by the way. As I said, it ain’t hard to imagine. Oh, OH!!!!! Sorry for the exclamation marks, but i’d never read or heard of this song i’m mentioning next as ‘a classic’ until I got the actual album, and decided that it was for myself. ‘What Is Life’ beautifully evokes Sixites pop songs, a kind of ‘Keep On Running’ rhythmic feel. ‘What Is Life’ is another song here that deserved to be a number one single all over the world. This is music, man. It’s a song I can listen to over and over, so very catchy. Oh, Spector produces Dylan?? Now, that would be something to witness, preferably at a distance! But, George covers the Dylan tune ‘If Not For You’. Rightly so, he played with Dylan and helped Dylan create the song in the first place. Harrison’s version sports a very soulful vocal, beautiful piano and overall backing. I’ll end this paragraph by mentioning the storming ‘Wah-Wah’. Not going into any detail, i’ll just mention that it sounds so fucking good.

As for the second half or so of the album? Well. More spirtual numbers, a few seemingly throwaway numbers. Ah, let’s expand. Let’s take ‘Apple Scruffs’. It’s homely, it’s natural, it’s…. egoless. It seems to be nothing as such, but surrounded as it is, by the songs it IS surrounded by… genuis. ‘Ballad Of Sir Frankie Crisp’? There’s a song written by a guy who spent years with Lennon and who spent years admiring Dylan. The title song, perfection. ‘Art Of Dying’? Spector works wonders here. The closing five numbers last another LP in themselves, loose jams recorded with future members of Derek And The Domino’s. The closing ‘Out Of The Blue’ is eleven minutes long, but ‘All Things Must Pass’ is that kind of album. It literally offers everything. Isolate a few numbers here and there, you could be mean and say, ‘hey, it’s not that hot’ – but ‘Out Of The Blue’ contains groove, and besides, it arrives after such an emotional trip, that this is exactly what you need. A jam, a coda. No solution to life’s problems, just an album to make life a little more bearable.

Add A Comment?

Readers Comments

Simon B slb23@shaw.ca
IMHO, I don’t think that ALL THINGS MUST PASS is a 10/10 album. There’s a more than a few classic tracks, a bunch of great melodies and riffs, and most of the songs are as good (if not better than) the songs he was allowed to put on the Beatles albums. There is, however, “Wah Wah”, “Run of the Mill”, “Let It Down”, “Apple Scruffs”, “I Dig Love”, and most of the “jam” record; which, IMHO, aren’t as good as the rest of the album. The rest of the album contains quite a few great songs: the up-beat pop hits “My Sweet Lord” and “What is Life”, an excellent cover of Dylan’s “If Not For You”, the catchy “Awaiting On You All”, the proto-disco of “Art of Dying”, and the reflective, somber ballads “Isn’t it a Pity (Version 1)”, “Beware of Darkness”, ‘All things must Pass”, and “Hear Me Lord”. 7.5/10

Ben Fishes_Inc@hotmail.com
I didn’t exactly believe all the hype behind this record, but for the most part it delivers. The song “I Dig Love” proves that he did indeed play in a band with John Lennon.
Andy Hanrahanhanrahan_us@yahoo.com
I bought this album on the strength of your review and was not disappointed. There are so many beautiful songs here that a 10/10 rating is spot on. The song ‘The ballad of Sir Frankie Crisp(let it roll)’ is one of the nicest songs I’ve ever heard.

gavin thorburn gavinthorburn@hotmail.co.uk
george harrison never topped this album,never even came close.and frankly he didnt need to.this triple album astonished me when i first heard it and it still does many many listens later.an incredible collection of moving songs and the best solo album by an ex beatle.and has anybody else noticed the melody of hey jude on isnt it a pity version 2….

Mike Harrison cathairball5000@yahoo.com
ATMP probably IS the best solo album Harrison ever recorded, but like a lot of double or triple albums (well, there aren’t TOO many triple albums out there, come to think of it), there’s some excess that could’ve been eliminated. Personally, ATMP isn’t one of my favorite sets, but there’s no doubt that a single LP with the best songs would’ve been a KILLER release. Actually, as it stands I think the first five songs are the highlights, and it gets less interesting as it goes on. I think the more spiritual songs weigh it down a bit, but still, I would want a few of these on a single record because it exemplifies Harrison’s diversity…..and in 1970 he was the most diverse and interesting of the Beatles, in my opinion.

Gazza garyhess44@hotmail.com
George was always a born disciple , john and paul,dylan,clapton,krishna but could george stand on his own ? The answer is a resounding yes , but i think stretching it to a treble album was a bit much. “id have you anytime” is a sweet pretty opener , “isnt it a pity” a sad look at the end of the beatles with more than a touch of hey jude but the best tracks are the countryish “if not for you” (which suits george more than dylan) and his country waltz to dylans reclusivity “behind the locked door”. Other tracks that should be mentioned are the stately “beware of darkness” “let it roll” which is just beautiful and shows lennon was listening too (the melody is very similar to his later oh yoko) “i dig love” makes me smile so simple and yet so beatles- its the kind of thing that paul would have loved and really got his teeth into . Georges genorosity of spirit shows on “apple scruffs” and the joyous “let it down” . But Is it a classic though? not quite , the! title track is a lovely song but i prefer the “get back” version done at twickenham where the beatles harmonies bring so much more to the song, making it almost mantra like. My sweet lord and wah wah have brill melodies but are way too long – And alas awaiting on you all and the art of dying are tune free zones and the spector kitchen sink production doesnt always work – some more variety in the sound would have been nice and you know what ? “what is life” is “keep on running” (george was prone to a bit of plagiarism) and the apple jam session is just horrible – Why george ??? The beatles missed george but he also showed here that he missed their focussed editing and pruning,for as a single LP this would have been the best beatle solo LP by some way .

David yodasling@aol.com
All Things Must Pass, is more evidence that the Beatles were nothing more than the Britney Spears of their day. It’s all about production, guest artists, and excess of the worst kind. Each album after this one gone thinner and thinner in form and content because the usual troop of collaborators were not around to inject inflation to the final product. There are a few good songs here, most the spiritual ones, because George actually “felt” those personally. The rest are just fillers, forced droppings produced for the pop music threadmill. And as for the Jam… well, who ever played those more than once? Did anyone care at all that these “important” could play their intruments without a “script” and without a big deal producer? No, no one did and still done. Death to the Beatles.

D I Kertis USA
In contrast to another writer, I love Let it Down and Run of the Mill in particular, definitely more than If Not For You (a good cover, but still a cover) and Behind that Locked Door. The stripped down version of Let it Down on the 30th anniversary reissue, with just George on acoustic guitar and a very subtle string synthesizer, is amazing. I Dig Love is another one people tend to regard as one of the weaker tracks. I kinda… dig it, though. Better than Apple Scruffs, I’d say, and although I like both versions of Isn’t it a Pity?, I’d easily lose the second one, along with the Dylan cover, before I Dig Love. I Live for You, another bonus track from the reissue, is beautiful and I think it’s better than the other country/western song, Behind that Locked Door. All in all, at least a 9/10 for me. A really powerful, substantial album.

