Category Archives: Unconfirmed Quotes of Founders

Phony quotes attributed to Abraham Lincoln

121108_BB_AbrahamLincoln-2x

Abraham Lincoln (Daniel Day-Lewis)

Spielberg’s film follows 56-year-old Abraham Lincoln, the 16th president of the United States, from January of 1865 until his death in April. The portrait on the left was taken in 1864.

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These quotes have no primary sources but they have been falsely attributed to Lincoln through the years.

Abraham Lincoln Research Site
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Unproven Quotations Attributed to Abraham Lincoln
The Internet is loaded with quotes which Abraham Lincoln never said. Lots of quotes are attributed to Abraham Lincoln but cannot be verified. On this page I have attempted to compile a list of some of the most common misnomers.“Congressmen who willfully take actions during wartime that damage morale and undermine the military are saboteurs and should be arrested, exiled or hanged.”

“If I knew that I had eight hours to chop a tree down, I would spend the first six sharpening my axe.”

“The philosophy taught in the classroom in this generation will become the philosophy of the government in the next generation.”

“I am a slow walker but I never walk back.”

“Those who look for the bad in people will surely find it.”

“Do I not destroy my enemies when I make them friends?”

“I don’t know who my grandfather was; I am much more concerned to know what his grandson will be.”

“In the end it is not the years in your life that count, it’s the life in your years.”

The Ten Cannots

“I will prepare and some day my chance will come.”

“A friend is someone who has the same enemies you have.”

“Good things may come to those who wait, but only the things left by those who hustle.”

“I am in favor of animal rights as well as human rights. That is the way of a whole human being.”

“Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man’s character, give him power.”

“I care not much for a man’s religion whose dog and cat are not the better for it.”

“I like to see a man proud of the place in which he lives. I like to see a man live so that his place will be proud of him.”

“It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to open one’s mouth and remove all doubt.”

“I do not think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday.”

“If this is coffee, please bring me some tea; but if this is tea, please bring me some coffee.”

“If I were two-faced, would I be wearing this one?”

“Whatever you are, be a good one.”

“Most folks are about as happy as they make up their minds to be.”

“A nation that does not honor its heroes will not long endure.”

“A lawyer’s time and advice are his stock in trade.”

“To sin by silence when they should protest makes cowards of men.”

“The strength of a nation lies in the homes of its people.”

“No man stands so tall as when he stoops to help a child.”

“No matter how much cats fight, there always seem to be plenty of kittens.”

“The best thing about the future is that it comes only one day at a time.”

“I am not bound to win, but I am bound to be true. I am not bound to succeed, but I am bound to live up to what light I have.”

“You cannot escape the responsibility of tomorrow by evading it today.”

“Force is all-conquering, but its victories are short-lived.”

“Prohibition will work great injury to the cause of temperance. It is a species of intemperance within itself, for it goes beyond the bounds of reason in that it attempts to control a man’s appetite by legislation, and makes a crime out of things that are not crimes. A Prohibition law strikes a blow at the very principles upon which our government was founded.”

“All that loves labor serves the nation. All that harms labor is treason to America.”
Lincoln is often credited with saying, “You can fool all of the people some of the time, and some of the people all of the time, but you can’t fool all of the people all of the time.” Lincoln allegedly said it in a speech in Clinton, Illinois, on September 2, 1858. In 1905 two newspapers, the Chicago Tribune and the Brooklyn Eagle, gathered testimony to see if Lincoln really said it. The evidence was conflicting and dubious in some particulars. No contemporary accounts of the text of the Clinton speech contain this utterance. However, tradition still attributes the quote to Lincoln, and it has remained a favorite in popular usage.

Below is a letter that is often attributed to Abraham Lincoln. It purportedly was written to his son’s teacher. However, there is no source for it. It is bogus. It is a thoughtful letter, but it wasn’t really Abraham Lincoln who wrote it.

————————————————-

“He will have to learn, I know, that all men are not just and are not true.
But teach him if
you can, the wonder of books…but also give him quiet time to ponder the
eternal mystery of
birds in the sky, bees in the sun and flowers on a green hillside.

In school, teach him it is far more honorable to fall than to cheat…
Teach to have faith in
his own ideas, even if everyone tells him he is wrong. Teach him to be
gentle with gentle people
and tough with the tough.

Try to give my son the strength not to follow the crowd when everyone
getting on the bandwagon…
Teach him to listen to all men; but teach him also to filter all he hears on
a screen of truth,
and take only the good that comes through.

Teach him, if you can, how to laugh when he is sad…Teach him there is no
shame in tears.
Teach him to scoff at cynics and to be beware of too much sweetness…Teach
him to sell his brawn
and brain to highest bidders, but never to put a price on his heart and soul.
Teach him to close
his ears to a howling mob…and stand and fight if thinks he is right.

Treat him gently, but do not cuddle him, because only the test of fire makes
fine steel. Let
him have the courage to be impatient.. Let him have the patience to be
brave. Teach him always to
have sublime faith in himself, because then he will have faith in humankind.

This is a big order, but see what you can do. He is such a fine little
fellow my son!”
Additionally, there is a purported Lincoln letter to William F. Elkin. Lincoln allegedly wrote, “We may congratulate ourselves that this cruel war is nearing its end. It has cost a vast amount of treasure and blood…It has indeed been a trying hour for the Republic; but I see in the near future a crisis approaching that unnerves me and causes me to tremble for the safety of my country…corporations have been enthroned and an era of corruption in high places will follow, and the money power of the country will endeavor to prolong its reign by working upon the prejudices of the people until all wealth is aggregated in a few hands and the Republic is destroyed. I feel at this moment more anxiety for the safety of my country than ever before, even in the midst of war.”

The authenticity of Lincoln’s words has been questioned by many. In Merrill Peterson’s Lincoln in American Memory,” the author states, “(John) Nicolay immediately repudiated the prophecy, first spotted in 1888, as ‘a bold, unblushing forgery.’ He was correct, though this did not end its use. It was quoted by respected journalists, like Henry Demarest Lloyd, by clergymen, and by congressmen, and it even found its way into The Lincoln Encyclopedia published in 1950.”

It can be added that the alleged letter from Lincoln to Elkin is not included in The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln which is considered the most definitive source of Lincoln’s writings.

Several good single volume sources of genuine Lincoln quotes are: (1) Recollected Words of Abraham Lincoln compiled and edited by Don E. Fehrenbacher and Virginia Fehrenbacher. (2) A Treasury of Lincoln Quotations edited by Fred Kerner. (3) Of the People, By the People, For the People and other Quotations from Abraham Lincoln edited by Gabor S. Boritt. (4) Abe Lincoln Laughing: Humorous Anecdotes from Original Sources by and about Abraham Lincoln edited by P.M. Zall.

