FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE PART 174 Nat Hentoff, historian,atheist, pro-life advocate, novelist, jazz and country music critic, and syndicated columnist (Featured artist is Jim Woodson )

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Culture

The Pleasures and Contradictions of Being Nat Hentoff

Read more: http://forward.com/culture/200348/the-pleasures-and-contradictions-of-being-nat-hent/

The writer and activist Nat Hentoff has died at 91, ‘surrounded by family and listening to Billie Holliday’s music,’ as his son put it on Twitter.

Here’s a look back at the bearded, jazz-loving, proudly aetheistic, First Amendment advocate and columnist, written after the release a 2013 documentary about his life and career.

The title of David Lewis’s documentary “The Pleasures of Being Out of Step/Notes on the Life of Nat Hentoff” begs a central question: Has Hentoff, 89, famed social commentator, critic, jazz writer and activist, really spent his life being out of step? Or is that largely a romanticizing conceit?

If one considers the prevailing conformity of Eisenhower-era culture out of which his career first flowered, the answer, of course, is yes; a bearded, left-leaning, jazz-loving, African-American-befriending agnostic Jew was about as out of step as a person could get. But situated more narrowly within his own milieu, among his own kind, this East Coast child of the Great Depression who lived in the heart of Greenwich Village, frequenting its lively night scene while helping to forge the distinctive tone of its own local newspaper, has spent most of his life not only in step, but also frequently choreographing those steps for his confreres.

Nevertheless, Hentoff was, in his way, in the vanguard. He developed a love for jazz early in life, and unlike many fans of his generation, took it seriously as art music rather than as glorified dance music. He brought to his listening a quality of focused, sustained attention that has always been rare. In Lewis’s film, Hentoff relates a story that seems as extraordinary as it is characteristic of the man: Unable to appreciate Charlie Parker’s genius — the ideas were too dense, he says, and came too quickly for him to grasp — he followed a friend’s advice and listened to Parker’s records at half-speed, closely and repeatedly. Slowed down, the music gradually became comprehensible, its intricacies less opaque, its beauties less veiled, and he began to understand the scope of the talent on display. It is no accident that Hentoff was the first non-musician to be named a Jazz Master by the National Endowment for the Arts.

Musicians themselves sensed in him a kindred spirit, and many became his personal friends. Charles Mingus wrote in his memoirs that Hentoff was one of the few white men with whom he found it possible to form a deep, abiding friendship. The writer’s admiration for his favorite artists was unfeigned, wholehearted and free of any consciousness of a racial divide. Interracial friendships were not so very rare in left-wing circles during the 1950s; nevertheless, there seems to have been a special quality of warmth and receptivity that Hentoff brought to these relationships.

Besides jazz, Hentoff’s other passion was the First Amendment. He was as consistent — and as fanatical — about civil liberties and freedom of speech as he was about music. When American Nazis wanted to march through Skokie, Illinois, a town with many Holocaust survivors among its denizens, it caused a schism in liberal circles. Did hateful expression as ugly and provocative as that of the march qualify as protected speech? Many said no, but Hentoff was unwavering, publicly and vociferously supporting the ACLU in its defense of the Nazis. No doubt this position remains controversial to many. But as Margot Hentoff said of her husband, he tended to feel it necessary “to take things to an absolute position.”

Lewis, the documentary’s producer and director, is a veteran journalist, and this his first feature-length film. So how should we assess it? Do we judge it as an aesthetic artifact without regard to its subject? Or do we like it or hate it depending primarily on our personal reactions to Nat Hentoff’s tastes and opinions? Can we simply ask whether it holds our interest?

According to this last criterion, the documentary emphatically succeeds. It is a compelling portrait of a specific time and place, easy to view in retrospect as a verdant intellectual oasis amid a vast gray desert. Hentoff is a fascinating figure worthy of our attention. Andre Braugher provides authoritative narration. And Lewis has assembled a congenial and lively group of witnesses, especially the witty, skeptical Margot Hentoff, the fine jazz historian Stanley Crouch, and Hentoff’s estranged but apparently still grudgingly affectionate Village Voice colleague Karen Durbin

Perhaps the most striking presence is that of the late Amiri Baraka; despite a history of having penned, along with a few superb plays, some repellently anti-Semitic screeds (quite a few of them produced after he claimed to have abandoned that prejudice), he nonetheless offers a sympathetic and insightful account of the natural alliance between African Americans and Jewish Americans, along with an acknowledgment that most of jazz’s early white enthusiasts tended to be Jews. His testimony in the film is gripping in its own right and startling when considered in its context.

But judging the film as a crafted object, one has to admit that it is not edited with anything resembling a sure hand. If Lewis was guided by some principle while shaping his documentary, if there is some overarching architecture governing the way the succession of historical footage and testimony is structured, I fail to perceive it. The film jumps around chronologically and in terms of subject matter, and cuts from witness to witness without apparent logic or purpose. Virtually every scene succeeds in holding our interest, but the way these scenes are assembled appears almost random.

With one exception. Mr. Lewis — or perhaps it’s Mr. Hentoff — has a surprise for us up his sleeve, and that surprise is saved for the final ten minutes or so of the film. In the last decade, Hentoff turned violently against abortion. He became as vociferously pro-life as the most zealous evangelical Christian. In the film, he presents this change of heart as a logical extension of his belief in individual freedom — a line of thought implicitly granting personhood to a developing fetus — along with his longstanding opposition to capital punishment.

Regardless of where one stands on this issue— and independent of how one weighs the logical consistency he claims to embrace — this stance comes as a shock (even his wife seems a little shocked). As does a final card superimposed over the film, telling us that in 2009 Hentoff became a Senior Fellow at the Cato Institute. The film identifies the Cato Institute as “a libertarian think tank,” which, while not inaccurate, doesn’t do it justice. It is a rabidly right-wing entity founded by the Koch family; other than its stance on abortion, one can say with justice that it flies in the face of virtually every cause Hentoff has championed. But as if to confirm the thoroughgoing nature of his apostasy, Hentoff has recently endorsed Rand Paul’s presidential candidacy. An astonishing, an unthinkable development; it’s as if the word “libertarian,” all by itself, has overridden not only the man’s lifelong value system, but his higher cerebral functions.

Hentoff was fired from the Village Voice in 2008; many suspect it was because of his pro-life stance, although the paper’s owners deny it. He certainly lost friends; his combative forensic style was never gentle, and when it was turned on erstwhile allies, it seems to have alienated many of them permanently. In his ninth decade, Nat Hentoff has justified the film’s title. He’s finally, decisively, out of step.

Erik Tarloff is a screenwriter, novelist, and playwright. His latest novel is ‘All Our Yesterdays.’”

Read more: http://forward.com/culture/200348/the-pleasures-and-contradictions-of-being-nat-hent/

The Pleasures of Being Out Of Step Official Trailer (2014) – Nat Hentoff, Bob Dylan Documentary HD

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Dancing at the Wailing Wall in 1967:

Picture of Wailing Wall from 1863


Source: Earthly Footsteps of the Man of Galilee, p. 147.

President Carter with Adrian and Joyce Rogers in 1979 at the White House:
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Adrian Rogers in the White House pictured with President Ronald Reagan below:

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Adrian and Joyce Rogers with President Bush at Union University in Jackson, TN:

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Nat Hentoff like and Milton Friedman and John Hospers was a hero to Libertarians. Over the years I had the opportunity to correspond with some prominent Libertarians such as Friedman and Hospers. Friedman was very gracious, but Hospers was not. I sent a cassette tape of Adrian Rogers on Evolution to John Hospers in May of 1994 which was the 10th anniversary of Francis Schaeffer’s passing and I promptly received a typed two page response from Dr. John Hospers. Dr. Hospers had both read my letter and all the inserts plus listened to the whole sermon and had some very angry responses. If you would like to hear the sermon from Adrian Rogers and read the transcript then refer to my earlier post at this link.  Earlier I posted the comments made by Hospers in his letter to me and you can access those posts by clicking on the links in the first few sentences of this post or you can just google “JOHN HOSPERS FRANCIS SCHAEFFER” or “JOHN HOSPERS ADRIAN ROGERS.”

Image result for john hospers francis schaeffer

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Image result for nat hentoff milton friedman

Likewise I read a lot of material from Nat Hentoff and I wrote him several letters. In the post I will include one of those letters.

Nat Hentoff on abortion

Published on Nov 5, 2016

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Adrian Rogers pictured below on national day of prayer with President Bush.

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XXXXXXX 4th Letter on Israel on 8-5-14 and Hot Springs

To Nat Hentoff, From Everette hatcher

Sent August 5, 2014

I know that I had written you about Israel back in May of this year, but Israel has jumped into the news a great deal since then so I thought I needed to write you again. Zechariah 12:3 (KJV) notes, “And in that day will I make Jerusalem a burdensome stone for all people.”

It is amazing how up to date the Bible can be in many ways.
Mike Huckabee opened up his 8-2-14 Fox news show up with these words:
“You bet it is tragic that many civilians in Gaza have died, but when Palestinians pack their population around their military hardware and weaponry and then they fail to heed the leaflets, radio transmissions, dud warning bombs, phone calls and text messages, the results will be tragic…. I wonder if the Jew-haters would feel better if Israel was terrible at protecting and there were thousands of dead Jewish children?,,,,Every single agreed to cease-fire agreement pushed for by President Obama has resulted in Hamas violating it by firing more rockets right into civilian targets in Israel.”
Furthermore, Bible believers are not surprised that Israel doesn’t get along with their cousins in the Middle East because Genesis 16:12 notes concerning Israel’s neighbors “…he will live in hostility towards all his brothers.” Also we were not surprised when the Jews returned to the Holy Land after War World II because Isaiah 11:12 asserts, “And He will … gather together the dispersed of Judah from the four corners of the earth.”
I visited Israel in 1976 and our tour guide was my pastor Adrian Rogers. During the trip he asserted  that the Jews had a divine right to be in the land, but they would never have peace until Christ came back.
Rogers also made 4 other points concerning the young nation of Israel.
First, the Old Testament predicted that the Jews would regather from all over the world and form a new reborn nation of Israel.  (Isaiah 11:11-12)
Second, it was also predicted that the nation of Israel would become a stumbling block to the whole world. (Zechariah 12:3)
Third, it was predicted that the Hebrew language would be used again as the Jews’ first language even though we know in 1948 that Hebrew at that time was a dead language! (Zeph 3:9; 2 Thess 2:3-4).
Fourth, it was predicted that the Jews would never again be removed from their land.(Amos 9:14-15)
I was fascinated to read a few years later these groundbreaking words by a famous columnist who happened to be a Jew. Irving Kristol in his article, “The Political Dilemma of American Jews,” COMMENTARY MAGAZINE, 7/1/84 , wrote:

The rise of the Moral Majority is another new feature of the American landscape that baffles Jews…One of the reasons—perhaps the main reason—they do not know what to do about it is the fact that the Moral Majority is strongly pro-Israel. Some Jews, enmeshed in the liberal time warp, refuse to take this mundane fact seriously. They are wrong… In short, is it not time for an agonizing reappraisal?