– See more at: http://www.adriandenning.co.uk/george.html#sthash.R3K2RhO9.dpuf

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MUSIC MONDAY George Harrison: Beware Of Darkness

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George Harrison: Beware Of Darkness

Beware of Darkness (song)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
“Beware of Darkness”
Song by George Harrison from the album All Things Must Pass
Published Harrisongs
Released 27 November 1970
Genre Rock
Length 3:48
Label Apple
Writer(s) George Harrison
Producer(s) George Harrison, Phil Spector
All Things Must Pass track listing

“Beware of Darkness” is a song written by English musician George Harrison and originally released on his 1970 solo album All Things Must Pass. It has also been covered by artists such as Leon Russell, Marianne Faithfull, Spock’s Beard, Concrete Blonde, Matthew Sweet and Susanna Hoffs.[1] Harrison and Russell performed the song at the Concert for Bangladesh in 1971, and Eric Clapton performed it at the Concert for George in 2002.[2][3] The song warns against permitting illusion from getting in the way of one’s true purpose, an admonition that, like the content of “My Sweet Lord“, reflects the influence of the Radha Krishna Temple.

Lyrics and music[edit]

“Beware of Darkness” is a ballad containing dense imagery.[2] The song marks a return to the spiritual concerns of Harrison’s songs with the Beatles such as “Within You Without You“.[3][4] The lyrics of “Beware of Darkness” reflect the philosophy of the Radha Krishna Temple, with which Harrison was involved, in which spiritual concerns must always override material things.[3] In the verses, the listener is warned against various influences that may corrupt him or her.[3] Among the potential corrupting influences are con men (“soft shoe shufflers”), politicians (“greedy leaders”) and pop idols of little substance (“falling swingers”).[2][3] In addition, the lyrics warn against negative thoughts (“thoughts that linger”), since these corrupting influences and negative thoughts can lead to maya, or illusion, which distracts people from the true purpose of life.[2][3][4][5] The middle eight delivers the message that this “can hurt you”, and that “that is not what you are here for.”[2]

Author Simon Leng describes the melody of “Beware of Darkness” as “complex and highly original”.[4] The melody of the verses incorporates a pedal point on the key of G major and moves to G sharp minor, a progression Leng claims “should not work in harmonic terms”, using as an analogy a count of “one, two, six”, but notes that somehow the melody manages to work.[4][6] Music professor Wilfrid Mellers explains the effectiveness of this key shift as dramatising the “beware” in the lyrics.[6] Similarly, Mellers claims that harmonic movement from the key of C sharp minor to D major to C major “creates the ‘aimless’ wandering of ‘each unconscious sufferer'” described in the lyrics.[6] The nearly chromatic melody of the verses contrasts with a more standard rock melody in the middle eight.[4] The musicians on the recording include Harrison, Eric Clapton and Dave Mason on guitar, Carl Radle on bass guitar, Bobby Whitlock on piano, Gary Wright on organ and Ringo Starr on drums.[3][4]

Reception[edit]

AllMusic critic Richie Unterberger views “Beware of Darkness” as one of the highlights of All Things Must Pass.[7] Ben Gerson of Rolling Stone claims that it may be the album’s best song, commenting on its “enigmatic” music and the combination of “warning” and “affirmation” in its lyrics.[8] Rolling Stones Anthony DeCurtis terms the song “haunting”, noting that it reflects fears that Harrison hoped to calm with his religious beliefs.[9]

Chip Madinger and Mark Easter call the song “a stunning composition”, reflecting the considerable growth in Harrison’s songwriting abilities since his early Beatle days.[10] Writing for the music website Something Else!, Nick DeRiso includes “Beware of Darkness” among the highlights of Harrison’s solo career on Apple Records; DeRiso describes it as Harrison’s “best album’s very best song – one where he perfectly matches a lyrical meditation on overcoming life’s harder moments … with the sound, mysticism and fury of one of the early 1970s’ greatest amalgamations of sidemen”.[11] Writing for Mojo magazine in 2011, John Harris described the track as “simply jaw-dropping”.[12]

American rock band Beware of Darkness are named after the song.[13]

Other versions[edit]

“Beware of Darkness” was one of the songs Harrison played at the Concert for Bangladesh at Madison Square Garden on 1 August 1971.[10] Harrison sang the lead vocals for the first two verses, and then Leon Russell took over the lead for the third verse.[3] It was played at both the afternoon and evening performances.[10] The evening performance of the song was included on the album Concert for Bangladesh as well as the film of the concert.[2][10][14][15]

An acoustic version of “Beware of Darkness”, which was recorded on 27 May 1970,[16] was included on the Harrison bootleg album Beware of ABKCO![2][17][18] This version was later released on the 2001 remaster of All Things Must Pass.[16]

Russell recorded his version of “Beware of Darkness” on his 1971 album Leon Russell and the Shelter People.[1][19][20] Australian critic Toby Creswell considered “Beware of Darkness” the highlight of the album, regarding this as the “definitive” version of the song, noting that Russell “brings chiaroscuro to this song about Eastern mysticism”.[20] The song was also included on several of Russell’s compilation albums, including Gimme Shelter!: The Best of Leon Russell and The Best of Leon Russell.[1]

Marianne Faithfull included the song on her album Rich Kid Blues, which – though recorded in 1971 – was released in 1984 and also on her 2000 compilation album It’s All Over Now Baby Blue.[1][21][22]

In 1986 an alternative American Band Concrete Blonde covered the song on their Concrete Blonde (album).[1][23]

Spock’s Beard used “Beware of Darkness” as the title track of their 1996 album Beware of Darkness, basing their version on Leon Russell’s.[1][24]

Matthew Sweet and Susanna Hoffs covered “Beware of Darkness” on their 2009 album Under the Covers, Vol. 2.[1][25]

Eric Clapton performed “Beware of Darkness” at the George Harrison tribute concert Concert for George in 2002.[3][26] Author Ian Inglis stated that Clapton’s performance “captures the thoughtful intent of the original”.[3]

Joe Cocker covered “Beware of Darkness” for his Hymn for My Soul, 2007 album. In 2010 American singer Laura Martin recorded her version of this song on her “Songs for the Fall” album. The Hardin Burns, an American duo consisting of guitarist Andrew Hardin and ex-The Burns Sisters, Jeannie Burns, released a rendition of “Beware of Darkness” on their 2012 album “Lounge”.

George Harrison Playing Here Comes The Sun

Stop Using Our Songs: Trump, Republicans Get More Objections

George Harrison estate latest to blast Trump song use

by AFP22 Jul 2016

New York (AFP) – George Harrison’s estate has denounced Donald Trump for playing The Beatles’ “Here Comes the Sun” at the Republican convention, joining a slew of artists angry at the candidate.