The sketch of Lincoln at the top of the page is by John Nelson Marble

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Did David Barton fabricate quotes and attribute them to the founding fathers?

On the Arkansas Times Blog on June 17, 2012 I noted:

Google the phrase ” David Barton fabricated quotes” and you will get many websites that claim this is true and Rob Boston’s 1996 article “consumer alert” in the Church and State Magazine is what prompted this reaction throughout the country. As a journalist you would think people like Max would call Boston out on this. An apology should have been issued by Boston years ago.

Hopefully today when you google that phrase you will be taken to my website, www.thedailyhatch.org, and you will not have to read all those lies that were prompted by Rob Boston about David Barton.

If you go to http://www.youtube.com and type in “Rob Boston Fake Quotes” you will get a 6 min, 47 sec clip with Rob Boston being interview on February 10, 2010 on Countdown with Keith Olbermann. The origin of this “fake quote scandal” was my 1996 encounter with Rob Boston. Looking back I think it was my trusting nature that got me in trouble.  (I should have known that Boston could be quite rude at times and that should tipped me off to a character flaw.)

It all started because I was involved in a series of correspondence with  Boston who is the senior policy analyst at the Americans United for the Separation of Church and State (AU) and a board member of the American Humanist Society.

(Portions of this below appeared in an article I did for the Freedom Writer in May/June 1997 issue which is a publication friendly to Boston and not to me but they felt the record should be set straight concerning the misleading article that Boston had written in 1996 in Church & State titled “Consumer Alert.”.)

Let me start from the very beginning. As an evangelical Christian and a member of the Christian Coalition, I felt obliged to expose a misquote of John Adams’ I found in an article entitled “America’s Unchristian Beginnings” (Los Angeles Times, August 3, 1995, p.B-9) by the self-avowed atheist Dr. Steven Morris. However, what happened next changed my focus to the use of misquotes, unconfirmed quotes, and misleading attributions by the religious right.

In the process of attempting to correct Morris, I was guilty of using several misquotes myself. Dr John George  coauthor (with Paul Boller Jr.) of the book They Never Said It! (Oxford University Press, 1989) set me straight. George pointed out that George Washington never said, “It is impossible to rightly govern the world without God and the Bible.” (They Never Said It! pp. 126-127). I had cited page 18 of the 1927 edition of Halley’s Bible Handbook. This quote was probably generated by a similar statement that appears in A Life of Washington (New York: Harper and Brothers, 1835) by James Paulding. Sadly, no one has been able to verify any of the quotes in Paulding’s book since no footnotes were offered.

After reading They Never Said It! I had a better understanding of how widespread the problem of misquotes is. Furthermore, I discovered that many of these had been used by the leaders of the religious right. I decided to confront some individuals concerning their misquotes. WallBuilders, the publisher of David Barton’s The Myth of Separation (published in 1989), helped me further by providing me with their “Questionable Quote” list. The list contained a dozen quotes of the founders that Barton could only confirm with secondary sources.

Proverbs 19:25 states, “…rebuke a discerning man, and he will gain knowledge.” Since I was rebuking fellow Christians, I felt certain they would all gladly quit using unconfirmed or questionable quotes. The religious right leaders I contacted had three different responses.

The first was the reaction that I expected. Several thanked me for bringing these corrections to their attention. They agreed that it is wrong to use disputed quotes as if they were authentic.

The second, which was the most common response, was to claim that their critics were biased skeptics who find the truth offensive. The premise of this argument is, “We know our critics are 100% wrong all the time, so who cares what they have to say anyway. We are the only unbiased ones.”

And the third response was from one who defended his method of research and his method of confirming sources. Furthermore, he said that he pursued his graduate education in order to improve his level of scholarship. Nevertheless, that respondent never provided me with his original sources.

There are some misquotes used commonly by separationists, but evidently the religious right has a much more widespread problem. One illustration demonstrates just how widespread the problem is among religious right lay historians. When David Barton wrote The Myth of Separation he used many secondary sources for the 500 quotes that appeared in his book published in 1989. After an effort to find primary sources for these quotes, Barton complied the “Questionable Quote” list with the 12 quotes that could only had confirmation through secondary sources. None of these questionable quotes originated with Barton.

After confronting over thirty religious right authors, I turned my attention to individuals from the separationist point of view. During this time I provided Rob Boston, of Americans United, with the “questionable quote” list in the hope that he would confront some individuals on his  side of the ideological fence. I even included my correspondence from several religious right leaders such as the late D. James Kennedy. Nevertheless, based upon the “Questionable Quote” list that I provided to him, Boston wrote the slanted article for Church & State titled “Consumer Alert.” (July /August 1996). In this article he implies that Barton made up the dozen quotes on the “Questionable Quote” list.

In “Consumer Alert,” these words appeared in bold print: “Mything in action: David Barton’s ‘Questionable Quotes.'” Barton was called a “double fraud.” 

Professor Fritz Detweiler of Adrian College’s religion and philosophy department responded to this controversy in his weekly column stating that Barton “made up quotes and attributed them to James Madison, Patrick Henry, George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, and other leading Americans…. Barton’s fabricating quotes to serve his purpose is particularly disturbing on two fronts. First, Barton was not content to let the record speak for itself because it didn’t say quite what he wanted it to say. Second, the fraudulent construction of quotes poses a particular problem for [historians] seeking to verify their accuracy.”

In response to that article, David Barton wrote in WallBuilders‘ summer 1996 newsletter that “the article,  “Consumer Alert”‘ is agenda driven. Our honest efforts to clear the ‘world’s rhetorical rivers,’ as we casually stated in the earlier draft, were twisted and misconstrued to sound as if we created the quotes… We regret that the unconfirmed quotations have been circulated over the last century-and-a-half, and WallBuilders acknowledges the errors of using secondary sources for primary historical figures. (These quotes have been purged from our materials wherever possible.) David Barton went on to make clear that his current level of scholarship as of the early 1990’s was not to use founders quotes unless they are documented by a primary source.

I had the opportunity to talk to Rob Boston on the phone about this on November 19, 1996. I told him that people all across this country have been writing letters to the editor of their local newspapers blasting David Barton because of Boston’s article and many more have been posting articles on the internet.) Boston said he was very glad people were on to Barton.

Then I pointed out to Boston that many of these people were accusing Barton of knowingly using bad quotes. Furthermore, one individual accused Barton of “creating quotes.” These people could be sued for libel. Boston replied, “No malice can be proved. I don’t know much about law, but I at least know that much.” Shortly after that Boston hung up on me, but not before he claimed “poetic license” and said he was glad that Barton’s reputation had been damaged. (Blair Scott, Alabama State Director, American Atheists, Inc. has since claimed, “David Barton was cornered and he admitted to fabricating the quotes, okay he actually called them “spurious,” but we all know that means he made them up.”)