I later corresponded with Mr. Kristol and shared with him some of these same Old Testament Prophecies concerning the Jews returning to the promised land once again.

In a letter to me dated September 21, 1995  Irving Kristol wrote this comment, “I am leery of taking Biblical prophecies too literally. They always seem to get fulfilled, some way or other, whatever happens. They are inspiring, of course, which enough for me.”

It is my view that there is a master plan that is getting played out on the world stage and Israel is in the center of the plan. Jesus spoke to the skeptical Jews of his day with his words from John 7 :16-17, “My doctrine is not mine, but his that sent me. If any man will do his will, he shall know of the doctrine, whether it be of God, or whether I speak of myself.” In other words, if you are an honest doubter and are willing to search out the truth and live by the results then God will reveal to you that Christ is his son. However, if you are a dishonest doubter then you are just unwilling to serve God and that is the core problem. You can’t find God for the same reason a thief can’t find a policeman.

Just recently I got to visit with Irving Kristol’s son Bill in a political meeting in Hot Springs, Arkansas on July 18, 2014.  I gave him copies of letters I had received from both his father and their family friend Daniel Bell. He was amazed. He read the letters on the spot and thanked me for them. I told that Old Testament prophecies concerning Israel was the subject of the letters. Then I told him how much I respected his mother’s historical work and asked how she was doing.

Is there a master plan and does the universe have an ultimate purpose? The events playing out in the Middle East today seem to indicate that these Old Testament prophecies concerning the country of Israel returning to prominence are correct. Do you wish to explain them away like Irving Kristol did?

Thank you for your time.

Sincerely,

Everette Hatcher, P.O.Box 23416, Little Rock, AR 72221, everettehatcher@gmail.com,

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Featured artist is Jim Woodson

President Bush’s Powerful Veteran Portraits

Published on Mar 2, 2017

During his first in-studio appearance, President George W. Bush discussed his admiration for veterans, the meaning behind his collection of portraits, and his newest furry family member.

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David Everett & Jim Woodson

DETAILS

Time:Sat., Aug. 29, 6-8:30 p.m. 2015
Free

LOCATION INFO:

Valley House Gallery and Sculpture Garden

6616 Spring Valley Road Dallas, TX
Dallas, TX  75254
972-239-2441

Tucked into a residential North Dallas neighborhood sits one of the city’s oldest and finest art galleries. Surrounded by acres of lush greenery and a small babbling brook, Valley House Gallery feels like an escape from the expansive swathes of concrete that comprise the rest of the city. This weekend, the gallery opens two exhibitions by Texas-based artists, one by sculptor, David Everett, and another by painter Jim Woodson. Both promise a unique perspective on the state’s landscape. See them in opening reception from 6-8:30 p.m. Saturday at Valley House Gallery, 6616 Spring Valley Rd. Admission is free. More information at valleyhouse.com.

Fort Worth’s Woodson Named State Painter

PAINTER OF DISTINCTION: JIM WOODSON ’65

After retiring from 39 years in the TCU School of Art, Jim Woodson ’65 is tabbed by the Texas Legislature as one of the state’s official visual artists.

For as long as 71-year-old painter Jim Woodson ’65 can remember, his hands were always clutching a pencil, poised to draw something.

Anything.

If he didn’t know that he was destined to become an artist, his childhood pals in his native Waco didn’t hesitate to remind him.

“My classmates kept on saying, ‘Jim draws all the time. He is bound to be an artist when he grows up,’” recalls Woodson, who retired in May after 39 years in the TCU School of Art.

His school chums were prophetic: Woodson not only has become an acclaimed painter and teacher, but, this year, the Texas Commission on the Arts announced him as the Legislature’s official state visual artist for two-dimensional work.

“I remember thinking how really nice it is just to be nominated,” Woodson says from his home away from Fort Worth, near Abiquiu, N.M. “But honestly, I didn’t think I had much of a shot because there were so many other good artists being considered.”

But Woodson did nab the statewide honor. In fact, the State Artist distinction amounts to a lifetime achievement commendation for Woodson’s decades of canvases that capture, in a transcendent way, new facets of Texas and New Mexico’s endless high desert landscape.

Woodson has shown his work in all corners of Texas, from the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth to the compact Old Jail Art Center in Albany. Laura Bush has purchased a Woodson, while seven of his pieces are on view at the Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway offices in Fort Worth. In September, Woodson completed a successful first show in the prestigious Wade Wilson Art gallery in Santa Fe.

Today, when asked for his take on the evolution of his prize-winning painting style, Woodson admits his earliest landscapes were spare, bereft of trees, yet full of undulating Palomino-colored hills of Northern California. Upon his return to Texas, in his early 30s, he was more influenced by those artists who were manipulating the landscape to create their work.

“In some extreme instances, I would actually build a three-dimensional form and bury it into the landscape, all to be as inventive as I could with the landscape,” says Woodson. “Pretty soon, I began imposing my own fantastical architectural or even interior shapes and spaces into the landscape in my mind and would then paint them. The landscape becomes an activity, not at all dead, but constantly in flux.”

Since 1982, Cheryl Vogel has been the chief curator of the Valley House Gallery and Sculpture Garden in Dallas, which has, since 1998, acted as Woodson’s primary DFW gallery representative and agent.

What first excited Vogel about Woodson’s artistry was his accomplished brush work and brash scale of a typical Woodson canvas. Many of his works average four-by-five feet.

“He always has such a sense of air and movement and energy in his paintings,” says Vogel. “They are never static.”

Even more appealing to Vogel is Woodson’s avowed refusal to burden the landscape with any obsessive, photographic meticulousness.

“He means his works to be paintings, though they are as far away from calendar paintings as you can get,” says Vogel. “They are muscular and masculine. His colors peer out between his final strokes, yet he is not impressionistic by nature. He wants to paint, as he says, ‘a verb not a noun.’ Meaning: He wants action in there.”

All in all, it’s the kind of singular artistic sensibility that, according to Vogel, prices Woodson’s work at $600 for graphite drawings, $2,000-$4,000 for works on paper, and $4,000-$25,000 for oil paintings. A standard four-by-five-foot Woodson oil will often fetches over $12,000.

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That would have been a king’s ransom to the financially strapped household Woodson called home in Waco. Woodson’s father was a broom-maker, with an 8th-grade education, and his mother a school secretary. The 6-year-old Woodson passed the days by seeking out any flat surface on which to draw, usually with the blunt graphite of a humble pencil.

A self-styled little “terrorist” in high school, Woodson cultivated a greasy-haired, James Dean-like rebel image.

“I think I was just bored with everything going in class,” says Woodson who, despite his lackadaisical affect, was still elected president of his school’s art club. “I now feel bad that I must have caused my art teacher as much grief as I did.”

A very green college student, Woodson was the first in his family to ever get more than a high school education. He was lucky enough to encounter an inspirational painting teacher named Joe Farrell Hobbs while a sophomore at Arlington State College (now University of Texas at Arlington).

“The thing about Joe,” recalls Woodson, “is that he was such a solid example of how someone could actually make a living – pay his bills, have a family — while teaching and making art. At the time, I didn’t have a clue how I could manage to do that.

“While Prof. Hobbs taught us a pretty standard painting class,” continues Woodson, “he also taught us not only about using the core material properly, but about being in the world as a vital, working, living artist.”

Upon graduating from TCU in 1965 (Woodson transferred there from Arlington State), he enrolled in the Masters of Fine Arts program at the University of Texas at Austin. Unhappy with the excessively theoretical and academic bent of the art program at UT, the freshly married Woodson was itching to leave Austin.

And with a massive sale of his accumulated art, Woodson, his wife, Linda, and their dog, piled into their car and took off for San Francisco, arriving there in 1967’s “Summer of Love.”

“Suddenly, I was an artist caught in the hippy world,” says Woodson. “It was a wonderful time. I even got to hear Janis Joplin and the Grateful Dead in Golden Gate Park.”

A series of less-than-satisfying jobs, including one at the California Historical Society and at a plastic sign factory, would eventually chase Woodson from his perceived California nirvana back to Fort Worth.

An old teacher-acquaintance from TCU, Harry Geffert, had contacted Woodson about returning to his alma mater to apply for several open painting teaching positions.

So, one plane ride later in 1974, and the 33-year old Woodson was back at TCU, assuming a one-year appointment as a visiting artist, teaching painting and drawing.

Thirty-nine years later, up until his official retirement this past spring, Woodson was still “visiting.”

“I always felt very confident as a teacher,” Woodson says. “I’ve always known I had something to offer the kids.”

Throughout his years at TCU, Woodson’s teaching philosophy evolved into one of not wanting to fill up his students’ heads with too much theory.

“Sometimes getting out of the students’ way is one of the best things you can do,” admits Woodson. “Sure, I can improve their work with color and help them with some ideas and concepts, but what I fundamentally try to convey is how seriously they must be committed to being an artist. That’s what inspirational art teachers did for me.”

It must be uplifting for Woodson when he gets that occasional invite to a splashy art show featuring one of his former students. That would seem to be the ultimate validation of a job well done in launching a viable artist into the world.

“Whenever I see evidence of one of my students’ success,” says Woodson, “I think back to what my art teachers told me: ‘If you really feel like you have a choice to be an artist, then don’t do it. Because being an artist is not about having a choice.’ You’ve got to do it. For me it was totally clear.”

Exhibit:
The works of Jim Woodson will be shown at the Moudy Art Gallery in an exhibition from September 16 to October 11.

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WOODY WEDNESDAY  Ranking Woody Allen’s 47 movies!!!! Part 2

Ranking Woody Allen’s 47 movies!!!! Part 1

The Best & The Rest: Every Woody Allen Film Ranked

This week, Woody Allen‘s 2016 title (for as we all know, there’s one each year), “Cafe Society,” starring Kristen Stewart, Jesse Eisenberg, Steve Carell, Corey Stoll, Blake Lively and Anna Camp, opens after a warm reception as the opening film at the most recent Cannes Film Festival. You can read our take from Cannes here, or hang on to scroll through and see where it lands on the list below, but we thought this would be a good time to gussy up our previous sprawling two-part Allen retrospective, and because we’ve been a little harmonious around here of late and miss the sounds of sobbing and breaking crockery, to rank it.

READ MORE: The Best And The Rest: Every Stanley Kubrick Ranked

Weathering personal scandal and coming in and out of fashion like flares, Allen’s been at constant work as a director for five decades now, and “Cafe Society” marks his 47th theatrically-released feature. Which means we have a lot to get through, so let’s get straight to it, shall we? Here, ranked worst to best, are all of Woody Allen’s theatrical features —with any list this long, there’s bound to be massive disagreement, so remember, the comments section awaits your ire. Or your congratulations, on the slim chance you agree with all of it.