The classic ode to optimism and rebirth, written by Harrison for the Fab Four’s 1969 album “Abbey Road,” featured on the playlist at the Cleveland arena as the Republican Party nominated the populist tycoon as its presidential contender.

The use of the song at the convention “is offensive and against the wishes of the George Harrison estate,” it wrote on Twitter late Thursday.

“If it had been ‘Beware of Darkness,’ then we MAY have approved it! #TrumpYourself,” the estate tweeted.

It was referring to a 1970 solo track by Harrison who, influenced by Hindu spirituality, warned against material attachment and sang: “Beware of greedy leaders / They take you where you should not go.”

Trump, who has rose to prominence with strident denunciations of immigrant groups, has faced repeated protests from artists who oppose his playing of their songs at his rallies, which have repeatedly been marred by violence.

The Rolling Stones, Adele, Neil Young, R.E.M., Aerosmith and Queen are among acts that have lodged objections.

Late Italian opera legend Luciano Pavarotti’s family earlier Thursday also criticized Trump for playing the tenor’s recording of Puccini’s celebrated aria “Nessun Dorma.”

Pavarotti’s family said that the singer stood for “the values of brotherhood and solidarity” which are “entirely incompatible with the worldview expressed by the candidate Donald Trump.”

Separately, the organizers behind Woodstock — the iconic 1969 counter-cultural festival in upstate New York — questioned the logo of the Republican National Convention.

They said that the logo, featuring the Republicans’ elephant symbol scaling an electric guitar, was reminiscent of Woodstock’s image of a dove on an acoustic guitar.

“For almost 50 years, the Woodstock dove-and-guitar logo has symbolized, and resonated with, those who believe in equality, community, activism and environmental protection,” Joel Rosenman, the 1969 festival’s co-producer, said in a statement.

“These are universal values that we encourage the RNC, and all Americans, to adopt in today’s politically charged and chaotic times,” he said.

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My Brother Brandon AUG 26 2016 By MARTY BURLSWORTH

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Greater: Official Trailer – Old #2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Harrison, Arkansas, is about as small town as it gets.

There are about 11,000 people in town and one unspoken rule: If it’s Friday night, you’re going to the Harrison High football game. And the only thing bigger than high school football in Harrison — or anywhere else in Arkansas — is Razorback football.

Arkansas doesn’t have a pro football team — I don’t even know if a pro team could survive here. But almost every boy growing up in the state wants to be a Razorback. That’s the dream.

It was my dream, too, and I sure worked hard at it. But I didn’t have that natural talent. Not like my younger brother Brandon. Boy, did he have the size and did he have the skills.

I was 16 years older than Brandon, so I was already out of the house, married and raising my own boys by the time he was of any age. But I’d do anything for that kid. Of course, he was my brother and you do anything for family, but things were a little tougher for him. Our parents divorced when Brandon was just two years old. On top of that, Dad had trouble with drinking and wasn’t really in our lives when Brandon was a little boy. So I did whatever I could to be there for Brandon.

If it meant bringing a basket of baseballs to the park so he could work on his hitting and pitching, I wanted to be there.

If it meant going over to Mom’s house to help him with homework, I wanted to be there.

There’s no explanation for it. He was my brother and I just wanted everything for him.  I’d do anything I could for him.

So when Brandon got it in his mind that he was going to be a Razorback, I was all in.

See, Brandon started out a little scrawny. He spent his first season of high school football as a sophomore on the sidelines. I don’t even think he played one game. But that summer Brandon had two things going for him: His work ethic and, luckily, a pretty big growth spurt.

“Dang, Marty, what have you been feedin’ that boy?”

His high school coaches couldn’t believe his size when he came back for his junior season. By that point he was about six-foot-two, over 200 pounds and still growing. And he just dominated on the field — didn’t matter if he was on defense or offense. He played on both sides of the ball and would just blow the field up. He’d be all over the line, right off the snap. Opposing teams made game plans just to handle Brandon. He was that good.

Almost every boy growing up in the state wants to be a Razorback. That’s the dream.

He spent as many days as he could in the weight room getting stronger. And it paid off. By his senior year, Brandon was an all-conference and all-state player and played in the state’s All-Star Game. But as good as he was, Brandon was also a late bloomer  — he was only 17 his senior year — and he was still a little undersized for college ball. He wasn’t as tall or as heavy as D-I colleges wanted him to be.

But Arkansas was the dream. And if Brandon was doing whatever he could on the field, then I sure as heck would do whatever I could to help get my brother there.

So I started calling coaches and seeing where he could play. And the first call I made was to the recruiting coordinator at Arkansas. He took my call, but I couldn’t tell just how interested he was.

“Sure, bring him on up for a game,” he said.

So Mom, Brandon and I piled into my minivan and we drove over to Fayetteville. We’d been to a couple of Razorbacks games before, and Brandon had seen the stadium and sat in the stands. But this was on a different level. We watched the game from this conference room at the top of the stadium. It had this outdoor patio that you could stand on and look down on the field. As Brandon and I were standing out there, the offensive linemen came out, running on the field with their helmets on. And boy, was he soaking it in. So was I.

“That looks good, doesn’t it?” I said.

“I like that,” he responded.

At that moment, we both felt so close to his dream coming true — something that wasn’t even a possibility for a boy who had been sitting on the sidelines just two years ago.

But I knew we still needed a scholarship.

I don’t how many times I’d call to check in. Coach, ya need anything? I’d sit every week with the newspaper. I go straight to the sports and see if any scholarships were offered. I kept track of how many might be left for Brandon. O.K., they gave one to that boy, that’s 12 so far. We may still get one.

In the end, Brandon got invited to be a walk-on. It was disappointing, but Brandon wanted to go to Arkansas more than anything and, well, he didn’t want any regrets. And I didn’t want him to always be wondering what could have been. It was the Razorbacks. This was the dream.

A couple of weeks before Brandon left for school, one of the Arkansas coaches called me.

“We want Brandon here, but if he can’t handle it I can see what I can do to get him to a smaller school,” he said. “I want him here, but he’ll know and we’ll know.”

“Coach, don’t worry about it. He won’t be going down.”

Brandon belonged on that field, and he knew it. He was a Razorback.

“Well, that’s good,” he said, sort of laughing. “I know he’s working hard, but he’ll know and we’ll know.”

“Coach, mark it down. He’s not going down.”

Brandon belonged on that field, and he knew it. He was a Razorback. Some of his teammates have since told me how red his face would be during practice, how hard he went, how he never gave up.

Brandon didn’t dress the first two games of his freshman season, but we found out that he’d be on the field for the third. We were going to Fayetteville for the game and I called him early in the week to tell him where our seats would be.

“So you just walk down this side of the stadium, O.K.? And I’ll get a photo of you in your uniform. It’ll be real cool.”

And then he walked out and there it was: BURLSWORTH.

I was so proud.

After the season, over the holidays, we got a call. The school was going to give Brandon a scholarship.

