Category Archives: Current Events

MUSIC MONDAY Beatles Anthology Part 6

You may be interested in links to the other posts I have done on the Beatles and you can click on the link below: FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE PART 288, LINKS TO 3 YEARS OF BEATLES POSTS (March of 2015 to Feb of 2018) Featured artist is Mark Dion


The Beatles Anthology 6 [Legendado/

Beatles AntRINGO:

I hated the Philippines As soon as we got there, it was bad, bad news
It was one of those places where you knew they were waiting for a fight

HARRISON:
It was a very negative vibe the moment we got off the plane
So we were a bit frightened
We got in this car, not even with Neil
The guy just drove off with us four. Our bags were on the runway

NEIL ASPINALL TOUR MANAGER:
Those little briefcases had the marijuana in them
so I had to…
While the confusion was going on
I put them in the boot of the limo I was going to be in
I just said “Take me to where you’ve taken the Beatles”

HARRISON:
I thought, God, this is it, we’re going to get busted
They took us away and drove us to Manila harbour and put us on a boat
and took us out to this yacht anchored in the harbour

NEIL ASPINALL TOUR MANAGER:
I never really understood why they got put on this boat

HARRISON:
I just remember Brian Epstein really flustered
He must have been with, maybe…
the Philippine promoter, agent or somebody
He was yelling and shouting and he appeared on the scene
They were all yelling and then they took us back off the boat
and drove us in the car to a hotel suite
Then we did a concert which again had a big problem
because Brian Epstein had made a contract for a stadium
Rizal Memorial Football Stadium Manila 4th July 1966 or a situation for I don’t know how many thousands of people
Maybe 2000-5000 people, something like that
When we got there, it was like the Monterey Pop Festival
Just millions – 200000 people on that site

RINGO:
We did the show and I didn’t know personally…
that Madame Marcos had invited us to dinner

LENNON:
Normally we only get invited by silly Ambassadors wanting to see us
So somebody set it up and we didn’t know about it

PAUL:
“It is indeed a great honour, but it’s our day off so we can’t go”
We were very firm. We don’t get many days off to stuff in a royal reception

RINGO:
John and I were sharing a room after the gig and in the morning…
we phoned for breakfast and newspapers as we like to read about ourselves
Can we have egg and bacon and all the newspapers?
Yes
We were just in our beds, chatting
doing whatever we were doing
Time went by so we called again “Excuse me, can we have our breakfast?”
Still nothing happened so we put the TV on
There was this horrific TV show
of Madame Marcos screaming “They’ve let me down”
All these shots of the cameramen… tip the camera on to empty plates
and up to the faces of little kids crying because the Beatles hadn’t come

HARRISON:
And the TV commentator saying “And they’re still not here yet”
“The Beatles are supposed to be here”
We were amazed, couldn’t believe it
We just watched ourselves not arriving at the Presidential Palace
I don’t recall much of what happened until the newspapers arrived
and the TV news, it was: “Beatles snub First Family”

RINGO:
Then things started to get really weird
Come on, get out of bed, get packed, we’re getting out of here
As we started to get to the car, we really had no help
We got downstairs and there was one motor bike
After this huge motorcade had brought us in, there was just one guy
At the airport there’s chanting, people hating us, all the way

PAUL:
We were put into the transit lounge
Then we got pushed from one corner to another

LENNON:
“You treated like ordinary pasenger!”
They were saying “Ordinary passenger!” He doesn’t get kicked, does he?

PAUL:
They started knocking over our road managers
That worried you? – Yeah, I swear there were 30 of them

LENNON:
What do you say they were? – I saw five in sort of outfits
that were kicking and booing and shouting
Did you get kicked? – No, I moved when they touched me
I was petrified. I could have been kicked and not known it

RINGO:
There’s the famous story of John and I hiding behind these nuns
We thought, it’s a Catholic country, they won’t beat up nuns

PAUL
We got on the British Airways plane, all kissing the seats
You know, this is a little piece of Britain
It was feeling you were in a foreign country and all the rules had changed
They did carry guns after all so you weren’t too gung-ho
Then an announcement:

HARRISON:
“Will Mr Epstein, Mr Evans and Mr Barrow…”
That was Tony Barrow, our press agent at the time
“…will they get off the plane”
And Mal, who was the nicest, gentlest person –
a big guy, but really sweet –
he went past me down the aisle of the plane, breaking out in tears
He said “Tell Lil I love her.” That’s his wife
Because he thought the plane would go and he’d be stuck in Manila
We sat there for what seemed a couple of hours
It was probably 30 minutes, maybe an hour
and they got back on the plane and it was allowed to leave
They took the money off Brian Epstein that we’d earned at the concert
And that was it, we got out of there and it was such a relief
but I felt such resentment for those people

RINGO:
It’s probably the most frightening… I’ve never been back

LENNON:
We’ll never go to any nut-houses again

PAUL:
But the nice thing about it was that in the end…
when we found out that it was Marcos and what he’d been doing to his people
and what lmelda had been doing
and the rip-off it all allegedly was
We were glad to have done it
We must have been the only people who ever dared to snub Marcos

LENNON:
Do any of you have plans to record on your own?
We do at home

HARRISON
In fact we have done. Eleanor Rigby was Paul on his own and…

LENNON:
We were just drinking tea

___________________________

BRIAN EPSTEIN: New York 6th August 1966

I have prepared a statement which I will read
which has had John Lennon’s absolute approval by telephone
This is as follows:
“The quote which John Lennon made to a London columnist three months ago
“has been quoted and represented entirely out of context”

GEORGE MARTIN:
George Martin Record Producer Early in 1966, John was interviewed in the Evening Standard
and he remarked that the Beatles were more popular than Jesus Christ

PAUL:
Was it a mistake? In the short term, yeah. Maybe not in the long term
But he said “I don’t know what’s wrong with the church
“At the moment the Beatles are bigger than Jesus Christ”
Like they’re not building Jesus enough. That was taken out of context in America

HARRISON:
There was all this big palaver going on
Anyway, we got to America. I think we did a press conference
where John, under the pressure of the cameras and the Press…
You know, just the stress
of having to deal with this thing that he in effect had caused

LENNON:
If I’d said television is more popular, I might have got away with it
Chicago 11th August 1966 I was talking to a friend. I said Beatles as a remote thing, not what I think
but as the Beatles like other people see us
I just said they are having more influence on kids and things
than anything, including Jesus, but I said it in the wrong way
Some teenagers have repeated your statements, saying:
“I like the Beatles more than Jesus Christ.” What about that?
Originally I pointed out that fact in reference to England
That we meant more to kids than Jesus did, or religion at that time
I wasn’t knocking it but just saying it as a fact
And it’s true, more for England than here
I’m not saying we’re better or comparing us with Jesus Christ as a person
or God as a thing, or whatever it is
I just said what I said and it was taken wrong, and now it’s all this

HARRISON:
The repercussions were big
Particularly what they call the Bible belt
Down the south there, they were having a field day
We’ve got footage of a disc jockey saying:
“Come and bring your Beatle trash and deposit it here”
“…to one of our 14 pickup points in Birmingham, Alabama…”

LENNON:
The photos showed middle-aged DJs and 12-year-olds burning LP covers

RINGO:
Millions of kids were burning their Beatle records
There were bonfires of them, which was OK ‘cos then they re-bought them

KKK LEADER:
The Beatles said in the newspapers that they’re getting better than Jesus
The Ku-Klux-Klan, being a religious order,
will come out here the night that they appear here
We’re going to demonstrate with different ways and tactics
to stop this performance
The Klan is going to come out here and make a stop to these accusations
This is nothing but blasphemy and we’ll stop it any terror way we can
We’re known as a terror organisation… – Terror organisation?
We have ways and means to stop this – What ways and means?
There will be a lot of surprises when they get here

______________________________________________

The Beatles Anthology 6 [Legendado/Parte 2] HD

LENNON:
My image as anti-Christ or anti-religious was wrong. I’m a most religious fella

NEWSCASTER:
Well, it looks like the bloom is off the Beatles
Last year, not an empty seat in Shea stadium-this year, thousands
Perhaps 15000 or 20000 empty seats in an arena that holds 56000
Oh dear, what a failure, we only sold 50000?
Miserable… we were dying on our feet there!
Yeah, there was big news about that, you know
They’ve only sold 50000 seats!
“It’s all over for the Beatles” says Roger Whittaker of the Dallas Times
OK – I don’t ever remember going there twice
Are you a Beatles fan, or are you here because it’s the right thing to do?
I love the Beatles
I bet there’s a group you prefer now – No group’s better than the Beatles
Aren’t they on their way out? – No, they’re still strong
Are the Beatles out of style? – They’ll never go out of style
Which group is better than the Beatles? – The Beatles, I love them
Don’t you think this craze is silly and strictly for girls?
No, they are very talented musicians and songwriters, excellent showmen
You like them? – Yeah
How long do you think they’ll last? – As long as they keep playing
You know the Beatles bring joy into the world
We forget our cares when we hear Beatle records. They’re fun
How long do you think the Beatles can last?
I wish they’d last for ever, they could bring happiness to everybody
They’re less popular than they were months ago
Is there another group you like better? – There is
Which one? – Herman and the Hermits

LENNON:
It doesn’t matter if people don’t like our records, our looks or what we say
They’re entitled to not like us
and we’re entitled not to have anything to do with them
We’ve all got our rights, you know… Harold

HARRISON:
There was this other thing of this woman…
A famous psychic she was supposed to be
She’d predicted Kennedy’s assassination and other things
She was saying in the papers the Beatles would die in a plane crash

GEORGE MARTIN:
All this time, they were getting death threats
It wasn’t long since President Kennedy had been assassinated
I remember going to one of their concerts at the Red Rock Stadium
I climbed up on a gantry overlooking the stage with Brian
and looked down at the boys during the performance
The amphitheatre at Red Rocks is such that a sniper on the hill
could pick off any of those fellows at any time, no problem
I was very aware of this. So was Brian, and so were the boys

PAUL:
How much of a good thing can you have? How long can you sustain things?
Every tour we’d done had just gone great
But we were getting fed up because we’d been at it so long
It gets gruelling, one Holiday Inn after another

HARRISON:
Just the general Beatlemania, you know… it took its toll
We were seeing it then no longer as like…
a naive kind of… just on the buzz of our fame and success
By this time, the dental experience
had made us see it from a different light It was no longer fun any more

Beatles Anthology (3/7) – Part 6

RINGO:

I don’t think anyone didn’t want to stop touring
Paul would have gone on longer than George and I
But you’ll have to ask Paul about that

PAUL:
“Touring’s good, it keeps us sharp”
“I’d keep music live.” I’d been sort of a bit that attitude
But finally I agreed with them
I think it was George and John who were particularly fed up

LENNON:
We might have been waxworks for the good we did there
Nobody heard anything, not even a basic beat
because they were too busy tearing each other up

HARRISON:
We were just tired, you know
It had been four years of legging around screaming in this mania
We were tired, we needed the rest

PAUL:
By the time we got to Candlestick Park, we knew it wasn’t fun any more
I think that was the main point
We’d always try to keep… you’ve got to keep some fun in it for yourself
In anything you do, you know
We’d been pretty good at that. We’d enjoyed touring and TV
We’d enjoyed Europe, we’d enjoyed America
Candlestick Park San Francisco 29th August 1966 But now, even America was beginning to pale
So by then it was: don’t tell anyone, but this is probably our last gig

RINGO:
There was big talk at Candlestick Park
That very period of “This has got to end. This is it”
But my… we went further than that
We got back to England before we finally said “That’s it”

HARRISON:
I certainly felt that we weren’t going to tour again like that
I never really projected into the future
I was thinking this is going to be such a relief
to not have to go through that madness

PAUL:
I don’t remember feeling negative about the band, but about touring
But you always forget the bad bits. I remember the band as being quite good

LENNON:
I’m sorry for the people who can’t see us live
Sometimes you haven’t missed anything because you wouldn’t have heard us
but sometimes I think you might have enjoyed it
The Beatles were then just four lads on that rather dimly lit stage

PAUL:
We were getting worse as a band while all those people were screaming
It was lovely that they liked us but we couldn’t hear to play
The only place we could develop was in the studio, where we could hear ourselves

HARRISON
The most important thing was the safety aspect
Soon after that, it became terrorism
When we were going, it was only us and two people
All those things happened, like people threatening Ringo
or saying the plane was… – Snipping bits of hair off and stuff
The plane would crash, hurricanes, race riots, student riots
There was always some big thing going on when we pulled into town
We’d come in the middle with this mania and it would be chaos
It was just becoming too difficult on the nervous system

PAUL:
When we’d all decided it was “What are we going to do? Announce it?”
We said no, just don’t say anything

LENNON:
But I was too scared to walk away. I was thinking it was the end
I was dead nervous, so I said yes to Dick Lester that I’d make a movie
I went to Spain for six weeks because I didn’t know what to do
What do you do when you don’t tour? There’s no life

LENNON CLIP FROM MOVIE:
Our officer calls me up and says “Musketeer Gripweed”
He was a tall chap, some would call him weedy. I did
Remember, we were some few hundred miles behind enemy lines
He said “Green, green, green.” So I did
Some bastard’s been prior, has he, Jock?
One bastard down the road stinks to high heaven
Are you a duration bloke? – You wouldn’t chuck her, would you?
Well, pack it in then. I’m a regular. It’s my sodding career, liberating, all right?

____
Ringo came to Spain, right
to Almeria when John and I were down there

RINGO
Yeah, I went and hung out because he was lonely
We really supported each other a lot
He was out there being this actor

HARRISON:
John was doing How I Won the War so I went to India for six weeks
It was a fantastic time
I would go out and look at temples and go shopping
I travelled all over, went to various places
and eventually went up to Kashmir
I stayed on a houseboat in the middle of the Himalayas
It was incredible. I’d wake up in the morning
A little Kashmiri fellow would bring us tea and biscuits
I could hear Ravi in the next room doing his practice
That was incredible times for me

NEIL ASPINALL TOUR MANAGER:
George was doing the Indian stuff. I don’t know what Paul was doing

PAUL:
To me, if you are blessed with the ability to write music…
film scores are kind of an interesting diversion
George Martin, being able to write and to orchestrate
got an offer through the Boulting Brothers
for him and me to do some film music for The Family Way
I looked at the film and thought it was a great film. I still do
A very powerful, emotional, soppy but good film for its time
We even got an lvor Novello award for the best film song that year
for Love in the Open Air

The Beatles Anthology 6 [Legendado/Parte 3] HD

LENNON:
Can I have a word?
Are the Beatles going to go their own ways in 1967?
On our own or together, we’re always involved with each other
Could you ever see a time when you weren’t working together?
I can see us working not together for a period, but we’d always get together
You need other people for ideas and we all get along fine
Will you be doing films on your own next year?
No, I don’t want to make a career of it. I just felt like doing it
Dick Lester asked me and I said yes
I wouldn’t have done it if the others hadn’t liked it, but they were on holiday
Do you foresee a time when the Beatles won’t be together?

RINGO:
No, no
Have you got tired of each other?
No
Have you got anything lined up on your own, film parts for example?
There may be one if we don’t do one together early next year
I’m sort of out of it – John and Paul can still write
even though we’re not working together
And George can learn his sitar. I’ve just been sitting around
Getting bored? – No, getting fat!

HARRISON:
Do you think that in the New Year you will be going your own ways?
No, no definitely not

PAUL:
Can I have a brief word? If you never toured again, would it worry you?
I don’t know. No, I don’t think so
But the only thing about that is, performance for us…
It’s gone downhill because we can’t develop when no one can hear us
so for us to perform, it gets more difficult each time
Do you mean they don’t listen to you so you don’t want to do that?
We want to do it, but if we’re not listened to
and we can’t even hear ourselves, we can’t get any better
But in the studio we could do Strawberry Fields, Penny Lane and then Pepper
Were they the first ones out?
That was what happened once we got full-time into the studio
And saying at the time “Now our performance is that record”

GEORGE MARTIN:
That new record started with Strawberry Fields
That was going to be what became Pepper. But no one had heard of Pepper yet
But it was going to be a record made in the studio
with songs they had written which couldn’t be performed live
They were designed to be studio productions and that was the difference

PAUL:
Strawberry Fields is John’s song
He used to live next door to Strawberry Fields, a Salvation Army place for kids
He used to bunk over and it was his little magic garden to play in
When I visited him, he’d tell me about Strawberry Fields

LENNON:
Strawberry Fields I wrote when I was making How I Won the War in Spain
It’s a Salvation Army home
near the house I lived in with my aunty in the suburbs
Although I took the name as an image

PAUL:
We had this thing called the mellotron for the intro of Strawberry Fields
This is one. We had flutes, and this was the intro
Then the nice thing is that our stuff started to get a bit more surreal
Penny Lane was a bit surreal too, although a sort of cleaner thing
I remember saying to George Martin, a very clean recording
I was into clean sounds. Mainly Beach Boy kind of things at that point
But the Fireman with his hour-glass and all that
was us trying to get into a bit of art, of surrealism, all based on real things
There was a barber called Bioletti
I think he’s still there, actually, in Penny Lane
He had the pictures all barbers have of the haircut you can have
only instead of saying “The barber with pictures of haircuts in his windows”
you’d change it round to…
Every head he’s had the pleasure to know
A barber showing photographs like it’s an exhibition
It was like twisting it to a slightly more artsy angle
Penny Lane is not only a street, it’s a district
I lived in Penny Lane in a street called Newcastle Road
so I was the only actual person that lived in Penny Lane

Beatles Anthology (5/7) – Part 6

Right now, we’re going to say hello to John Lennon and Paul McCartney
Penny Lane having failed to make No. 1 in Britain, were you at all put out?
No, the main thing is it’s fine to be kept from being number one
by a record like Release Me
because they’re not both trying to do the same kind of thing
So that’s a completely different scene altogether
But you have in the past been reported as saying
that if a record didn’t go to No. 1 you’d think of packing it all in
It was a relief
Everything we did went straight to No. 1, so there was that pressure
I believe we had six or seven in a row
It was out, in, out, you know
So within the group it took the pressure off
You obviously don’t have to write any more songs except you like doing it
But it’s always been like that – that’s the good thing
It has been a hobby and it still is
Can you tell us anything about the numbers you’re now engaged on?
Paul had been on a train or plane journey with Mal Evans
He came up with the idea of Sgt Pepperand he was kind of…
To me, we were in the studio to make the next record
and he was going on about this idea of some fictitious band
Sgt Pepperis Paul after a trip to America
The whole West Coast long-named group thing was coming in
People are no longer the Beatles or the Crickets, but suddenly
‘Fred and his Incredible Sheep Shrinking Grateful Aeroplanes’
There were many such bands: Laughing Joe and his Medicine Band
Thank you wam bam mam kind of group names, you know
Colonel Tucker’s Medicinal Brew and Compound
So I thought, if there was a band, what would be a mad name for it?
It was basically Paul’s idea
He had this song, Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band
He was identifying it with the Beatles themselves
I think we recorded the song first
and then the idea came to make it into an album
It was also triggered by Neil Aspinall, who said at that time:
Why don’t we have Sgt Pepper as the compere?
At the beginning of the show, he introduces the band
At the end of every Beatles show, Paul always used to say:
“It’s time to go, we’ve got to go to bed and this is our last number”
Do the last number and go
I suggested Sgt Pepper should come on at the end of the album:
“Well, that’s it, we’ve got to go. Here’s our last number”
and send the album on tour instead of the band
We liked that idea
We’d read a report somewhere that said:
Elvis Presley has sent his gold-plated Cadillac out on tour
We thought that was a great idea – because we’d been sending ourselves out
We thought that’s a really good idea. You stay at home and send your car
It did go on tour and people had come and they’d pay money
They wandered around it as if it was an exhibit and he didn’t have to be there
Then, in the 60s when we thought of doing Sgt Pepper, we didn’t want to tour
The idea suddenly sounded very nifty, you know
We said we haven’t gold-plated Cadillacs, we don’t do that stuff
but we could send a record out on tour
It was Sgt Pepper and his Lonely Hearts Club Band and all these other acts
It was going to run like a rock opera
and we got as far as Sgt Pepper and Billy Shears
A Little Help From My Friends, then everyone said sod it, let’s just do tracks
So from the start it was going to be something totally different
but it still kept the title
and the feel that it’s all connected
It’s called the first concept album, it doesn’t go anywhere
Mr Kite – All my contributions –
had nothing to do with this idea of Sgt Pepper and his band
But it works because we said it worked and that’s how it appeared
Apart from Sgt Pepper, Billy Shears, and the so-called Reprise… that’s it
Every other song could have been on any other album
A Day in the Life, Mr Kite – they could have gone anywhere
We were spending a long time in the studio
and still doing the same basic tracks
and then it would take weeks for the overdubs
The great thing about this band was whoever had the idea, that was OK
Whoever had the best idea, that’s the one we’d use

The Beatles Anthology 6 [Legendado/Parte 4] HD

PAUL:
For instance, in A Day in the Life, John had this opening verse
I think he’d got the idea from the Daily Mirroror something

LENNON:

It had two stories-the Guinness child had killed himself in a car
That was the main headline story
The next page was about 4000 holes in Blackburn, Lancashire

PAUL:
So Blackburn, Lancashire… the holes… Albert Hall
all got mixed, just a little poetic jumble that sounded nice

GEORGE MARTIN:
The momentous song, A Day in the Life began in a very simple way
And we’ve got the rehearsal take, take one, very first time we’d heard it
with John giving instructions as usual just before he starts it
Have the mike on the piano, quite low to keep with my maracas
John was singing and playing his acoustic guitar, Paul was on piano
George was playing maracas, I think, and certainly Ringo was on bongos
John counts in by saying “Sugar Plum Fairy”
Sugar Plum Fairy, Sugar Plum Fairy
Even in this early take
he has a voice which sends shivers down the spine

PAUL:
That was mainly a John song
I read the news today, oh boy… He’d taken a lot of it from a newspaper
Then I had another bit…
Woke up, fell out of bed, dragged a comb across my head
That was a little bit I had, it wasn’t doing anything
and we got the concept of building it like a mini-operetta

GEORGE MARTIN:
John said let’s shove it in the middle and see if we can’t connect them
We connected them with a series of empty bars either side of Paul’s section
before we came back into John’s as a reprise
and we knew we had to fill those bars with something sensational
To keep the 24 bars so everybody knew when to come back in
dear old Mal Evans stood by the piano counting the bars
Also, he set off an alarm clock at the end to trigger everybody back into it
They wanted an orchestral climax to fill these empty bars
A giant orgasm of sound rising from nothing at all to a most incredible noise
And this is what we came up with
With that we joined up the two parts of the song
The moment I remember best outside of him bringing the song…

PAUL:
It was obviously a gorgeous song when he brought it
I was a big fan of John’s, you’ve got to remember that
It wouldn’t just be: oh yes, professional person will write this
It would be: I can’t wait to get my hands on this
We’d learned the chords off him and we’d develop it
But the moment I remember…
We got to a little bit that he didn’t have where we said:
I’d love to turn you on
We looked at each other and thought, we know what we’re doing here, don’t we?
We’re actually saying, for the first time ever, words like ‘turn you on’
which was in the culture anyway but no one had actually said it on record
There was a look of recognition between us
Do it, do it, get it down!