Irrational Man Official Trailer #1 (2015) – Emma Stone, Joaquin Phoenix Movie HD

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Irrational-Man-woody-allen-emma-stone-joaquin-phoenix-261568943. “Irrational Man” (2015)
No one was more taken aback than we were by the depth of our dislike of Allen’s last film before “Café Society.” Starring Emma Stone and Joaquin Phoenix, two actors we’re preternaturally fond of, and supported by ringer Parker Posey, the picture marks a return to contemporary America after the frou-frou period fluffiness of “Magic in the Moonlight” and seems a return to a particularly Allen-esque murder-and-infidelity plot that had yielded decent results in the past. But “Irrational Man” is one of Allen’s nastiest and most troubling films, a sourhearted laughless “comedy” in which the female lead is only present to talk about how tortured and interesting the male lead is, while that male lead has some sort of self-absorbed existential crisis that we’re apparently supposed to care about. Around the time Stone delivers the wack line “I love that you order for me” in a restaurant scene, and long before the signposted pseudo-intellectual namedropping has stopped (she discovers he’s plotting a crime because of notes in the margin of “Crime and Punishment”), it’s clear that “Irrational Man” represents all of Allen’s late-period worst tendencies regarding sexism and self-indulgence, but with none of the jokes that made it all worthwhile in the past.

 

celebrity-leonardo-dicaprio-woody-allen42.“Celebrity” (1998)
Of all the filmmaker’s surrogates in his canon throughout the years, none was a weirder choice than British thesp/director Kenneth Branagh playing a novelist-turned-tabloid journalist (following, of course, a disastrous divorce) in “Celebrity.” The casting is bizarre in and of itself, especially since “Celebrity” was released at the tail end of Branagh’s impressive Shakespeare run, and yet the way Branagh almost perfectly mimics Allen’s jerks, tics and stuttering speech patternsit may be the most impressive aspect of “Celebrity.” The problems are everywhere else, in a film that is less a coherent story than a series of vignettes in which Branagh bumps into various celebrities (usually playing exaggerated versions of themselves). The best cameo goes to Leonardo DiCaprio, upending his then-badboy image, but as a satire on the vacuity of Hollywood, which would you think the famously reticent and celebrity-averse Allen would be in a perfect position to deliver, “Celebrity” is almost entirely toothless, In fact, the period-set “Cafe Society” does the price-of-fame stuff much better.

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RESPONDING TO HARRY KROTO’S BRILLIANT RENOWNED ACADEMICS!! Part 140 Geoffrey Hawthorn, Cambridge, Professor of Politics, “I recognize religious feeling when I see it, and I am drawn to it and I want to hear about it”

On November 21, 2014 I received a letter from Nobel Laureate Harry Kroto and it said:

…Please click on this URL http://vimeo.com/26991975

and you will hear what far smarter people than I have to say on this matter. I agree with them.

Harry Kroto

Image result for harry kroto

I have attempted to respond to all of Dr. Kroto’s friends arguments and I have posted my responses one per week for over a year now. Here are some of my earlier posts:

Arif AhmedHaroon Ahmed,  Jim Al-Khalili, Sir David AttenboroughMark Balaguer, Horace Barlow, Michael BateSir Patrick BatesonSimon Blackburn, Colin Blakemore, Ned BlockPascal BoyerPatricia ChurchlandAaron CiechanoverNoam Chomsky, Brian CoxPartha Dasgupta,  Alan Dershowitz, Frank DrakeHubert Dreyfus, John DunnBart Ehrman, Mark ElvinRichard Ernst, Stephan Feuchtwang, Robert FoleyDavid Friend,  Riccardo GiacconiIvar Giaever , Roy GlauberRebecca GoldsteinDavid J. Gross,  Brian Greene, Susan GreenfieldStephen F Gudeman,  Alan Guth, Jonathan HaidtTheodor W. Hänsch, Brian Harrison,  Stephen HawkingHermann Hauser, Robert HindeRoald Hoffmann,  Bruce HoodGerard ‘t HooftCaroline HumphreyNicholas Humphrey,  Herbert Huppert,  Gareth Stedman Jones, Steve JonesShelly KaganMichio Kaku,  Stuart KauffmanMasatoshi Koshiba,  Lawrence KraussHarry Kroto, George Lakoff,  Rodolfo LlinasElizabeth Loftus,  Alan MacfarlaneDan McKenzie,  Mahzarin BanajiPeter MillicanMarvin MinskyLeonard Mlodinow,  P.Z.Myers,   Yujin NagasawaAlva NoeDouglas Osheroff, David Parkin,  Jonathan Parry, Roger Penrose,  Saul PerlmutterHerman Philipse,  Carolyn PorcoRobert M. PriceVS RamachandranLisa RandallLord Martin ReesColin RenfrewAlison Richard,  C.J. van Rijsbergen,  Oliver Sacks, John SearleMarcus du SautoySimon SchafferJ. L. Schellenberg,   Lee Silver Peter Singer,  Walter Sinnott-ArmstrongRonald de Sousa, Victor StengerJohn SulstonBarry Supple,   Leonard Susskind, Raymond TallisMax TegmarkNeil deGrasse Tyson,  Martinus J. G. Veltman, Craig Venter.Alexander Vilenkin, Sir John Walker, James D. WatsonFrank WilczekSteven Weinberg, and  Lewis Wolpert,

XXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

Geoffrey Hawthorn

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Geoffrey Hawthorn (28 February 1941 – 31 December 2015) was a British Emeritus Professor on International Politics and Social and Political Theory at the University of Cambridge and a well known author.[1][2]

Education[edit]

Hawthorn studied at Jesus College, Oxford (BA) and the London School of Economics and Political Science (MA).

Academic career[edit]

Hawthorn was a lecturer in Sociology at the University of Essex, 1964–1970. In 1970 he began a longstanding academic association with the University of Cambridge: lecturer in Sociology, 1970–1985; reader in Sociology and Politics, 1985–1998; professor of International Politics, 1998–2007; fellow, Churchill College, 1970–1976; fellow, Clare Hall since 1982. Visiting Professor of Sociology at Harvard University between 1973 and 1974 and between 1989 and 1990; visiting member of the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, New Jersey, 1989–1990. As from 2007 he was an emeritus professor of International Politics and Social and Political Theory at the University of Cambridge. According to Stefan Collini in Hawthorn’s obituary at the The Guardian: “It is thanks to him more than to any other individual that Cambridge now boasts a flourishing Department of Politics and International Studies”. He was a member of the editorial board of the Cambridge Review of International Affairs.[3][4][5][6]

Publications[edit]

  • The Sociology of Fertility, London, Collier-Macmillan, 1970
  • Enlightenment and Despair, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1976, 1987
  • Population and Development, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1977
  • The Standard of Living, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1987
  • Plausible Worlds: Possibility and Understanding in History and the Social Sciences, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1991
  • The Future of Asia and the Pacific, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1998
  • Thucydides on Politics, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2014.

His ideas on contrafactual history are well known and have been highly influential. Hawthorn was also the author of numerous papers in learned journals and other periodicals.[4][7][8][9]

In  the third video below in the 138th clip in this series are his words and  my response is below them. 

50 Renowned Academics Speaking About God (Part 1)

Another 50 Renowned Academics Speaking About God (Part 2

A Further 50 Renowned Academics Speaking About God (Part 3)

An interview of Geoffrey Hawthorn – part 1

Uploaded on Nov 25, 2009

An interview about the life and work of the sociologist and political theorist, Geoffrey Hawthorn, filmed by Alan Macfarlane on 23 April 2009. For a higher quality, downloadable version with a detailed summary, please see http://www.alanmacfarlane.com

__________________________

An interview of Geoffrey Hawthorn – part 2

Geoffrey Hawthorn interviewed by Alan Macfarlane 23rd April 2009

Quote by Dr. Hawthorn:

I suppose that intellectually I am an atheist, but socially I hope I am a tolerant agnostic. I recognize religious feeling when I see it, and I am drawn to it and I want to hear about it.

My response to  Dr. Hawthorn’s quote:

 

I would like to give 3 responses to the above assertion made by Dr. Hawthorn.

FIRST, Romans 1 points that every person has a God-given conscience instead of them that tells them that God exists. I go into this further in a June 17, 2014 letter I wrote to Harry Kroto (which is below). The interesting factor is that this can be tested by a lie-detector. This tells us why DR. HAWTHORN WAS DRAWN TO HEAR ABOUT OTHER’S IDEAS  ABOUT GOD!!!!!!

SECOND, let me recommend a book  by Sean McDowell and Jonathan Marrow, called Is God Just a Human Invention? And Seventeen Other Questions Raised by the New Atheists. I have included a review of it later in this post.

THIRD, Solomon showed very clearly in the Book of Ecclesiastes that without God in the picture when one looks at life UNDER THE SUN the only conclusions one can reach is that life is meaningless and there is no satisfaction anywhere.  H.J.Blackham founded the BRITISH HUMANIST ASSOCIATION, and he  has eloquently stated:

On humanist assumptions, life leads to nothing, and every pretense that it does not is a deceit. If there is a bridge over a gorge which spans only half the distance and ends in mid-air, and if the bridge is crowded with human beings pressing on, one after the other they fall into the abyss. The bridge leads nowhere, and those who are pressing forward to cross it are going nowhere….It does not matter where they think they are going, what preparations for the journey they may have made, how much they may be enjoying it all. The objection merely points out objectively that such a situation is a model of futility“( H. J. Blackham, et al., Objections to Humanism (Riverside, Connecticut: Greenwood Press, 1967).

Harold John Blackham (31 March 1903 – 23 January 2009)

Image result for h.j. blackham british humanist

___

In fact, I sent Hawthorn a  sheet of quotes  that included that quote above from  H.J. Blackham but I never received a return letter from him.  Here is another section from that letter:

Let me show you some inescapable conclusions if you choose to live without God in the picture. Schaeffer noted that Solomon came to these same conclusions when he looked at life “under the sun.”

  1. Death is the great equalizer (Eccl 3:20, “All go to the same place; all come from dust, and to dust all return.”)
  2. Chance and time have determined the past, and they will determine the future.  (Ecclesiastes 9:11-13 “I have seen something else under the sun:  The race is not to the swift
    or the battle to the strong, nor does food come to the wise or wealth to the brilliant  or favor to the learned; but time and chance happen to them all.  Moreover, no one knows when their hour will come: As fish are caught in a cruel net, or birds are taken in a snare, so people are trapped by evil times  that fall unexpectedly upon them.”)
  3. Power reigns in this life, and the scales are not balanced(Eccl 4:1; “Again I looked and saw all the oppression that was taking place under the sun: I saw the tears of the oppressed—
    and they have no comforter; power was on the side of their oppressors—  and they have no comforter.” 7:15 “In this meaningless life of mine I have seen both of these: the righteous perishing in their righteousness,  and the wicked living long in their wickedness. ).
  4. Nothing in life gives true satisfaction without God including knowledge (1:16-18), ladies and liquor (2:1-3, 8, 10, 11), and great building projects (2:4-6, 18-20).
  5. There is no ultimate lasting meaning in life. (1:2)

By the way, the final chapter of Ecclesiastes finishes with Solomon emphasizing that serving God is the only proper response of man. Solomon looks above the sun and brings God back into the picture in the final chapter of the book in Ecclesiastes 12:13-14, “ Now all has been heard; here is the conclusion of the matter: Fear God and keep his commandments, for this is the whole duty of man.  For God will bring every deed into judgment, including every hidden thing, whether it is good or evil.”