For the next three years, Brandon started for the Razorbacks. And for the next three years, every Friday at 5:30 p.m., I’d close up the photography studio I owned in Harrison, pick up my mom, and my wife and kids, and drive to Brandon’s football games. Whether it was in Fayetteville, or in Knoxville or Tuscaloosa, we had an unspoken rule: We were going to Brandon’s games. We probably put 30,000 miles on my minivan each season. We drove it to death. I had about 212,000 miles on it by the time I got rid of it.

One weekend when I was driving with Brandon to campus — I think maybe it was his junior year — a thought crossed my mind.

“Man, you might get to play at the next level.”

“Ah, I don’t know, I just gotta focus on this season.”

Brandon was so single-minded, so focused. He didn’t take one summer off the entire time he was at Arkansas. Other boys would go home after school got out in May and stay there until camp started in late July. But Brandon would stay on campus, working — painting the stadium, setting up dorms, things like that — and taking classes. So by his fourth year at Arkansas, he was already finishing his masters degree.

By the time he was a senior, we both knew that if we wanted to keep playing football he was going to have to enter the NFL draft. I tried bringing it up to him again.

“You know, Brandon, you could think about entering the draft. You’ll have all your coursework done and can graduate at the end of the year anyway.”

“Yeah,” he said with a smile. “I’ve kind of been planning it that way.”

And would you believe, all these NFL agents started flying into Harrison wanting to sign Brandon. He asked me to help him, but there’s all this certification that goes into being an agent. I wasn’t sure. But this was my brother. So before he started his senior year, I started working on getting my certification. And that spring, the Burls boys found themselves in Indianapolis at the combine.

As we walked by one of the pro shops, we joked to each other.

“Should we get some Colts gear?”

“Yeah, let’s go buy some Colts stuff.”

When we got back home to Harrison, the day of the draft was just filled with anxiety. We didn’t expect Brandon to go real high, and we had been told that he wouldn’t. Still, with each pick, even in the first round, you get more and more nervous. People were swinging by all day. And I remembered to do what other agents had advised me to do, I kept multiple lines open. I kept gaming out who was left.

“Has he been picked yet?”

“No!”

Finally, in the third round Brandon answered the phone and gave us the thumbs-up. Then we looked to the TV: Brandon’s picture came up on the screen and they were calling his name from the podium.

And would you believe it, it was the Indianapolis Colts who took him. We suddenly needed that gear, because we would be rooting for the Colts.

The next week, Brandon flew to Indianapolis for minicamp. He called to check in a couple of times. “Now, if you find yourself at that Colts shop,” I told him, “You make sure and get us some gear this time.”

Brandon Burlsworth, NFL player. The struggles that he had gone through to get where he was were over. He could finally reap the rewards of everything he put into the game — all the training, all the schooling, all the dedication, all the hard work. I was high as a kite.

Mom and I picked him up at the airport when he came home. I was just so proud of him. In a few weeks he’d be heading back. And I couldn’t wait to be right there with him. We planned to move out to Indianapolis with him.

But before all that, Brandon made one last trip to Fayetteville to visit with his Razorbacks teammates. He was determined to drive home the same day so he could attend evening church service with the family.

Faith. Family. Football.

That’s the order of things for us.

Every week, Brandon made the drive home. Faith and family — they meant everything to Brandon. And every week he was right on time with his little white Subaru parked in Mom’s driveway. So when he was two hours late that evening, Mom started to get worried.

She called me just before six o’clock, with panic and worry in her voice.

“He should’ve been home by now.”

“I’m sure he just got stuck in traffic, or maybe ran out of gas. He’ll show up and everything will be fine.”

I didn’t mean to dismiss Mom’s concerns, but I just figured there was some sort of reason or explanation. But as it got later in the evening and Mom got more and more worked up, I hopped into my own car to head over and see if we could find out what had happened.

 Mom called me just before six o’clock, with panic and worry in her voice. “He should’ve been home by now.”

When I turned on to the street behind Mom’s house, I could see her driveway through this little opening between houses. And I could see a little white car parked in her driveway.

I let out a little sigh of relief. Brandon was home.

But as I turned the next corner onto Mom’s street and pulled up to her house, I got a good look at the car.

It wasn’t Brandon’s white Subaru.

It was a police car.

One of my sons, who was in my car with me, started asking what was wrong, what had happened. I opened the door to Mom’s house and she was in a state.

Brandon, the officer told us, had collided head-on with a semi. He died instantly.

***

If it’s difficult to describe the love for a brother, it’s impossible to explain the loss of a brother.

I wanted everything for Brandon, and within a few moments, it had all been taken away. Less than two weeks before, I had watched as Brandon stood on the front lawn of Mom’s house and gave interviews to local TV crews about getting picked in the NFL draft. Now, I was taking calls from the same stations about Brandon’s death.

That’s what it’s all about: What you do while you were here.

We still don’t really know what happened that afternoon. I don’t think anyone was at fault. It was just one of those things — when it’s time, it’s time. And it was Brandon’s time.

To this day, people tell me where they were when they heard the news. It was a terrible day for Harrison, it was a terrible day for the state. We had to have the funeral at the high school gym. There just wasn’t enough space anywhere else. Two buses of Razorbacks players arrived. It seemed as if the whole town was there to support Brandon and who he was and what he meant to everybody.

That’s what it’s all about: What you do while you were here.

PHOTOGRAPH BY BETH HALL/AP IMAGES

 

And Brandon did a lot in his 22 years.

I can only hope I did as much as I could to help him.

Brandon wanted to do more, though. After the draft, he spoke to me a lot about helping other kids in Harrison. Brandon knew what it was like to be doubted, to be told you weren’t good enough. He said he wanted to hold football camps and bring kids to his NFL games. So a few months after his death, we started the Brandon Burlsworth Foundation, where we do all of that and more.

I think Brandon would be proud of the work we’re doing in his name. He may be gone, but I still want to do whatever I can to keep his dreams going, to keep his legacy going.

There’s never a day where I don’t think about Brandon. Whether I’m driving around town, past the baseball park where we used to play catch, past the Razorbacks signs on front lawns, I feel his presence.

I never used to worry before Brandon died. But now that my own boys are older, if they’re even ten minutes late, I get a little concerned and think that maybe they’re in trouble, maybe something went wrong.

And when it’s Friday night here in Harrison and the whole town is at the football game, I think about Brandon.

And I know…I feel him here with me.

***

Greater, a film depicting the life and tragic death of Brandon Burlsworth will be released in theaters on August 26th. Locations and showtimes are available on www.greaterthemovie.com.

Brandon Burlsworth

Uploaded on Aug 31, 2011

Brandon was a walk on turned All American at the University of Arkansas. He was drafted by the Indianapolis Colts and 11 days later was tragically killed in a car accident. The Brandon Burlsworth Foundation was founded in his name and has several programs: The Burls Kids program takes underprivileged children to all Arkansas Razorback and Indianapolis Colts home games. The BBF in partnership with Walmart provides eye care to 14,000 pre-K thru 12th grade students whose working families are trying, but still cannot afford extras like eye care and do not qualify for state funded programs. We hold football camps each year in Harrison and Little Rock and we have several football scholarship and awards including the Burlsworth Trophy, a national award given out to the most outstanding Division One college football player who began his career as a walk-on.