RINGO:
So the sleeve came and we wanted to dress up
To be those people, the Peppers
We had to get suits and it was flower-power coming into its fullest
That’s what it was

NEIL ASPINALL TOUR MANAGER:
Mal and I went to all the different libraries and got prints
Peter Blake blew them up and tinted them and made the colour

PAUL:
I remember the weekend it was released
getting a telegram from people like James Fox: “Long live Sgt Pepper”
People had come round and said “Great album, man”
So it got very noticed-as if “You’re making it for us,” our crowd

GEORGE MARTIN:
I think it did represent what the young people were on about
It seemed to coincide with a revolution in young people’s thinking
It was, I suppose, the epitome of the swinging ’60s
It linked up with Mary Quant and mini skirts and that kind of thing
And dope to a certain extent
The freedom of sex, and of soft drugs like marijuana
It was all a bit exciting and I thihk it did reflect this time

PAUL:
I thought it was great
I thought it was a huge advance
I was very pleased as the music papers had been saying:
“What are the Beatles up to? Drying up, I suppose?”
It was nice making an album lke Pepper, thinking, yeah, drying up, that’s right
So it was lovely to have that on them
When it came out, I loved it
I had a party to celebrate. That weekend was a bit of a party as I recall
I remember getting lots of telegrams from people
The biggest single tribute was that it was released on the Friday
On Sunday we went to the Saville Theatre
which Brian Epstein rented and ran some rock shows
because nothing ever happened on a Sunday
Jimi Hendrix opened with Sgt Pepper and he’d had since Friday to learn it

Beatles Anthology (7/7) – Part 6  (on drugs)

RINGO:
Sgt Pepperfor me-it was great – it’s a fine album
but I did learn to play chess on it
Because I’d have so much spare time, you know
We’d do the basic track and then we’d put other stuff on, then…
but the percussion would be overdubbed later and later

HARRISON:
For me it was a bit tiring, a bit boring
A few moments I enjoyed but generally I didn’t like that album much
My heart was still in India
That was the big thing for me when that happened in ’66
After that, everything else seemed like hard work
It was a job. It was doing something I didn’t really want to do
I was losing interest in being fab at that point

LENNON:
It wasn’t that spectacular when you look back on it
People just had this dream about Pepper. It was good for then, you know

GEORGE MARTIN:
I was very cross that the BBC decided to ban some of the tracks
They wouldn’t play A Day in the Life. Why? I don’t know
Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds was banned for a rumoured drug connection
and Lucy in the Sky actually stood for LSD, which wasn’t true
and that it was an album promoting the use of drugs among the young
I was aware of them smoking pot but not that they did anything very serious
In fact I was so innocent that I actually took John up to the roof
when he was having an LSD trip and not knowing what it was\

LENNON:
I never took it in the studio. Once I did by accident, thinking it was uppers
I was not in a state of handling it but I took it
and I was just so scared on the mike
I said “What was it? I feel ill”
I thought I was going to crack and I said I must get some air
They took me up on the roof and George Martin was looking at me funny
Then it dawned on me I must have taken acid

GEORGE MARTIN:
The only place I could take him for fresh air was the roof
We went up and it was a wonderful starry night
He looked up and went to the edge of the parapet
He looked up at the stars and said “Aren’t they fantastic?”
To him, they would have been especially fantastic
They just looked like stars to me

PAUL:
Paul, how often have you taken LSD?
About four times
The newscaster said “Is it true you’ve had drugs?”
I made a lightning decision, thinking:
I’m either going to try and bluff this… They’re at my door… No, go away!
Or I’m just going to tell him and I thought, sod it…
I told him, you know what’s going to happen
I’m going to be blamed for telling everyone I take drugs
But you are the people who’ll distribute this thing
I’ll tell you but, if you are worried about it affecting kids, don’t show it
Do you think you’ve encouraged your fans to take drugs?
No, I don’t think my fans will take drugs just because I did
That’s not the point. I was asked whether I had or not
then the whole bit about how far it’s going, how many it will encourage
It is up to the newspapers and up to you on television
You’re spreading this
It’s going into all the homes in Britain and I’d rather it didn’t
But you’re asking me the question. You want me to be honest

HARRISON:
It seemed strange-we’d been trying to get him to take it for 18 months
It seemed funny that one day he’s on television talking about it

RINGO:
It gave the press a field day, to be on all our cases
I didn’t think it was their business
but once he said it…
Whoever said anything in the Beatles, the other three had to deal with it
Which we did with all love because we loved each other
But I could have done without it myself

LENNON:
The point about the whole drug scene was that the press asked Paul:
“Have you taken LSD?” Otherwise we didn’t say a word about it
It was just a personal thing

RINGO:
I feel to this day that we did take certain substances
but never to a great extent at the sessions
We took a little…
but whenever we overdid our intake
the music we made was absolutely sh$%
And we’d go home real happy with the tape
We’d play it when we got home and play it the next day
Every time, we’d come back to record again
we’d all say “We have to do that again”
Because it didn’t work
It didn’t work for the Beatles to be too deranged when making music

The Beatles Anthology 6 [Legendado/Parte 5(Final)] HD

HARRISON:
Somebody said we should invest some money so we thought let’s buy an island
We’ll just go there and drop out
We rented a boat
and went up and down the coast from Athens, looking at islands
We came to one we’d arranged to see
It came to nothing. We didn’t buy an island, we came home
Subtitles: Screentext

________________

Rush Limbaugh’s Rare Voice Extolled Individual Liberty and Limited Government was

Rush Limbaugh gave rare voice to what conservatives already believed about individual liberty, personal responsibility, and limited government. Pictured: Then-first lady Melania Trump bestows the Presidential Medal of Freedom on Limbaugh during the State of the Union address Feb. 4, 2020. (Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

It was news that talk radio devotees, among whom I long have counted myself, had been anticipating—make that dreading—for months. But when the news broke Wednesday shortly after noon EST, that didn’t make it any less hurtful.

When a Limbaugh came on the radio at the usual time and it was not Rush but instead his wife, Kathryn, it was painfully obvious what she was going to say. Namely, that the nationally syndicated, conservative talk show titan had lost his battle with stage 4 lung cancer at the age of 70.

Limbaugh had announced the cancer diagnosis to his millions of listeners just over a year ago, on Feb. 3, 2020. He had continued to host his three-hour program weekdays to the extent that his declining health and the medical treatments permitted, with a variety of guest hosts filling in as needed.

Rush’s last on-air appearance was Feb. 2. Kathryn served as the final guest host Wednesday, so to speak, albeit just for 10 minutes, preceding a “best of” compilation.

Want to keep up with the 24/7 news cycle? Want to know the most important stories of the day for conservatives? Need news you can trust? Subscribe to The Daily Signal’s email newsletter. Learn more >>

“I know that I am most certainly not the Limbaugh that you tuned in to listen to today. I, like you, very much wish Rush was behind this golden microphone right now,” Kathryn began, adding: “It is with profound sadness I must share with you directly that our beloved Rush … passed away this morning due to complications from lung cancer.”

She continued in a somber monologue:

On behalf of the Limbaugh family, I would personally like to thank each and every one of you who prayed for Rush and inspired him to keep going. You rallied around Rush and lifted him up when he needed you the most.

To thank Limbaugh for the thousands of hours of his unique blend of information and entertainment over the past 30-plus years, I had “rallied around Rush” late last year in the only way I could think of.

Having lost both parents and a sister to cancer after the traditional oncology regimen of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy (which some of us deride as “cut, burn, and poison”) failed them, I sent Limbaugh an email urging him to seek out alternative, holistic medical treatment on the premise of “What do you have to lose?”

I provided contact information for a nationally known complementary medicine practitioner in Palm Beach, Florida, his own backyard.

Whether he ever reached out to that doctor’s clinic, I have no way or knowing. But I do know that he read my email, because a few weeks later, I unexpectedly received what amounted to a thank-you gift package on my doorstep from Limbaugh himself.

In it were an oversized coffee mug with Limbaugh’s signature on one side and an illustration of the U.S. flag over the words “Preserve America” on the other; two note pads; a full-sized American flag; and a mirror-framed photo of Limbaugh giving a thumbs-up during President Donald Trump’s State of the Union address on Feb. 4, 2020, where he was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Although ultimately unsuccessful, my Rx to Rush was the least I could do as a fan who had listened to his show almost since its inception in 1988. I was working at the time at a radio station in Manchester, New Hampshire, which carried the program.

A couple of years later, when I got a job as a copy editor at the Portsmouth Herald newspaper, also in New Hampshire, I would have lunch in my car just to listen to his show.

I suppose that qualifies me as a “Dittohead,” the nickname Rush coined for his listeners. His liberal critics never understood Limbaugh’s appeal, disparagingly suggesting that his conservative listeners were taking their political marching orders from him.

But that was the exact opposite of the truth: In a media world dominated by liberals, Limbaugh gave rare voice to what we already believed about individual liberty, personal responsibility, and limited government.

He delivered it all with an irreverent humor—and with what he jokingly called “talent on loan from God”—that will be difficult to replace.

“From today on, there will be a tremendous void in our lives and, of course, on the radio,” Kathryn Limbaugh said on the air.

That’s a fact. Two other things are also undeniable: One is that Limbaugh and talk radio saved the AM dial from oblivion at a time when music was moving wholesale to FM. The other is that for all their criticism of talk radio, liberals always have been envious because it was the one information medium they don’t dominate; they sought unsuccessfully to find liberal hosts who could match Rush’s appeal.

For talk radio devotees, Rush Limbaugh’s death is like losing a member of the family—and no doubt our response resembles how longtime fans of “Jeopardy!” mourned the recent loss of Alex Trebek, who hosted the beloved game show for even longer than Rush was on national radio.

Limbaugh’s oversized shoes will be hard to fill. However, the 600-plus radio stations of his EIB (Excellence in Broadcasting) Network will need a permanent replacement host for those three hours a day, five days a week.

Succession plans presumably were discussed when it was becoming clear that Limbaugh’s cancer was incurable, but if so, the plans have yet to be announced. Plenty of potential heirs could vie for the noon-to-3 p.m. EST throne of talk radio, because Limbaugh spawned an entire generation of conservative talk radio hosts with local programs across the country.

As former Vice President Mike Pence said Wednesday: “There was only one Rush Limbaugh.” However, my nominee as his replacement would be Chris Plante, who hosts the 9 a.m.-to-noon show preceding Rush on affiliate WMAL-FM in Washington, D.C., and who shares Rush’s biting wit, pop culture savvy, and irreverent sense of humor.

As for that talent on loan from God? On Wednesday, that loan was paid back in full.

Godspeed, Rush Limbaugh.

Rush Limbaugh’s Moving Tribute To Andrew Breitbart

Uploaded by on Mar 1, 2012

Rush Limbaugh’s Moving Tribute To Andrew Breitbart

_______________

I noticed that Max Brantley of the Arkansas Times Blog ignored the news of Andrew Breitbart’s death. Actually the final page of the day appeared at 3:30 pm and then disappeared on Thursday.

I had the opportunity to visit briefly with Andrew last year and share a laugh. He seems to be a very gracious person even though he is depicted by  the left otherwise.

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Andrew Breitbart at CPAC 2012 02102012 – FULL SPEECH

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Rep. Louie Gohmert Pays Tribute to Andrew Breitbart

Rep. Louie Gohmert Pays Tribute to Andrew Breitbart Uploaded by GohmertTX01 on Mar 1, 2012 Rep. Louie Gohmert (TX-01) spoke on the House floor about the life and legacy of his friend, conservative writer and American patriot, Andrew Breitbart. “Thank you, dear God, for sharing this extraordinary gift that was Andrew Breitbart with us. We […]

Andrew Breitbart spoke to Little Rock, Arkansas group May 25, 2011 (Part 4,the media world has changed with cable, Fox News, and the web)

Andrew Breibart spoke in Little Rock on May 25, 2011 Andrew Breitbart in Arkansas The second monthly luncheon with featured speaker Andrew Breitbart was excellent. (Check out the Tolbert Report for more coverage of this event.) First, we got to hear from Dave Elswick of KARN   who came up with the idea of this luncheon, […]

Andrew Breitbart spoke to Little Rock, Arkansas group May 25, 2011 (Part 3,one time default cultural liberal, but now a conservative )

Andrew Breibart spoke in Little Rock on May 25, 2011 Andrew Breitbart in Arkansas Dave Elswick Chicago and Introduction.wmv Conservative film activist Andrew Breitbart spoke in Little Rock on Wednseday May 25th at the Hilton Hotel. The room was packed with conservative activist and Tea Party members. Breitbart talked about dealing with the liberal media […]

Andrew Breitbart spoke to Little Rock, Arkansas group May 25, 2011 (Part 2, video clips )

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Dan Mitchell article Everything You Need to Know about Fixing the Budget Mess in Washington

Everything You Need to Know about Fixing the Budget Mess in Washington

The 21st century has been bad news for proponents of limited government. Bush was a big spender, Obama was a big spender, Trump was a big spender, and now Biden also wants to buy votes with other people’s money.

That’s the bad news.

The good news is that there is still a simple solution to America’s fiscal problems. According to the just-released Budget and Economic Outlook from the Congressional Budget Office, tax revenues will grow by an average of 4.2 percent over the next decade. So we can make progress, as illustrated by this chart, if there’s some sort of spending cap so that outlays grow at a slower pace.

The ideal fiscal goal should be reducing the size of government, ideally down to the level envisioned by America’s Founders.

But even if we have more modest aspirations (avoiding future tax increases, avoiding a future debt crisis), it’s worth noting how modest spending restraint generates powerful results in a short period of time. And the figures in the chart assume the spending restraint doesn’t even start until the 2023 fiscal year.

The main takeaway is that the budget could be balanced by 2031 if spending grows by 1.5 percent per year.

But progress is possible so long as the cap limits spending so that it grows by less than 4.2 percent annually. The greater the restraint, of course, the quicker the progress.

In other words, there’s no need to capitulate to tax increases (which, in any event, almost certainly would make a bad situation worse).

P.S. The solution to our fiscal problem is simple, but that doesn’t mean it will be easy. Long-run spending restraint inevitably will require genuine reform to deal with the entitlement crisis. Given the insights of “public choice” theory, it will be a challenge to find politicians willing to save the nation.

P.P.S. Here are real-world examples of nations that made rapid progress with spending restraint.

P.P.P.S. Switzerland and Hong Kong (as well as Colorado) have constitutional spending caps, which would be the ideal approach.

Schumer Is Wrong About Debt. Congress Must Take Debt Danger Seriously, Not Spend Recklessly.

Debt

Calling for stimulus spending in response to COVID-19, Majority Leader Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., stated on Jan. 28, “The dangers of undershooting our response are far greater than overshooting it.” (Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc./Getty Images)

The combination of unified control of the federal government along with the COVID-19 pandemic has seemingly caused some elected officials to think there are no consequences to new spending proposals. However, they must wake up to the dangers posed by recklessly adding to the national debt.

On Thursday, Majority Leader Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., exemplified this mindset by saying, “The dangers of undershooting our response are far greater than overshooting it. We should have learned the lesson, from 2008 and 2009, when Congress was too timid and constrained in its response to the global financial crisis.”

>>> What’s the best way for America to reopen and return to business? The National Coronavirus Recovery Commission, a project of The Heritage Foundation, assembled America’s top thinkers to figure that out. So far, it has made more than 260 recommendations. Learn more here.

This is wrong on several fronts.

The Left has declared war on our culture, but we should never back down, nor compromise our principles. Learn more now >>

First, the stimulus spending that took place in the wake of the Great Recession was ineffective at creating jobs, and in some ways slowed the economy by creating perverse incentives and crowding out private activity.

Second, despite the difficulties associated with the pandemic, the economy is currently in much better shape than it was during the last recession.

The national unemployment rate hit 10% in October 2009 and stayed above 8% through August 2012. In contrast, the COVID-19 recession caused unemployment to spike to 14.8% in April 2020, but it fell below 7% by October.

Third, Congress has already approved over $4 trillion in response to the pandemic, much of which is still available or in the process of being distributed. The idea that Congress has been “undershooting” the response is ridiculous.

Most importantly, Schumer and other leftists in Congress are ignoring the very real danger posed by adding to the $27.8 trillion federal debt, which is over $210,000 for every U.S. household.

Even after the pandemic is over and the economy returns to normal, we will face serious problems as a result of the federal government’s broken finances.

Over $21 trillion worth of federal debt obligations are traded on the open market. While interest rates are low today, Congress has no control over what those rates will be as the debt turns over and requires refinancing.

Credit rating agencies are growing concernedabout the sustainability of America’s finances. If demand for our debt goes down, that will force the Treasury to offer higher interest rates.

Higher interest rates on so much debt would add up very quickly, which makes this a serious risk to economic growth and future prosperity. That means we need to put an end to massive deficits and eventually shrink the debt, either in absolute terms or in relation to the size of the economy, to reduce the risk to current and future generations.

This will be impossible unless legislators address the driving force behind long-term debt and deficits: unsustainable benefit programs such as Social Security and Medicare.

Major trust funds will run dry all too soon. Medicare Part A (hospital insurance) goes broke in 2024, Social Security Disability Insurance in 2026, and the Social Security retirement fund in 2031. These are programs that tens of millions of people rely on, and trust fund insolvency would cause serious upheaval, especially for Social Security.