______________________

Harry Kroto, Dept of Chemistry and Biochemistry, c/o Florida State

June 17, 2014

Dear Dr. Kroto,

I noticed that you are on the Committee for the Scientific Investigation of Claims of the Paranormal (CSICOP) and that prompted me to send this material to you today.

A couple of months ago I mailed you a letter that contained correspondence I had with Antony Flew and Carl Sagan and I also included some of the material I had sent them from Adrian Rogers and Francis Schaeffer. Did you have a chance to listen to the IS THE BIBLE TRUE? CD yet? I also wanted to let know some more about about Francis Schaeffer. Ronald Reagan said of Francis Schaeffer, “He will long be remembered as one of the great Christian thinkers of our century, with a childlike faith and a profound compassion toward others. It can rarely be said of an individual that his life touched many others and affected them for the better; it will be said of Francis Schaeffer that his life touched millions of souls and brought them to the truth of their creator.”

Thirty years ago the christian philosopher and author Francis Schaeffer (1912-1984) died and on the 10th anniversary of his passing in 1994 I wrote a number of the top evolutionists, humanists and atheistic scholars in the world and sent them a story about Francis Schaeffer in 1930 when he left agnosticism and embraced Christianity. I also sent them  a cassette tape with the title “Four intellectual bridges evolutionists can’t cross” by Adrian Rogers (1931-2005) and some of the top  scholars who corresponded with me since that time include Ernest Mayr (1904-2005), George Wald (1906-1997), Carl Sagan (1934-1996),  Robert Shapiro (1935-2011), Nicolaas Bloembergen (1920-),  Brian Charlesworth (1945-),  Francisco J. Ayala (1934-) Elliott Sober (1948-), Kevin Padian (1951-), Matt Cartmill (1943-) , Milton Fingerman (1928-), John J. Shea (1969-), , Michael A. Crawford (1938-), (Paul Kurtz (1925-2012), Sol Gordon (1923-2008), Albert Ellis (1913-2007), Barbara Marie Tabler (1915-1996), Renate Vambery (1916-2005), Archie J. Bahm (1907-1996), Aron S “Gil” Martin ( 1910-1997), Matthew I. Spetter (1921-2012), H. J. Eysenck (1916-1997), Robert L. Erdmann (1929-2006), Mary Morain (1911-1999), Lloyd Morain (1917-2010),  Warren Allen Smith (1921-), Bette Chambers (1930-),  Gordon Stein (1941-1996) , Milton Friedman (1912-2006), John Hospers (1918-2011), and Michael Martin (1932-).

Corliss Lamont and Herbert A. Tonne pictured above. 

The truth is that I am an evangelical Christian and I have enjoyed developing relationships with skeptics and humanists over the years. Back in 1996 I took my two sons who were 8  and 10 yrs old back then to New York, Washington, Philadelphia, Delaware, and New Jersey and we had dinner one night with Herbert A. Tonne, who was one of the signers of the Humanist Manifesto II. The Late Professor John George who has written books for Prometheus Press was my good friend during the last 10 years of his life. (I still miss him today.) We often ate together and were constantly talking on the phone and writing letters to one another.

It is a funny story how I met Dr. George. As an evangelical Christian and a member of the Christian Coalition, I felt obliged to expose a misquote of John Adams’ I found in an article entitled “America’s Unchristian Beginnings” by the self-avowed atheist Dr. Steven Morris. However, what happened next changed my focus to the use of misquotes, unconfirmed quotes, and misleading attributions by the religious right.

In the process of attempting to correct Morris, I was guilty of using several misquotes myself. Professor John George of the University of Central Oklahoma political science department and coauthor (with Paul Boller Jr.) of the book THEY NEVER SAID IT! set me straight. George pointed out that George Washington never said, “It is impossible to rightly govern the world without God and the Bible. I had cited page 18 of the 1927 edition of HALLEY’S BIBLE HANDBOOK. This quote was probably generated by a similar statement that appears in A LIFE OF WASHINGTON by James Paulding. Sadly, no one has been able to verify any of the quotes in Paulding’s book since no footnotes were offered.

Paul F. Boller Jr.: 1916–2014

After reading THEY NEVER SAID IT! I had a better understanding of how widespread the problem of misquotes is. Furthermore, I discovered that many of these had been used by the leaders of the religious right. I decided to confront some individuals concerning their misquotes. WallBuilders, the publisher of David Barton’s THE MYTH OF SEPARATION, responded by providing me with their “unconfirmed  quote” list which contained a dozen quotes widely used by the religious right.

Sadly some of the top leaders of my own religious right have failed to take my encouragement to stop using these quotes and they have either claimed that their critics were biased skeptics who find the truth offensive or they defended their own method of research and claimed the secondary sources were adequate.

I have enclosed that same CD by Adrian Rogers that I sent 20 years ago although the second half does include a story about  Charles Darwin‘s journey from  the position of theistic evolution to agnosticism. Here are the four bridges that Adrian Rogers says evolutionists can’t cross in the CD  “Four Bridges that the Evolutionist Cannot Cross.” 1. The Origin of Life and the law of biogenesis. 2. The Fixity of the Species. 3.The Second Law of Thermodynamics. 4. The Non-Physical Properties Found in Creation.  

In the first 3 minutes of the CD is the hit song “Dust in the Wind.” In the letter 20 years ago I gave some of the key points Francis Schaeffer makes about the experiment that Solomon undertakes in the book of Ecclesiastes to find satisfaction by  looking into  learning (1:16-18), laughter, ladies, luxuries,  and liquor (2:1-3, 8, 10, 11), and labor (2:4-6, 18-20).

I later learned this book of Ecclesiastes was Richard Dawkins’ favorite book in the Bible. Schaeffer noted that Solomon took a look at the meaning of life on the basis of human life standing alone between birth and death “under the sun.” This phrase UNDER THE SUN appears over and over in Ecclesiastes. The Christian Scholar Ravi Zacharias noted, “The key to understanding the Book of Ecclesiastes is the term UNDER THE SUN — What that literally means is you lock God out of a closed system and you are left with only this world of Time plus Chance plus matter.” No wonder Ecclesiastes is Richard Dawkins’ favorite book of the Bible! 

Here the first 7 verses of Ecclesiastes followed by Schaeffer’s commentary on it:

The words of the Preacher, the son of David, king in Jerusalem. Vanity of vanities, says the Preacher, vanity of vanities! All is vanity. What does man gain by all the toil at which he toils under the sun? A generation goes, and a generation comes, but the earth remains forever. The sun rises, and the sun goes down, and hastens to the place where it rises. The wind blows to the south and goes around to the north; around and around goes the wind, and on its circuits the wind returns. All streams run to the sea, but the sea is not full; to the place where the streams flow, there they flow again.  

Solomon is showing a high degree of comprehension of evaporation and the results of it. (E.O.Wilson has marveled at Solomon’s scientific knowledge of ants that was only discovered in the 1800’s.) Seeing also in reality nothing changes. There is change but always in a set framework and that is cycle. You can relate this to the concepts of modern man. Ecclesiastes is the only pessimistic book in the Bible and that is because of the place where Solomon limits himself. He limits himself to the question of human life, life under the sun between birth and death and the answers this would give.

(Harvard’s E.O. Wilson below)

Image result for e.o.wilson

Solomon doesn’t place man outside of the cycle. Man doesn’t escape the cycle. Man is in the cycle. Birth and death and youth and old age.

(Francis Schaeffer pictured above)

There is no doubt in my mind that Solomon had the same experience in his life that I had as a younger man (at the age of 18 in 1930). I remember standing by the sea and the moon arose and it was copper and beauty. Then the moon did not look like a flat dish but a globe or a sphere since it was close to the horizon. One could feel the global shape of the earth too. Then it occurred to me that I could contemplate the interplay of the spheres and I was exalted because I thought I can look upon them with all their power, might, and size, but they could contempt nothing. Then came upon me a horror of great darkness because it suddenly occurred to me that although I could contemplate them and they could contemplate nothing yet they would continue to turn in ongoing cycles when I saw no more forever and I was crushed.

You are an atheist and you have a naturalistic materialistic worldview, and this short book of Ecclesiastes should interest you because the wisest man who ever lived in the position of King of Israel came to THREE CONCLUSIONS that will affect you.

FIRST, chance and time have determined the past, and they will determine the future.  (Ecclesiastes 9:11-13)

These two verses below  take the 3 elements mentioned in a naturalistic materialistic worldview (time, chance and matter) and so that is all the unbeliever can find “under the sun” without God in the picture. You will notice that these are the three elements that evolutionists point to also.

Ecclesiastes 9:11-12 is following: I have seen something else under the sun: The race is not to the swift or the battle to the strong, nor does food come to the wise or wealth to the brilliant or favor to the learned; but time and chance happen to them all. Moreover, no one knows when their hour will come: As fish are caught in a cruel net, or birds are taken in a snare, so people are trapped by evil times that fall unexpectedly upon them.

SECOND, Death is the great equalizer (Eccl 3:20, “All go to the same place; all come from dust, and to dust all return.”)

THIRD, Power reigns in this life, and the scales are not balanced(Eccl 4:1, 8:15)

Ecclesiastes 4:1-2: “Next I turned my attention to all the outrageous violence that takes place on this planet—the tears of the victims, no one to comfort them; the iron grip of oppressors, no one to rescue the victims from them.” Ecclesiastes 8:14; “ Here’s something that happens all the time and makes no sense at all: Good people get what’s coming to the wicked, and bad people get what’s coming to the good. I tell you, this makes no sense. It’s smoke.”

Solomon had all the resources in the world and he found himself searching for meaning in life and trying to come up with answers concerning the afterlife. However, it seems every door he tries to open is locked. Today men try to find satisfaction in learning, liquor, ladies, luxuries, laughter, and labor and that is exactly what Solomon tried to do too.  None of those were able to “fill the God-sized vacuum in his heart” (quote from famous mathematician and philosopher Blaise Pascal). You have to wait to the last chapter in Ecclesiastes to find what Solomon’s final conclusion is.

In 1978 I heard the song “Dust in the Wind” by Kansas when it rose to #6 on the charts. That song told me that Kerry Livgren the writer of that song and a member of Kansas had come to the same conclusion that Solomon had. I remember mentioning to my friends at church that we may soon see some members of Kansas become Christians because their search for the meaning of life had obviously come up empty even though they had risen from being an unknown band to the top of the music business and had all the wealth and fame that came with that. Furthermore, Solomon realized death comes to everyone and there must be something more.

Livgren wrote:

All we do, crumbles to the ground though we refuse to see, Dust in the Wind, All we are is dust in the wind, Don’t hang on, Nothing lasts forever but the Earth and Sky, It slips away, And all your money won’t another minute buy.”