Later I got several board members of Americans United to contact Boston on my behalf and voice their opinion of how unfair Boston had been to Barton in his article  “Consumer Alert”. On March 7, 1997, I spoke with Barry Lynn the executive director of Americans United. Lynn was very gracious on the phone and  promised to consider an article from me in response to the slanted  “Consumer Alert” article Boston had written earlier. Americans United board member Dr. Paul Simmons of Louisville helped me write the aritcle, but ultimately it was never published.

The real scandal is that this same lie caused by Boston’s article about Barton is still today being spread throughout the world on youtube and on TV. On Feb 10, 2010 on MSNBC’s show Countdown with Keith Olberman, Rob Boston was the guest and Olberman opened the show with these words:

“What happens if you want your audience to believe that the the founding fathers did not want the separation of church and state when obviously and clearly and repeatedly they did. Well you make up quotes defending your position and dishonestly attribute them to the likes of James Madison and Thomas Jefferson… More on Mr Barton and those quotes in a moment.”

Then Olbermann and Boston go on to criticize  Barton throughout the remainder of the program. However, in this interview Boston never says that Barton manufactured quotes, but he doesn’t stop Olbermann from telling the same old lie about Barton that came from this 1996 scandal. Boston knew that his article  “Consumer Alert” from 1996 was responsible for Olbermann’s inaccurate words about Barton, but Boston didn’t lift a finger to set the record straight. In 2009 Boston finally admitted concerning Barton “Unconfirmed Quote List”: “He didn’t make the stuff up, he just relied on bad sources.” Boston should have admitted this in 1996 and apologized and then tried to correct the record anytime he saw it on the internet.

Furthermore this youtube video clip has received over 75,000 hits. The clip was put on youtube by a person going by the username “JesusSavesAtCitibank” whoever that is. If you click on the username you will be provided several links to articles. The first link will bring you to Boston’s 1996 article  “Consumer Alert”.

David Barton has tried to raise the level of scholarship in the debate concerning the founders by committing to use only quotes that have been confirmed by primary sources. Dr. John George has commented, “While not agreeing with Barton concerning separation of church and state, I must say he has done everyone a service by circulating the ‘Questionable Quote List.’ Especially gratifying is his encouraging those in his own Religious Right camp to cite only primary sources for the quotes they utilize. Unfortunately, a sizable minority will ignore the advice.”

Many separationists like Dr. George praised Barton for challenging others to a higher level of scholarship concerning these unconfirmed quotes. Instead, of complimenting Barton when I provided this information to Boston in 1996, he chose to imply that Barton was guilty of making up quotes.

Now Barton is being attacked on the Arkansas Times Blog June 15, 2012 by the username “Deathbyinches”for making up quotes and attributing them to the founders and another blogger even provided a link to the People for the American Way website which includes many criticisms of Barton concerning these quotes. Last year when Barton was scheduled to come hold a seminar for state legislators and constitutional officers on Jan 25 and 26 in Little Rock,one liberal media person (Max Brantley) in Arkansas associated with Americans United had called him the “bogus Texas historian.” That is when I knew I had to set the record straight concerning Rob Boston’s fake quote youtube clip.

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Samuel Adams Unconfirmed Quote was Confirmed Eventually

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Unconfirmed Quote attributed to Alexis de Tocqueville

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Supreme Court never said It.

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Lots of Fake Quotes of Founding Fathers in Circulation

HALT: HaltingArkansasLiberalswith Truth   ___ I wanted to thank Gene Lyons for bringing this issue of fake quotes of the Founding Fathers to our attention because it should be addressed. In April 8, 2010 article “Facts Drowning in Disinformation,” he rightly notes that Thomas Jefferson never said, “The democracy will cease to exist when you […]

Brummett: Politicizing Arizona is Shameful

HALT:HaltingArkansasLiberalswithTruth.com

Series:    Is Rightwing Rhetoric encouraging Violence? Part 3
Bill O’Reilly  on the left-incited politicization of the tragic shooting of Rep Gabrielle Giffords.

In my last post in this series I stated,” I just wish that Gene Lyons, Max Brantley, Pat Lynch, Ernest Dumas, John Brummett and every other liberal would come out and condemn the liberals who have accused the conservatives of rhetoric that has encouraged the tragedy in Arizona. There is no connection at all between Jared Loughner and the conservatives. In fact, his favorite books include “The Communist Manifesto.” Then how could have the conservatives been guilty of encouraging this act of violence by Loughner?

This was written partly because I read the liberal NY Times columnist Paul Krugman’s comments through a link from the Arkansas Times on Jan 8th. Krugman asserted:

A Democratic Congresswoman has been shot in the head; another dozen were also shot.

We don’t have proof yet that this was political, but the odds are that it was. She’s been the target of violence before…. Actually, it’s been scary for quite a while, in a way that already reminded many of us of the climate that preceded the Oklahoma City bombing.

You know that Republicans will yell about the evils of partisanship whenever anyone tries to make a connection between the rhetoric of Beck, Limbaugh, etc. and the violence I fear we’re going to see in the months and years ahead. But violent acts are what happen when you create a climate of hate.

In the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette Paul Krugman’s latest article “The Climate of Hate,” January 14, 2011 appears. In it Krugman asserts, “Where’s that toxic rhetoric coming from? Let’s not make a false pretense of balance: It’s coming, overwhelmingly, from the right.”

John Brummett in his January 11, 2011 article wrote these words:

Some liberals want to blame Sarah Palin for having tweeted during last year’s campaign that conservatives need not retreat, but reload. They want to blame her for linking that little gem to a map showing districts of Democratic House members who voted for health care reform and who were therefore “targeted.” This target was presented in the form of cross-hairs that were placed on the map to indicate the location of these Democrats’ districts.

Outrageous as that was, no fair-minded person can argue seriously that Palin was encouraging anyone to go shoot any of these Democratic House members.

He went on to quote a leading Republican political consultant who said, “For those who are politicizing this..U should be ashamed.” Brummett agreed. Then Brummett noted:

A lunatic gunman’s actions cannot be blamed on any reasonably sane or law-abiding person, even if that other person’s behavior well-represents the bad judgment and overheated rhetoric rampant in our modern political and pundit classes.

Nor can the lunatic’s actions even be blamed on the general culture of polarization, intolerance and rage created by this collective blather of contemporary blowhards.