Annual deficits for the federal government and these major benefit programs are too large to close overnight. Deficits were already high during the years of strong economic growth prior to the pandemic, and then exploded in 2020.

Reforms aiming to slow the growth of spending on Social Security and Medicare can have a significant effect, but only if those reforms are in place several years before the trust funds run out. The longer we wait, the more drastic the necessary changes become.

Besides reforming large benefit programs, there are many other ways for Congress to improve the nation’s financial health. These include refocusing the federal government on core priorities, eliminating wasteful spending, returning to a regular budget process, and strengthening economic growth.

What would not help this massive and growing problem is spending trillions of dollars we don’t have on more “relief” legislation that would do little to help the economy. Hopefully Congress will come to its senses and recognize that it has a responsibility to use taxpayer dollars wisely.

Have an opinion about this article? To sound off, please email letters@DailySignal.com and we will consider publishing your remarks in our regular “We Hear You” feature.

—-

March 31, 2021

President Biden  c/o The White House
1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW
Washington, DC 20500

Dear Mr. President,

Please explain to me if you ever do plan to balance the budget while you are President? I have written these things below about you and I really do think that you don’t want to cut spending in order to balance the budget. It seems you ever are daring the Congress to stop you from spending more.

President Barack Obama speaks about the debt limit in the East Room of the White House in Washington. | AP Photo

“The credit of the United States ‘is not a bargaining chip,’ Obama said on 1-14-13. However, President Obama keeps getting our country’s credit rating downgraded as he raises the debt ceiling higher and higher!!!!

Washington Could Learn a Lot from a Drug Addict

Just spend more, don’t know how to cut!!! Really!!! That is not living in the real world is it?

Making more dependent on government is not the way to go!!

Why is our government in over 16 trillion dollars in debt? There are many reasons for this but the biggest reason is people say “Let’s spend someone else’s money to solve our problems.” Liberals like Max Brantley have talked this way for years. Brantley will say that conservatives are being harsh when they don’t want the government out encouraging people to be dependent on the government. The Obama adminstration has even promoted a plan for young people to follow like Julia the Moocher.  

David Ramsey demonstrates in his Arkansas Times Blog post of 1-14-13 that very point:

Arkansas Politics / Health Care Arkansas’s share of Medicaid expansion and the national debt

Posted by on Mon, Jan 14, 2013 at 1:02 PM

Baby carrot Arkansas Medicaid expansion image

Imagine standing a baby carrot up next to the 25-story Stephens building in Little Rock. That gives you a picture of the impact on the national debt that federal spending in Arkansas on Medicaid expansion would have, while here at home expansion would give coverage to more than 200,000 of our neediest citizens, create jobs, and save money for the state.

Here’s the thing: while more than a billion dollars a year in federal spending would represent a big-time stimulus for Arkansas, it’s not even a drop in the bucket when it comes to the national debt.

Currently, the national debt is around $16.4 trillion. In fiscal year 2015, the federal government would spend somewhere in the neighborhood of $1.2 billion to fund Medicaid expansion in Arkansas if we say yes. That’s about 1/13,700th of the debt.

It’s hard to get a handle on numbers that big, so to put that in perspective, let’s get back to the baby carrot. Imagine that the height of the Stephens building (365 feet) is the $16 trillion national debt. That $1.2 billion would be the length of a ladybug. Of course, we’re not just talking about one year if we expand. Between now and 2021, the federal government projects to contribute around $10 billion. The federal debt is projected to be around $25 trillion by then, so we’re talking about 1/2,500th of the debt. Compared to the Stephens building? That’s a baby carrot.

______________

Here is how it will all end if everyone feels they should be allowed to have their “baby carrot.”

How sad it is that liberals just don’t get this reality.

Here is what the Founding Fathers had to say about welfare. David Weinberger noted:

While living in Europe in the 1760s, Franklin observed: “in different countries … the more public provisions were made for the poor, the less they provided for themselves, and of course became poorer. And, on the contrary, the less was done for them, the more they did for themselves, and became richer.”

Alexander Fraser Tytler, Lord Woodhouselee (15 October 1747 – 5 January 1813) was a Scottish lawyer, writer, and professor. Tytler was also a historian, and he noted, “A democracy cannot exist as a permanent form of government. It can only exist until the majority discovers it can vote itself largess out of the public treasury. After that, the majority always votes for the candidate promising the most benefits with the result the democracy collapses because of the loose fiscal policy ensuing, always to be followed by a dictatorship, then a monarchy.”

Thomas Jefferson to Joseph Milligan

April 6, 1816

[Jefferson affirms that the main purpose of society is to enable human beings to keep the fruits of their labor. — TGW]

To take from one, because it is thought that his own industry and that of his fathers has acquired too much, in order to spare to others, who, or whose fathers have not exercised equal industry and skill, is to violate arbitrarily the first principle of association, “the guarantee to every one of a free exercise of his industry, and the fruits acquired by it.” If the overgrown wealth of an individual be deemed dangerous to the State, the best corrective is the law of equal inheritance to all in equal degree; and the better, as this enforces a law of nature, while extra taxation violates it.

[From Writings of Thomas Jefferson, ed. Albert E. Bergh (Washington: Thomas Jefferson Memorial Association, 1904), 14:466.]

_______

Jefferson pointed out that to take from the rich and give to the poor through government is just wrong. Franklin knew the poor would have a better path upward without government welfare coming their way. Milton Friedman’s negative income tax is the best method for doing that and by taking away all welfare programs and letting them go to the churches for charity.

_____________

_________

Thank you so much for your time. I know how valuable it is. I also appreciate the fine family that you have and your commitment as a father and a husband.

Sincerely,

Everette Hatcher III, 13900 Cottontail Lane, Alexander, AR 72002, ph 501-920-5733

Williams with Sowell – Minimum Wage

Thomas Sowell

Thomas Sowell – Reducing Black Unemployment

By WALTER WILLIAMS

—-

Ronald Reagan with Milton Friedman
Milton Friedman The Power of the Market 2-5

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MUSIC MONDAY The Beatles Anthology 5 Shea Stadium New York 15th August 1965

—-

You may be interested in links to the other posts I have done on the Beatles and you can click on the link below: FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE PART 288, LINKS TO 3 YEARS OF BEATLES POSTS (March of 2015 to Feb of 2018) Featured artist is Mark Dion

Ladies and gentlemen

Honoured by their country
decorated by their Queen
and loved here in America…
Here are the Beatles!
Shea Stadium New York 15th August 1965
Thank you very much. We’d like to carry on now
with a song which was one of our records a few months ago
This song is called I Feel Fine
I never felt people came to hear our show
I felt they came to see us
Because from the count-in on the first number
the volume of screams
would just drown everything out
Vox made us special big amplifiers for that tour
They were 100 watts
We went up from the 30 watt amp to the 100 watt amp
Neil Aspinall Tour Manager That was miked up, I think, to the big speakers round Shea Stadium
so the audience weren’t necessarily listening to the sound from the stage
They were listening to what was coming from the PA system
We were just working off the normal columns, which were…
So it can’t have sounded too good
Can you hear me?
We’d like to do a slow song now
It’s also off ‘Beatles VI’ or something. I don’t know what it’s off
I haven’t got it
It’s a waltz, this one. Remember that
Anyway, the song’s called, hopefully enough… aah, look at her!
It’s called Baby’s in Black
The next song we’d like to sing…
John was having a good time. He was into his comedy, which was great
The great thing about John, if there was ever a tense show –
which that undoubtedly was –
you can’t play to that many people for the first time and not be tense –
his comedy would come in and he’d start the faces
The shoulders would start going and it was very encouraging
because at least we’re not taking it seriously
If you look at that footage and see how we are acting
or reacting to the place
it’s very big, it’s very strange
I feel that on that show
John cracked up, just went mad
Not mentally ill, just got crazy
If you see him, he’s playing the electric piano with his elbows
It was a really strange thing
We did I’m Down
I did the organ on the record and decided to play it on stage for the first time
I felt naked without a guitar and George couldn’t play for laughing
I was doing it for a laugh
It was marvellous, the biggest crowd we’d ever played to
The biggest live show that I think anybody’s ever done
and it was fantastic
That was a good experience, the first really big open air…
“Wow, look at this!” you know
I didn’t think about it like that at the time
I personally didn’t realise that it was the first really big open air…
You know, 55000 people
Even now it’s a big crowd, 56000
But then-it’s like old money – it seemed like millions of people
60000 people
They told me it was 70
On one or another trip, we met Elvis
It was one of the highlights of our visit
but by the time we’d got near his house we’d forgotten where we were going
We were in this Cadillac limousine
You know, in LA, everything goes round and round and round
Then I think we were going along Mulholland…
We had a couple of cups of tea in the back of the car
By the time we got to Elvis’s house we forgot where we were going
It didn’t really matter where we were going
Bel Air, actually. The meet was arranged and we were going to see him
I was pretty excited about it all and then we arrived
We pulled up at these big gates – we’re going to see Elvis!
We all fell out of the car, just like in a Beatles cartoon
All in hysterics… trying to pretend we weren’t… silly
In the house, Elvis was sitting on a couch, playing a Fender bass –
plugged in an amplifier – watching the TV
And it was “Oh, there’s Elvis”
It was Elvis. He just looked like Elvis
He was the King, wasn’t he? It was Elvis
This is Mr Hips, you know. Hip-swivelling man!
Wow, you know, that’s Elvis!
He was playing Mohair Sam all evening
He played it endlessly on a jukebox. It was the record of the moment for him
So it was great to see he’s a music fan, he’s not just…
because that was one of our big records of the moment too
He had a TV going all the time, which is what I do anyway
In front of the TV, he had a massive Fender bass amplifier
with a big bass plugged in it
He was playing bass all the time with the picture up on the TV
so we just got in there and played with him
We plugged in whatever was around and we all played and sang
I never jammed with Elvis at all
John said he’d… – John jammed with Elvis
It must have been when we went out of the room
I think it was because he had a bass there, so I thought…
So I thought you know… bass, hey, this is interesting
Ringo played football with him – Yeah, I played football with Elvis
Round about 10 or 10.30…
Priscilla was brought in
She had a long thing on… and a tiara
I’ve got this picture of her like… as a sort of Barbie doll
with kind of purple gingham and a gingham bow in her very beehive hair
I spent most of the party trying to suss out if anybody had any reefer
I think it wouldn’t have mattered to me if she was there
Because it was him I came to see
I don’t remember the boys he had with him
All his gang-the Memphis Mafia or whatever they call them
He was surrounded by these sycophants
“I’m going to the loo now.” “OK, Elv, we’ll go with you.” Strange
I was so angry that he wasn’t making any music, as he should have been
We were asking about this, just making movies
and not doing any personal appearances or TV
I think he enjoys making movies so much
If we don’t do personal appearances, we get bored quickly
He says he misses it a bit
He was great, just how I expected him
It just sort of faded out, you couldn’t get close
It’s not like we could have become good friends, it was impossible
We weren’t buddies or anything, but he was really nice
He was a nice guy, he was very slim, you know
He was really good. I’m glad I met him
It was one of the great meetings in my life
The saddest part is now, years and years later
we found out that he tried to have us banished from America
because he was very big with the C.I.A. and everything
It’s very sad to me that he felt so threatened
That he thought, like a lot of people, that we were bad for American youth
In ’62 we were touring in a van and people were laughing at us
That’s how our careers started. They were laughing at us in Scotland
Then they got interested and got to really listen and like us
Then this screaming thing started
They used us as an excuse to go mad
The world did, then blamed it on us
We were just in the middle, in a car or hotel room. We couldn’t do much
We couldn’t go out, we couldn’t do anything
For us it was a drag – we knew they wouldn’t hear anything
because it’s just like a riot, not like a show
It felt dangerous because everybody was out of hand
Even the cops were just caught up in the mania
It was like they were this big movie
We felt trapped in the middle while everybody else was going mad
We were actually the sanest people in the whole thing
The realisation was kicking in that nobody was listening
That was OK in the beginning
but even worse than that is that we were playing so bad
We were now a big band. When we went ‘Whooahh’ and shook our heads
everyone went mad
I don’t really think it was that bad
I was playing just shit
all I could do was… hold down the off-beat
I couldn’t come off that, really
because if you went to do anything on the toms, it was just nothing
There was no noise
I just felt that we were playing really bad
I’d joined the Beatles because they were the best band in Liverpool
I wanted to play with good players and that’s what it was all about
First and foremost, we were musicians
George Martin Record Producer Their musical creativity showed no signs of flagging
On the contrary, they were becoming more and more productive
The work they were giving me was much more interesting
They were finding new frontiers all the time
Our whole attitude was changing
We’d grown up a little
I think grass was really influential in a lot of our changes
Especially with the writers
Because they were writing different stuff, we were playing differently
We were all expanding in all areas of our life
opening up to a lot of different attitudes

The Beatles Anthology 5 [Legendado/Parte 2] HD

The direction was changing away from the Thank You Girl poppy stuff
the early stuff – From Me to You, She Loves You
All the early stuff was directly relating to your fans
kind of saying, please buy this record
Thank You Girl, PS I Love You, it was all very that
There came a point where we’d done enough of that and branched out
into songs that are a bit more surreal, more entertaining
Other people were arriving on the scene who were a little bit influential
I don’t really know whether we’d been influenced
Dylan was starting to influence us quite heavily at that point
When it got sort of contemporary as it were, a contemporary influence
I think Rubber Soul was about when it started happening
It was just around that period
when we were all getting into different kinds of music
George’s became Indian
We were all listening to classical music and various types of music
other than our own and our rock’n’roll roots
and George moved into the Indian thing
He’d give you a better explanation of just when it was
During the filming of Help!
there were some Indian musicians in a restaurant scene
and I kind of messed around with the sitar then
During that year, towards the end of the year
I kept hearing the name Ravi Shankar. I heard it about three times
About the third time I heard it, a friend of mine said:
“Have you heard Ravi Shankar?”
So I went out and bought the record
and that was it, I just felt…
It felt very familiar to me to listen to that music
It was around that time I bought a sitar
I bought a cheap sitar in a shop called India Craft in London
It was lying around. I hadn’t figured out what to do with it
When we were working on Norwegian Wood it just needed something
and it was quite spontaneous, from what I remember
I just picked up the sitar, found the notes and just played it
We miked it up and put it on and it just seemed to hit the spot
They were getting more and more interested in unusual sounds
They were trying out new instruments and saying to me:
“What ideas have you got for this?”
Yesterday had been the first time we used other instrumentalists on records
The only person who’d played with them before was me
Now we had a group of other musicians
so we weren’t averse to using other people or other sounds
Rubber Soul was an indication of the way things were going. A great album
That’s my favourite-at the time I think it was the best we’d made
We certainly knew we were making a good album
You know the cover, the photo where we looked stretched
That was the kind of thing that we were all very into
That kind of random little exciting thing that would happen
The photographer, Bob Freeman, had taken pictures at John’s house
We just had our new gear on, the polo necks
We were doing straight mug shots, four of us all posing
Back in London, he was in someone’s flat
He was showing us a little carousel of slides
and he had a piece of cardboard that was album cover size
He was projecting the photographs on to it, planning an album cover
We’d just chosen the photo. We said “That one looks good”
We all liked ourselves in one particular shot
and he was just winding up when the card it was on fell back a bit
It elongated the photo and we went “Can you do it like that?”
He said “Yeah, I could print it like that” so we thought, that’s it… Rubber Soul!
So there’s no great mysterious meaning behind all of this
It was just four boys working out what to call their new album
I don’t see too much difference in Rubber Soul and Revolver
To me, they could be volume one and two
Maybe I’m wrong, I haven’t played them right back to back
but they were both very pleasant and enjoyable records for me
It has that quality because it’s the follow on
and we were just starting to really find ourselves in the studio
You know, what we could do, which was…
over just being four of us playing our instruments and the vocals
Their ideas were beginning to become much more potent in the studio
They started to tell me what they wanted and would press me for ideas
More ways of translating those ideas into reality
We’d be well into the album and we knew I’d be doing a number somewhere
We’d say “Have you got a song?” or “We’ve got this for you”
I thought it might not be a bad idea…
rather than giving him a very serious song
because he wasn’t that keen on singing
I remember the idea coming up just before going to sleep
That little twilight moment when silly ideas come into your head
I just thought of Yellow Submarine
By then, I’d started writing myself
but it was hard to bring your songs in when you had Lennon and McCartney
It was a bit of a joke because I’d bring these songs I’d written
and they’d laugh because I’d re-written an old standard again
I was great at re-writing Jerry Lee Lewis songs
I didn’t have many songs. They were more or less the ones I had written
I’ve always had a couple I was working on or thinking about
and in the later years I did have a huge backlog
but in the mid-60s I didn’t have too many
George went through the same problem as I did with his first songs
but that didn’t last long
Then we started coming up with great songs. Which one of us was on Revolver?
That was the point where you discover you’re not actually…
you’re paying more money to the taxman…
You’re so happy that you’re finally earning money, then you find out…
In those days we paid 19s.6d. out of every û1
There were 20 shillings in û1
That was with super-tax, surtax and tax-tax and stuff
It was ridiculous
A heavy penalty to pay for making money
It was on Revolverthat we have the track Tomorrow Never Knows
which was a great innovation
That’s me in my Tibetan Book of the Dead period
and the expression Tomorrow Never Knows was another of Ringo’s
I was self-conscious about the lyrics of Tomorrow Never Knows
so I took one of Ringo’s malapropisms like Hard Day’s Night
to take the edge off the heavy philosophical lyrics
John had a song which was all on the chord of C
which we thought a perfectly good idea, like Indian music is all on one chord
I wondered how George Martin would take it-it was a radical departure
At least we’d had three chords and maybe a change for the middle eight
Suddenly this was just John strumming on C rather earnestly
In those days there was no technology like there is now
There were two guitars, bass and drums, and that was it
If we did stuff in the studio with the aid of recording tricks
then we couldn’t just reproduce them on stage
Nowadays you could do Tomorrow Never Knows, have all the loops on a keyboard
You could have as many pianists, drummers and orchestras as you wanted
But in those days we were just a little dance hall band
and we never thought of augmenting ourselves
The hard stuff was the complicated harmonies, hard to do live on stage
Like for instance Nowhere Man
Nowhere Man was OK, wasn’t it? – It was OK, but it was hard
Circus Krone Munich
Somewhere between albums and tours… I had a dentist, anyway…
One night, John and his wife Cynthia
and Patti and myself were having dinner at this guy’s house
This fellow, for some reason or other,
had obtained lysergic acid diethylamide 25
which at that time was not illegal
It was a legally obtained medication
But we didn’t really know about it
I seemed to recall that I’d heard vaguely about it
but I didn’t really know what it was
He just put it in our coffee
He didn’t know what it was, just…
It’s the thing with middle class London swingers who’d heard about it
They didn’t know it was different from pot or pills and they gave us it
He advised us to stay. We thought it was for an orgy and we didn’t want to know
It became a bit seedy to me
As if he was trying to get something happening in his house
There was some reason he didn’t want us to go
Then he said “Leave your car here, I’ll drive and you can come back later”
I said “No, we’ll go in my car,” and we drove. This guy came as well, in his car
We got to the nightclub
We were just insane. We all thought there was a fire in the lift
Just a little red light and we were all screaming, all hysterical
We went up to the floor where the discotheque was
The door opens and we all go aaaaaah!!
We felt lke the elevator was on fire or we were going into hell or something
We were all in hysterics, crazy
Then we got out at the top and everything was OK
We sat there, probably for hours, and I ended up driving everybody home
It was daylight and I was driving a Mini with John, Cynthia and Patti
I seem to remember we were doing 18 miles an hour
And I was really concentrating
Some of the time it just felt normal
then suddenly it was all crazy
I really was frightened of that kind of stuff
When you’re young, you’re taught… watch out for them devil drugs
So when acid came round, we’d heard that you’re never the same
It alters your life and you never think the same again
I think John was rather excited by that prospect. I was rather frightened
I thought this could mean that I’d never get back home
Oh geez, you know. It may not be the greatest move
So I delayed and was seen to stall a bit within the group –
because there was a lot of peer pressure
Day Tripper– That was a drug song, I just liked the word
The last Saturday Club show… We’ll ever do…
The last Saturday Club before Christmas, we’d like…
to wish everybody a very happy Crimble from all of us
and thank everyone who sent cards this week and all the other weeks
I hope you all have a happy Christmas and a very happy New Year
Nice of you to drop in today, ladsOh, we weren’t doing anything
Not at all, Brian. Like you said, Merry Christmas to you
We can’t ask you to work todayNo, it’s not allowed
We’ll play your record. Does it matter which side we play?
We Can Work It Out
Well, sort it out amongst yourselves then
Have you got it? Yeah, I’m putting it on now
Here goes the needle on the record
Well, the mania was…
As we’ve said, it was pretty difficult to get around
Out of convenience, we decided we were not going to go in
Going to the TV studios to promote our records was too much of a hassle
We’ll just make our own little films and we’ll put them out
What was happening…
We really couldn’t fit in all the live television shows
that people wanted us to do round the world: Shindig, Ed Sullivan Show
Top of the Pops, Thank Your Lucky Stars and stuff in France, Germany, etc.
So to accommodate those people
we decided that if we just made – we call them promo films –
a promo film of the individual songs
and sent that to TV stations around the world
That would fulfil their obligation, or that would do the job
The idea was that we didn’t have to go out
We thought this was a great idea, to send the movies, the film
We didn’t call them videos, they were just going on TV
We thought this was a great ruse
Let’s do these and we can stay home
Ladies and gentlemen, here’s a feature taped for us in England
by Ringo Starr, Paul McCartney, John Lennon and George Harrison
Hello, Ed, how are you?
I’m sorry we can’t be there in person to do the show
but everybody’s busy these days, with the washing and the cooking…
We hope you like it. One’s called Rain and one’s called Paperback Writer
The idea was to send them to America because we can’t go everywhere
We’ll send these things out to promote the record
These days, everybody does that
It’s just part of your promotion for a single
so I suppose in a way we invented MTV
That’s the first record with backwards music on it
Haneda Airport Tokyo 30th June 1966
This is a thing we never really talked about
Everywhere we were going in those days, it was a demonstration of something
Riots were happening
Plus people were demonstrating because the Budokan
was supposed to be a spiritual hall reserved for martial arts
Some Japanese say that your performances will violate the Budokan
which is devoted to traditional Japanese martial arts
and you set a bad example to Japanese youth
by leading them astray from traditional Japanese values. What do you think?
If a dancing troupe from Japan goes to Britain
nobody tries to say they’re violating traditional laws
or that they are trying to spoil anything
We’re singing here because we’ve been asked to
I’d rather watch singing than wrestling anyway
We’re not trying to violate anything
and we’re just as traditional anyway
In any town we went to, someone always had a grievance
Something was wrong
We were locked up in the hotel for a long time with merchants coming round
and showing us ivory and stuff like this
People go to Tokyo and do shopping. We couldn’t get out of the hotel
I once tried to get out but a policeman ran after me. I did actually do it…
Paul and maybe Ringo got out one day and got in a taxi
The police caught them and made them go back to the hotel
But John and I actually got out
We made it down to the local market and it was great
We were looking at things and buying things
Then the police came and got us and said “Naughty boys!”
We were only allowed out at the time for the concert
when it was worked out like a military manoeuvre
“At 5.30 precisely we will knock on your door”
Exactly as scheduled. Then they said “You will line up outside the room”
“At 5.32 we will leave the door”
“We will now walk to the lift”
“At 5.33 we will be at the elevator”
“The elevator takes one minute and eight to get down”
“At 5.35 we’ll be down in the car park”
Then they said “You will get in car with Mr Evans”
Then they had the seating arranged in all the cars
Amazing efficiency we’d never seen the like of in Britain
Just to be… how we were
They’d knock on the door and we’d never come out
It would just totally wreck their timing
You’d see all these guys going absolutely barmy
because we hadn’t walked down the corridor at 7.14 and a third
We knew we were doing that to them
As we went to the gig, they had the fans organised
with police patrols on each corner
so there weren’t fans haphazardly waving along the streets
They’d been herded on to corners and were allowed to wave from there
So you’d go along the street and there would be a little ‘eeekk’
You would go a few more hundred yards and ‘eeekk’
It was very strange. The audience were very nice
They’re reserved but they were up on their feet, or they tried to be
but the police had telephoto lenses all around and anybody who stood up
and looked like they might run towards the stage or something
had their photograph taken
So the people were very restricted in how they could respond to us
But it was a warm reception
It was very nice but a bit clinical
Nippon Budokan Hall
Ladies and gentlemen, let’s welcome the Beatles!
The close harmonies on things like Paperback Writerand Nowhere Man
were very hard to do on stage because it was just empty
There were no guitar notes to take it from
We had an eight-track by then, that was the problem
So we had the luxury of double tracking
Also, we were competing with the Beach Boys’ Pet Sounds and all that
I think it was around that time
All the voices were really like double tracked…
There was no way of doing it on stage really
Evening Performance 30th June 1966
You’d get to the point where it was particularly bad
Then we’d do our Elvis legs and wave to the crowd
and they’d all scream and it would cover it up
I think Paul already said that the screaming
covered a lot of worrying moments
The screams did cover a lot of of sins…
and those shows, it wasn’t there
The second show was pretty good, but the first one was a bit of a shock
You mean we actually played better in the thirty minutes we had?
Yeah, I guess so
Well, that’s probably true
Afternoon Performance 1st July 1966
I think it just started to hit everybody. I remember we had one meeting…
We were mainly talking about the musicianship going downhill
Never mind the boredom of doing it
There was always so much pressure, from the minute you opened your eyes
People trying to get at you for whatever reason
To be friends or to get an interview or to do a radio
The pressure was on from the minute you started
The Philippines was almost like a mistake from the very beginning
As soon as we got there, it was bad, bad news
I hated the Philippines
It was one of those places where you knew they were waiting for a fight
They were pushing you and, if you’d done anything, they would have…
Subtitles: Screentext