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Song IT IS ENOUGH by the band THE WAITING

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It is Enough – The Waiting

Published on Feb 26, 2014

John 3:16-17
King James Version (KJV)
16,For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.

17,For God sent not his Son into the world to condemn the world; but that the world through him might be saved.

Buy at itunes:
https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/the…

04. It Is Enough

The Waiting
by The Waiting

Bookmark and Share
Lyrics:

There’s something about the sorrow showing on your face
Something so tender and contrite
I know you’re tired of being in this place
Your every daydream turns to night
And you’ve worked and strived and struggled
Until your fingers they’ve turned blue
From digging deep into the heart
Of what you can and cannot do
There’s something about the hesitation in your step
Something so beautiful and scared
There’s something hard about the truth that you accept
And still you find a Savior there
So don’t you despise the road
Should it drive straight to the Son
He’s got His reason to receive you
And doesn’t need another one
The Blood, it is enough
For every man, woman and child
To be reconciled
The Blood, it is enough
For those of every shade of skin
To begin again
There’s something about the way you cry yourself to sleep
Something so destitute and poor
Sweet is every tear that’s running down your cheek
How each one clears the way for more
So if it drives you to the Savior
Then don’t disconnect the pain
He’s got one excuse to hold you
And never let you go again
Everybody has tarried
In a barren land
Even in a devil’s den
But if the cross that you carry
Should slip from your hands
Get on your knees
And pick it up, pick it up, pick it up again

 

The Waiting (band)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Waiting
Origin Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Genres Pop rock
Years active 1991–2003, 2010–Present
Labels Inpop Records (previously Sparrow Records)
Website http://www.thewaiting.org
Members Brad Olsen
Todd Olsen
Clark Leake
Brandon Thompson

The Waiting is a Christian alternative pop rock band, consisting of Brad Olsen (vocals), Todd Olsen (guitar), Clark Leake (bass), and Brandon Thompson (drums, percussion, loops). Since the members focus time on other aspects of their lives and take their time recording the band does not produce and perform as frequently as some other bands.

Early albums by “The Waiting” were guitar driven alternative rock that drew fans with clever songwriting and introspective lyrics that stood out from most Christian rock of the day. The band’s later albums moved towards a more polished pop sound.

In August 2003, The Waiting hit the stage in Georgia where they played a sold out show after which they quit touring full-time to be at home more and pursue other endeavors. Even though they do not tour full-time, they never officially broke up. The Waiting still plays occasional spot dates.

In May 2009 Brad Olsen released his solo album titled The More I Think I Understand The Less I Can Explain, It was produced by “Oats”, aka Todd Olsen. Brad Olsen continues to write and record music. He resides in Atlanta, GA with his family. He is available for booking.

Todd Olsen also resides in Atlanta where he works as a music producer. In November 2011, he released a solo album under his nickname “Oats” entitled A Tear and a Sneer.

Clark Leake received a Masters in Theology from St. Vladimir Orthodox Seminary in May 2007. He lives in Louisville, KY with his wife.

Brandon Thompson resides in the Atlanta Georgia area with his wife and two sons and has produced a couple of bands in his home studio as well as taking a job at Mount Paran North Church of God in Marietta, GA, at which he remained until mid-2006. In 2006, Brandon moved to another local church, His Hands Church where he was the Technical Director. In 2011 Brandon became the main auditorium Production Director for Watermarke Church, which is a campus of Northpoint Ministries in Woodstock, GA. Brandon maintains and occasionally updates his personal website at BranThomps.com and can be found on Twitter at @BranThomps.

In 2010, The Waiting announced that they had been working on a new album and released a new single, “Name” and were playing limited spot dates. In 2011, the band released three more singles. In June 2012, the new album Mysteriet became fully funded by 119 backers on Kickstarter, when it was estimated to release in September 2012.[1] The band’s last Facebook entry (as of April 2016), written by Todd Olson on March 23rd, 2016 stated that Brad Olson is doing vocals for the album (Todd mailed him a mic). In 2013, Todd said, “our new album Mysteriet is written but we are still working on getting the music right- no surprise bc how does one make music that evokes the mystery and majesty of the Trinity? I can best describe what we are doing by saying what we are not doing. We are NOT making a follow up to wonderfully made or unfazed- tho unfazed was very successful. what we are attempting to do is make a follow up to the song Hands In The Air musically and spiritually. if we are making a follow up at all.”[2] “Mysteriet” is the Norwegian word for “The Mystery”. This is quite fitting, since the actual release date of the band’s first album in over twelve years has yet to be announced.[3]

Discography[edit]

  • Tillbury Town (1991)
  • Blue Belly Sky (1995) 11 tracks, color cover
  • The Waiting (1997)
  • Blue Belly Sky (1998 re-issue) 15 tracks, black and white cover
  • Unfazed (1998)
  • Wonderfully Made (2002)
  • Mysteriet (coming soon?)

Compilation Contributions[edit]

Year Compilation Album[4] Contributed Song(s) Original Album
1995 R.E.X. 95 (Sampler) “Israel” Blue Belly Sky
1995 The Simply Fabulous $1.99 New Music Sampler “Staring at a Bird” Blue Belly Sky
1997 The Simply Xcellent $1.99 New Music Sampler “Number 9”
“Hands in the Air”
The Waiting
1998 Cornerstone ’98 Sampler Disc “Number 9” The Waiting
1998 WWJD: What Would Jesus Do? “Put the Blame on Me” The Waiting
1999 Simply Spectacular $2.99 New Music Sampler “Unfazed” Unfazed
1999 No Lies “Unfazed” Unfazed
1999 Listen:Louder “At Your Feet”     —     (none)

References[edit]

  1. Jump up^ “Be a part of… Mysteriet”. Kickstarter. Retrieved 27 July 2014.
  2. Jump up^ “The Waiting Official Facebook Page”. Facebook. Retrieved 27 July 2014.
  3. Jump up^ “2014 releases”. Jesus Freak Hideout. Retrieved 27 July 2014.
  4. Jump up^ “The Waiting discography”. Jesus Freak Hideout. Retrieved 27 July 2014.

External links[edit]

  • [1] The official The Waiting FB page
  • [2] The official oats FB page
  • [3] The official Brad Olsen FB page
  • [4] Brad Olsen’s official website
  • [5] The official Twitter page for The Waiting
  • [6] ChristianityToday.com Artist Page
  • [7] Interview

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MUSIC MONDAY George Harrison – What Is Life

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George Harrison – What Is Life

Published on Nov 29, 2016

Music video by George Harrison performing What Is Life. (C) 2002 G.H. Estate Ltd, under exclusive licence to Calderstone Productions Limited, a division of Universal Music Group

http://vevo.ly/bcFeST

George Harrison-US Tour 1974 (rare!)