Reasonable, responsible and essentially decent people can behold mindless political meanness and become frustrated by it, even to the point of engaging reciprocally in mindless political meanness. But they do not grab a pistol and shoot a member of Congress and anyone happening to be around her. Nor are they inviting anyone else to do that.

I want to say that there is at least one liberal in Arkansas that is willing to stand up against his own camp when he sees they have stepped over the line. I know what it feels like, because when I started writing on the subject of Unconfirmed Quotes of the Founders that I am afraid that my own conservative camp has been guilty of using more than the left, and as a result of my writings, I received lots of negative feedback from conservatives.

Truth sometimes steps on the toes of people in both camps. I am proud to say that I have offended some in my camp when I have confronted them with it. I wear it as a badge of honor.

_______________________________________________________

Today I am profiling St lawmaker Eddie Joe Williams.

My friend Bob Robbins in front of my 67 SS Camaro

From the Beginning

Eddie Joe Williams was born in Sheridan, Arkansas in 1954. He lived in Sheridan until he joined the United States Army in 1972.

While attending military training in Colorado, Eddie Joe met the love of his life, DeLona Rudy.  The two have been happily married since 1973.  After serving a tour in the Army, Eddie Joe returned to Sheridan to begin his career with the Union Pacific Railroad.

Over his thirty years with the railroad, Eddie Joe worked his way from a laborer to the Regional Director of Transportation, who manages the day to day operations of the Eastern division of the railroad, which spans from Chicago to Louisiana.

Political Career

Due to the extensive travel required by being a senior manager, Eddie Joe decided to retire from management and raise his family in Cabot; where he began his public service.

For 15 years, Eddie Joe has been serving his community, beginning with an appointment to the planning commission.  After serving on the planning commission, Eddie Joe was elected to serve on the City Council three consecutive times.  Currently, Eddie Joe is serving his last year as Mayor of Cabot.

Family

Eddie Joe and DeLona have raised four beautiful daughters and currently have seven grandchildren.

Their oldest is Bethany (“Buffy”) Hartz. Buffy is married to Justin Hartz and they have four children; Lane 12, Carson 8, Maggie 8, and Caleb 6.

The next daughter is Amanda (“Mandy”) Glover. She is married to Michael Glover and they have one son, Spencer 5.

Next in line is Tiffinie (“Tiff”) Taylor. Tiff is married to Josh Taylor and they have two sons; Lawson 3 and Hudson 2.

Last but not least is Hannah. Hannah is married to David Warren.  Hannah and David do not have any children, but they have a wonderful dog named Winston.

Currently Eddie Joe’s greatest enjoyment is spending time with his grandchildren.

Unconfirmed Quote attributed to Thomas Jefferson

HALT:HaltingArkansasLiberalswithTruth.com

Part 6 David Barton:Were the Founding Fathers Deists?
In 1988 only 25% of Christians voted but that doubled in 1994. Christians are the salt of the world.

The last few days I have been  looking at this issue of unconfirmed quotes that people think that the Founding Fathers actually said and the historical evidence concerning them. David Barton has collected these quotes and tried to confirm them over the last 20 years.

Here is one attributed to Thomas Jefferson.

12. I have always said and always will say that the studious perusal of the Sacred Volume will make us better citizens. –Thomas Jefferson (unconfirmed)

This quote can be found attributed to Thomas Jefferson in an 1869 work by Samuel W. Bailey, but as yet we have not found it in a primary source. Jefferson’s religious thoughts are well-documented. As he fought the battles of dogmatic, sectarian divisiveness, one can find religious quotations both positive and negative. Therefore, this positive reference to the Bible could easily have flowed from his pen. For example, notice these excerpts from his letters. They reveal both his dislike of sectarianism, as well as his love for what he considered the pure doctrines of Jesus:

An eloquent preacher of your religious society, Richard Motte, in a discourse of much emotion and pathos, is said to have exclaimed aloud to his congregation, that he did not believe there was a Quaker, Presbyterian, Methodist or Baptist in heaven, having paused to give his hearers time to stare and to wonder. He added, that in heaven, God knew no distinctions, but considered all good men as his children, and as brethren of the same family. I believe, with the Quaker preacher, that he who steadily observes those moral precepts in which all religions concur, will never be questioned at the gates of heaven, as to the dogmas in which they all differ. That on entering there, all these are left behind us, and the Aristides and Catos, the Penns and Tillotsons, Presbyterians and Baptists, will find themselves united in all principles which are in concert with the reason of the supreme mind. Of all the systems of morality, ancient and modern, which have come under my observation, none appear to me so pure as that of Jesus.

To the corruptions of Christianity I am, indeed opposed; but not to the genuine precepts of Jesus himself. I am a Christian, in the only sense in which he wished any one to be; sincerely attached to his doctrines, in preference to all others.

But the greatest of all the reformers of the depraved religion of His own country, was Jesus of Nazareth.

In fact, Jefferson thought Christianity so important that he personally authored a work for the Indians entitled The Life and Morals of Jesus of Nazareth which set forth the teachings of Jesus as delivered in the Gospels. (The Fifty-seventh Congress ordered a reprint of his work. ) Many people have claimed that Jefferson omitted all miraculous events of Jesus from his so called “Bible.” Rarely do those who make this claim let Jefferson speak for himself. Jefferson’s own words explain that his intent for that book was not for it to be a “Bible,” but rather for it to be a primer for the Indians on the teachings of Christ (which is why Jefferson titled that work, “The Life and Morals of Jesus of Nazareth“). What Jefferson did was to take the “red letter” portions of the New Testament and publish these teachings in order to introduce the Indians to Christian morality. To deny this is to deny that he swore “upon the altar of God, eternal hostility against every form of tyranny over the mind of man.”

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This is a profile from the Morning News from 2009 of State lawmaker Mary Slinkard.

Mary Slinkard

Wed, Jan 7, 2009

LegislatorsRepresentative

mary-slinkardR-Gravette
House District 100
Freshman
Committees: Judiciary; State Agencies.
Special connections: Benton County clerk until her swearing in at the House.
How to reach her: House in-session number: 501-682-6211. On weekends: 479-616-2010.
What you should know: Asked for and traded her slot on another committee to get to State Agencies, which oversees election law.
Her priority: “First will be to learn. After that, I’d like to see a firm deadline for persons to get their names on the ballot, preferably earlier so we can get ballots printed. I want to clarify election law. I just want things to work.”
Her biggest fear: “Being a newbie.”

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Two Unconfirmed quotes attributed to Noah Webster

HALT:HaltingArkansasLiberalswithTruth.com

Part 5 David Barton: Were the Founding Fathers Deists?
First Bible printed in USA was printed by our founding fathers for use in the public schools. 20,000 Bibles. 10 commandments hanging in our courthouses.