MSNBC’s Andrea Mitchell botches attempt to fact-check Sen. Ted Cruz on Shakespeare quote

John and William Faulkner

Photo by Phill Mullen


The only known photograph of William Faulkner (right) with his eldest brother, John, was taken in 1949. Like his brother, John Faulkner was also a writer, though their writing styles differed considerably.

My grandfather, John Murphey, (born 1910) grew up in Oxford, Mississippi and knew both Johncy and “Bill” Faulkner. He told me that Bill was a very bashful shy man. Johncy was outgoing and would be very friendly and would love to stop and visit.

My grandfather was in the moving business and he had moved Johncy several times, but Johncy still had several outstanding bills. Then one day Johncy told my grandfather to take the bills to his brother and he would pay them in full. I don’t know the exact date, but my grandfather was told that Faulkner had got his first big check from a publisher and I am guessing that it was  in the early 1930’s.

MSNBC’s Andrea Mitchell botches attempt to fact-check Sen. Ted Cruz on Shakespeare quote

‘Oh dear Andrea, this tweet is a Scottish tragedy,’ one critic reacted

MSNBC anchor Andrea Mitchell was brutally mocked on Twitter Wednesday for her botched attempt to fact check Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, over a Shakespeare quote.

During his Wednesday appearance on “America’s Newsoom,” Cruz invoked The Bard to summarize the second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump.

“It’s reminiscent of Shakespeare [in] that it is full of sound and fury, and yet signifying nothing,” said Cruz, referencing part of a well-known soliloquy from “Macbeth.”

However, that reference was apparently lost on Mitchell.

“@SenTedCruz says #ImpeachmentTrial is like Shakespeare full of sound and fury signifying nothing. No, that’s Faulkner,” Mitchell tweeted.

Mitchell was quickly backed up by Washington Post columnist Jennifer Rubin, who wrote, “and it says volumes about his lack of soul. That’s Any Thinking Person.”

The NBC News chief Washington correspondent’s error led to a tsunami of fact-checking from critics, who pointed out that the title of William Faulkner’s 1929 novel “The Sound and the Fury” came from Shakespeare’s words.

“Oh dear Andrea, this tweet is a Scottish tragedy,” Washington Post correspondent Annie Gowen reacted.

“Faulkner wrote the book ‘The Sound and the Fury.’ But the phrase comes from Shakespeare’s Macbeth: ‘It is a tale, told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.’ The whole passage is beautiful,” New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof gently corrected Mitchell.

“Um, Andrea. You know how ‘Out, damn spot!’ might SOUND like it’s from a Tide commercial, but it’s REALLY from Macbeth? Well…” Bloomberg Opinion writer Robert George wrote.

“Unless Faulkner predates #MacBeth, @tedcruz wins this round,” Daily Caller editor Virginia Kruta declared.

“It pains me to say this but Ted Cruz wins this round,” The Nation correspondent Jeet Heer similarly admitted.

Cruz also had some fun at the expense of Mitchell and Rubin.

“Methinks she doth protest too much,” the senator reacted, adding, “One would think NBC would know the Bard. Andrea, take a look at Macbeth act 5, scene 5: ‘[Life] struts & frets his hour upon the stage, And then is heard no more. It is a tale Told by an idiot, full of sound & fury, Signifying nothing.'”

Cruz added, “Between NBC & the Washington Post, you’d think somebody would have read Macbeth.”

Mitchell eventually admitted her error and apolozied to the senator.

“I clearly studied too much American literature and not enough Macbeth. My apologies to Sen. Cruz,” the MSNBC anchor tweeted.

I just got finished watching Woody Allen’s latest movie “Midnight in Paris” and I loved it. In that movie there are several famous writers and artists that appear in the film. I am doing a series of posts that takes a look at this great writers and artists.

By the way, I know that some of you are wondering how many posts I will have before I am finished. Right now I have plans to look at Cole Porter, Fitzgerald, Heminingway, Juan Belmonte,Gertrude Stein, Gauguin, Lautrec, Geores Brague, Dali, Rodin,Coco Chanel, Modigliani, Matisse, Luis Bunuel, Josephine Baker, Van Gogh, Picasso, Man Ray, T.S. Elliot and several more.

William Faulkner is one of those writers. Here below is another review of the film:

June 10, 2011

Midnight in Paris (2011)

Midnight in Paris is not only Woody Allen’s best movie in decades, it is also one of the most joyous, warm-hearted and magical movies of his entire career.  A sumptuous love letter to both the city of Paris and its rich history, Allen’s romantic fantasy is also a touching ode to art and the artist that has (or had) created it.  Above all that, though, the film is a look at the perils of trying to escape from an imperfect present into a mythically “perfect” era of the past.

Self-described hack Hollywood screenwriter Gil (Owen Wilson) has come to Paris with his fiance Inez (Rachel McAdams) to both help plan their upcoming wedding and to finish his first attempt at a literary novel.  While Gil adores Paris and its history, Inez is contemptuous of both the city and Gil’s love for it.  Inez’s mother (Mimi Kennedy) and father (Kurt Fuller) are even less supportive.  The already stressed relationship between Gil and Inez cracks all the more when the couple meets the pedantic Paul (Michael Sheen), a former flame of Inez’s, and Carol (Nina Arianda).

While Inez spends more and more time with Paul, Gil just wanders Paris at night.  For when the clock strikes midnight, that is when the true magic of the City of Light is revealed.

Ah, to be in 1920s Paris and to be able to rub shoulders with the likes of Ernest Hemingway (a hilarious Corey Stoll), Zelda and F. Scott Fitzgerald (Allison Pill and Tom Hiddleston, respectively), and Salvador Dali (an even more hilarious Adrien Brody).  How cool would it be able to have Gertrude Stein (Kathy Bates) herself critique your first novel?  Being a reader of Hemingway and Fitzgerald and a huge fan of William Faulkner (who is only mentioned in the film and not seen) I so wanted to be able to experience Owen Wilson’s lost-in-his-own-generation character’s time hoping adventure for myself.  My first words to my wife after the movie ended were, “Now I want to go to Paris!”

In my review of Woody Allen’s 1987 drama September, I made note of his penchant for cynicism and pessimism, especially in his dramas.  That penchant made Allen’s supposed “light” drama from last year, You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger, an almost soul crushing viewing experience for me.  That film not only left me feeling depressed and unfulfilled, but it also had me questioning whether or not my recent career change had been the right one to make.  I am guessing that, since I was struggling with a writing project of my own, I projected far too much of myself onto Josh Brolin’s washed up writer character.  I wanted him to succeed in his own writing project because I wanted to succeed in my own writing project.  When he did not and, in a Secret Window, Secret Garden styled plot development, the man stole another writer’s work and claimed it as his own, I was devastated.

Owen Wilson’s struggling writer character, however, is far more sympathetic and, even more important, a more honest character than Brolin’s scheming loser had been.  I was rooting for him to find his way to happiness and fulfillment, which are things that Allen routinely denies his more sympathetic characters.  Remembering the fate of the struggling writer in You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger, I spent most of the running of Midnight in Paris dreading Gil’s eventual fate.  What bitter truth and/or horrible disappointment would come down on him and threaten to crush his hopes and dreams?

I will not answer that question in this review, but I will say that I left the move theater with a smile on my face and a glow in my heart.

Four stars out of four and one of the year’s best films.

Faulkner in Paris, 1925
Photo by W.C. Odiorne
After he wrote his first novel, Soldiers’ Pay, Faulkner traveled to Europe in the manner of many other young writers of the day. While in France, he adopted the look and air of a Bohemian poet by growing a beard and absorbing the art and culture of Paris’ Left Bank. One of his favorite places was in the Luxembourg Gardens, where he was photographed by William C. Odiorne. He wrote a long description of the Gardens, which he would later revise and incorporate into his novel Sanctuary

Jimmy heard many family stories growing up and he too  loved to tell stories. One of Jimmy Faulkner’s favorite stories was about how his famous uncle went to see the film Gone With The Wind seven times when it came out in 1939. “Brother Will (Faulkner was Jimmy’s uncle, but Jimmy called him Brother Will), never saw the ending,” Jimmy Faulkner said. “He always walked out the first time a Yankee came on the screen.”  Jimmy also takes great pride in the often quoted description of Jimmy  as “the only person who likes me (William Faulkner)  for who I am.”

Jimmy Faulkner describes his taking Brother Will to the hospital the night before he died in the new introduction to his father’s book My Brother Bill .  He writes, “I checked him in, and stayed with him until about 10 that night.  When I was ready to leave, I went to his bedside, reached down and took his hand. I told him, ‘Brother Will, when you’re ready to come home, let me know and I’ll come get you. He said “Yes, Jim, I will.’” He never got home alive. He died around 2 in the morning on July 6, 1962.

 ___________________________

From left, Murry “Jack” Falkner, age eight; Sallie Murry Wilkins, age eight, the boys’ first cousin; William Faulkner, age ten; seated, John “Johncy” Falkner, age six. The picture was taken in September 1907.

From left, Murry “Jack” Falkner, age eight; Sallie Murry Wilkins, age eight, the boys’ first cousin; William Faulkner, age ten; seated, John “Johncy” Falkner, age six. The picture was taken in September 1907.
1925: Faulkner travels to New Orleans. His goal is to book a freighter to Europe, hoping the expatriate experience will boost his career as it has those of writers such as Ernest Hemingway and Robert Frost. The New Orleans French Quarter is so congenial that he remains there six months, becoming friends with the writer Sherwood Anderson and launching his own career in fiction. Faulkner’s first novel, Soldiers’ Pay, receives Anderson’s blessing and is accepted by Anderson’s New York publisher, Boni and Liveright. Faulkner and his New Orleans roommate, the artist William Spratling, sail for Genoa in July, and Faulkner makes his way to Paris, his base for three months. He writes portions of two novels and several sketches, but he runs out of money and returns to Oxford, Mississippi, by Christmas.
______________________

William Faulkner, The Art of Fiction No. 12

Interviewed by Jean Stein in 1956 for Paris Review

INTERVIEWER

How did you get your background in the Bible?

FAULKNER

My Great-Grandfather Murry was a kind and gentle man, to us children anyway. That is, although he was a Scot, he was (to us) neither especially pious nor stern either: he was simply a man of inflexible principles. One of them was everybody, children on up through all adults present, had to have a verse from the Bible ready and glib at tongue-tip when we gathered at the table for breakfast each morning; if you didn’t have your scripture verse ready, you didn’t have any breakfast; you would be excused long enough to leave the room and swot one up (there was a maiden aunt, a kind of sergeant-major for this duty, who retired with the culprit and gave him a brisk breezing which carried him over the jump next time).

It had to be an authentic, correct verse. While we were little, it could be the same one, once you had it down good, morning after morning, until you got a little older and bigger, when one morning (by this time you would be pretty glib at it, galloping through without even listening to yourself since you were already five or ten minutes ahead, already among the ham and steak and fried chicken and grits and sweet potatoes and two or three kinds of hot bread) you would suddenly find his eyes on you—very blue, very kind and gentle, and even now not stern so much as inflexible—and next morning you had a new verse. In a way, that was when you discovered that your childhood was over; you had outgrown it and entered the world.

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MUSIC MONDAY The Beatles Anthology 4

THE BEATLES Anthology 4 (Part 1/3) Subtitulado Español.[HQ]

You may be interested in links to the other posts I have done on the Beatles and you can click on the link below: FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE PART 288, LINKS TO 3 YEARS OF BEATLES POSTS (March of 2015 to Feb of 2018) Featured artist is Mark Dion