Take a minute and compare Kerry Livgren‘s words to that of the late British humanist H.J. Blackham:

On humanist assumptions, life leads to nothing, and every pretense that it does not is a deceit. If there is a bridge over a gorge which spans only half the distance and ends in mid-air, and if the bridge is crowded with human beings pressing on, one after the other they fall into the abyss. The bridge leads nowhere, and those who are pressing forward to cross it are going nowhere….It does not matter where they think they are going, what preparations for the journey they may have made, how much they may be enjoying it all. The objection merely points out objectively that such a situation is a model of futility“( H. J. Blackham, et al., Objections to Humanism (Riverside, Connecticut: Greenwood Press, 1967).

Harold John Blackham (31 March 1903 – 23 January 2009)

_____________________________________

Both Kerry Livgren and the bass player DAVE HOPE of Kansas became Christians eventually. Kerry Livgren first tried Eastern Religions and DAVE HOPE had to come out of a heavy drug addiction. I was shocked and elated to see their personal testimony on The 700 Club in 1981 and that same  interview can be seen on youtube today. Livgren lives in Topeka, Kansas today where he teaches “Diggers,” a Sunday school class at Topeka Bible ChurchDAVE HOPE is the head of Worship, Evangelism and Outreach at Immanuel Anglican Church in Destin, Florida.

Solomon’s experiment was a search for meaning to life “under the sun.” Then in last few words in the Book of Ecclesiastes he looks above the sun and brings God back into the picture: “The conclusion, when all has been heard, is: Fear God and keep His commandments, because this applies to every person. For God will bring every act to judgment, everything which is hidden, whether it is good or evil.”

The answer to find meaning in life is found in putting your faith and trust in Jesus Christ. The Bible is true from cover to cover and can be trusted.

Now on to the other topic I wanted to discuss with you today. I wanted to write you today for one reason. IS THERE A GOOD CHANCE THAT DEEP DOWN IN YOUR CONSCIENCE  you have repressed the belief in your heart that God does exist and IS THERE A POSSIBILITY THIS DEEP BELIEF OF YOURS CAN BE SHOWN THROUGH A LIE-DETECTOR? (Back in the late 1990’s I had the opportunity to correspond with over a dozen members of CSICOP on just this very issue.)

I have a good friend who is a street preacher who preaches on the Santa Monica Promenade in California and during the Q/A sessions he does have lots of atheists that enjoy their time at the mic. When this happens he  always quotes Romans 1:18-19 (Amplified Bible) ” For God’s wrath and indignation are revealed from heaven against all ungodliness and unrighteousness of men, who in their wickedness REPRESS and HINDER the truth and make it inoperative. For that which is KNOWN about God is EVIDENT to them and MADE PLAIN IN THEIR INNER CONSCIOUSNESS, because God  has SHOWN IT TO THEM,”(emphasis mine). Then he  tells the atheist that the atheist already knows that God exists but he has been suppressing that knowledge in unrighteousness. This usually infuriates the atheist.

My friend draws some large crowds at times and was thinking about setting up a lie detector test and see if atheists actually secretly believe in God. He discussed this project with me since he knew that I had done a lot of research on the idea about 20 years ago.

Nelson Price in THE EMMANUEL FACTOR (1987) tells the story about Brown Trucking Company in Georgia who used to give polygraph tests to their job applicants. However, in part of the test the operator asked, “Do you believe in God?” In every instance when a professing atheist answered “No,” the test showed the person to be lying. My pastor Adrian Rogers used to tell this same story to illustrate Romans 1:19 and it was his conclusion that “there is no such thing anywhere on earth as a true atheist. If a man says he doesn’t believe in God, then he is lying. God has put his moral consciousness into every man’s heart, and a man has to try to kick his conscience to death to say he doesn’t believe in God.”

(Adrian Rogers at White House)

It is true that polygraph tests for use in hiring were banned by Congress in 1988.  Mr and Mrs Claude Brown on Aug 25, 1994  wrote me a letter confirming that over 15,000 applicants previous to 1988 had taken the polygraph test and EVERY-TIME SOMEONE SAID THEY DID NOT BELIEVE IN GOD, THE MACHINE SAID THEY WERE LYING.

It had been difficult to catch up to the Browns. I had heard about them from Dr. Rogers’ sermon but I did not have enough information to locate them. Dr. Rogers referred me to Dr. Nelson Price and Dr. Price’s office told me that Claude Brown lived in Atlanta. After writing letters to all 9 of the entries for Claude Brown in the Atlanta telephone book, I finally got in touch with the Browns.

Adrian Rogers also pointed out that the Bible does not recognize the theoretical atheist.  Psalms 14:1: The fool has said in his heart, “There is no God.”  Dr Rogers notes, “The fool is treating God like he would treat food he did not desire in a cafeteria line. ‘No broccoli for me!’ ” In other words, the fool just doesn’t want God in his life and is a practical atheist, but not a theoretical atheist. Charles Ryrie in the The Ryrie Study Bible came to the same conclusion on this verse.

Here are the conclusions of the experts I wrote in the secular world concerning the lie detector test and it’s ability to get at the truth:

Professor Frank Horvath of the School of Criminal Justice at Michigan State University has testified before Congress concerning the validity of the polygraph machine. He has stated on numerous occasions that “the evidence from those who have actually been affected by polygraph testing in the workplace is quite contrary to what has been expressed by critics. I give this evidence greater weight than I give to the most of the comments of critics” (letter to me dated October 6, 1994).

There was no better organization suited to investigate this claim concerning the lie detector test than the Committee for the Scientific Investigation of Claims of the Paranormal (CSICOP). This organization changed their name to the Committe for Skeptical Inquiry in 2006. This organization includes anyone who wants to help debunk the whole ever-expanding gamut of misleading, outlandish, and fraudulent claims made in the name of science. I AM WRITING YOU TODAY BECAUSE YOU ARE ASSOCIATED WITH CSICOP.

I read The Skeptical Review(publication of CSICOP) for several years during the 90’s and I would write letters to these scientists about taking this project on and putting it to the test.  Below are some of  their responses (15 to 20 years old now):

1st Observation: Religious culture of USA could have influenced polygraph test results.
ANTONY FLEW  (formerly of Reading University in England, now deceased, in a letter to me dated 8-11-96) noted, “For all the evidence so far available seems to be of people from a culture in which people are either directly brought up to believe in the existence of God or at least are strongly even if only unconsciously influenced by those who do. Even if everyone from such a culture revealed unconscious belief, it would not really begin to show that — as Descartes maintained— the idea of God is so to speak the Creator’s trademark, stamped on human souls by their Creator at their creation.”

2nd Observation: Polygraph Machines do not work. JOHN R. COLE, anthropologist, editor, National Center for Science Education, Dr. WOLF RODER, professor of Geography, University of Cincinnati, Dr. SUSAN BLACKMORE,Dept of Psychology, University of the West of England, Dr. CHRISTOPHER C. FRENCH, Psychology Dept, Goldsmith’s College, University of London, Dr.WALTER F. ROWE, The George Washington University, Dept of Forensic Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.

3rd Observation: The sample size probably was not large enough to apply statistical inference. (These gentlemen made the following assertion before I received the letter back from Claude Brown that revealed that the sample size was over 15,000.) JOHN GEOHEGAN, Chairman of New Mexicans for Science and Reason, Dr. WOLF RODER, and Dr WALTER F. ROWE (in a letter dated July 12, 1994) stated, “The polygraph operator for Brown Trucking Company has probably examined only a few hundred or a few thousand job applicants. I would surmise that only a very small number of these were actually atheists. It seems a statistically insignificant (and distinctly nonrandom) sampling of the 5 billion human beings currently inhabiting the earth. Dr. Nelson Price also seems to be impugning the integrity of anyone who claims to be an atheist in a rather underhanded fashion.”

4th Observation: The question (Do you believe in God?)  was out of place and it surprised the applicants. THOMAS GILOVICH, psychologist, Cornell Univ., Dr. ZEN FAULKES, professor of Biology, University of Victoria (Canada), ROBERT CRAIG, Head of Indiana Skeptics Organization, Dr. WALTER ROWE, 
 
5th Observation: Proof that everyone believes in God’s existence does not prove that God does in fact exist. PAUL QUINCEY, Nathional Physical Laboratory,(England), Dr. CLAUDIO BENSKI, Schneider Electric, CFEPP, (France),
6th Observation: Both the courts and Congress recognize that lie-detectors don’t work and that is why they were banned in 1988.  (Governments and the military still use them.)
Dr WALTER ROWE, KATHLEEN M. DILLION, professor of Psychology, Western New England College.
7th Observation:This information concerning Claude Brown’s claim has been passed on to us via a tv preacher and eveybody knows that they are untrustworthy– look at their history. WOLF RODER.
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Solomon wisely noted in Ecclesiastes 3:11 “God has planted eternity in the heart of men…” (Living Bible). No wonder Bertrand Russell wrote in his autobiography, “It is odd, isn’t it? I feel passionately for this world and many things and people in it, and yet…what is it all? There must be something more important, one feels, though I don’t believe there is. I am haunted. Some ghosts, for some extra mundane regions, seem always trying to tell me something that I am to repeat to the world, but I cannot understand that message.”
Gene Emery, science writer for Providence Journal-Bulletin is a past winner of the CSICOP “Responsibility in Journalism Award” and he had the best suggestion of all when he suggested, “Actually, if you want to make a good case about whether Romans 1:19 is true, arrange to have a polygraph operator (preferably an atheist or agnostic) brought to the next CSICOP meeting. (I’m not a member of CSICOP, by the way, so I can’t give you an official invitation or anything.) If none of the folks at that meeting can convince the machine that they truly believe in God, maybe there is, in fact, an innate willingness to believe in God.”

DO YOU HAVE ANY REACTIONS TO ADD TO THESE 7 OBSERVATIONS THAT I GOT 15 YEARS AGO? Thank you again for your time and I know how busy you are.

Everette Hatcher, everettehatcher@gmail.com, http://www.thedailyhatch.org, cell ph 501-920-5733, Box 23416, LittleRock, AR 72221

 

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MUSIC MONDAY George Harrison’s song “Dehra Dun” says MANY ROADS WILL GET YOU TO HEAVEN

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George Harrison – “Dehra Dun”

Uploaded on Mar 21, 2011

George Harrison “Dehra Dun”

Dehra dehra dun, dehra dun dun
Dehra dehra dun, dehra dun dun
Dehra dehra dun, dehra dun dun
Dehra dehra dun…
Many roads can take you there, many different ways
One direction takes you years, another takes you days
Dehra dehra dun, dehra dun dun
Dehra dehra dun, dehra dun dun
Dehra dehra dun, dehra dun dun
Dehra dehra dun…
Many people on the roads looking at the sights
Many others with their troubles looking for their rights
Dehra dehra dun, dehra dun dun
Dehra dehra dun, dehra dun dun
Dehra dehra dun, dehra dun dun
Dehra dehra dun…
See them move along the road in search of life divine
Beggers in a goldmine
Dehra dehra dun, dehra dun dun
Dehra dehra dun, dehra dun dun
Dehra dehra dun, dehra dun dun
Dehra dehra dun…
Many roads can take you there, many different ways
One direction takes you years, another takes you days
Dehra dehra dun, dehra dun dun
Dehra dehra dun, dehra dun dun
Dehra dehra dun, dehra dun dun
Dehra dehra dun

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George Harrison sings, “Many roads can take you there, many different ways.” However, Christ said in John 14:6:

Jesus said to him, “I am the way, and the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me.”