The last few days I have been  looking at this issue of unconfirmed quotes that people think that the Founding Fathers actually said and the historical evidence concerning them. David Barton has collected these quotes and tried to confirm them over the last 20 years. These unconfirmed quotes are used every single day and unfortunately my group of conservatives have been guilty of using them more than the liberals have. This website HALT (HaltingArkansasLiberalswithTruth.com) includes the T for the word ‘truth” and I want to be totally honest concerning the scholarship of the works that I quote.

Below are two unconfirmed quotes that have been attributed to Noah Webster in the past.

7. The principles of all genuine liberty, and of wise laws and administrations are to be drawn from the Bible and sustained by its authority. The man therefore who weakens or destroys the divine authority of that book may be assessory to all the public disorders which society is doomed to suffer. — Noah Webster (unconfirmed)

8. There are two powers only which are sufficient to control men, and secure the rights of individuals and a peaceable administration; these are the combined force of religion and law, and the force or fear of the bayonet. — Noah Webster (unconfirmed)

These words are entirely consistent with the life and character of Noah Webster. His conversion in 1808 to true Christianity, as opposed to a reliance on outward works and moral duties, is well-documented in his letters. And his attitude on the relationship between government and religion is clearly revealed in his writings. Concerning the origin of civil liberty, he declared:

Almost all the civil liberty now enjoyed in the world owes its origin to the principles of the Christian religion.
. . . . . . . . . .
[T]he religion which has introduced civil liberty, is the religion of Christ and his apostles.
. . . . . . . . . .
This is genuine Christianity, and to this we owe our free constitutions of government.

This is but a small portion of Webster’s thought on the subject of religion and government. Whether he stated the quotes in question or not, they sound like Webster. There is far too much evidence to deny this. Despite this consistency, we recommend avoiding the unconfirmed quote and using the numerous Webster quotations that have stronger supporting documentation.

___

Unconfirmed Quote attibuted to Patrick Henry

David Barton pictured below:

Part 4 David Barton: Were Founding Fathers Deists?
Only 5% of the original 250 founding fathers were not Christians (Ben Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Aaron Burr, Thomas Paine, Ethan Allen, Joe Barlow, Charles Lee, Henry Dearborn, ect)

In the next few weeks I will be looking at this issue of unconfirmed quotes that people think that the Founding Fathers actually said and the historical evidence concerning them. David Barton has collected these quotes and tried to confirm them over the last 20 years. These unconfirmed quotes are used every single day and unfortunately my group of conservatives have been guilty of using them more than the liberals have. This website HALT (HaltingArkansasLiberalswithTruth.com) includes the T for the word ‘truth.” I want to always tell it like it is and that includes this fact: Conservative Republicans will be more likely than their liberal counterparts to  stand up today in state legislatures all across the country and use quotes that have not been confirmed with original sources linking them to the Founding Fathers.
I am not really that upset about this Patrick Henry quote since I know that he was definately an evangelical Christian. Plenty of evidence exists that he believed what is in this quote. Take a look.

1. It cannot be emphasized too strongly or too often that this great nation was founded, not by religionists, but by Christians; not on religions, but on the gospel of Jesus Christ! — Patrick Henry (unconfirmed)

Few could dispute that this quotation is consistent with Henry’s life and character. (Interestingly, those who advocate a secular society today view Henry as an arch enemy.) One early biographer describes how Henry reprinted and distributed Soame Jennings book, View of the Internal Evidence of Christianity, and also that Henry looked to the restraining and elevating principles of Christianity as the hope of his country’s institutions. Bishop Meade, writing of Virginia families in general, says of Henry that, despite possible periods of alienation, his attachment to the [Episcopal] Church of his fathers is clearly established. In one of many courtroom speeches, Henry offered these thoughts (one need not agree with his ideas to understand the context):

I know, sir, how well it becomes a liberal man and a Christian to forget and forgive. As individuals professing a holy religion, it is our bounden duty to forgive injuries done us as individuals. But when the character of Christian you add the character of patriot, you are in a different situation. Our mild and holy system of religion inculcates an admirable maxim of forbearance. If your enemy smite one cheek, turn the other to him. But you must stop there. You cannot apply this to your country. As members of a social community, this maxim does not apply to you. When you consider injuries done to your country your political duty tells you of vengeance. Forgive as a private man, but never forgive public injuries. Observations of this nature are exceedingly unpleasant, but it is my duty to use them.

In a 1796 letter to his daughter Henry stated:

Amongst other strange things said of me, I hear it is said by the deists that I am one of their number; and, indeed, that some good people think I am no Christian. This thought gives me much more pain than the appellation of Tory; because I think religion of infinitely higher importance than politics; and I find much cause to reproach myself that I have lived so long and have given no decided and public proofs of my being a Christian. But, indeed, my dear child, this is a character which I prize far above all this world has, or can boast.

Bishop Meade, mentioned above, also describes a letter from Rev. Dresser, who was addressing two Church historians. Concerning Patrick Henry, Dresser wrote:

It is stated, in an article which I saw some time ago, from the Protestant Episcopalian, and, I presume, from one of you, that Patrick Henry was once an infidel, &c. His widow and some of his descendants are residing in this county, and I am authorized by one of them to say that the anecdote related is not true. He ever had, I am informed, a very abhorrence of infidelity, and actually wrote an answer to Paine’s Age of Reason, but destroyed it before his death. His widow informed me that he received the Communion as often as an opportunity was offered, and on such occasions always fasted until after he had communicated, and spent the day in the greatest retirement. This he did both while Governor and afterward. Had he lived a few years longer, he would have probably done much to check the immoral influence of one of his compatriots [?], whose works are now diffusing the poison of infidelity throughout our land.

Henry’s religious persuasion is well-established. However, there is more evidence that should be considered. Biographer William Wirt Henry relates that a visiting neighbor recalled Henry holding up the Bible and stating:

This book is worth all the books that ever were printed, and it has been my misfortune that I have never found time to read it with the proper attention and feeling till lately. I trust in the mercy of Heaven that it is not yet too late.

Despite his regret for not having spent more time in the Bible, Henry knew the value of Scripture. Taken together with his efforts while in public life, there is an ample foundation for this excerpt from his Last Will and Testament:

This is all the inheritance I can give my dear family. The religion of Christ can give them one which will make them rich indeed.From a copy of Henry’s Last Will and Testament obtained from Patrick Henry Memorial Foundation, Red Hill, Brookneal, VA

As a final thought, there is a possibility that the unconfirmed quote came from Henry’s uncle, the Reverend Patrick Henry. We find no record of the Reverend’s letters or writings. Therefore, until more definitive documentation can be presented, please avoid the words in question.