Last year you visited more countries than ever – Yeah, that’s correct
Which was your favourite? – America, I think
Why, in particular? – Because you make a lot of… no!
No, because it’s good-it’s like Britain, only with buttons
There’s more people in America. You get big audiences, it’s all wild and happy
When we were going back for the second tour of America, they said:
“We’ll start in San Francisco with a ticker tape parade”
That was once when I actually said I’m not going
I’m not having a ticker tape parade
It seemed like only a year since they assassinated Kennedy
I could just imagine, you know, how mad it is in America
It was just so much fun
Everyone got into the mania
We were getting a little crazy with it all
We called it the eye of the hurricane. It was calmer right in the middle
Altogether I think it’s 30 days
Stadiums hold more people, we normally play theatres in England
Haircuts, for instance?
It just happened, you know, you wake up one day and there you are
We wrote them, we recorded them, we play them every day
Smiling-that’s all we rehearse
On this tour we don’t get much time to do anything
I’ve just liked this kind of music for about 8 years, or since it came out
It’s just good fun
I loved it
I loved all the decoy cars
and all these intricate ways of getting us to the gigs
People would say, doesn’t it drive you mad, all these girls screaming?
I’d say no. At a big football match you’ll see the men going ‘ruuhhhrrrhh’
This is the girls’ equivalent
We did the same thirty minutes
Twenty-five if we didn’t like you, we’d play it fast
You could never hear anything. We played the repetition of our singles
Just doing our hits, then we only played twenty minutes anyway
We never realised how fast we played when we were live
The adrenalin would sometimes make you, instead of…
Very fast, you know
With all the adrenalin, we’d be talking fast… and on with the next song
We’d like to carry on with a song which was on our first Capitol album
We hope you enjoy the song. It’s called All My Loving
The Hollywood Bowl 23rd August 1964
The Hollywood Bowl was pretty tatty
It’ll probably go out one day, I suppose
But we were so nervous. It was like going on at the Palladium
I wanted to have a live concert
George Martin Record Producer Capitol provided their engineers and we recorded at the Hollywood Bowl
but the techniques we had then in America was three-track half-inch
and the separation wasn’t too great
To begin with, you had the voices in the centre
and a mixture of drums, bass and guitars on separate side-tracks
But pervading the whole lot were the screams from the audience
It was like putting a microphone by a 747 jet
It was just one continual screaming sound
It was difficult to get a good recording with the techniques we had there
And in fact the Hollywood Bowl tapes weren’t issued
But many years later I dug them up and refurbished them
And we did actually issue a record
My idols were Elvis… pre-army Elvis…
I still think that was the most exciting thing going
Little Richard – I was a big fan – but we’d met him in Hamburg
so we didn’t have to go to America to meet him. He was a big idol
Chuck Berry, Jerry Lee Lewis, Fats Domino – we met Fats in New Orleans
He had a very big diamond watch in the shape of a star
which was very impressive
We started to meet people who’d been in the newspapers or on film
We were actually rubbing shoulders with them
He was one of them
He was our idol
Bob was our hero
Not an idol but we heard his record, we’d listen to his album
It really gave us a buzz and we played it over and over
I heard of Bob through John
He played the records to me. It was just great
I think it was Freewheelin’
We loved Bob Dylan
So by the time we met him we’d heard much more about him
It was a great honour to meet him. We had a crazy party the night we met
I thought I’d got the meaning to life that night
I said to our roadie “Mal, get a pencil and paper. I’ve got it ”
Mal couldn’t find a pencil and paper anywhere
Eventually he found it and I wrote down my message for the universe
I said “Keep that in your pocket”
The next morning, he asked if I wanted to see that bit of paper
“Oh yeah” and I’d written… “There are seven levels”
There were two men in the room and Bob’s the well-known one
Al Aronowitz was there – a journalist, who’s like a mate
That was the first time for me that I’d really smoked marijuana
I laughed and laughed and laughed
It was fabulous
I remember travelling with the boys
I was almost kicked out of an aircraft by reporters wanting to get on
I got stuck in a lift between floors when too many people crowded in
and being escorted by police cars
It was just a three-ring circus from which there was no let-up
Peace only came when they were alone in their hotel rooms
hearing the screams outside and watching television
That was about it. Hell of a life, really
Yeah, there was all kinds of stuff
We flew out of Montreal in order to avoid Ringo getting killed
We were playing Canada
and they decided to make an example of an English Jew
One major fault is I’m not Jewish
We were playing the gig and I was always on a high riser
I had a cop, a plain clothes policeman sitting there with me
Now for the first time I was worried, really worried
I had the cymbals a bit like this to give me a bit of protection
Usually they’re like this, but I had ’em up
Then I started getting hysterical, thinking…
if someone in the audience has a pop at me
what is this guy going to do, catch the bullet?
It was getting funnier all the time and this guy was just sitting there
All that kind of stuff was happening all the time. It was terrifying
People would set off firecrackers in the hall
and you’d think one of the others had got shot
But on stage I always feel safe, even though they break through
I just feel as though I’m all right when I’m plugged in
I don’t feel as though they’ll get me
If you look at any books that say where the Beatles were working
you’ll find we hardly ever had a day off. We’d have to complain to Brian
He had all the pressure of people wanting to book us, with high offers
We’d say “We gotta have a day off, man”
Neil Aspinall Tour Manager We didn’t get any time off-we seemed to get five minutes here and there
It might have been longer but it felt like five minutes. But that was OK
Everywhere, there were hordes of people trying to get hold of them
trying to get their autographs, trying to touch them
Everywhere they went they were brought cripples
There was a thing that went around – look out, fellows, cripples coming!
Paraplegics were wheeled in so that they could touch them, like Jesus almost
Derek Taylor Beatles’ Press Officer There was without doubt a lot of opportunism
There were people pushing wheelchairs who were bonkers
The people in the wheelchairs were victims of whatever had got them there
and also the prisoners of these people
That situation did become nightmarish
There were some really bad cases, God help them
but there was really some…
Poor little children would be brought in. Some actual basket cases
I mean they were just in baskets, you know
and also some really…
just sad thalidomide kids
It’s not very nice to be afflicted
but John had this thing that manifest as a joke
He’d always joke about it because the reality was too much for him
I think it was fear or something
You can see, actually, in all these home movies
every time the camera is on John, he goes into a spastic kind…
his interpretation of what a spastic is
John would always do daft clapping
We couldn’t really see ourselves as the sort of ‘yah’, ‘c’mon’, ‘get on’
It was all…
There was a lot of that, but it kept us sane, I think
A bit of irreverent humour. It meant we weren’t falling for the game too much
It’s dead easy. All you’ve got to do is clap hands
Clap your hands
If you don’t want to clap your hands, you can stamp your feet on the floor
When we left the screaming fans, there were screaming policemen
and the Lord Mayors and their wives
and the hotel manager and his entourage
The only place we ever got any peace was when we got in the suite
and went to the bathroom
That was about the only place where you could have a bit of peace
We’ll probably never do another tour like it
It’s been something we’ll probably remember for the rest of our days
We just nipped about very quickly and then we were back home
Today the Beatles returned from America
London Airport 21st September 1964 where they played 32 shows in 34 days in 24 different cities
But there’s no rest for the boys. In two weeks, they’ll be on the road in the UK
John had mucked around with feedback for a while. Yes, it was intentional
He found it difficult to get the right amount of feedback
I think it was the first time that feedback was used on a record
He loved things like that. He loved weird effects
It was his idea, it was great
I remember that John and George had Everly Brothers ‘Gibsons’
We had these big Gibson round sound-hole… electrics
They looked like ones the Everlys had used
They were semi-electrics. They had electric facilities on them
And John leaned his against the amp
We were starting to talk about the song and the A string started feeding back
What? Can we… can you do that?
Oh yes, I can edit it on the front
He figured how to do it. We used to do it on stage then
John figured out that you just hit the A and get it buzzing by the amp
So it was a start of all that… – In a way, he invented Jimi Hendrix
It probably was, actually
Once you see somebody messing with feedback
it’s a whole field of research, isn’t it?
But that’s how it happened. It wasn’t engineered, it came from an accident
and then we made it something we could edit on to the front
Funny chaps, who are they? Maybe I’ll find out as the show goes on
Most of the boys’ songs are taken from their latest LP called…
It’s called Beatles for Sale
It’s got eight of our songs and the rest are…
8 from 14… 9? Please, I’m not very good at counting
6, of course… yes 8 and 6
Who are the other numbers… – Kansas City for one
Two Carl Perkins, one Little Richard, one Chuck Berry and one Dr Feelgood
What’s the Chuck Berry number? – Rock and Roll Music
We like the old numbers – Sing one for us, will you?
All right then, Kansas City
Shindig TV Show London
Palais des Sports Paris
A problem with their concerts was that they couldn’t hear themselves
Today, everyone’s used to the technology and great concerts
and everyone has a fold-back speaker at their feet to hear what’s going on
Didn’t have that in those days
John, Paul and George would be standing at microphones
in front of a screaming crowd of 60000
Ringo would be at the back on the drums and he said to me:
“It was very difficult following, I couldn’t do anything clever
“I couldn’t do great drum kicks or drum rolls or fills
“I just had to keep that back beat going to keep everybody together”
Killer of demons, gorge on this flesh, our offering… drink!
Hold!
The ring, she’s not wearing the sacrificial ring
She cannot be sacrificed without the ring
We’d done the Hard Day’s Night film, which was great
Dick Lester had done this artsy black and white thing we’d all loved
So the next things was: OK, what next? Well, maybe a colour film
In colour, yeah, wow, there you see, they had more money for that one
So then things went a bit awry
We started saying:
We’ve never been to the Bahamas, could you write that in?
It was fabulous
But we went to the Bahamas for the hot scenes and it was freezing
We had to run round in shirts and thin trousers
but it was actually bloody cold!
I’ve never been skiing-could you write in a scene with skiing?
First time I’d been on skis
I loved that, not that any of us could ski
Dick Lester just put us on skis and edged us down a mountain
Boys! Are you buzzing?
I think this was beginning to get into that period
when people were giving up the drink, the stimulant of the times
and were getting into the herbal jazz cigarettes
It was changing things a bit. Things became more imaginitive, more crazy
By then we were smoking marijuana for breakfast
Nobody could communicate with us
It was just glazed eyes, giggling all the time
We had fun in those days
I think that was one reason for not learning the script
We just showed up a bit stoned, smiled and hoped we’d get through it
‘ere you are-cop this one hand
Ugly though, aren’t they? – Hands?
Some people’s are – You’re light in the kitty again
Show us your hand, Ringo
You want to chuck one in – Get on
How about drumming? – Won’t affect it
I don’t know many… – It appears I need one card…
It’s difficult when four people
all have to say lines one behind the other
If one person forgets, you’ve got to start again
and then the next person forgets
The scenes in Buckingham Palace in Help!
We were doing that scene for days
where they put some pipe… and some red smoke comes through
We shove it out of the window and all the guards fall over
It must be their tea break
That scene just went on for ever, we were in stitches, hysterics, laughing
We pushed Dick Lester to the limit of his…
He was very, very easygoing
He was a pleasure to work with
There’s one scene in the film
where Victor Spinetti and whoever else in the scene are curling
You know those big stones they do
And one of them has a bomb in it
We find out about this and we have to run away
Paul and I ran about seven miles
We just ran and ran so we could stop and have a joint and come back
We were just off… You know we’d run to Switzerland
I enjoyed filming it
I’m sort of satisfied but not smug about it, you know. It’ll do
We couldn’t do it any better because we’re not capable enough actors
We were searching around for a title
That was crucial to us, to get the titles good
We’d had the Hard Day’s Night thing
which had been Ringo just making a mistake
He jumbles his words, not meaning to
and you get a new phrase that’s better than the two he mixed
We toyed with Tomorrow Never Knows which was another of his
We ended up using that as a song title
I remember us all sitting around trying to think of stuff
I think John went home
We came up with… With Dick Lester, we came up with the idea of Help!
Then John went home and happened to write it that evening
Wait a minute, hold on. That’s wrong
John got the idea, I think, for the title Help!
From things he said later, I think it was a bit his state of mind
He was feeling a bit constricted by the whole Beatle thing
He never said that when he wrote it
He said later that was how he felt and that’s why he wrote it
But he was kind of plump
I think that he just didn’t feel right
I think it was because he felt he was a bit…
He called it his fat Elvis period
He got a bit podgy, in his own eyes
That was depressing him a bit
But I think John’s done inverviews and articles about that
I’d go into these troughs every few years
It was less noticeable in the Beatles, their image would carry you through
I was in the middle of a trough in Help! but you can’t see it
I’m singing Help! for a kick-off
But you’re protected by the image of the power of the Beatles
Big Night Out TV Show Blackpool
I used to live in a little flat at the top of a house
I had a piano by the bed and woke one morning with this tune in my head
I thought “I don’t know this tune, or do I?” An old jazz tune or something?
My dad knew a lot of old jazz, maybe I remembered it from somewhere
I went to the piano and found the chords to it
It was like G, F sharp minor 7, B…
made sure I remembered it
then said to my friends “What’s this? It’s got to be something”
I couldn’t have written it, I’d just dreamed it. You don’t get that lucky
When he’d got the lyric together, we decided to record it
I said it’s a lovely song, I can’t see what Ringo can do on it
I can’t really see what heavy electric guitars are going to do
Why don’t you sing it to me with a guitar and then decide?
It was good because all the others, the guys…
I look at them, like ooops… I mean, a solo record
They said, it doesn’t matter. There’s nothing we could add
And so for Paul McCartney of Liverpool, opportunity knocks!
Thank you, Ringo. That was wonderful
I remember John listening to it
There’s a particular bit where the cello moves into a kind of bluesy note
John thought that was terrific
It was applauded but it wasn’t really a Beatle record. I said to Brian:
It’s Paul’s song, shall we call it “Paul McCartney”? And he said, no!
I can’t remember him making that suggestion
but I wouldn’t have done that. We never entertained those ideas
It was sometimes tempting. People would flatter you and say…
you should get out front, put this solo record out, but we always said no
We didn’t even ever put it out as a single in England
We were a bit embarrassed. We were a rock’n’roll band, a little R&B combo
NME Poll Winners’ Concert London
George’s songwriting was painful for him as he had no one to collaborate with
John and Paul were such a collaborative duo
They would throw advice to George but they didn’t really work with him
Paul and I really carved up the empire between us
George didn’t even sing when we brought him in. He was a guitarist
He wasn’t in the same league for a long time. That’s not putting him down
He just hadn’t had the practice at writing that we had
They’d been writing since we were at school
They’d written all – or most of their bad songs
before we got into the recording studio
I had to come from nowhere and start writing
and to have something at least quality enough
to put in the record with all their wondrous hits
He wrote Don’t Bother Me, I remember, one of the first ones
Then he started to improve and eventually…
became very good with a classic – Something in the Way She Moves
which I think Frank Sinatra still refers to
as his favourite Lennon-McCartney song. Thanks, Frank
Now something we don’t often do
Give someone a chance to sing who doesn’t often sing
All out of key and nervous, singing Act Naturally… Ringo!
Thank you very much, everybody
It’s lovely to be here
We’d like to carry on with a song which is our record before…
This one’s called Ticket to Ride
I liked it because it was… slightly a new sound at the time
I used to like guitars. I don’t want anything else on the album –
jangling piano, or whatever
It’s a heavy record, you know
George Harrison MBE
John Lennon MBE
Ringo Starr MBE
and Paul McCartney MBE
We were in Twickenham film studios when Brian showed up
He took us to the dressing room rather secretively. What’s this about?
Brian said:
They want to give you these MBEs
We’re going to accept. What do you think, boys?
At first we were very impressed. We said, what does it mean?
You become a Member of the British Empire. We were honoured, genuinely
The lowest honour that you could possibly get
The cynicism crept in and we said, what do you get for it?
He said, û40 a year, and we said, yeah
He said, you can go into St Paul’s whispering gallery for nothing
How much does it cost, anyway? He said, about a shilling
I can’t really remember any sort of Daily Mirror reaction, ‘how dare they’
A lot of the army… that was the only other reaction…
was soldiers sent theirs back
This is a protest to the Queen because this Order is being debased
by giving this to people who are not deserving of it
The Beatles are already rewarded with a tremendous amount of money
If I had the MBE
I should be put out at being placed on the same level as a pop singer
I don’t think it was a good idea to return them
I undertand the surprise that the Beatles would be given the award
It’s a little ridiculous on both sides
One side values the honour too highly and the other too lowly
This medal raises the qustion: where is the British Empire?
It’s purely honorary. I don’t think it has any value at all
Someone always takes exception to someone else getting something
Most people were pleased
It’s a very good thing, they deserved it
They’re great
I think they deserved it
I think the MBE is a bit of a joke
Hundreds of people have got it in the past, why not the Beatles?
I think they’re great
I’m glad everyone’s delighted
They deserve everything they’ve got. They’re very clever people
They’re young, vital, and they give this country a kick and a lift
And, my God, we need it
How do you like having an MBE? – Great. We’re honoured
I thought it was really thrilling
We’re going to meet the Queen and they’re going to give us a badge
We thought, this is cool
Buckingham Palace London In days gone by, they’d storm the Royal Palace gates
demanding bread or the right to vote, or some other civil right
These days, it’s all for the Beatles
The mop-haired quartet receive their MBEs from the Queen today
It was good fun. We ended up at the Palace. Quite strange
An equerry to the Queen, a guardsman
took us into a side room and showed us what we had to do
“You approach Her Majesty like this, and never turn your back on her”
The other part I remember…
Paul and I went up together
and first she said… she felt I had started the band
I said no, I was the last to join
She said, well, how long have you been together?
Without a blink, both Paul and I said:
We’ve been together now for forty years
She just had this strange look on her face like she wanted to…
I don’t know, laugh, or ‘off with their heads! ‘ You know what I mean
Had you met the Queen before? – No, first time
What did she think of you in the flesh? Did she tell you?
No, she’s not going to say, but she seemed pleasant, made us relaxed
We were standing in line, waiting to go through, hundreds of people
We’d been grilled by the guardsman, saying, this is what you do
We were so nervous, we went to the toilet
We smoked a cigarette there – we were all smokers in those days
But years later, I’m sure John… thinking back and remembering:
“We went in the toilet and smoked” and it turned into a reefer
Because the worst thing to do before meeting the Queen is smoke a reefer
But we never
I was too stoned to remember. I don’t know
After all we did for Great Britain
selling all that corduroy and making it swing
they just gave us a bloody old leather medal with wooden string through it
It was like the whole momentum had been going for years. It kept rolling
And now we were playing stadiums
That was in the days people were still playing the Finsbury Park Astoria
And to play at Shea Stadium…
Now, ladies and gentlemen
Honoured by their country
decorated by their Queen
and loved here in America…
Here are the Beatles!
Subtitles: Screentext

Time Is Ours to Win War on Government Waste

A man waits at a bus stop in Washington, D.C., that displays the national debt of the United States, June 19, 2020. (Photo: Olivier Douliery/AFP/Getty Images)

In the last 20 years, our country’s national debt has exploded.

In 2001, when George W. Bush took office, the national debt was $5.8 trillion. It took around 225 years—booms, busts, depressions, wars, etc.—to amass that much national debt. In just eight years, Bush and a compliant Congress doubled the number to $11.7 trillion. In Barack Obama’s two terms, another $8.6 trillion was added.

During the past four years, Donald Trump and Congress fought many battles, but not over this: In that time, America’s future was mortgaged to the tune of another $6.7 trillion.

Today, the national debt is around $27 trillion, a fourfold increase in the last two decades. That doesn’t count unfunded mandates. And there is no end in sight.

The Left has declared war on our culture, but we should never back down, nor compromise our principles. Learn more now >>

Whenever human beings gather to accomplish a task, any task, without strong and effective oversight, a natural evolution takes place. Whether it be in business, academia, philanthropy, or government, every activity morphs from the original goal to self-aggrandizement.

In government, this process is particularly toxic. There are no profits, let alone a profit motive. No concern with productivity. No incentive to turn off the proverbial lights. No measure of success. No motivation to end counterproductive activities.

Add to this mix the influence of public employee unions. Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Harry Truman were opposed to them for reasons that long ago became apparent. The goal of all unions is self-preservation—just as management’s is to maximize profits.

But public employee unions add two other noxious elements to the mix: (1) defending job incompetence and (2) heavy-handed involvement in the electoral process in a search for pliant politicians who can help them achieve their objectives by spending ever more of the public’s money.

Now, out of the blue, the experts-for-hire have a new scheme to justify continued fiscal irresponsibility: modern monetary theory. It holds that so long as interest rates are lower than inflation rates, politicians can spend away. That is not a theory. It is idle wordplay, and the victim of such sophistry is the American taxpayer—and future generations of American taxpayers.

Never in our history has fiscal soundness been more important. The exploding annual deficits of the last 20 years have produced a national debt as a percentage of the gross domestic product that is as high as it was during World War II even though our nation is at peace.

Moreover, many severely underfunded programs such as Social Security and Medicaid are not included in today’s debt calculations, although they should be.

The passage of a 5,593-page must-pass-quickly bill in December was indisputable evidence that the national debt will never be addressed from the top down. That legislation was sent to the Senate two hours before the vote. Who can read 2,800 pages per hour, 47 pages per minute? How can responsible lawmakers vote on bills they have not read?

While our political leaders have repeatedly told us how important this bill was to the survival of so many Americans, they delayed the bill for months for political reasons.

A crucial-to-the-survival-of-so-many-Americans pork-filled bill? Some $10 million to Pakistan for “gender programs”? Another $700 million to Sudan for Lord knows what? And on and on and on.

History has a clear and repeated message: If we do not address this exploding debt, it will bring to life all-knowing leaders, leaders who Friedrich Hayek said possessed the “fatal conceit.” They think they know more than is knowable. Leaders who have all the answers for everything they define as a problem: more regulations, more government control, more taxes.

This is a noxious cure that has never succeeded, one that has left country after country in economic tatters.

Fortunately, the world in changing. Today, we have the means to address this financial irresponsibility, this threat to our country, as our Founders envisioned it. We are immersed in the Information Age, the Big Data world, the Cloud world, the Bitcoin world.

The cost of communications is close to zero. Smartphones, iPads, and computers are a crucial part of everyday life. With the touch of a finger, one click, information on every topic is available 24 hours a day.

Buy anything. Sell anything. Today, instant access to information is embedded in our culture. Why should government expenditures be exempt?

Transparency has always been the best antidote to rein in profligate government spending. Having instant information at our fingertips gives fiscally responsible Americans a powerful new weapon in the War on Waste.

Today, there is no reason why every local, state, and federal government expenditure is not online, in real time, available to every citizen. Taxpayers should be able to attend a school board meeting and pull up school expenses on their phones.

Open the Books has a formidable weapon to unleash the voting public’s ability to address this exploding national debt, this lack of transparency, this threat to our democracy—the Open the Books Government Expenditure Library, which contains over 5 billion (and growing) local, state, and federal government expenditures.

Last year, we filed 41,500 Freedom of Information Act requests. We sued several government entities to encourage them to provide us the same information we collect from other states.

The Open the Books Government Expenditure Library is open to everyone: citizens, politicians, students, academics, scholars, journalists, think tanks—everyone, 24-hours a day, seven days a week.