John MacArthur: Is Jesus the Only Way?

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If God has not revealed Himself, then there are no absolutes. Good is evil and evil is good. We see this in Hinduism.

The new theologians also have no way to explain why evil exists, and thus they are left with the same problem the Hindu philosophers have; that is, they must say that finally everything that is is equally in God. In Hindu thought one of the manifestations of God is Kali, a feminine representation of God with fangs and skulls hanging about her neck. Why do Hindus picture God this way? Because to them everything that exists now is a part of what has always been, a part of that which the Hindus would call “God”—and therefore cruelty is equal to noncruelty. Modern humanistic man in both his secular and his religious forms has come to the same awful place. Both have no final way to say what is right and what is wrong, and no final way to say why one should choose noncruelty instead of cruelty.

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The Biblical view concerning how sin entered the world is explained in the book GENESIS  IN SPACE AND TIME by Francis Schaeffer, Chapter 5  pages 33  -41:

chapter 5

The space-time fall and its results

Eve was faced with a choice, she pondered the situation and then she put her hand into the history of man and changed the course of human events.

The Fruit Is Eaten

The Genesis account is short and to the point: “And when the woman saw that the tree was good for food, and that it was pleasant to the eyes, and a tree to be desired to make one wise, she took of the fruit thereof, and did eat, and gave also unto her husband with her; and he did eat” (Gen. 3:6).1 The flow is from the internal to the external; the sin began in the thought-world and flowed outward. The sin was, therefore, committed in that moment she believed Satan instead of God. At this point the whole matter was decided. Nonetheless, a history is involved, for first she believed Satan, then she ate, and then she gave the fruit to Adam.

Genesis 3:17 refers to this historical flow, for God in speaking to Adam says that he has “hearkened unto the voice of thy wife, and hast eaten of the tree.” And we are reminded, as we have seen in 2 Corinthians 11:3, that as the serpent beguiled Eve through his subtlety (at her point of history) so our own minds (at our point of history) may also be corrupted from the simplicity that is in Christ.

Paul in 1 Timothy 2:14 points out something further: “And Adam was not deceived, but the woman being deceived was in the transgression.” Temptation is extremely hard to resist when it is bound up with the man-woman relationship. For example, in Exodus 34:16 we are warned not to let the man-woman relationship lead us into idolatry (spoken of as going “a whoring after their gods”).

Two great drives are built into man. The first is his need for a relationship to God, and the second his need for a relationship to the opposite sex. A special temptation is bound up with this sexual drive. How many young women are there who are faithful as Christians until they come to a certain age and feel with their whole being, without ever analyzing it, the need for marriage and are then swept over into marrying a non-Christian man? And how many men are there who are faithful until they feel the masculine drive and give up their faithfulness to God by marrying a woman who carries them into spiritual problems for the rest of their life? I look upon such young men and young women as I see them going through this, and I cry for them, because in a way there is no greater agony than suddenly to fall in love and then to realize that one must say no to this natural drive because it leads in that particular case to a severing of our greater relationship-our relationship to God. While what happened in the Garden of Eden was a spacetime historic event, the man-woman relationship and force of temptation it must have presented to Adam is universal.

The Results of the Fall for the Human Race

The results of Adam and Eve’s action are recorded in many places in Scripture, but nowhere more clearly than in Romans 5:12-19 where Paul emphasizes that Adam and Eve’s action marked the entrance of sin into the human  race. I will quote here part of this passage: “Therefore, as through one man sin entered into the world, and death through sin; and so death passed [spread] unto all men, for that all sinned:-for until the law sin was in the world; but sin is not imputed when there is no law. Nevertheless death reigned from Adam until Moses, even over them that had not sinned after the likeness of Adam’s transgression, who is a figure of him that was to come…. For if by the trespass of the one the many died…. For if, by the trespass of the one, death reigned through the one…. So then as through one trespass the judgment came unto all men to condemnation…. For as through the one man’s disobedience the many were made sinners . . .” (ASV).

The repetition makes the point obvious: By the action of one man in a historic, space-time situation, sin entered into the world of men. But this is not just a theoretical statement that gives us a reasonable and sufficient answer to man’s present dilemma, explaining how the world can be so evil and God still be good. It is that in reality, from this time on, man was and is a sinner. Though some men do not like the teaching, the Bible continues like a sledge hammer, driving home the fact that evil has entered into the world of man, all men are now sinners, all men now sin. Listen to God’s declaration concerning the human race in Jeremiah 17:9: “The heart is deceitful above all things, and desperately wicked: who can know it?”

Incidentally, in one way it is easier today than it was a few years ago to proclaim the sinfulness of man. On every side artists, novelists and protest singers are saying, “What’s wrong with man? Something’s wrong with man.” The Bible agrees and gives us a realistic view of life: “The heart is deceitfully wicked.”

I think the strongest words were spoken by Jesus himself in John 8:44, where he turns on those who are claiming the fatherhood of God and says: “Ye are of your father the devil, and the lusts of your father it is your will to do” (ASV). In other words, Jesus is saying, “You choose to be in Satan’s parade.”

Isaiah writes, “All we like sheep have gone astray; we have turned every one to his own way” (Is. 53:6). It is obvious that if “all we like sheep have gone astray,” I can no longer merely say they have gone astray, but I must say I have gone astray. I, too, sin. Paul picks this up in the letter to the Romans as he summarizes the status of all the races-first the Gentiles and then the Jews: “As it is written, There is none righteous, no, not one: There is none that understandeth, there is none that seeketh after God. They are all gone out of the way, they are together become unprofitable; there is none that doeth good, no, not one” (Rom. 3:10-12). If there is none that is righteous, no, not one, then I am included. I have written the word me in the margin of my Bible at this place. Galatians 3:10 carries the force: “For as many as are of the works of the law are under the curse: for it is written, Cursed is everyone that continueth not in all things which are written in the book of the law to do them.” All mankind stands in this place. Not only the revealed law of God but also every moral motion of every man who has ever lived condemns men, because men keep neither the revealed law of God nor even live consistently according to their own moral motions. This is the point of Romans 2:1-2: “Therefore thou art inexcusable, O man, whosoever thou art that judgest: for wherein thou judgest another, thou condemnest thyself; for thou that judgest doest the same things. But we are sure that the judgment of God is according to truth against them which commit such things.”

What Paul says involves the whole man as he comes to Scripture. The Bible never leaves this as a generalization or as an abstraction. Paul writes, “Therefore thou art inexcusable, O man.” Perhaps the most important part of this is that it is in the singular, for it speaks to every individual who hears or reads: “Whosoever thou art that judgest: for wherein thou judgest another, thou condemnest thyself; for thou that judgest doest the same things.” The simple fact is that it is not only the man who has the written law of God, the Bible, who stands under the judgment of law, but every man who ever lived. I have pointed out elsewhere that wherever anthropologists and sociologists have been, they have found that men have moral motions. The specific standards may be different, but all men operate under moral categories. So Paul says here that a man stands condemned on the basis of his own moral motions, for every time he condemns another man he has put himself under the same condemnation. Every man makes moral judgments concerning other men and then does not keep them himself. The results? All men are sinners, and all men sin.

This indictment includes those who are now Christians as well as non-Christians. Men are not born Christians, a sort of special race. Every single man who is now a child of God was at one time a rebel. We are all hewn from the same rock, whether we come from a church background or a non-church background. No sacerdotalism can help man.

Am I a Christian today? Never forget, then, that yesterday I was as much a rebel as anyone who walks on the face of the earth. As Ephesians 2:2-3 says in burning words: “Wherein in time past ye walked according to the course of this world, according to the prince of the power of the air, the spirit that now worketh in the children of disobedience.” He is talking here to the church at Ephesus. But he continues and adds himself to the list, he steps over and joins us, for it is not just “ye” but “we”: “Among whom also we all had our conversation [meaning here our total way of life, our “life-form”] in the lusts of our flesh, fulfilling the desires of the flesh and of the mind; and were by nature the children of wrath, even as others.” This is who we are. If we are Christians today, this is who we have been. We had a different king-the father of lies. We must not be proud, for as Ephesians 5:8 says, “For ye were sometimes darkness, but now ye are light in the Lord.” Remember, you were also marked by Adam’s sin, and you were sinners: “And you, that were sometime alienated and enemies in your mind by wicked works, yet now hath he reconciled” (Col. 1:21).

Don’t be proud. As you look out across the world of sinners, weep for them. Be glad indeed if you are redeemed, but never forget as you look at others that you have been one of them, and in a real sense we are still one with them, for we still sin. Christians are not a special group of people who can be proud; Christians are those who are redeemed-and that is all!

Everywhere we turn we find the same thing: “For we ourselves [notice the “we” again] also were sometimes foolish, disobedient, deceived, serving divers lusts and pleasures, living in malice and envy, hateful, and hating one another” (Tit. 3:3). Paul never allowed those who followed his teaching to forget that they were not a special kind just because they may have been Jews at the beginning and circumcised or just because they were now baptized Christians. Each one must say, “I have been the rebel, I have been the sinner.” The force of this is perhaps brought most fully in the great statement in 1 John 1:10: “If we say that we have not sinned, we make him [God] a liar, and his word is not in us.” To forget in our emotional reactions as well as in our words that we indeed have been sinners, not only involved in the results of Adam’s sin but deliberately sinning ourselves over and over and over again -to forget this is to call God a liar.

Thus, all men are under the judgment of God. Even the marvelous chapter that speaks so clearly of hope, the third go chapter of the Gospel of John, twice emphasizes that men are under God’s judgment. We read, for example, these words in John 3:18: “He that believeth on him is not condemned: but he that believeth not is condemned already, because he hath not believed in the name of the only begotten Son of God.” The testimony of John the Baptist in the last verse of this chapter is even more emphatic: “He that believeth on the Son has everlasting life: but he that believeth not the Son shall not see life; but the wrath of God abideth on him” (v. 36). In a world that loves synthesis, the Bible stands with a message of total antithesis: He who believes has life but he who does not is subject to the wrath, the judgment, of God. Here, then, is the basic result of the space-time fall that we are considering in the flow of history-men are rebels and under the judgment of God.

Guilt before God

Other results of sin were immediately evident in the Garden of Eden: “And the eyes of them both were opened, and they knew that they were naked; and they sewed fig leaves together, and made themselves aprons” (Gen. 3:7). The word aprons in the Hebrew is interesting. Actually, it simply means to “gird yourself about,” so people have translated the word in various ways. One Bible, the Breeches Bible of 1608, got its name from the way it translated this word. But whatever an apron is, it is something one puts around himself.

The significance is that Adam and Eve were brought to a realization of what they had done. They began to feel afraid and to feel guilt-and well they might, for their guilt feelings were rooted in true guilt. When a man has sinned against God, he not only has guilt feelings, he has true guilt; and he has true guilt even if he does not have feelings of guilt.