________________________________________________

This below is a profile of a State Lawmaker from a 2009 interview from the Morning News:

Kim Hendren

Wed, Jan 7, 2009

LegislatorsSenators

hendren-kimR-Gravette
Senate District 9
Serving his second term in the state Senate in the age of term limits, although he served earlier in the Senate from 1979 to 1983. Served one term in the House from 2001 to 2003.
Committees: Chairman of Energy; Rules; Joint Budget; Legislative Council; Education.
Special connections: An engineer and businessman whose interests include car dealerships.
How to reach him: E-mail address: hendrenk@arkleg.state.ar.us. Business number: 479-787-6500. “If my office doesn’t answer you’ll get my voice mail, which I check.”
What you should know: Has a special chagrin against state laws and regulations that try to micromanage school districts.
His priority: “Everybody’s priority is education, both higher education and general.” Will repeat earlier attempts to pass a law requiring that cell phones used in cars be hands-free. Wants state scholarships to higher education to include some “sweat equity” requirements.
Firmest prediction: “We will ask for more efficiency in the education area to save public money. There will also be resistance to any increase in taxes.”

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Samuel Adams Unconfirmed Quote was Confirmed Eventually

HALT:HaltingArkansasLiberalswithTruth.com

Part 3 David Barton: Were Founding Fathers Deists?

American Bible Society filled with Founding Fathers

Here is another in the series of  unconfirmed quotes that people think that the Founding Fathers actually said and the historical evidence concerning them. David Barton has collected these quotes and tried to confirm them over the last 20 years. These unconfirmed quotes are used every single day and unfortunately my group of conservatives have been guilty of using them more than the liberals have. This website HALT (HaltingArkansasLiberalswithTruth.com) includes the T for the word ‘truth.” .
Unlike the previous unconfirmed quotes on the list that David Barton compiled, this quote was later confirmed. This also disproves the theory that all these quotes are “Fake Quotes.” You got to remember that evidence is always turning up and this is a case below where an original source was found.

11. A general dissolution of principles and manners will more surely overthrow the liberties of America than the whole force of the common enemy. While the people are virtuous they cannot be subdued; but when once they lose their virtue then will be ready to surrender their liberties to the first external or internal invader.Samuel Adams (unconfirmed confirmed!)

This is a perfect example of how we are able to verify quotations. Originally, the statement was suspect because the only source was secondary, and we were uncomfortable with the documentation. However, after acquiring a more thorough version of Samuel Adams’ writings, we found the statement in a letter to James Warren dated February 12, 1779

__________________________________________________

Today the State lawmaker I am profiling is Karen Hopper

This is Karen Hopper
Baxter County resident 21 years. 

Former Senior District Representative for U.S. Congressmen Tim and Asa Hutchinson, working on both legislative issues & individual constituency matters.

Worked continually in support of other conservatives seeking public office at the local, state & national level.

Former news reporter covering all levels of government.

Member N.R.A.

Member Mountain Home Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors

Recipient of the Mountain Home Chamber of Commerce Opal Award for community service.

B.S. Journalism/Advertising, Murray State University.

Married 24 years to Fred Waddell

Associate Vice Chancellor for Research, Special Projects, and Distance Learning at Arkansas State University Mountain Home.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Campaign to Elect Karen Hopper–431-8934

April 28, 2008

Hopper Pledges To Work to Reduce Excessive Tax on Charitable Bingo

State Representative Candidate Karen Hopper (R) of Lakeview said today if elected she will work to reduce the excessive tax on charitable bingo that has left many local veteran’s groups, churches, and community organizations unable to fund their causes.  Hopper is a candidate in the May 20 Republican Primary Election.

Hopper said information from the Bureau of Legislative Affairs, the research arm of the Arkansas General Assembly, indicates the state has collected in excess of $830,000 through March from a 1-cent per bingo card tax.  The Arkansas Department of Finance and Administration (DF&A) had projected it would cost under $600,000 annually to administer the program.

“At this rate with three months to go in the fiscal year, the state stands to collect in excess of a half million dollars more than it needs to administer the program.  This money should be in our communities funding the projects of our veteran’s groups, churches, and community organizations,” Hopper said.

Voters in 2006 approved a constitutional amendment legalizing charitable bingo and raffles.  Act 388 of 2007 established the rules and regulations for operators, including a method of taxing the games.  Under the rules established by Act 388, groups must purchase a license and then pay a 1-cent tax on each bingo game card or “face” sold.  The Act also requires charities to purchase bingo and raffle licenses.

Hopper said despite the legislature having input from representatives of community organizations around the state as the terms of Act 388 were hammered out, DF&A’s interpretation of the rules has lead to the excessive collections.

“The result is that community organizations across the state are suffering to the point they are not able to fund their causes.  The Alley-White American Legion Post 52 of Mountain Home advises it cannot meet its overhead and has resorted to holding a monthly pancake breakfast to generate additional income,” Hopper said.

“We need to reduce this excessive tax so that our local community organizations are able to fund college scholarships, Boys and Girls State delegates, and numerous other activities,” Hopper added.                   While efforts have been made requesting DF&A reduce the tax, officials with that state agency maintain any changes must be made legislatively.

 

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Unconfirmed Quote attributed to Ben Franklin

HALT:HaltingArkansasLiberalswithTruth.com


Part 2 David Barton on Founding Fathers were they deists?
Not James Wilson and William Samuel Johnson

In the next few weeks I will be looking at this issue of unconfirmed quotes that people think that the Founding Fathers actually said and the historical evidence concerning them. David Barton has collected these quotes and tried to confirm them over the last 20 years. These unconfirmed quotes are used every single day and unfortunately my group of conservatives have been guilty of using them more than the liberals have. This website HALT (HaltingArkansasLiberalswithTruth.com) includes the T for the word ‘truth.” I want to always tell it like it is and that includes this fact: Conservative Republicans will be more likely than their liberal counterparts to  stand up today in state legislatures all across the country and use quotes that have not been confirmed with original sources linking them to the Founding Fathers.

6. Whosoever shall introduce into public affairs the principles of primitive Christianity will change the face of the world. — Benjamin Franklin (unconfirmed)

Franklin knew quite well the value of Christianity to society. In the context of teaching history to the youth of Philadelphia, he said:

History will also afford the frequent opportunities of showing the necessity of a public religion, from its usefulness to the public; the advantage of a religious character among private persons; the mischiefs of superstition, &c. and the excellency of the Christian religion above all others, ancient or modern.