Transparency can be as revolutionary as the internet has been for the economic well-being of the world. Transparency cannot only enhance the odds of the survival of this, the greatest country in the history of the world, but, over time, it will contribute to our prosperity, our health, and our happiness.

Wasted taxpayer dollars are not just nonproductive. Waste allowed to exist encourages more waste. Fraud allowed to exist encourages more fraud. A financially sound economy, one that works to remove waste, fraud, duplication, and incompetence, will increase respect for government, for the rule of law.

Open the Books places the future of this great country more firmly in the hands of the voters. To ensure our elected officials realize this, we have to communicate continuously with them what we expect and how we will vote.

I suggest we begin with one clear public statement: “I will never vote for anyone who has voted for a bill they have not read.” Register that statement at OpenTheBooks.com/READTHEBILL.

Obviously, our elected officials are unwilling to address this explosive, increasingly crucial national debt problem. Fortunately, we the taxpaying voters today have a weapon at our fingertips to successfully wage a War on Waste. Successful because our political leaders will quickly recognize that if they want to be reelected, they will have to respond accordingly.

The Daily Signal publishes a variety of perspectives. Nothing written here is to be construed as representing the views of The Heritage Foundation.

Have an opinion about this article? To sound off, please email letters@DailySignal.com and we will consider publishing your remarks in our regular “We Hear You” feature.

Originally published by RealClearPolitics

March 31, 2021

President Biden  c/o The White House
1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW
Washington, DC 20500

Dear Mr. President,

Please explain to me if you ever do plan to balance the budget while you are President? I have written these things below about you and I really do think that you don’t want to cut spending in order to balance the budget. It seems you ever are daring the Congress to stop you from spending more.

President Barack Obama speaks about the debt limit in the East Room of the White House in Washington. | AP Photo

“The credit of the United States ‘is not a bargaining chip,’ Obama said on 1-14-13. However, President Obama keeps getting our country’s credit rating downgraded as he raises the debt ceiling higher and higher!!!!

Washington Could Learn a Lot from a Drug Addict

Just spend more, don’t know how to cut!!! Really!!! That is not living in the real world is it?

Making more dependent on government is not the way to go!!

Why is our government in over 16 trillion dollars in debt? There are many reasons for this but the biggest reason is people say “Let’s spend someone else’s money to solve our problems.” Liberals like Max Brantley have talked this way for years. Brantley will say that conservatives are being harsh when they don’t want the government out encouraging people to be dependent on the government. The Obama adminstration has even promoted a plan for young people to follow like Julia the Moocher.  

David Ramsey demonstrates in his Arkansas Times Blog post of 1-14-13 that very point:

Arkansas Politics / Health Care Arkansas’s share of Medicaid expansion and the national debt

Posted by on Mon, Jan 14, 2013 at 1:02 PM

Baby carrot Arkansas Medicaid expansion image

Imagine standing a baby carrot up next to the 25-story Stephens building in Little Rock. That gives you a picture of the impact on the national debt that federal spending in Arkansas on Medicaid expansion would have, while here at home expansion would give coverage to more than 200,000 of our neediest citizens, create jobs, and save money for the state.

Here’s the thing: while more than a billion dollars a year in federal spending would represent a big-time stimulus for Arkansas, it’s not even a drop in the bucket when it comes to the national debt.

Currently, the national debt is around $16.4 trillion. In fiscal year 2015, the federal government would spend somewhere in the neighborhood of $1.2 billion to fund Medicaid expansion in Arkansas if we say yes. That’s about 1/13,700th of the debt.

It’s hard to get a handle on numbers that big, so to put that in perspective, let’s get back to the baby carrot. Imagine that the height of the Stephens building (365 feet) is the $16 trillion national debt. That $1.2 billion would be the length of a ladybug. Of course, we’re not just talking about one year if we expand. Between now and 2021, the federal government projects to contribute around $10 billion. The federal debt is projected to be around $25 trillion by then, so we’re talking about 1/2,500th of the debt. Compared to the Stephens building? That’s a baby carrot.

______________

Here is how it will all end if everyone feels they should be allowed to have their “baby carrot.”

How sad it is that liberals just don’t get this reality.

Here is what the Founding Fathers had to say about welfare. David Weinberger noted:

While living in Europe in the 1760s, Franklin observed: “in different countries … the more public provisions were made for the poor, the less they provided for themselves, and of course became poorer. And, on the contrary, the less was done for them, the more they did for themselves, and became richer.”

Alexander Fraser Tytler, Lord Woodhouselee (15 October 1747 – 5 January 1813) was a Scottish lawyer, writer, and professor. Tytler was also a historian, and he noted, “A democracy cannot exist as a permanent form of government. It can only exist until the majority discovers it can vote itself largess out of the public treasury. After that, the majority always votes for the candidate promising the most benefits with the result the democracy collapses because of the loose fiscal policy ensuing, always to be followed by a dictatorship, then a monarchy.”

Thomas Jefferson to Joseph Milligan

April 6, 1816

[Jefferson affirms that the main purpose of society is to enable human beings to keep the fruits of their labor. — TGW]

To take from one, because it is thought that his own industry and that of his fathers has acquired too much, in order to spare to others, who, or whose fathers have not exercised equal industry and skill, is to violate arbitrarily the first principle of association, “the guarantee to every one of a free exercise of his industry, and the fruits acquired by it.” If the overgrown wealth of an individual be deemed dangerous to the State, the best corrective is the law of equal inheritance to all in equal degree; and the better, as this enforces a law of nature, while extra taxation violates it.

[From Writings of Thomas Jefferson, ed. Albert E. Bergh (Washington: Thomas Jefferson Memorial Association, 1904), 14:466.]

_______

Jefferson pointed out that to take from the rich and give to the poor through government is just wrong. Franklin knew the poor would have a better path upward without government welfare coming their way. Milton Friedman’s negative income tax is the best method for doing that and by taking away all welfare programs and letting them go to the churches for charity.

_____________

_________

Thank you so much for your time. I know how valuable it is. I also appreciate the fine family that you have and your commitment as a father and a husband.

Sincerely,

Everette Hatcher III, 13900 Cottontail Lane, Alexander, AR 72002, ph 501-920-5733

Williams with Sowell – Minimum Wage

Thomas Sowell

Thomas Sowell – Reducing Black Unemployment

By WALTER WILLIAMS

—-

Ronald Reagan with Milton Friedman
Milton Friedman The Power of the Market 2-5

Related posts:

Welfare Spending Shattering All-Time Highs

  We got to act fast and get off this path of socialism. Morning Bell: Welfare Spending Shattering All-Time Highs Robert Rector and Amy Payne October 18, 2012 at 9:03 am It’s been a pretty big year for welfare—and a new report shows welfare is bigger than ever. The Obama Administration turned a giant spotlight […]

We need more brave souls that will vote against Washington welfare programs

We need to cut Food Stamp program and not extend it. However, it seems that people tell the taxpayers back home they are going to Washington and cut government spending but once they get up there they just fall in line with  everyone else that keeps spending our money. I am glad that at least […]

Welfare programs are not the answer for the poor

Government Must Cut Spending Uploaded by HeritageFoundation on Dec 2, 2010 The government can cut roughly $343 billion from the federal budget and they can do so immediately. __________ Liberals argue that the poor need more welfare programs, but I have always argued that these programs enslave the poor to the government. Food Stamps Growth […]

Private charities are best solution and not government welfare

Milton Friedman – The Negative Income Tax Published on May 11, 2012 by LibertyPen In this 1968 interview, Milton Friedman explained the negative income tax, a proposal that at minimum would save taxpayers the 72 percent of our current welfare budget spent on administration. http://www.LibertyPen.com Source: Firing Line with William F Buckley Jr. ________________ Milton […]

The book “After the Welfare State”

Dan Mitchell Commenting on Obama’s Failure to Propose a Fiscal Plan Published on Aug 16, 2012 by danmitchellcato No description available. ___________ After the Welfare State Posted by David Boaz Cato senior fellow Tom G. Palmer, who is lecturing about freedom in Slovenia and Tbilisi this week, asked me to post this announcement of his […]

President Obama responds to Heritage Foundation critics on welfare reform waivers

Is President Obama gutting the welfare reform that Bill Clinton signed into law? Morning Bell: Obama Denies Gutting Welfare Reform Amy Payne August 8, 2012 at 9:15 am The Obama Administration came out swinging against its critics on welfare reform yesterday, with Press Secretary Jay Carney saying the charge that the Administration gutted the successful […]

Welfare reform part 3

Thomas Sowell – Welfare Welfare reform was working so good. Why did we have to abandon it? Look at this article from 2003. The Continuing Good News About Welfare Reform By Robert Rector and Patrick Fagan, Ph.D. February 6, 2003 Six years ago, President Bill Clinton signed legislation overhauling part of the nation’s welfare system. […]

Welfare reform part 2

Uploaded by ForaTv on May 29, 2009 Complete video at: http://fora.tv/2009/05/18/James_Bartholomew_The_Welfare_State_Were_In Author James Bartholomew argues that welfare benefits actually increase government handouts by ‘ruining’ ambition. He compares welfare to a humane mousetrap. —– Welfare reform was working so good. Why did we have to abandon it? Look at this article from 2003. In the controversial […]

Why did Obama stop the Welfare Reform that Clinton put in?

Thomas Sowell If the welfare reform law was successful then why change it? Wasn’t Bill Clinton the president that signed into law? Obama Guts Welfare Reform Robert Rector and Kiki Bradley July 12, 2012 at 4:10 pm Today, the Obama Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) released an official policy directive rewriting the welfare […]

“Feedback Friday” Letter to White House generated form letter response July 10,2012 on welfare, etc (part 14)

I have been writing President Obama letters and have not received a personal response yet.  (He reads 10 letters a day personally and responds to each of them.) However, I did receive a form letter in the form of an email on July 10, 2012. I don’t know which letter of mine generated this response so I have […]

Schumer Is Wrong About Debt. Congress Must Take Debt Danger Seriously, Not Spend Recklessly

Debt

Calling for stimulus spending in response to COVID-19, Majority Leader Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., stated on Jan. 28, “The dangers of undershooting our response are far greater than overshooting it.” (Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc./Getty Images)

The combination of unified control of the federal government along with the COVID-19 pandemic has seemingly caused some elected officials to think there are no consequences to new spending proposals. However, they must wake up to the dangers posed by recklessly adding to the national debt.

On Thursday, Majority Leader Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., exemplified this mindset by saying, “The dangers of undershooting our response are far greater than overshooting it. We should have learned the lesson, from 2008 and 2009, when Congress was too timid and constrained in its response to the global financial crisis.”

>>> What’s the best way for America to reopen and return to business? The National Coronavirus Recovery Commission, a project of The Heritage Foundation, assembled America’s top thinkers to figure that out. So far, it has made more than 260 recommendations. Learn more here.

This is wrong on several fronts.

The Left has declared war on our culture, but we should never back down, nor compromise our principles. Learn more now >>

First, the stimulus spending that took place in the wake of the Great Recession was ineffective at creating jobs, and in some ways slowed the economy by creating perverse incentives and crowding out private activity.

Second, despite the difficulties associated with the pandemic, the economy is currently in much better shape than it was during the last recession.

The national unemployment rate hit 10% in October 2009 and stayed above 8% through August 2012. In contrast, the COVID-19 recession caused unemployment to spike to 14.8% in April 2020, but it fell below 7% by October.

Third, Congress has already approved over $4 trillion in response to the pandemic, much of which is still available or in the process of being distributed. The idea that Congress has been “undershooting” the response is ridiculous.

Most importantly, Schumer and other leftists in Congress are ignoring the very real danger posed by adding to the $27.8 trillion federal debt, which is over $210,000 for every U.S. household.

Even after the pandemic is over and the economy returns to normal, we will face serious problems as a result of the federal government’s broken finances.

Over $21 trillion worth of federal debt obligations are traded on the open market. While interest rates are low today, Congress has no control over what those rates will be as the debt turns over and requires refinancing.

Credit rating agencies are growing concernedabout the sustainability of America’s finances. If demand for our debt goes down, that will force the Treasury to offer higher interest rates.

Higher interest rates on so much debt would add up very quickly, which makes this a serious risk to economic growth and future prosperity. That means we need to put an end to massive deficits and eventually shrink the debt, either in absolute terms or in relation to the size of the economy, to reduce the risk to current and future generations.

This will be impossible unless legislators address the driving force behind long-term debt and deficits: unsustainable benefit programs such as Social Security and Medicare.

Major trust funds will run dry all too soon. Medicare Part A (hospital insurance) goes broke in 2024, Social Security Disability Insurance in 2026, and the Social Security retirement fund in 2031. These are programs that tens of millions of people rely on, and trust fund insolvency would cause serious upheaval, especially for Social Security.

Annual deficits for the federal government and these major benefit programs are too large to close overnight. Deficits were already high during the years of strong economic growth prior to the pandemic, and then exploded in 2020.

Reforms aiming to slow the growth of spending on Social Security and Medicare can have a significant effect, but only if those reforms are in place several years before the trust funds run out. The longer we wait, the more drastic the necessary changes become.

Besides reforming large benefit programs, there are many other ways for Congress to improve the nation’s financial health. These include refocusing the federal government on core priorities, eliminating wasteful spending, returning to a regular budget process, and strengthening economic growth.

What would not help this massive and growing problem is spending trillions of dollars we don’t have on more “relief” legislation that would do little to help the economy. Hopefully Congress will come to its senses and recognize that it has a responsibility to use taxpayer dollars wisely.

Have an opinion about this article? To sound off, please email letters@DailySignal.com and we will consider publishing your remarks in our regular “We Hear You” feature.

—-

March 31, 2021

President Biden  c/o The White House
1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW
Washington, DC 20500

Dear Mr. President,

Please explain to me if you ever do plan to balance the budget while you are President? I have written these things below about you and I really do think that you don’t want to cut spending in order to balance the budget. It seems you ever are daring the Congress to stop you from spending more.

President Barack Obama speaks about the debt limit in the East Room of the White House in Washington. | AP Photo

“The credit of the United States ‘is not a bargaining chip,’ Obama said on 1-14-13. However, President Obama keeps getting our country’s credit rating downgraded as he raises the debt ceiling higher and higher!!!!

Washington Could Learn a Lot from a Drug Addict

Just spend more, don’t know how to cut!!! Really!!! That is not living in the real world is it?

Making more dependent on government is not the way to go!!

Why is our government in over 16 trillion dollars in debt? There are many reasons for this but the biggest reason is people say “Let’s spend someone else’s money to solve our problems.” Liberals like Max Brantley have talked this way for years. Brantley will say that conservatives are being harsh when they don’t want the government out encouraging people to be dependent on the government. The Obama adminstration has even promoted a plan for young people to follow like Julia the Moocher.  

David Ramsey demonstrates in his Arkansas Times Blog post of 1-14-13 that very point:

Arkansas Politics / Health Care Arkansas’s share of Medicaid expansion and the national debt

Posted by on Mon, Jan 14, 2013 at 1:02 PM

Baby carrot Arkansas Medicaid expansion image

Imagine standing a baby carrot up next to the 25-story Stephens building in Little Rock. That gives you a picture of the impact on the national debt that federal spending in Arkansas on Medicaid expansion would have, while here at home expansion would give coverage to more than 200,000 of our neediest citizens, create jobs, and save money for the state.

Here’s the thing: while more than a billion dollars a year in federal spending would represent a big-time stimulus for Arkansas, it’s not even a drop in the bucket when it comes to the national debt.

Currently, the national debt is around $16.4 trillion. In fiscal year 2015, the federal government would spend somewhere in the neighborhood of $1.2 billion to fund Medicaid expansion in Arkansas if we say yes. That’s about 1/13,700th of the debt.

It’s hard to get a handle on numbers that big, so to put that in perspective, let’s get back to the baby carrot. Imagine that the height of the Stephens building (365 feet) is the $16 trillion national debt. That $1.2 billion would be the length of a ladybug. Of course, we’re not just talking about one year if we expand. Between now and 2021, the federal government projects to contribute around $10 billion. The federal debt is projected to be around $25 trillion by then, so we’re talking about 1/2,500th of the debt. Compared to the Stephens building? That’s a baby carrot.

______________

Here is how it will all end if everyone feels they should be allowed to have their “baby carrot.”

How sad it is that liberals just don’t get this reality.

Here is what the Founding Fathers had to say about welfare. David Weinberger noted:

While living in Europe in the 1760s, Franklin observed: “in different countries … the more public provisions were made for the poor, the less they provided for themselves, and of course became poorer. And, on the contrary, the less was done for them, the more they did for themselves, and became richer.”

Alexander Fraser Tytler, Lord Woodhouselee (15 October 1747 – 5 January 1813) was a Scottish lawyer, writer, and professor. Tytler was also a historian, and he noted, “A democracy cannot exist as a permanent form of government. It can only exist until the majority discovers it can vote itself largess out of the public treasury. After that, the majority always votes for the candidate promising the most benefits with the result the democracy collapses because of the loose fiscal policy ensuing, always to be followed by a dictatorship, then a monarchy.”

Thomas Jefferson to Joseph Milligan

April 6, 1816

[Jefferson affirms that the main purpose of society is to enable human beings to keep the fruits of their labor. — TGW]

To take from one, because it is thought that his own industry and that of his fathers has acquired too much, in order to spare to others, who, or whose fathers have not exercised equal industry and skill, is to violate arbitrarily the first principle of association, “the guarantee to every one of a free exercise of his industry, and the fruits acquired by it.” If the overgrown wealth of an individual be deemed dangerous to the State, the best corrective is the law of equal inheritance to all in equal degree; and the better, as this enforces a law of nature, while extra taxation violates it.

[From Writings of Thomas Jefferson, ed. Albert E. Bergh (Washington: Thomas Jefferson Memorial Association, 1904), 14:466.]

_______

Jefferson pointed out that to take from the rich and give to the poor through government is just wrong. Franklin knew the poor would have a better path upward without government welfare coming their way. Milton Friedman’s negative income tax is the best method for doing that and by taking away all welfare programs and letting them go to the churches for charity.

_____________

_________

Thank you so much for your time. I know how valuable it is. I also appreciate the fine family that you have and your commitment as a father and a husband.

Sincerely,

Everette Hatcher III, 13900 Cottontail Lane, Alexander, AR 72002, ph 501-920-5733

Williams with Sowell – Minimum Wage

Thomas Sowell

Thomas Sowell – Reducing Black Unemployment

By WALTER WILLIAMS

—-

Ronald Reagan with Milton Friedman
Milton Friedman The Power of the Market 2-5

Related posts:

Welfare Spending Shattering All-Time Highs

  We got to act fast and get off this path of socialism. Morning Bell: Welfare Spending Shattering All-Time Highs Robert Rector and Amy Payne October 18, 2012 at 9:03 am It’s been a pretty big year for welfare—and a new report shows welfare is bigger than ever. The Obama Administration turned a giant spotlight […]

We need more brave souls that will vote against Washington welfare programs

We need to cut Food Stamp program and not extend it. However, it seems that people tell the taxpayers back home they are going to Washington and cut government spending but once they get up there they just fall in line with  everyone else that keeps spending our money. I am glad that at least […]

Welfare programs are not the answer for the poor

Government Must Cut Spending Uploaded by HeritageFoundation on Dec 2, 2010 The government can cut roughly $343 billion from the federal budget and they can do so immediately. __________ Liberals argue that the poor need more welfare programs, but I have always argued that these programs enslave the poor to the government. Food Stamps Growth […]

Private charities are best solution and not government welfare

Milton Friedman – The Negative Income Tax Published on May 11, 2012 by LibertyPen In this 1968 interview, Milton Friedman explained the negative income tax, a proposal that at minimum would save taxpayers the 72 percent of our current welfare budget spent on administration. http://www.LibertyPen.com Source: Firing Line with William F Buckley Jr. ________________ Milton […]

The book “After the Welfare State”

Dan Mitchell Commenting on Obama’s Failure to Propose a Fiscal Plan Published on Aug 16, 2012 by danmitchellcato No description available. ___________ After the Welfare State Posted by David Boaz Cato senior fellow Tom G. Palmer, who is lecturing about freedom in Slovenia and Tbilisi this week, asked me to post this announcement of his […]

President Obama responds to Heritage Foundation critics on welfare reform waivers

Is President Obama gutting the welfare reform that Bill Clinton signed into law? Morning Bell: Obama Denies Gutting Welfare Reform Amy Payne August 8, 2012 at 9:15 am The Obama Administration came out swinging against its critics on welfare reform yesterday, with Press Secretary Jay Carney saying the charge that the Administration gutted the successful […]

Welfare reform part 3

Thomas Sowell – Welfare Welfare reform was working so good. Why did we have to abandon it? Look at this article from 2003. The Continuing Good News About Welfare Reform By Robert Rector and Patrick Fagan, Ph.D. February 6, 2003 Six years ago, President Bill Clinton signed legislation overhauling part of the nation’s welfare system. […]

Welfare reform part 2

Uploaded by ForaTv on May 29, 2009 Complete video at: http://fora.tv/2009/05/18/James_Bartholomew_The_Welfare_State_Were_In Author James Bartholomew argues that welfare benefits actually increase government handouts by ‘ruining’ ambition. He compares welfare to a humane mousetrap. —– Welfare reform was working so good. Why did we have to abandon it? Look at this article from 2003. In the controversial […]

Why did Obama stop the Welfare Reform that Clinton put in?