Uploaded on Oct 17, 2011

The North American Tour 1974
songs:
What Is Live,Dark Horse

What Is Life – George Harrison

What Is Life

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This article is about the George Harrison song. For other uses, see What is Life (disambiguation).
“What Is Life”
What Is Life (George Harrison single - cover art).jpg

US picture sleeve
Single by George Harrison
from the album All Things Must Pass
A-side My Sweet Lord(UK)
B-side Apple Scruffs(except UK)
Released 15 February 1971 (US)
Format 7-inch vinyl
Genre Rock, soul
Length 4:22
Label Apple
Writer(s) George Harrison
Producer(s) George Harrison, Phil Spector
George Harrison singles chronology
My Sweet Lord
(1970)
What Is Life
(1971)
Bangla Desh
(1971)
All Things Must Pass track listing

What Is Life” is a song by the English musician George Harrison, released on his 1970 triple album All Things Must Pass. In many countries, it was issued as the second single from the album, in February 1971, becoming a top-ten hit in the United States, Canada and elsewhere, and topping singles charts in Australia and Switzerland. In the United Kingdom, “What Is Life” appeared as the B-side to “My Sweet Lord“, which was the best-selling single there of 1971. Harrison’s backing musicians on the song include Eric Clapton and the entire Delaney & Bonnie Friends band, with whom he had toured during the final months of the Beatles. Harrison co-produced the recording with Phil Spector, whose Wall of Sound production also employed a prominent string arrangement by John Barham and multiple acoustic rhythm guitars, played by Harrison’s fellow Apple Records signings Badfinger.

An uptempo composition in the soul genre, “What Is Life” is one of several Harrison love songs that appear to be directed at both a woman and a deity. Harrison wrote the song in 1969 and originally intended it as a track for his friend and Apple protégé Billy Preston to record. Built around a descending guitar riff, it is one of Harrison’s most popular compositions and was a regular inclusion in his live performances. Rolling Stone magazine has variously described it as a “classic”[1] and an “exultant song of surrender”.[2]

“What Is Life” has appeared in the soundtrack for feature films such as Goodfellas (1990), Patch Adams (1998), Big Daddy (1999) and This Is 40 (2012). Harrison’s original recording was included on the compilations The Best of George Harrison and Let It Roll, and live versions appear on his album Live in Japan (1992) and in Martin Scorsese‘s 2011 documentary George Harrison: Living in the Material World. In 1972, Olivia Newton-John had a UK hit with her version of the song. Ronnie Aldrich, the Ventures, the Four Freshmen and Shawn Mullins are among the other artists who have covered the track.

Background and composition[edit]

Even before his temporary departure from the Beatles in January 1969 (documented in the song “Wah-Wah“),[3] their Apple Records label was an “emancipating force” for Harrison from the creative restrictions imposed on him within the band, according to his musical biographer, Simon Leng.[4] In his “definitive” article on All Things Must Pass for Mojo magazine, John Harris has written of Harrison’s “journey” as a solo artist beginning in November 1968 – when he spent time in Woodstock with Bob Dylan and the Band – and incorporating a series of other collaborations through the following eighteen months, including various Apple projects and a support role on Delaney & Bonnie and Friends’ brief European tour.[5] One of these projects, carried out intermittently from April to July 1969,[6] was his production of That’s the Way God Planned It, an album by Billy Preston, whom Harrison had met during the Beatles’ Hamburg years and had recently recruited to guest on the band’s troubled Get Back sessions.[7][8] It was while driving up to a Preston session in London from his home in Esher, Surrey, that Harrison came up with the song “What Is Life”.[9]

In his autobiography, I, Me, Mine, Harrison describes it as having been written “very quickly” and recalls that he thought it would be a perfect, “catchy pop song” for Preston to record.[10] His lyrics, while simple, were similarly uplifting and universal:[11][12]

What I feel, I can’t say
But my love is there for you any time of day
But if it’s not love that you need
Then I’ll try my best to make everything succeed.

Tell me, what is my life without your love?
And tell me, who am I without you, by my side?

These lyrics have caused some debate among biographers and music critics, as to whether “What Is Life” should be viewed as a straightforward love song – perhaps a “lovingly crafted paen” to Harrison’s wife Pattie, as Alan Clayson puts it[13] – or a devotional song like many of Harrison’s compositions.[12][14] Ian Inglis writes that the song title suggests a “philosophical debate about the meaning of life”, yet its rendering as “what is my life” in the choruses “reshapes [the meaning] completely”.[11] Theologian Dale Allison finds no religious content in “What Is Life” but notes the “failure of words to express feelings” implied in the opening line (“What I feel, I can’t say“), a recurring theme of Harrison’s spiritual songs such as “That Is All“, “Mystical One” and “Pisces Fish“.[15] Joshua Greene, another religious academic, identifies the song as part of its parent album’s “intimately detailed account of a spiritual journey”: where “Awaiting on You All” shows Harrison “convinced of his union with God”, “What Is Life” reveals him to be “uncertain that he deserved such divine favor”.[16]

The song’s second verse repeats what Inglis refers to as the “somewhat confusing promise” from Harrison (in lines 3 and 4) should his love be “rejected”:[11]

What I know, I can’t do
If I give my love out to everyone like you
But if it’s not love that you need
Then I’ll try my best to make everything succeed.

Musically, Simon Leng describes “What Is Life” as “Motown-spiced” and a comparatively rare example of its composer’s willingness to embrace the role of “entertainer” in his songwriting.[17]

In I Me Mine, Harrison recalls that he changed his mind about offering “What Is Life” to Preston once he’d arrived at Olympic Studios and found the singer busy working on more typical material – or “playing his funky stuff” as Harrison puts it.[10][9] Rather than attempt it with the Beatles during the band’s concurrent Abbey Road sessions, he stockpiled the track with his many other unused songs from the period – “All Things Must Pass“, “Let It Down“, “I’d Have You Anytime” and “Run of the Mill” among them[18] – and revisited it a year later, after completing work on Preston’s second Apple album, Encouraging Words.[19]

Recording[edit]

By May 1970, having recently collaborated with “genuine R&B heavy-weights” such as Doris Troy and Preston, as well as participating in the “blue-eyed soul[20] Delaney & Bonnie European tour, along with Eric Clapton, the previous December, Harrison was well placed to record “What Is Life”, Leng observes.[21] With Phil Spector as co-producer and all the Friends team on hand, the song was among the first tracks taped for Harrison’s debut post-Beatles solo album;[22] recording took place at Abbey Road Studios in London, during late May or early June.[22][23] The same core of musicians – Bobby Whitlock, Carl Radle, Jim Gordon, Bobby Keys and Jim Price – would similarly elevate other All Things Must Pass tracks such as “Awaiting on You All”, “Art of Dying” and “Hear Me Lord“.[24]