“And they heard the voice of the LORD God walking in the garden in the cool of the day: and Adam and his wife hid themselves from the presence of the LORD God amongst the trees of the garden” (v. 8). This is the verse we have used in our previous studies to indicate the wonder of the open communication which God had with man. In the garden in the cool (or the wind) of the day, there was open fellowship, open communion-open propositional communication between God and man before the Fall. But now that which was his wonder and his joy, the fulfillment of his need, an infinite, personal reference point with whom he could have communion and communication became the reason for his fear. He was going to meet God face to face! Once man had shaken his fist in the face of God, what had been so wonderful became a just reason for fear, because God was really there.

So we read: “And the LORD God called unto Adam, and said unto him, Where art thou? And he said, I heard the voice in the garden, and I was afraid, because I was naked; and I hid myself. And he said, Who told thee that thou wast naked? Hast thou eaten of the tree, whereof I commanded thee that thou shouldst not eat? And the man said, The woman whom thou gavest to be with me, she gave me of the tree, and I did eat. And the LORD God said unto the woman, What is this that thou hast done? And the woman said, The serpent beguiled me, and I did eat” (vv. 9-13).

The first thing we notice here is that Adam and Eve immediately begin to try to pass the guilt from themselves to another, and we have, therefore, the division which is at the very heart of man’s relationship with man from this point on. The human race is divided-man against man. We do not have to wait for modern psychologists to talk about alienation. Here it is. Man is alienated from his wife-the wife from her husband-as they turn against each other, especially at the points of blame and guilt. All the alienation that any poet will ever write about is here already. In a way, both Adam and Eve were right. Eve had given the fruit to Adam, and Satan had tempted Eve. But that does not shift the responsibility. Eve was responsible and Adam was responsible, and they stood in their responsibility before God.

God’s Judgment on Man and Nature

As God speaks to the parties involved at this moment of history, we find four steps in his judgment of their action. First, he speaks to the serpent who has been used by Satan: “And the LORD God said unto the serpent, Because thou hast done this, thou art cursed above [from among] all cattle, and above [from among] every beast of the field; upon thy belly shalt thou go, and dust shalt thou eat all the days of thy life” (v. 14). As we shall see, all nature becomes abnormal yet the serpent is singled out in a special way “from among all cattle.'”

Second, in verse 15 he speaks to Satan; we will return to that.

Third, he speaks to the woman: “Unto the woman he said, I will greatly multiply thy pain [this is more accurate than the King James word sorrow] and thy conception; in pain thou shalt bring forth children; and thy desire shall be to thy husband, and he shall rule over thee.” There are two parts here: the first relates to the womanness of the woman-the bearing of children-and the second to her relationship to her husband. In regard to the former, God says that he will multiply two things-not just the pain but also the conception. It seems clear that if man had not rebelled there would not have been as many children born.

In regard to the relationship to her husband, he says, “And thy desire shall be to thy husband, and he shall rule over thee.” This one sentence puts an end to any pure democracy. In a fallen world pure democracy is not possible. Rather, God brings structure into the primary relationship of man-the man-woman relationship. In a fallen world (in every kind of society-big and smalland in every relationship) structure is needed for order. God himself here imposes it on the basic human relationship. Form is given and without such form freedom would only be chaos.

It is not simply because man is stronger that he is to have dominion (that’s the argument of the Marquis de Sade). But rather he is to have dominion because God gives this as structure in the midst of a fallen world. The Bible makes plain that this relationship is not to be without love. As the New Testament puts it, the husband is to love his wife as Christ loved the church (Eph. 5:23). In a fallen world it is not surprising to find that men have turned this structure into a kind of slavery. It is not meant to be a slavery. In fact, it is in cultures where the Bible has been influential that the balance has been substantially restored. The Bible balances the structure and the love.

Nevertheless, it is still true: Since the Fall what God. says in verse 16 is to be the structure or the form of the basic human relationship-the man-woman relationship. It is right that a woman should feel a need for freedom, a feeling of being a “human being” in the world. But when she tries to smash the structure of this basic relationship, finally what she does is to hurt herself. It is like unravelling the knot that holds the string of human relationships together. All other things flow from it-the loss of her own children’s obedience and the crumbling of society about her. In a fallen world we need structure in every social relationship.

The Abnormal Universe

Fourth, God speaks to the man: “And unto Adam he said, Because thou hast hearkened unto the voice of thy wife, and hast eaten of the tree, of which I commanded thee, saying, Thou shalt not eat of it: cursed is the ground for thy sake; in toil [the word sorrow in the King James is inaccurate] shalt thou eat of it all the days of thy life” (v. 17). In other words, at this point the external world is changed.

It is interesting that almost all of the results of God’s judgment because of man’s rebellion relate in some way to the external world. They are not just bound up in man’s thought life; they are not merely psychological. Profound changes make the external, objective world abnormal. In the phrase for thy sake God is relating these external abnormalities to what Adam has done in the Fall.

All of these changes came about by fiat. Creation, as we have already seen, came by fiat. And, though we have come to the conclusion of creation with the creation of Eve, yet fiat has not ceased. The abnormality of the external world was brought about by fiat. Putting it into twentieth-century terminology, we can say this: The universe does not display a uniformity of cause and effect in a closed system; God speaks and something changes. We are reminded here of the long arguments that date back to the time of Lyell and Darwin concerning whether there could be such a thing as catastrophe-something that cut across the uniformity of cause and effect. Scripture answers this plainly: Yes, God spoke and that which he had created was changed.

So now the earth itself is abnormal. We read, for example, in Genesis 5:29, which speaks of the world before the flood: “And he [Noah’s father] called his name Noah, saying, This same shall comfort us concerning our work and toil of our hands, because of the ground which the LORD hath cursed.” The name Noah itself simply means rest or comfort. The Scripture says that at this point in the flow of biblical history men knew very well that the toil of their hands was a result of God’s having changed the earth.

Why is it like this? Because, one might say, you, O unprogrammed and significant Adam, have revolted. Nature has been under your dominion (in this sense it is as an extension of himself, as a king’s empire is an extension of himself). Therefore, when you changed, God changed the objective, external world. It as well as you is now abnormal.

It is interesting that in each of the steps of God’s judgment toil is involved: The serpent goes upon his belly; the woman has pain in childbirth; the man has toil in his work.

Verse 18 continues: “Thorns also and thistles shall it bring forth to thee.” The word thistles here means luxuriously-growing but useless plants. The phrase it shall bring forth to thee has in the Hebrew the sense of “it shall be caused to bud.” This phrase, therefore, suggests that here, too, the change was wrought by fiat. Furthermore, the phrase suggests the modern biological term mutation, a non-sterile sport. That is, the plants had been one kind of thing and were reproducing likewise, and then God spoke and the plants began to bring forth something else and continue to reproduce in that new and different form.

The introduction of toil does not mean the introduction of work, because in Genesis 2:15, as we have seen, God took man and put him in the Garden of Eden “to dress it and to keep it.” There was work before the Fall, but certainly we can see the force of the distinction before and after the Fall, in the language of Genesis 5:29, where labor is called the “toil of our hands, because of the ground which the LORD hath cursed.” Since the whole structure of the external world has changed, the meaning of work has changed. Thus Genesis 3:19 says: “In the sweat of thy face shalt thou eat bread, till [the concept of “until” is important here] thou return unto the ground; for out of it was thou taken: for dust thou art, and unto dust shalt thou return.”

The results are twofold. First, man shall have his food (and all else) by the sweat of his brow. Second, there is an end to this-an end that is not a release. The end is the greatest abnormality in the external world-the dissolution of the total man. A time will come at the end of each man’s life when he physically dies and the unity of man the unity of body and soul-is torn asunder. Christianity is not platonic; the soul is not considered all-important. Rather, at physical death that unity which man is meant to be is fractured. This is the second kind of death brought about by the Fall, the first being immediate separation from fellowship with God and the third being eternal death as men are judged in their rebellion and separated from God forever.

Christianity as a system does not begin with Christ as Savior, but with the infinite-personal God who created the world in the beginning and who made man significant in the flow of history. And man’s significant act in revolt has made the world abnormal. Thus there is not a total unbroken continuity back to the way the world originally was. Non-Christian philosophers almost universally agree in seeing everything as normal, assuming things are as they have always been. The Christian sees things now as not the way they have always been. And, of course, this is very important to the explanation of evil in the world. But it is not only that. It is one way to understand the distinction between the naturalistic, non-Christian answers (whether spoken in philosophic, scientific or even religious language) and the Christian answer. The distinction is that as I look about me I know I live in an abnormal world.

Among contemporary philosophers Martin Heidegger in his later writings has suggested a sort of space-time fall. He says that prior to Aristotle, the pre-Socratic Greeks thought in a different way. Then when Aristotle introduced the concept of rationality and logic, there was an epistemological fall. His notion, of course, has no moral overtones at all, but it is intriguing to me that Heidegger has come to realize that philosophy cannot explain reality if it begins with the notion that the world is normal. This the Bible has taught, but the Bible’s explanation for the present abnormal world is in a moral Fall by a significant man, a fall which has changed the external flow of history as no epistemological fall could do. Heidegger’s problem is that, while he well sees the need of a fall, he will not bow before the existence of the God who is there and the knowledge that God has given us. Hence he ends up with an insufficient fall and an insufficient answer.

Separations

Another way to look at the results of the Fall is to notice the separations that are caused by sin. First is the great separation, the separation between God and man. It underlies all other separations, not only in eternity but right now. Man no longer has the communion with God he was meant to have. Therefore, he cannot fulfill the purpose of his existence-to love God with all his heart, soul and mind-to stand as a finite personal point before an infinite-personal reference point and be in relationship with God himself. When man sinned, the purpose of his existence was smashed. And modern man is right when he says that man is dead. It is not that man is nothing, but that he is no longer able to fulfill his mannishness. Genesis 3:23-24 shows this separation between man and God in a real, historic, graphic sense.

As evangelicals we sometimes emphasize the first separation and fail to properly emphasize all the others that now exist. The second great separation is separation of man from himself. Man has fear. Man has psychological problems. How does a Christian understand these? Primarily as the abnormal separation of man from himself. Man’s basic psychosis is his separation from God carried into his own personality as a separation from himself. Thus we have self-deception. All men are liars, but, most importantly, each man lies to himself. The greatest falsehood is not lying to other men but to ourselves. A related aspect is the loss of ability to acquire true knowledge. All his knowledge is now out of shape because the perspective is wrong, the framework is wrong. That is, man does not lose all his knowledge, but he loses “true knowledge,” especially as he makes extensions from the bits and pieces of knowledge he does have.

Furthermore, man has separated his sexual life from its original high purpose as a vehicle of communication of person to person. Sexuality loses its personal dimension; men and women treat each other as things to be exploited. Finally, at physical death comes the separation of the soul from the body, the great separation of a man from himself.