Thomas Sowell If the welfare reform law was successful then why change it? Wasn’t Bill Clinton the president that signed into law? Obama Guts Welfare Reform Robert Rector and Kiki Bradley July 12, 2012 at 4:10 pm Today, the Obama Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) released an official policy directive rewriting the welfare […]

“Feedback Friday” Letter to White House generated form letter response July 10,2012 on welfare, etc (part 14)

I have been writing President Obama letters and have not received a personal response yet.  (He reads 10 letters a day personally and responds to each of them.) However, I did receive a form letter in the form of an email on July 10, 2012. I don’t know which letter of mine generated this response so I have […]

MUSIC MONDAY the beatles anthology 3

the beatles anthology 3 part 4


You may be interested in links to the other posts I have done on the Beatles and you can click on the link below: FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE PART 288, LINKS TO 3 YEARS OF BEATLES POSTS (March of 2015 to Feb of 2018) Featured artist is Mark Dion

Congratulations, lads. Number one in US charts” or something
It was a great feeling
because we were booked to go there directly after the Paris trip
so it was handy to have a number one
British pop stars haven’t made much impact on the US, how will you fare?
Well, I can’t really say, can I?
Is it up to me? No. I just hope we go all right
But at that time I didn’t realise that Capitol Records had been told…
John F Kennedy Airport New York 7th February 1964 They wanted the Beatles, you see
Brian Epstein said “OK, you can have them…
“on condition that you spend $70000,” which sounded enormous
So they had to promote us, but I think there was more to it than that
They had a catchy single that took off
plus Ed Sullivan had seen us in England
and Time, Life and Newsweek
had all put covers of the Beatles on their magazines prior to us arriving
It was a surprise, though
because we thought we’d have to work a little bit for this notoriety
If there was a turning point in their career
Voice of Beatles’ Manager Brian Epstein a specific date on which the scope of their future was to be altered
it was the day they touched down at Kennedy International in New York
to a welcome seldom equalled anywhere in history
Would you please sing something? – No!
Is there something you CAN sing? – No, we need money first!
How many of you are bald if you have to wear those wigs? – All of us
Oh, we’re all bald… and deaf and dumb, too
Are you for real? – Come and have a feel
Are you going to get a haircut? – No, no, no… no thanks
I had one yesterday
That’s no lie – It’s true
What is it that your music does to these people?
Pleases them, I think. It must because they’re buying it
Why does it excite them so much? – We don’t know, really
We’re going to form another group and be managers
I remember the great moment of going into the limo
and there we were on American radio
And tomorrow an exciting morning as Brad Phillips has the Beatles…
Tomorrow night the Beatles read their own poetry on ‘Meet The Beatles… ‘
Oh, really?
I don’t understand this
We ain’t writ no poetry
Lock your door
We were so over-awed by American radio – Epstein had to stop us –
we phoned every radio in town, asking them to play the Ronettes
We didn’t ask for our own records, but other people’s
This is John Lennon of the Beatles on 1010 WINS
This is the Beatles station. They’re taking over, telling us what to play
One more week of this and I’ll become the fifth Beatle
I liked Murray, he was a good guy. There was him and cousin Bruce
He became the so-called ‘fifth Beatle’ – he was really big on our record
He helped make it a hit
Paul, suppose you tell them what we got next
We were very impressed with him, so we’d ring his show
He’d say “The Beatles are on and I’ve got an exclusive interview”
We’d ring up “Hello, excuse me, Murray.” “Oh, it’s George. Hi, George…”
We’d give him all the exclusives because we loved him
This is Paul McCartney from WINS
and it’s Marvin Gaye singing Pride and Joy
It’s me-you know me-yes
We’re waiting for a call from London and you’re blocking the line
Hello, John – Hello, Brian
What are your first impressions of arrival in America?
I don’t know. They’re sort of wild, you know… all wild
Wilder than they are in England? – Maybe it was the first impression
They seemed out of their minds
Did you get home betweeen leaving Paris and going to the States?
We were in London for two days – You didn’t go to Liverpool?
No. George went but he’s regretting it. He still hasn’t slept
Is George there now? – Do you want to speak to him?
In a moment, but do you want to say anything to the fans here at home?
Tell them not to forget, we’re only away for ten days
We’re thinking of them
Let’s have a word with Ringo
What was the first thing you did when you got to your hotel, Ringo?
We had a big press interview with about 100 people
We got out of that, then we had a Cadillac each, marvellous cars
What sort of things do they want to know at the press reception?
Are we bald, and what do we do with our money-the usual things
You proved you don’t wear wigs? – Yeah, we took them off
Well, cheerio Ringo, and the best of luck to you
Give my regards to everyone. Here’s George now
Hello, George – How are you, Brian?
The first thing you’ll be doing is the Ed Sullivan Show, isn’t it?
We rehearse that tomorrow and do the show on Sunday
What will you be doing on the show?
I Want to Hold your Hand, She Loves You, Please Please Me
The usual ones
How many of your records are in the American hit parade?
We’ve got six in the top hundred
I Want to Hold Your Hand, She Loves You, Please Please Me, From Me to You
My Bonnie, which is a laugh, and I Saw Her Standing There
You know in New York three records are number one:
Please Please Me, She Loves You, I Want to Hold Your Hand
That’s marvellous! We’re all very proud of you
Good luck, and we look forward to seeing you back home soon
We’ll see you in two weeks, I suppose
I’d this throat thing because when you see the photographs –
they did publicity shots in Central Park –
There’s pictures of the three of them with the New York skyline behind them
Our theatre’s jammed with newsmen and photographers from all over
The city has never witnessed such excitement as stirred by the Beatles
Tonight you will twice be entertained by them
Right now, and again in the second half of our show. The Beatles!
The Ed Sullivan Show New York 9th February 1964
It’s still supposed to be the largest viewing audience ever in the States
and the States being the biggest show biz town ever
People still talk about it like “Where were you when Kennedy was shot?”
Something very nice happened and the Beatles got a kick out of it
They’ve just received a wire from Elvis Presley and Colonel Tom Parker
wishing them a tremendous success in our country
Later they said there was the least reported, or no reported crime
Even criminals had a rest for ten minutes while we were on
Then we did the train ride to Washington
That’s where we got to know quite a few of the press guys
They started to get friendly and let us know they were actually there to kill us
Beause we shouted at them, they loved us
God knows what would have happened if we hadn’t shouted
It’s great being here in New York – Washington
Oh, is that the place? Washington? I’m just moving so fast
Voice of Neil Aspinall Tour Manager That Washington show was like a boxing ring, with people all round
Every song, you’d go to a different side of the stage
so you had to move the mikes all the time
Ringo was sitting on this round thing in the middle of the stage
He had to turn that round to face the band and it got stuck
All this chaos was going on. But it was a good show
Washington Coliseum 11th February 1964
Thank you very much, everybody, and good evening
We’d like to thank everybody here in America, Washington
We’d like to thank everybody for buying this particular record –
for starting us off in America
and giving us the chance to come here and see you all in Washington
The song we’d like to carry on with now
is one which we recorded on an LP that we made
That’s English for album, an album we made
We’d like you to join in – clap your hands and stamp your feet
Everybody join in all together
The song’s called I Saw Her Standing There
Thank you very much
We would like to sing a song now
which was a record for us and it was our first hit in England
This song was released in America. It didn’t do anything
It was released later again and, well, it’s doing something, you know
We’d like to play for you now Please Please Me
British Embassy Washington 11th February 1964 The British Embassy it was – there was a party
This was starting to happen because we were now conquering America
and the British Ambassador could play a role in this
It would be good publicity for him, you know
There were a lot of ‘Hooray Henrys’ which we’d never met before
We hadn’t played many Arts Balls or Cambridge May Balls
We’d heard about these guys who got a bit stroppy after a few drinks
“Oh, I say… play Rachmaninov’s Piano Concerto, ha ha ha”
We were standing around, saying “Hi” and having a drink
One of them came up behind me and snipped a piece of my hair off
I was so angry “What the hell do you think you’re doing?”
“Oh, it’s OK, old chap”
Some bloody animal cut Ringo’s hair in the middle of…
I walked out, swearing at all of them. I just left in the middle of it
We eventually got down to Miami
which was just like Paradise
We’d never been to anywhere where there were palm trees
We took a lot of photos. We were like tourists with our Pentax cameras
We had a great time, looking down at the sand from our hotel
The kids would write “I love John” on the sand
so you could read it from your hotel room
Who are you?
What’s your name?
Which one are you?
This was just the most brilliant place I’d ever been to
People were lending us yachts or anything we wanted
This family lent us their boat and they let me drive
a 60 foot yacht, a speed boat
which I proceeded to bring in to port head on
Not really knowing much about driving speed boats
and so they have those pretty rails on the front hanging over
I bent the bugger all over the place but they didn’t seem to mind
The Ed Sullivan Show Rehearsals Miami 16th February 1964
For the next song, we’d like to sing… OK, hang on…
Shut up while he’s talking
And now from the stage of the Deauville Hotel – Ed Sullivan!
Thank you very much
It’s so nice to be here, thank you
It’s happened again. Last Sunday on our show in New York
the Beatles played to the greatest audience ever on American TV
Tonight, here in Miami Beach
again the Beatles face a record busting audience
Ladies and gentlemen
Here are four of the nicest kids we’ve ever had on our stage
Excuse the mess, won’t you… packing
These youngsters from Liverpool, England…
Their conduct over here, not only as fine professional singers
but as a group of fine youngsters
will leave an imprint with everyone over here who has met them
Nobody ever made it in America – we were dying to be the first
A lot of people had tried and failed in America
We were very confident, our confidence was at an all-time high
I felt we’d conquered America – it was an attitude we had
We’d conquered Sweden and France so America was ours now
London Airport 22nd February 1964
What do you most like about the trip, Ringo?
I loved it all, especially Miami
I didn’t know what ‘sun’ meant before I went there
Don’t you get it in Liverpool? – No, they’ve finished up there
Did you have a chance to get away without anybody recognising you?
We borrowed a couple of millionaires’ houses, you know
You could afford to buy a couple – We’d sooner borrow, it’s cheaper
We did a bit of water skiing
Did your wife enjoy it over there? – She loved it, who… who?
Don’t tell them he’s married – I’m sorry, I didn’t mean to
What about the taste of the fans over there, did you find the same stuff?
Yeah, we expected them to be very different but they weren’t at all
The accent was the only difference
Did they reckon you sang in an English accent or an American one?
Some fella said, how come you’re from Britain
and you sing with an American accent?
We tried to explain that it’s a Liverpool accent
I hear that the four of you will be millionaires by the end of the year
That’s nice
Have you time to spend this money? – What money?
You went to see those movies with Elvis or somebody in them in Liverpool
Everybody was waiting to see him. I’d be waiting there too
They’d all scream when he came on the screen
So we thought, that’s a good job
We’d always… I’m talking about this progression with the Beatles
From the Stevedores’ and Dockers’ Union, the Cavern, better clubs
So films was one that we’d always thought of
We loved The Girl Can’t Help It and knew rock’n’roll could lead to films
How do you reckon that one out?
I loved the pictures as a kid
I used to go a hell of a lot in Liverpool
Great memories from the Saturday morning pictures
If it was a pirate movie, I would be a pirate
If it was a western, I’d come home as a cowboy
It was a great fantasy land for me as a kid
We were interested in films and what happened was…
Brian started talking to people, knowing of our interest
He came up with Dick Lester’s name
He did the Running Jumping Standing Still film with Spike Milligan
A classic comedy short, about five minutes long
I don’t know if it’s funny now, but it was very funny then
So they got hold of Dick Lester and we were really pleased
Dick came round. He was a bit of a musician, played jazz piano
so he was even more interesting
He was American but he’d worked in Britain with the Goons
He got hold of Alun Owen, a Welsh playwright
who’d written Last Tram to Lime Street
Something like that, it was a long time ago now
It was a very good play with Billie Whitelaw
that Alun was known for
He was a very likeable Welsh bloke and he hung out with us for a few days
He picked up little quotes like “He’s very clean, isn’t he?”
He picked up the jokes and sarcasm, the Beatle humour
John’s wit and each one of us, Ringo’s laconic humour
He picked up our characters, which was good
Normally in pictures you do things back to front, maybe the end on one day…
and the beginning the next day, but this one we almost did it in sequence
It was very exciting. We got on a train at Marylebone station
and the next minute we’re in a film
There were little girls in gymslips who were actually models
We were fascinated with them and George married one
Pattie Boyd was one of the girls on the train
The whole of the train bit – we were just going to pieces…
It was all so romantic with the lights and coming to work in the limo
Getting up early wasn’t the best thing we could do
The scene in Hard Day’s Night, the one I got a good credit for –
walking on the beach… by the canal
with the camera and that – the lonely guy scene
That came about because I came directly to work –
very unprofessional – straight from a night club
I was a little hung over, to say the least
I was just so out of it, so they said “Let’s do anything”
My version of it was – I said “Just film me walking around”
I looked so cold and dejected because I felt like shit
There was no acting going on, I just felt so bad
I was less embarrassed than the others
but I think John got into the movie too
Hello
Wait a minute, you’re… – No, I’m not
Oh, you are. I know you are – I’m not, no
You look just like him – You’re the first ever to say that
Yes you do, look
No, my eyes are lighter. My nose…
Oh yes, your nose is very… – Is it?
I would have said so – You know him better though
I do not. He’s a casual acquaintance – That’s what you say
What have you heard?
It’s all over the place – Is it really?
But I stuck up for you – I knew I could rely on you
You don’t look like him at all
She looks more like him than I do
Alun Owen tried to write a scene of us being harassed by the press
which was part of our daily duty really
They were saying things like “How did you find America?”
Turn left at Greenland
What do you call that hairstyle?
Arthur
Has success changed your life?
I think it did, because Alun hung around with us and was careful…
to put words into our mouths that he’d heard us speak
so I think he did a very good script
Leave those drums alone! – Oh, just a little touch
If you even breathe on them… – Aren’t you being rather arbitrary?
There you go, hiding behind a smokescreen of bourgeois clichôs
I don’t mess around with your earphones – Spoilsport
He’s very fussy about his drums. They loom large in his legend
What’s up? – Oh, he’s sulking again
I’ll show him
Pardon, ‘scuse, pardon… I’d like more drums, there
No, I think it’s on that…
On the third bit… more bang…
The next few minutes are in the lap of the gods and the hands of the Beatles
We’re going to hear versions of songs from their films
Gather round, famous film stars, gather round
In my young days, they used to have actors in films
It’s all changed now – They’re not doing that
Did you find that the best bits were left on the cutting room floor?
The good bits are in the film. He said those were the best. Rubbish!
Was it really? Who was worst? – Oh, Paul!
No, I think John was about the worst – No, it was you
Ringo was very good. He’s a good lad
They’re saying he’s the new Charlie Chaplin
He’s an old one
We liked the bit in the field where we all jump about like lunatics
because that’s pure film, as the director told us
We could have been anybody but we enjoyed it
NME Poll Winners’ Concert London
Well John, I believe you’ve written a book
This book’s called John LennonIn His Own Write, folks
W R I T E, you see-it’s a laugh a minute with John Lennon
Some of you might find it a bit difficult to understand
because it’s in a sort of funny lingo
Well, we get it. It’s full of laughs
I don’t really know how you can describe it, but…
I’ve never read anything like it. The stories are so funny
Many little drawings to make you laugh. It also had the wrestling dog
Once upon a time, in a far off, distant land
far across the sea, miles away from anyway, over the hills as the crow barks
39 people lived miles from anywhere on a little island on a distant land
At harvest time, the people celebrated with a feast and dancing
It was Perry’s – For Perry was the loud mirth
Job to provide – At Perry’s great pleasure, I might add
A new and exciting… – And usually it was
thrill and spectacular performer – Sometimes a dwarf was used
This year Perry had surpassed himself by getting a wrestling dog
But who would fight this wondrous beast? Not me, Dudley
Mr John Lennon…
Mr John Lennon will be back with the answers later in the programme
From an early age, John had a fancy for that kind of thing
At school he did “The Daily Howl” which was like a comic
He used to draw all the things and it would be little jokes
Today would be Muggy, followed by Tuggy, Weggy, and Thurggy
Little teenage jokes. He used to do a lot of that
Long distance calling for the manager of the Beatles? His name, please?
The manager’s name is Mr Brian Epstein
The manager’s name is Brian Epstein
I went to Torquay with Brian to write “A Cellarful of Noise”
On the third day he said “I’ve got a lovely idea. I want you to join us”
I thought this is incredible, this is the idea
Derek Taylor Beatles’ Press Officer I’d given up on the idea of joining them, thinking, if it happens, it happens
So after about 15 years on newspapers
I just dropped out and joined the Beatles
I was Brian’s personal assistant, then eventually their press officer
I remember we played in Amsterdam…
was when Derek first came on tour with us
We nearly didn’t do that tour
I was desperately ill, I was having my tonsils out
George is a very loyal person and he said:
George Martin Record Producer “If Ringo’s not part of the group, it’s not the Beatles. I won’t go”
I despised the way we couldn’t ever make a decision for ourselves
It was always like “No, sorry.” “But Ringo must go with us”
“Sorry, we’ll get a new drummer”
Jimmy Nicol was a good drummer who learnt Ringo’s parts very well
He rehearsed with them and got to know the songs very well
It was very strange
They’d taken Jimmy Nicol and I thought they didn’t love me any more
All that stuff went through my head
Holland 5th June 1964
Jimmy, will you find it difficult to take over the role of Ringo?
Not really, no
I can never make up for what Ringo is
How long will you be doing this? – Until next Thursday
You’re a sort of understudy. Do you think it a great break?
Oh yes, excellent
Treating you good? – Marvellous
How is Ringo, by the way?
His throat is so sore – you’re living on jelly and ice-cream
I was a smoker in those days and I was smoking the next day
That was pretty rough
Always good for a gag is John, you know
What do you expect to do in Hong Kong?
I don’t know, just see what’s happening
It’s very different from what I’ve seen before, I imagine
Will you do any sightseeing? – I hope so
Kaitak Airport Hong Kong 8th June 1964
Hong Kong was different. It was all army personnel
It was very funny. We’d expected Asians but it was the British Army
It was all these British people, there weren’t any Chinese there
It was a slightly flat show, in a smallish place
They all behaved themselves and all looked like…
They looked like a khaki audience. It was slightly strange
We just played. I don’t think we enjoyed the show too much
Mascot Airport Sydney 11th June 1964
We had these capes and they were disasters in Australia
The rain hit them and the dye came out
They put the Beatles on the back of a truck
They had umbrellas and were wearing these capes
I was OK, I was in the cab
The driver wouldn’t go any faster, even though it was pouring
He said “These kids have waited 24 hours to see these guys”
We got to the hotel and everybody was blue
because the dye had soaked off these coats from Hong Kong
They played Amsterdam, Hong Kong, and I met them in Australia
The flight was just horrendous to Australia, it still is
It may be two hours less now but it’s still a hell of a long way
I remember getting off the plane and feeling like a disaster area
But Australia was fabulous, being back with the boys and in the band
They’d bought me presents in Hong Kong
That was a really nice moment
It’s very nice for all of us to have back with us now… Ringo!
Festival Hall Melbourne 17th June 1964
We’d like to carry on now with a song we recorded not long ago
All My Loving
When the Beatles arrived in Adelaide, they were greeted by 300000 fans
Not surprising as they occupy the top 6 placings on the Australian chart
Australia is truly in the grip of Beatlemania
That was like a hero’s welcome
You’d go to the town hall and they’d all be in the centre
I think we enjoyed all that stuff
It could be wearing but, with that many people, we were flabbergasted
Yes, shocked and stunned, just happy
Everybody saying “There’s more people than came to see the Queen”
I should think so – she didn’t have any hit records
More people came to see us there than anywhere
I think the whole of Australia was there
We were on the roof of some hotel
I don’t know if it was Sydney or Adelaide, or where
There were thousands and thousands of kids
One of the things that stuck in my mind
was some guy on crutches – I don’t know why I focused on him
He was shouting, getting all excited
I saw him throw his crutches away, like he was healed
and he fell right on his face. He just fell over
Before we go, we’d like to say to all of you here tonight
and to everybody who’s come to see us on this tour…
We’d like to say, thank you all very much for coming along
World Premiere – A Hard Day’s Night London 6th July 1964
I think Hard Day’s Night had a lot of comedy in it. People said:
“They’re young Marx Brothers”
There had never been four people doing comedy besides them
Yeah, we were called Britain’s answer to the Marx Brothers
It was very well received and it did very well
That was part of the Beatles, they were very funny
I mean, they actually were funny
I found it exciting. I loved it
When you first see yourself on the big screen, you watch yourself
Look at that ear, that nose, my hair sticking out-each of us did that
They’re very supportive, the Liverpool people-they loved us getting on
They felt we were traitors when we left, but the whole town was behind us
We heard that we were finished in Liverpool
After a bit we began to believe it. We thought, we don’t want to go home
We’ll just sneak home to our houses
They said “I’ve been to the Cavern. They don’t like you any more”
Of course, they were talking to people who didn’t know us anyway
We went back and it was one of the best ever
Liverpool Airport 10th July 1964
Subtitles: Screentext