The recording is defined by Harrison’s descending, fuzztone guitar riff,[2] which also serves as the motif for the chorus.[12] The track opens with this riff,[25] which is then joined by Radle’s bass and “churning” rhythm guitar from Clapton, before Gordon’s drums bring the full band in.[9][26] During the verses, Gordon moves to a square, Motown-style beat – or “rock-steady Northern soul backbeat” in Leng’s words[21] – before returning to the “galloping rhythm” of the more open, “knockout” choruses,[2] and the song is driven equally by Badfinger drummer Mike Gibbins‘ powerful tambourine work.[27]

On “What Is Life”, Spector provided what music critic David Fricke terms “echo-drenched theater”, in the form of reverb-heavy brass, soaring strings (arranged by John Barham) and “a choir of multitracked Harrisons”.[2] The vocals and Barham’s contribution, along with a brief slide-guitar commentary from Harrison over the final verse,[12] were overdubbed at Trident Studios, most likely during late August through September.[28] Dated 19 August, Spector’s written comments on Harrison’s early mix of the song had suggested a “proper background voice” was still needed;[29] like sound engineer Ken Scott,[30] Spector would be impressed with the result, saying, “He was a great harmoniser … he could do all the [vocal] parts himself” and rating Harrison “one of the most commercial musicians and songwriters and quintessential players I’ve ever known in my entire career”.[31]

Release[edit]

“What Is Life” was released in late November 1970 as the first track on side two of All Things Must Pass, in its original, triple LP format.[32][33] Along with “My Sweet Lord” and “Isn’t It a Pity“, the song had already been identified as a potential hit single by Allan Steckler, manager of Apple’s US operation.[33] Backed by another album track, “Apple Scruffs“, “What Is Life” was issued as a single in America on 15 February 1971 (as Apple 1828), just as the “My Sweet Lord”/”Isn’t It a Pity” double A-side was finally slipping out of the top ten.[34][35]

French picture sleeve for the “What Is Life” single – a cropped and colorised version of Barry Feinstein‘s cover image for All Things Must Pass

The front of the single’s US picture sleeve consisted of a photo of Harrison playing guitar inside the central tower of his recently purchased home, Friar Park, in Henley-on-Thames.[36] The tower’s sole, octagonal-shaped room was an area that Harrison had adopted as his personal temple and meditation space.[37] This picture was taken by photographer Barry Feinstein, whose Camouflage Productions partner, Tom Wilkes, originally used it as part of an elaborate poster intended as an insert in the album package. The poster featured a painting of the Hindu deity Krishna watching a group of naked maidens beside a bathing pond.[38] Harrison apparently felt uncomfortable with the symbolism in Wilkes’s design – the Friar Park tower image filled the top half of the poster, floating among clouds above the Krishna scene – so Wilkes abandoned the concept and instead used a darkened photo of Harrison inside the house as the album poster.[39] The more common picture sleeve internationally was a close-up of Feinstein’s All Things Must Pass front-cover image, taken on the main lawn of Friar Park.[40] In Denmark, the sleeve featured four shots of Harrison, again with guitar,[41] taken on stage during the Delaney & Bonnie tour.[42]

At the end of March, “What Is Life” peaked at number 10 on the Billboard Hot 100[43] and number 7 on Cash Boxs Top 100 chart,[44] making Harrison the first ex-Beatle to have two top-ten hits in the United States.[45][46] The single was a success internationally, climbing to number 1 in Switzerland[47] and on Australia’s Go-Set National Top 60,[48] and reaching the top three elsewhere in Europe and in Canada.[49] In Britain, where Harrison had resisted issuing a single from All Things Must Pass until midway through January,[50] “What Is Life” appeared on the B-side to “My Sweet Lord”[51] – a combination that became the top-selling single of 1971 in that country.[52]

Reception[edit]

“What Is Life” is one of Harrison’s most commercial and popular songs[53] – a “spiritual guitar quest” that “became [a] classic”, according to Rolling Stone magazine.[1] On release, Billboard magazine’s reviewer wrote of “What Is Life” and “Apple Scruffs” as “intriguing rhythm follows-ups” to Harrison’s previous single, which were “sure to repeat that success” and “should prove big juke box items”.[54] In their Solo Beatles Compendium, authors Chip Madinger and Mark Easter refer to it as an “intensely catchy track” and view its pairing with “My Sweet Lord” in the UK as perhaps the strongest of all of Harrison’s singles.[22] Writing in 1981, NME critic Bob Woffinden grouped “What Is LIfe” with “My Sweet Lord”, “Isn’t It a Pity” and “Awaiting on You All” as “all excellent songs”.[55]

Reviewing the 2001 reissue of All Things Must Pass, for Rolling Stone, James Hunter wrote of how the album’s music “exults in breezy rhythms”, among which “the colorful revolutions of ‘What Is Life’ … [move] like a Ferris wheel“.[56] The following year, in Rolling Stone Press’s Harrison tribute book, David Fricke included “What Is Life” among his selection of “essential Harrison performances” (just three of which date from the ex-Beatle’s solo years) and described the track as an “exultant song of surrender”, abetted by Harrison’s “pumping fuzz guitar” and the song’s “singalong magnetism”.[57] AllMusic‘s Richie Unterberger similarly praises “What Is Life” for its “anthemic” qualities, “particularly snazzy horn lines”, and a guitar riff that is “one more entry in the catalog of George Harrison’s book of arresting, low, descending guitar lines”.[12]

Writing in the book 1,000 Recordings to Hear Before You Die, author Tom Moon refers to “the upbeat single ‘What Is Life'” as an example of how Harrison “grabs what he needs from his old band – that insinuating hook sense – and uses it to frame an utterly comfortable metaphysical discourse”.[58] Alan Clayson describes “What Is Life” as a seemingly “lovey-dovey pop song” that “craftily renewed the simplistic tonic-to-dominant riff cliché”,[27] while Simon Leng credits Harrison’s “innate ability to write very fine pop-rock songs” and deems the result “as innovative an exercise in rock-soul as The Temptations’ ‘Cloud Nine‘”.[21] Among Harrison biographers, only Ian Inglis is less than enthusiastic, acknowledging that Barham’s orchestration and the other musicians give the track “undoubted excitement and energy”, but lamenting that the song offers “little overall coherence between words and music”.[11]