This is not to say that Franklin was a Christian; he did not believe in the divinity of Christ. This is easily documented. However, he was well aware of the utility of religion in general and Christianity specifically. In a letter to his daughter, Franklin stated:

Go constantly to church, whoever preaches. The act of devotion in the Common Prayer Book is your principal business there, and if properly attended to, will do more towards amending the heart than sermons generally can do. For they were composed by men of much greater piety and wisdom, than our common composers of sermons can pretend to be; and therefore I wish you would never miss the prayer days; yet I do not mean you should despise sermons, even of the preachers you dislike, for the discourse is often much better than the man, as sweet and clear waters come through very dirty earth. I am the more particular on this head, as you seemed to express a little before I came away some inclination to leave our church, which I would not have you do.

A key phrase in our unconfirmed quote is “primitive Christianity.” Franklin, like Jefferson, felt the true doctrines of Christ had been perverted. Just days before his death, Franklin wrote to the Reverend Ezra Stiles:

As to Jesus of Nazareth, my opinion of whom you particularly desire, I think his system of morals and his religion, as he left them to us, the best the world ever saw or is like to see; but I apprehend it has received various corrupting changes, and I have, with most of the present dissenters in England, some doubts as to his divinity; though it is a question I do not dogmatize upon, having never studied it, and think it needless to busy myself with it now, when I expect soon an opportunity of knowing the truth with less trouble. I see no harm, however, in its being believed, if that belief has the good consequence, as probably it has, of making his doctrines more respected and more observed; especially as I do not perceive, that the Supreme takes it amiss, by distinguishing the unbelievers in his government of the world with any peculiar marks of his displeasure.

Moreover it was Franklin who made the famous appeal for prayer at the Constitutional Convention-an idea which was implemented shortly after the first congress convened. Madison’s notes of the convention offer these words:

We have been assured, Sir, in the Sacred Writings that except the Lord build the house, they labor in vain that build it. I firmly believe this; and I also believe that without His concurring aid, we shall succeed in this political building no better that the builders of Babel.

Franklin spoke favorably and often on the role of religion in America. However, while the questionable quote may have been his, Franklin’s writings are well-known and it is unlikely that anything new will surface.

___________________________________________

Today I am profiling State Lawmaker David Sanders.

About David J. Sanders

For David, standing up for our conservative values is a way of life, and it starts at home. He and his wife Rebecca, a teacher, have five children: Abigail, 11, Noah, 9, Isaac, 8, Elijah, 2.5 and Levi, who was born last October.He is an active member of Little Rock’s First Baptist Church, where he is an ordained deacon. David has spent the last four years working in Christian education as the director of development for the Arkansas Baptist School System, a K-12 Christian college preparatory school in West Little Rock.

After graduating from Ouachita Baptist University in 1997, he put his beliefs in to action when he went to work for the people of Arkansas in the Governor’s Office. Then, he left government and politics. For six years, David worked for Johnson Controls, Inc., one of the country’s leading energy services companies.

During that time he also started another career, which allowed him to become a leading conservative voice in Arkansas.

In 2000, Stephens Media hired David as a columnist. Twice a week, for nearly a decade, his column ran in more than 25 newspapers statewide. Two years later, Arkansas Business named David one of the state’s top leaders under 40-years old.

He also took our conservative values to the airwaves, first as a panelist on AETN’s ARKANSAS WEEK and then as the producer and host of Unconventional Wisdom, his award-winning public affairs program. His leadership was recognized outside the state as well.

THE WALL STREET JOURNAL and NATIONAL REVIEW ONLINE have published David’s conservative commentary. In May 2005, he was honored with the prestigious Robert D. Novak Fellowship.

Along with raising a family with his wife and working in business and education, standing up for “Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness” has been David’s fulltime job. He is a member of the Arkansas Right to Life, National Rifle Association and Club for Growth.

David has led on so many important issues. Now he wants to represent you in the Legislature so that he can fight to strengthen our families and against policies that could bankrupt our state. Like you, he wants Arkansas to be the Land of Opportunity.

I have enjoyed reading David’s articles over the years. Here is one below:

Taking on the Governor’s Commission on Global Warming (full column)

January 7, 2009

By David J. Sanders

A little review: A group called the Center for Climate Strategies held undue influence over the Arkansas Governor’s Commission on Global Warming and was forced onto the commission without any serious debate.

CCS acts at the behest of its wealthy donors who pay for their work to carry out its aggressive advocacy agenda. Here’s how the scheme works:

CCS helps set up a state-based global warming policy study group and then gets hired to direct it. The group will adopt one of CCS’s canned policy reports. Then, the policy group’s members lobby their state government to adopt controversial and costly environmental policies.

The GCGW reproduced one of CCS’s reports, which contained 54 policy recommendations and carried a price tag of $3.7 billion.

The governor’s office supplied a copy of CCS’s contract with the state, signed on Oct. 31. 2008. There was little explanation as to why CCS had begun working months before the commission was hurriedly pressured to hire the group at its first meeting.

But new information sheds more light on CCS’s heavy-hand, casting further doubt on the fidelity of the commission’s processes and policy recommendations.

On Monday, Dr. Richard Ford, commission member and economist and tenured faculty member at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, thumbed through a notebook on his desk, stopping at a copy of the law — Act 696 — that set up the global warming commission.

“Right here,” he said, pointing to the law’s emergency clause. “It says that ‘it is imperative that Arkansas study the scientific data … to determine whether global warming is an immediate threat to the citizens in the State of Arkansas.’ We did not do that.”

According to Ford, the only economist on the commission, the group wasn’t allowed to do what it was instructed by law to do. He explained that the commission never “studied or even debated the scientific data” on global warming.

So why would a commission set up to study and make policy recommendations about global warming not study it? It’s simple; CCS wouldn’t allow it, according to a memo entitled “Proposal to Develop an Arkansas Climate Action Plan” sent to Morril Harriman, Gov. Beebe’s chief of staff on June 27, 2007.

Under the heading “Participant Guidelines,” the memo stated, “Participants will not debate the science of climate change or the directive of the Act, but will instead provide leadership and vision for how Arkansas will rise to the challenges and opportunities of addressing climate change.”

This information was deleted from a similar memo on the GCGW’s Web site.

When asked about CCS’s insistence to limit debate, a governor’s spokesman tried to justify it by claiming that it wasn’t the commission’s job to debate climate change (Later he admitted that in spite of CCS’s “standards of conduct,” it wasn’t the policy of the governor’s office that debate on climate change be stifled.)

The memo also contained a projected budget totaling $435,383 for CCS’s cost to work with the commission. According to the governor’s office, the state only paid $50,000 of the total amount. The memo stated that CCS’s “group of private foundation donors” would “share” the rest of the cost.

The governor’s spokesman didn’t know who paid the remaining cost … of the commission that, mind you, was set up by law. He, instead, encouraged me to contact CCS.