MUSIC MONDAY Beatles Anthology 2

______________


Beatles Anthology (1/7) – Part 2

You may be interested in links to the other posts I have done on the Beatles and you can click on the link below: FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE PART 288, LINKS TO 3 YEARS OF BEATLES POSTS (March of 2015 to Feb of 2018) Featured artist is Mark Dion

We don’t know, it may be next week, it may be two or three years
but I think we’ll be in the business for at least another four years
You can be big-headed and say yeah, we’re going to last 10 years
but when you’ve said it, you think we’re lucky if we last three months
Probably the thing that John and I will do
will be write songs, as we’ve been doing, as a sort of sideline
We’ll hope to develop that a bit more
When we go home early in the morning, when we’ve finished the job
The kids don’t know you at home
but if they find out-well, where I live, they’ll get the drums out!
It was getting really big – we noticed as we moved around town
and started being noticed in the street
I was grateful that we had a kind of staircase to climb
First it was making it big in Liverpool, then being the best in the county
then the best in England, then we’d go to Scotland and break them in
Then it was well, what’s left? Er… radio
We wanted to be on Brian Matthews’ Saturday Morning Club, a huge show
The thing I loved would be to wake after a week of school or whatever…
I had a radio by my bed and would lie in until about 11
The most delicious lie in of your life, those teenage lie-ins, Saturday
Lie in, feeling great, turn the radio on
and this programme would be on for another hour
We really wanted to be on that. We knew there was a huge audience
Many tracks for Saturday Club were never put on record
Some good stuff we’d done at the Cavern or Hamburg, well recorded
We come along on Saturday morning, greeting everybody with a smile
Isn’t that nicethank you, dear Beatles
Your goal is always just a few yards ahead rather than right up there
Neil Aspinall Road Manager When we used to tour-do those…
Arthur Howe touring shows with quite a number of people on the bill
Roy Orbison, Tommy Roe, Gerry and the Pacemakers
Helen Shapiro… there’d be a number of people on the bill
and everybody got 12 minutes, 15, 20 minutes, whatever
In that time all anybody could do was plug their hit records
The ones the audience knew
With Helen Shapiro it was really embarrassing
We were happy just to be on the first nationwide tour of the theatres
She was established, she’d been around and had a bunch of hits
We were happy just to be on the tour, but it was embarrassing
because Please Please Me got to number 1 while we were on the road
and all the people coming to the show were waiting for the Beatles
It was embarrassing, because she was very nice
I think it was the tour after that when it was Tommy Roe
and Chris Montez and the Beatles
They moved us to being… actually closing the first half of the show
George Martin Record Producer Let’s go back a bit. The first record we issued was Love Me Do
The second was Please Please Me
which was only arrived at after much doubt on my part
that they could ever write a hit song
From that moment they blossomed, they became wonderful songwriters
But before they showed evidence of that, I still had to have an album out
I’d been to the Cavern and seen what they could do
I knew their repertoire, what they were able to perform
I said, let’s record every song you’ve got
We’ll whistle through them in a day
We knew those songs, that was the act we did all over the country
Basically this album was just what we did in the clubs
We just kept running through songs: “What about this… or this?”
We’d play and he’d say, “What else have you got?”
And 10.30 that evening, John sang Twist and Shout
His voice was going all day
He knew he could only give it one or two goes and it would just rip it
Which it did – you can hear it on the record
I couldn’t sing the damn thing, I was just screaming
I heard they were coming to the Manchester Odeon
Derek Taylor Beatles’ Press Officer We theatre critics, so-called
didn’t cover one-night stands of pop stars as there was no continuity
Anyway, I bought tickets at û1 each, I think
Gerry and the Pacemakers and Roy Orbison preceded the Beatles
It was hard to keep up with that man, he really put on a show
They all did, but Orbison had that fantastic voice
We’d be on the tour bus and Roy would be at the back
He wrote something like Pretty Woman and played it to us-great song
So a bit of competition came in – we had to write one as good
So we were just trying to improve all the time
We listened to other songs and tried to beat them
By the time we got to From Me To You… it was nice
I was very pleased with the chord in the middle, which was different…
That minor chord was something we hadn’t done before
We’d always know when we were going to be on the radio
Brian would say “Hello boys, it’s going to be on at 7.20”
We’d all be in the car and we’d stop so we could listen to it
The Beatles and From Me to You, their third single release
which is this week sitting at the top of the hit parade
Every time it moved in the charts, we’d have a celebratory dinner
If you look at the Beatles, from their first 18 months, they went…
because we were eating all this food
That’s where I discovered smoked salmon
I’d only ever had tinned salmon until I was 22!
We never stopped anywhere
If we were in Elgin on a Thursday
and we needed to be in Portsmouth on Friday, we’d just drive
We didn’t know how to stop this van
Neil would drive and there’d be the passenger seat
and three of us would sit on the bench seat-whichever three
We’d sit on this bench seat, which was pretty miserable
We’d go everywhere in the van. We’d kip on the amps
Some nights were so foggy, you’d be doing one mile an hour
and you’d still just keep going
We were like homing pigeons. You have to keep getting home
We got Mal when Neil couldn’t come because he was sick
We had to go down to do a radio show in London
We knew this guy Mal. He worked for the GPO
and he used to be a part-time bouncer at the Cavern
We got to know him and somebody suggested he drive for us
He drove us a couple of times when Neil couldn’t make it
Then there was so much happening, we employed him full-time
Once, on the motorway
the windscreen got knocked out by a pebble
Mal Evans Beatles’ Roadie So Mal put his hat on backwards, punched the windscreen out and drove
This was winter in Britain and it was freezing and foggy
We had to look for the kerb all the way to Liverpool, 200 miles
We were very, very cold
I remember we lay on each other
With a bottle of whisky
When the one on top was so cold, hypothermia was setting in
it was his turn to get on the bottom
We would warm each other up that way and keep swigging the whisky
It was quite an image
People think stardom, and it’s glamorous
and there’s us freezing, lying literally on top of each other
Oh yeah, we were tight
That was one thing to be said about us, we were really tight as friends
We could argue a lot amongst ourselves but we were very close
In the early days, we’d make a record in about 12 hours
A single every 3 months meant we’d have to write in the hotel or in a van
The demand on us was tremendous
I remember sitting on a pair of twin beds in a hotel bedroom
We had a day off so we were going to write a song
Our early songs, Please Please ME, From ME to YOU, P.S. I Love YOU
They were always very personal – Thank YOU girl
And we hit on the idea of doing a kind of reported conversation
“I saw her yesterday, she told me what to say, she said SHE loves YOU”
It gave us another little dimension, just meant that the song
was something different from what we and others had written before
Half a million advance orders have been made
for the Beatles’ latest single, She Loves You
It looks likely to be three number ones in a row for the Liverpool boys
We were the first working class singers
that stayed working class and pronounced it
Didn’t try and change our accents which in England were looked down upon
Cathy – A Fan from the Cavern Club The Beatles are Liverpudlians. They belong to us and to the Cavern
Yes, let the rest of the country have them and enjoy them
but please let them come back to us, at least once
just to be the same as they used to be
It would be fantastic
It was impossible to go home
If you’re in our business, you go to London
The recordings are there, the places to be seen are there
Where it’s happening is there, it’s just a natural move
George and I shared an apartment off Park Lane, û45 a week, a fortune
We’d go to the Saddle Rooms. It used to be a club
They used to have this horse and coach outside
Two little drunken Beatles in the back were being taken home
This is two shit kickers from Liverpool and this is far out news
“Oh, let’s take the carriage”
It was great, we were kings and were all just at the prime
We used to go round London in our cars and meet each other
and talk about music with The Animals and Eric
and we were very close to The Stones
This song we’re going to play, I Wanna Be Your Man
We virtually finished it in front of them because they needed a record
They’d put out Come On by Chuck Berry and needed a quick follow-up
They did it first – we did it with Ringo after
We were always nervous before each step we went up the ladder
but we always had that comfort of being four together
Not like Elvis, you know
I always felt sorry later for Elvis because he was on his own
There was only one Elvis – nobody else knew what he felt like
But for us, we all shared the experience
The Beatles, The Beatles… no, it couldn’t catch on
Big Night Out TV Show Hey, Bern! Is the tea ready yet?
Good evening and welcome to Big Night Out
The Morecambe And Wise Show It’s the Kay Sisters! Fabulous!
The Kay Sisters? This is the Beatles!
Hello, Beatle… where is he?
There he is. Hello, Bongo!
That’s Ringo! – Is he there as well? Oh great!
As you can gather, this is Eric. Say hello to Eric
I remember you, you’re the one with short, fat, hairy legs
No, he’s the one with short, fat, hairy legs
We’re the ones with the big, fat, hairy heads
Get out of that!
What’s it like, being famous? – It’s not like in your day, you know
That’s an insult, that is. What do you mean, not like in my day?
My dad used to tell me about you – In the old days
You’ve only got a little dad, have you?
All right, Bonzo?!
It’s Ringo! – Yeah, him as well
Get ’em off, they’ve done enough. I’m getting insulted
Let’s do a number with the boys – One their dad will remember
You go and get changed
What should we do, boys? Something suitable for Eric’s age?
Moonlight Bay. OK, you go and get changed
On television for the first time, Morecambe and Wise and the Beatles
presenting that wonderful old fashioned number, Moonlight Bay
OK fellas, that’s great, you look marvellous. Are you ready?
Right, we’ll take it from the top
Have the Beatles gone? – No, they’re here
What are you doing? – It’s murder… I can’t keep up
I haven’t got one… – Take 4!
I can’t breathe after all that mouth organ. Can we skip it?
I couldn’t hear what chords they were going…
A bit less of George
I feel like I’m singing in a sock… a one, two, three, four…
You’ve done it again
You made a mistake
Do it slower – No!
Ready – Ringo… keep your bit dead
Ringo! – We’re taping
No, the first one a loud attack, the second one not quite so loud
Rhythm and Blues, part nine
Paul forgot to sing – God, I’m sorry
I was just watching George…
What happened? – It’s every time you jump like that
Don’t slow down for christ sakes…
or I’m giving you no more drugs
Been for a shit I see, Megan?
Take 1- No reply
Stop
I just can’t get anywhere near light so he’ll have to do it
I’ll try to remember, John, and if I don’t it’s just too bad, in’t it?
You daft get!
George, what did the bass sound like? Good? Or utterly crap?
Did it? Well let’s see how you like it
Take 13
When I was playing in the living room with Eddie Clayton
my mother’s friend Annie McGuire would say:
“See you on the Palladium, son! See your name in lights”
That was the place to get to, the London Palladium!
Nothing bigger in the world than making it to the Palladium
And I said “Yeah, sure, Annie, that’s where we’re going to go”
So it was one of my things too: “To the Palladium!”
That was as far as I was looking
And I was sick
“Here they are…” – and I spewed up and went on
I was just nervous, craziness, you know, tension
We played the gig and we got on that roundabout and it was dynamite
This was it, you know what I mean
Anyone who knew you was so… fucking hell… hey, look at this!
It was just pretty far out, the Palladium
We like the fans and enjoy reading the publicity about us
but from time to time you don’t realise it’s actually about yourself
You see your pictures and read articles
about George Harrison, Ringo Starr and Paul and John
but you don’t actually think, “Oh, that’s me in the paper”
It’s funny, it’s just as though it’s a different person
It all sounds complaining but we’re not, we’re just putting the point
It affects your home more than it does yourself
You know what to expect but your parents and family don’t
We were treated differently and we had to get used to that
Then you found yourself in a weird land
All these people you’ve grown up with and lived with –
suddenly it was the one place you didn’t want to change
It all changed after that
You were never sure who your friends were unless you had them before
People are so in awe of fame
All you have to do is go on the radio or television once
and people see you in the street and act differently
But the Beatles were in the papers every day for a year or so
Everybody changes, they’re so impressed by it
People forget how to act normal
The one absolute, clear vision:
I was at my aunty’s, where I’d been a thousand times before
We were having a cup of tea one night
It may have been after one of those shows
Somebody knocked the table and my tea went in my saucer
Suddenly it was “He can’t have that, we have to tidy it up”
That would never have happened before
I thought, things are changing. It was like an arrow to the brain
Drop In TV Show Sweden 3rd November 1963
London Airport 31st October 1963
The Beatles return from Sweden to what the press call ‘Beatlemania’
We’ll see what the Queen Mother thinks of Beatlemania
when the Beatles perform at the Royal Variety Show on November 4th
I was sent to pursue them…
to harass them in September ’63
by the News Editor of the Daily Express, who said they’d had it
They’d betray their young fans by appearing on the Royal Variety Show
Go and get them. Get a quote
Get them to condemn themselves by saying:
“We shouldn’t be doing it, we’re betraying our fans”
We all turned up: the Daily Mail, the Express, the Mirror
They were very defiant. Ringo did the perfect quote:
“I want to play my drums for the Queen Mum”
John, in this Royal Variety Show, you’re appearing before royalty
Your language has to be good
and this thing with Ted Heath saying he couldn’t understand you
I can’t understand Teddy saying that at all really
I’m not going to vote for Ted
Paul, any changes in the act or will it be the usual routine?
No, we’ll have to change it. Hey, stop hitting me
We can’t do the same thing all the time
We haven’t thought about it – Suits with collars, parted hair?
You never know. We may not wear suits. We’ve no idea
Prince of Wales Theatre 4th November 1963
Thank you very much indeed
The next song we’d like to sing is a bit slower
This is from the show The Music Man
It’s also been recorded
by our favourite American group, Sophie Tucker
For our last number, I’d like to ask your help
Would the people in the cheaper seats clap your hands
and the rest of you, if you’d just rattle your jewellery
Thank you. We’d like to sing a song called Twist and Shout
We wanted to give people their money’s worth with our records
Our policy was to put 14 tracks a side-it was brand new
and never put singles on the albums
Everybody else who had a hit single made an album around it
With the Beatles was a sort of ‘first songbook’
They gave me a list of their songs
They were all thinking in terms of singles still
We weren’t thinking of an album being an entity by itself
It was a collection of songs
All we did was to record singles
and the ones that weren’t too good we’d put on an album
which is what With the Beatles was
Robert Freeman, who took this picture
copied, on request actually, Astrid Kirchherr’s photographs
We showed him the pictures Astrid took and said do it like this
With the Beatles has broken the record for advance sales of an LP
It has an advance of a quarter of a million
The previous record was held by Elvis Presley’s Blue Hawaii
Brian Epstein could well be right in his prediction
that the Beatles one day will be bigger than Elvis Presley
One of the cheekiest things we ever did was say to Brian Epstein:
“We’re not going to America till we’ve got a number 1 ”
We’d seen a lot of people, like Adam Faith, Cliff Richard –
quite big stars in Britain –
go to America and be 3rd or 4th on the bill after Frankie Avalon
or Fabian and people like that who were one hit wonders to us
So we thought, that’s the kiss of death to go over to America
Take a downward step in your career. We didn’t want to do that
So we told Brian we wouldn’t go until we have a number 1 record
We were trying to get into America all the time
I really thought She Loves You would have broken the American market
but if you think of our frustration here
we were being turned down by the company, which EMI actually owned
I was so frustrated, I said if they’re not going to put it out –
From Me To You was the first one we offered them –
they can’t deny us other people putting them out
I would take the record back and try and get it out with another label
I did negotiations with Swan and with VJ
each of whom, tiny labels in the States, took one or other title
They put those records out in America
Of course, being small labels, they didn’t make a great deal of success
That was the way it worked out. We released Please Please Me – Flop
From Me to You – Flop. Changed labels, released She Loves You
In England they’d all been number 1. All of them flops-nothing
By this time the news from England and Europe was overwhelming
that they were a hit group and they had to take them more seriously
Also the Swan and VJ labels were selling by this time
So Capitol were forced to release I Want To Hold Your Hand
It wasn’t made for the American market but it was a great record
Le Bourget Airport, Paris 14th January 1964
The funny thing about France was it was boys screaming
I think the girls were heavily chaperoned because it was boys
Yeah oui, OK, you know. Dear me, a funny crowd
We went down kind of medium. We were on the bill with Trini Lopez:
If he had a hammer – if you remember
I didn’t know Trini was on that show. I thought it was Sylvie Vartan
It was very strange because suddenly…
we had all these boys chasing us all over Paris
We had visions of all these French girls, ooh la la, and all that
But the opening night audience were tuxedoed elderly French people
Hanging round the stage door, all seemed to be a bunch
of slightly gay looking boys, shouting “Ringo, Ringo”
We didn’t go down that well but we built it up over a few days
Eventually it was a bit of a success
But we were used to a little bit more instant success than that
We got a telegram at the hotel after one of the shows
It came from Capitol Records
Congratulations, lads, number 1 in US charts or something
We all hit the roof. I remember riding around on Mal Evans’s back
He was happy to bear me. It was just very high hysterics
Brian rang me about half past one in the morning:
“I know you won’t mind being woken.” I said I wasn’t asleep anyway
He said “I’ve just heard from America. We’re number 1!”
Fantastic! He said “Do you want to come round?” Not half!
So we went round and had a great drink up. No bed that night!
It was a great feeling because we were booked to go there
directly after Paris, so it was handy to have a number 1
British pop stars haven’t made much impact on the US. How will you fare?
Well, I can’t really say, can I?
Is it up to me? No. I just hope we go all right
London Airport 7th February 1964
I know on the plane over I was thinking “Oh, we won’t make it”
We knew we would wipe them out
It was like flying into the unknown, we didn’t know what to expect
We were going to America
It was the first time for everyone, except George
I remember before landing, it was so exciting
As the plane flew over New York It felt like some sci-fi movie
and a big octopus grabbed the plane and was dragging us down to New York
and it was all so exciting. This was America
Things we’d dreamt about and all the music we’d loved came from here
All the music we’d loved came from there so just to be there was exciting
but because we’d made this condition of being number 1 before we went
it was like going as princes
Millions of kids at the airport, which nobody expected
We heard about it mid-air as I recall
There were journalists on the plane and the pilot radioed ahead
He said tell the boys there’s a big crowd waiting for them
We never expected anybody
We didn’t expect to sell records here so we were just amazed
Subtitles: Screentext

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