In a 2010 poll to find the “10 Best George Harrison Songs”, AOL Radio listeners voted “What Is Life” third behind “My Sweet Lord” and “Blow Away“.[59] A similar list by Michael Galluci of Ultimate Classic Rock placed it second (behind “My Sweet Lord”), as Galluci wrote of the track having “a giant pop hook as its guide” as well as “the catchiest chorus Harrison ever penned”.[25] In 2009, Matt Melis of Consequence of Sound listed it sixth among his “Top Ten Songs by Ex-Beatles”, writing: “it’s arguable that Harrison’s All Things Must Pass is the best solo album put out by a Beatle. ‘What is Life’ … with its riff-driven bounce, soaring harmonies on the choruses, and perfectly placed sax and trumpet, [is] probably Harrison’s catchiest pop song.”[60] In the 2005 publication NME Originals: Beatles – The Solo Years 1970–1980, Adrian Thrills rated it first among Harrison’s “ten solo gems”, adding: “One of Harrison’s greatest guitar riffs – brilliant pop.”[61] The song is said to be a favourite of Foo Fighters singer Dave Grohl.[2] In a Rolling Stone readers’ poll, titled “10 Greatest Solo Beatle Songs”, the song placed fourth, with the editor commenting: “The track is deceptively simple, and more layers become apparent the more often you play it.”[62] “What Is Life” has featured in Bruce Pollock’s book The 7,500 Most Important Songs of 1944–2000, Treble website’s “The Top 200 Songs of the 1970s” (ranked at number 101) and Dave Thompson‘s 1000 Songs That Rock Your World (at number 247).[63]

Subsequent releases and appearances in films[edit]

“What Is Life” was included on the 1976 compilation The Best of George Harrison as well as 2009’s Let It Roll: Songs by George Harrison.[64] The song has also been featured in a number of popular movies: Martin Scorsese‘s Goodfellas (1990), during the “May 11, 1980” sequence; Tom Shadyac‘s Patch Adams (1998); and, more recently, Sam MendesAway We Go (2009).[65] In late 2012, “What Is Life” was used in advance promotion for the film This Is 40, directed by Judd Apatow,[66] although it was omitted from the accompanying soundtrack album.[67] According to Rolling Stone: “Today, many people know it merely as a song from all those soundtracks: it’s in This Is 40, Patch Adams, Goodfellas and many more. It’s almost as ubiquitous as ‘Let My Love Open the Door‘ or ‘Solsbury Hill.'”[62] In Scorsese’s 2011 documentary George Harrison: Living in the Material World, “What Is Life” plays over a sequence of 1969 photos of Harrison – with, variously, Preston, Jackie Lomax, the Plastic Ono Band, Clapton and Ravi Shankar – immediately before which, archive footage shows him discussing the restrictions he felt within the Beatles and how the band “had to implode”.[68]

An alternative studio version of “What Is Life” – in fact, a rough mix of the original backing track with different orchestration (in this case, piccolo trumpet and oboe)[69] – was issued as one of five bonus tracks on the 2001 remaster of All Things Must Pass.[70] In the accompanying booklet, Harrison writes that this orchestral arrangement was discarded because he “didn’t like the feel”.[71] Speaking to Billboard editor-in-chief Timothy White in December 2000, Harrison explained the reason for the lack of a guide vocal on this version: “I’m playing the fuzz guitar part that goes all through the song. So all I could do on the [initial] take was to give the band the cue line – the first line of each verse – and then go back to playing that riff. So that rough mix without the vocal – I’d forgot all about it …”[72] The track also appears on the 2014 Apple Years 1968–75 reissue of All Things Must Pass.[73]

Live performance[edit]

A live version of the song, recorded with Eric Clapton and his band in December 1991, is available on Harrison’s 1992 album Live in Japan album.[74] The performance was recorded at Tokyo Dome on 17 December,[75] during the final show of the tour.[76]

Part of a concert performance of “What Is Life” from Harrison’s 1974 North American tour with Shankar is included in Scorsese’s George Harrison: Living in the Material World.[77] While challenging the commonly held view that this controversial 1974 tour was a “disaster”,[78][79] Simon Leng writes of a Fort Worth performance of “What Is Life” that was “greeted with a reception that matched anything the New York audience at the Bangla Desh concerts expressed”.[80]

Cover versions[edit]

“What Is Life”
Picture sleeve for Olivia Newton-John single What Is Life.jpg

German picture sleeve
Single by Olivia Newton-John
from the album Olivia
B-side “I’m a Small and Lonely Light”
Released 1972
Genre Country, pop
Length 3:21
Label Pye International
Writer(s) George Harrison
Producer(s) Bruce Welch, John Farrar

Olivia Newton-John[edit]

Australian pop singer Olivia Newton-John recorded “What Is Life”, along with a version of Harrison’s All Things Must Pass track “Behind That Locked Door“,[81] for her 1972 album Olivia.[82] The song was arranged and produced by Bruce Welch of the Shadows and John Farrar,[83] who was Newton-John’s regular producer and collaborator during the 1970s.[84]

Released as a single in some countries, this version reached the UK top 20 in March 1972,[27][85] peaking at number 16.[86][nb 1] It has since appeared on Newton-John compilation albums such as Back to Basics: The Essential Collection 1971–1992 (1992)[89] and The Definitive Collection (2002).[90]

Other artists[edit]

In 1971, British easy listening pianist Ronnie Aldrich covered “What Is Life” (as well as “My Sweet Lord”) on his album Love Story.[91] That same year, a version by the Ventures appeared on their New Testament album.[92]Also in 1971, a Finnish-language version of the song, titled “Mikä Saa Ihmisen Elämään”, was released as a single by local singer Oliver – better known as Veikko Laiho, of the Laiho Trio.[93]

The Four Freshmen recorded “What Is Life” for their album Fresh! in 1986,[94] six years after which Nicola Sirkis covered the song on the album Dans La Lune …[95] A version by Shawn Mullins was released as a single in 1999[96] and plays over the closing credits of the Adam Sandler movie Big Daddy (1999).[65][97]

Following Harrison’s death, Japanese band the Collectors contributed a recording of “What Is Life” to the Gentle Guitar Dreams tribute album, released in May 2002.[98] Classical guitarist Joseph Breznikar recorded a version of the song for his 2003 tribute album George Harrison Remembered: A Touch of Class.[99] In November 2004, Neal Morse released his recording of “What Is Life” on the special-edition version of his album One.[94] Les Fradkin included a cover of “What Is Life” on his 2005 tribute CD Something for George.[100]

Personnel[edit]

The following musicians are believed to have played on “What Is Life”:[9][26]

Chart performance[edit]

George Harrison version[edit]

Weekly charts
Chart (1971) Peak
position
Australian Go-Set National Top 60[48] 1
Austrian Singles Chart[102] 5
Belgian Ultratop Singles[103] 5
Canadian RPM 100 Singles[104] 3
Dutch MegaChart Singles[105] 2
French SNEP Singles Chart[106] 6
Japanese Oricon Singles Chart[107] 19
New Zealand NZ Listener Chart[108] 2
Norwegian VG-lista Singles[109] 7
South African Springbok Singles Chart[110] 4
Swiss Singles Chart[47] 1
US Billboard Hot 100[111] 10
US Cash Box Top 100[112] 7
West German Media Control Singles[113] 3
Year-end charts
Chart (1971) Position
Canadian RPM Singles Chart[114] 41
Dutch Singles Chart[115] 45
US Cash Box[116] 48

Olivia Newton-John version[edit]

Chart (1972) Peak
position
Irish Singles Chart[117] 18
UK Singles Chart[86] 16

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