But in the GCGW’s final report, a handful of donors, who are widely viewed as global warming alarmists or who have close ties to liberal causes, are identified as having paid the rest of Arkansas’ bill. The Blue Moon Fund, Rockefeller Brothers Fund, New York Community Trust, Energy Foundation, and the Sandler Family Supporting Foundation are all listed.

It’s becoming clearer: CCS helped set up the GCGW, then got hired to advise the group, limited the terms of the debate, pushed its policies, which were eventually adopted, and then found liberal donors sympathetic to the cause to pay the bill.

A bargain? No. A ruse? Yes.

Unconfirmed Quote attributed to Alexis de Tocqueville

HALT: HaltingArkansasLiberalswithTruth.com
Part 1 David Barton: Were the Founding Fathers Deists?
Religious holidays, Court cases, punishing kids in school for praying in Jesus name

In the next few weeks I will be looking at this issue of unconfirmed quotes that people think that the Founding Fathers actually said and the historical evidence concerning them. David Barton has collected these quotes and tried to confirm them over the last 20 years. These unconfirmed quotes are used every single day and unfortunately my group of conservatives have been guilty of using them more than the liberals have. This website HALT (HaltingArkansasLiberalswithTruth.com) includes the T for the word ‘truth.” I want to always tell it like it is and that includes this fact: Conservative Republicans will be more likely than their liberal counterparts to  stand up today in state legislatures all across the country and use quotes that have not been confirmed with original sources linking them to the Founding Fathers.

I hear this quote below used quite often by conservative lawmakers.

13. America is great because she is good, and if America ever ceases to be good, she will cease to be great. Alexis de Tocqueville (unconfirmed)

Alexis de Tocqueville’s work, Democracy in America, should be required reading for all involved in the Church/state debates. He devoted a significant portion of his work to the religious element of American life, as the following thoughts indicate:

Moreover, almost all the sects of the United States are comprised within the great unity of Christianity, and Christian morality is everywhere the same.In the United States the sovereign authority is religious, and consequently hypocrisy must be common; but there is no country in the whole world in which the Christian religion retains a greater influence over the souls of men than in America, and there can be no greater proof of its utility, and of its conformity to human nature, than that its influence is most powerfully felt over the most enlightened and free nation of the earth.

The Americans combine the notions of Christianity and of liberty so intimately in their minds, that it is impossible to make them conceive the one without the other; and with them this conviction does not spring from that barren traditionary faith which seems to vegetate in the soul rather than to live.

There are certain populations in Europe whose unbelief is only equaled by their ignorance and their debasement, while in America one of the freest and most enlightened nations in the world fulfills all the outward duties of religion with fervor.

Upon my arrival in the United States, the religious aspect of the country was the first thing that struck my attention; and the longer I stayed there, the more did I perceive the great political consequences resulting from this state of things, to which I was unaccustomed. In France I had almost always seen the spirit of religion and the spirit of freedom pursuing courses diametrically opposed to each other; but in America I found that they were intimately united, and that they reigned in common over the same country.

While the Tocqueville quote is not in this book, it may be in some other writings of which we are unaware. The fact that there is no primary source for someone quoted so often causes us to view the words as unconfirmed.

Supreme Court never said It.

1 Of 3 / Faith Of The Founding Fathers / American Heritage Series / David Barton

In the next few weeks I will be looking at this issue of unconfirmed quotes that people think that the Founding Fathers actually said and the historical evidence concerning them. These unconfirmed quotes are used every single day and unfortunately my group of conservatives have been guilty of using them more than the liberals have. This website HALT (HaltingArkansasLiberalswithTruth.com) includes the T for the word ‘truth.” I want to always tell it like it is and that includes this fact: Conservative Republicans will be more likely than their liberal counterparts to  stand up today in state legislatures all across the country and use quotes that have not been confirmed with original sources linking them to the Founding Fathers.
This first quote I will look at has been on David Barton’s Unconfirmed List for about 20 years but it was confirmed about 7 years ago but it turned out not to be a Supreme Court Case but a lower court case.

3. Our laws and our institutions must necessarily be based upon and embody the teachings of the Redeemer of mankind. It is impossible that it should be otherwise. In this sense and to this extent, our civilizations and our institutions are emphatically Christian. — Holy Trinity v. U. S. (Supreme Court) (inaccurate confirmed! — Richmond v. Moore, Illinois Supreme Court, 1883) 

This quotation appeared in many modern works, each attributing the wording to the U. S. Supreme Court’s 1892 decision in the Holy Trinity case. After researching and being unable to locate this quote in that case, we concluded that it was probably was a cut-and-paste typographical error, for several of the phrases do appear in that case, (10. For example, “These, and many other matters which might be noticed, add a volume of unofficial declarations to the mass of organic utterances that this is a Christian nation.” Church of the Holy Trinity v. United States; 143 U. S. 457, 471 (1892).

)but not in the exact wording given above; we therefore at that time recommended that this quote not be used. Now, however, after more than a decade of searching, we have located and confirmed the original source for this quote: it appears not in an 1892 U. S. Supreme Court case

11. Justice David J. Brewer, author of the 1892 Holy Trinity opinion, also wrote a book in 1905 called The United States: A Christian Nation. Brewer opened his work with these words: “We classify nations in various ways. As, for instance, by their form of government. One is a kingdom, another an empire, and still another a republic. Also by race. Great Britain is an Anglo-Saxon nation, France a Gallic, Germany a Teutonic, Russia a Slav. And still again by religion. One is a Mohammedan nation, others are heathen, and still others are Christian nations. This republic is classified among the Christian nations of the world. It was so formally declared by the Supreme Court of the United States. But in what sense can it be called a Christian nation? Not in the sense that Christianity is the established religion or that the people are in any manner compelled to support it. On the contrary, the Constitution specifically provides that “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof.” Neither is it Christian in the sense that all its citizens are either in fact or name Christians. On the contrary, all religions have free scope within our borders. Numbers of our people profess other religions, and many reject all. Nor is it Christian in the sense that a profession of Christianity is a condition of holding office or otherwise engaging in the public service, or essential to recognition either politically or socially. In fact the government as a legal organization is independent of all religions. Nevertheless, we constantly speak of this republic as a Christian nation-in fact, as the leading Christian nation of the world.” David J. Brewer, The United States A Christian Nation (Philadelphia: John C. Winston Company, 1905), pp. 11-12. )

but rather in an 1883 Illinois Supreme Court ruling in Richmond v. Moore. ( 12. Richmond v. Moore, 107 Ill. 429, 1883 WL 10319 (Ill.), 47 Am.Rep. 445 (Ill. 1883).) While we previously recommended against using this quote, it is now authenticated and can be cited, providing that it is attributed to the proper source.