The third of the great separations is man from man. This is the sociological separation. We have seen already how Adam was separated from Eve. Both of them immediately tried to pass off the blame for the Fall. This signals the loss of the possibility of their walking truly side by side in utopian democracy. Not only was man separated from his wife, but soon brother became separated from brother, Cain killing Abel. And, as we will see in the following chapter, there is a separation between the godly and the ungodly line of men. The godly line (those men who have returned to God) and the ungodly line (the unsaved humanity going on in rebellion) constitute two humanities. In one sense, of course, there is one humanity because we all come from one source. We are one blood, one flesh. But in the midst of one humanity, there are two humanities the humanity that still stands in rebellion and the humanity that is redeemed.

Soon in the flow of history we come to the tower of Babel, and with it we have the division of languages. Modern linguistics has helped us to understand how great the issues are here. So much is involved with language. Then after the time of Abraham comes the division between Jew and Gentile. These separations (and others related to them) are like titanic sonic booms in the sociological upheavals coming down to, and perhaps especially in, our day.

The fourth separation is a separation of man from nature and nature from nature. Man has lost his full dominion, and now nature itself is often a means of judgment. There is, for example, the flood at the time of Noah and, of course, nature pitted against Job. The separation of man from nature and nature from nature seems also to have reached a climax in our day.

Man’s sin causes all these separations between man and God, man and himself, man and man, and man and nature. The simple fact is that in wanting to be what man as a creature could not be, man lost what he could be. In every area and relationship men have lost what finite man could be in his proper place.

But there is one thing which he did not lose, and that is his mannishness, his being a human being. Man still stands in the image of God-twisted, broken, abnormal, but still the image-bearer of God. Man did not stop being human. As we have seen in Genesis 9:6 and in James 3:9, even after the Fall men are still in the image of God. Modern man does not see man as fallen, but he can find no significance for man. In the Bible’s teaching man is fallen but significant.

Let us not be misled: Man is still man. The unsaved painter can still paint. The unsaved lover can still love. He still has moral motions. And, though twisted, the unsaved thinker can still think. And furthermore, he lives on after his own death. He doesn’t just come to the end of his life and suddenly the clock stops. Man has meaning and significance. He may think that his history is just trash and junk, but it is not so.

Watch a man as he dies. Five minutes later he still exists. There is no such thing as stopping the existence of man. He still goes on. He has not lost his being as a human being. He has not lost those things which he intrinsically is as a man. He has not become an animal or a machine. And as I look out over the human race and see the lost-separated from God, separated from themselves, separated from other man, separated from nature-they are still men. Man still has tremendous value.

(Francis Schaeffer pictured below)

Image result for francis schaeffer whatever happened to human race?

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Before you even come to the Bible and begin to read it one must realize there are 2 ways to read the Bible. One is just one more religious thing among thousands of other religious is nothing more than another form of a trip, not very, very different actually from a drug trip. The other way is to understand that the Bible is truth and as such what we are listening to is something that is completely contrary to what here about us on every side namely merely statistical averages, relativistic things. Now having said this then I would have to guard myself for the simple reason that it doesn’t mean a person has to believe all of this before he can begin to read the Bible and find truth in the Bible.

I would just say in just passing I was not raised in a Christian family and I was reading much philosophy when I was a young man and I didn’t read the Bible because I believed it was true. I read it simply out of an intellectual honesty, but I did do one thing. I read it exactly as it was written beginning with Genesis 1:1 and going right on, I read it just as I would read another book expecting what was being given was a straight forward statement of what was meant and it wasn’t supposed to be read on a different level than that I would read in another kind of book. As I read it, it answered the questions already at that time I realized that humanistic philosophy couldn’t answer and over a six month period I came to conclude it was truth. Nevertheless, we must keep in the back of our mind how are we reading the Bible, just as another religious trip or am I really wrestling with the question of what is given in all the areas in which it speaks. Is it truth in comparison to merely relativism?

The Bible and Archaeology – Is the Bible from God? (Kyle Butt 42 min)

You want some evidence that indicates that the Bible is true? Here is a good place to start and that is taking a closer look at the archaeology of the Old Testament times. Is the Bible historically accurate? Here are some of the posts I have done in the past on the subject: 1. The Babylonian Chronicleof Nebuchadnezzars Siege of Jerusalem2. Hezekiah’s Siloam Tunnel Inscription. 3. Taylor Prism (Sennacherib Hexagonal Prism)4. Biblical Cities Attested Archaeologically. 5. The Discovery of the Hittites6.Shishak Smiting His Captives7. Moabite Stone8Black Obelisk of Shalmaneser III9A Verification of places in Gospel of John and Book of Acts., 9B Discovery of Ebla Tablets10. Cyrus Cylinder11. Puru “The lot of Yahali” 9th Century B.C.E.12. The Uzziah Tablet Inscription13. The Pilate Inscription14. Caiaphas Ossuary14 B Pontius Pilate Part 214c. Three greatest American Archaeologists moved to accept Bible’s accuracy through archaeology.

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A longtime LINKIN PARK fan responds to Chester Bennington’s suicide and some suggestions from a Christian perspective to those who feel depressed and suicidal

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I have been a longtime LINKIN PARK fan and was very sad to hear of Chester Bennington’s suicide. My favorite song from LINKIN PARK is SOMEWHERE I BELONG and I think that Chester never really found that out for himself. I am hopeful that people will rise up and try to reach those around them that are suffering with depression and help them. Here are some of those lyrics:

I wanna heal, I wanna feel what I thought was never real
I wanna let go of the pain I’ve felt so long
(Erase all the pain till it’s gone)
I wanna heal, I wanna feel like I’m close to something real
I wanna find something I’ve wanted all along
Somewhere I belong

I like the way Colin Foreman put it because I think he is right about Christianity having the answer to the meaning of life (and more on that at the end of this post) :

I firmly believe God will use this generation to revive his body the church on these shores and beyond. I personally have experienced the power of prayer, and know it was the prayers of my family and commuted Christians in my school that saved my soul and brought me to repentance and faith in Christ from the depths of sin. And God can do likewise for the many lost prodigals who are desperately searching for meaning in life.

As Linkin Park put it :
“ I WANT TO HEAL; I WANT TO FEEL;
LIKE I’M CLOSE TO SOMETHING REAL;
I WANT TO FIND SOMETHING I’VE WANTED ALL ALONG;
SOMEWHERE I BELONG”

Young people are searching for somewhere to belong throughout this land and beyond, if only the church would hear their cry.

Somewhere I Belong (Official Video) – Linkin Park

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Crawling (Official Video) – Linkin Park

Linkin Park singer Chester Bennington dies at 41 from apparent suicide

 

 

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Leave Out All The Rest (Official Video) – Linkin Park

New Divide (Official Video) – Linkin Park

In The End (Official Video) – Linkin Park

New Details Emerge in Death of Linkin Park’s Chester Bennington

Linkin Park Chester Bennington
Kathy Flynn, WickedGoddessPhotography.com

 

In the aftermath of the death of Linkin Park singer Chester Bennington, more details on his death are coming to light. We warn readers before moving forward that the details concern the manner in which he apparently took his own life.

What I’ve Done (Official Video) – Linkin Park

According to TMZ, law enforcement officials explained that Bennington committed suicide by hanging. The musician was discovered hanging from a door separating his bedroom from his closet. The rocker reportedly was found with a belt around his neck and sources state that there was a partially empty bottle of alcohol in the room where Chester died, but no evidence of drugs. Bennington has spoken frankly in the past about his issues with drugs and alcohol. The singer reportedly left no suicide note.

Faint (Official Video) – Linkin Park

TMZ’s article points out the similarities between Bennington’s death and that of his close friend, Chris Cornell, who died in a hanging incident after a show in Detroit earlier this year. Bennington’s death coincided with the date of Cornell’s birthday.

Numb (Official Video) – Linkin Park

As previously reported, Bennington was discovered by a housekeeper and police were called to the scene. It’s been reported that one of his Linkin Park bandmates arrived at his residence shortly after police arrived as he was picking Bennington up to head to a photo shoot.

One Step Closer (Official Video) – Linkin Park

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Where do we go from here? We can’t bring Chester back but we can help those around us who are dealing with depression and drug addiction.

 

I don’t want to dismiss the problems of alcohol and drug addiction, because they certainly can contribute to depression which can lead to suicide. Rather I want to concentrate in this post to how a person can respond to depression. Sadly Chester  chose suicide because he felt there was no other way like so many others today  depression can overwhelm people.  It is sad that this is such a pressing problem. I think of songs that point this out: Adam’s Song, The Last Resort, etc.

There are two usual approaches to this problem that young people take.

First, you have the worm approach. They crawl into the ground because they don’t want to be close to anyone.

Second, the puppy approach. They do anything they can to get people to like them.

The better approach is to act like the child of God that you are. Feeling loved and accepted starts with your relationship with Christ who is the only one able to meet the deepest needs of your life. (Fast forward to the end of this post if you need a relationship with Christ.) Talking to Jesus and reading his Word- The Bible – are steps to strengthening your friendship with him. He laid down his life for you, so it is obvious that he regards you as a friend worth dying for (John 15:13) That is powerful comfort when you wonder if anyone cares.

Portions of the above post were taken from the excellent devotional book by Josh McDowell, and Ed Stewart “Youth Devotions 2,” published in 2003 by Tyndale. Back then my kids were 17, 14, 9 and 7 and we went through several of these devotions together. Just recently I got the book out of the garage and three of my kids have been meeting with me at 5:30 am every morning and we are going through some of these same devotions again. I thank God for kids who came to me and asked to start meeting with me every morning to spend 30 minutes studying Bible applications and praying together. To God be the glory.

Papa Roach – Last Resort (Censored Version)

This series of posts concerns the song “The Last Resort.”

Amy Winehouse died a few years ago and it was a tragic loss. That really troubled me that she did not seek spiritual help instead of turning to drugs and alcohol. This post today will give hope to those who feel like it is all hopeless.

The band’s place in the pop music landscape was established with the release of their breakout single, “Last Resort,” which was quickly picked up by MTV and nominated for a “Best New Artist Video” award at the 2000 Video Music Awards. The song is a gut-wrenching first-person chronicle of hopelessness that’s gone so deep the singer is seriously contemplating suicide.   But the band is adamant about the fact that the song is about fighting to survive by overcoming depression, rather than allowing it to lead to suicide. “It’s not saying I can’t go on living. It’s saying I can’t go on living this way,” says Dick (Spin, 10/00).

I know there are some curse words in the following song. I have eliminated both times the curse word is used. I really think that there needs to be a response to the young people who are saying things like the words in this song Here are some of the words:

Do you even care if I die pleading, Would it be wrong, would it be right, If I took my life tonight, Chances are that I might, and I’m contimplating suicide, ‘Cause I’m losing my sight, losing my mind, Wish somebody would tell me I’m fine, Nothing’s alright, nothing is fine, I’m running and I’m crying, I never realized I was spread too thin, Till it was too late andI was empty within, Hungry, feeding on my chaos and living in sin, Downward spiral, where do i begin, It all started when i lost my mother, No love for myself and no love for another,Searching to find a love upon a higher level, finding nothing but QUESTIONS AND DEVILS, I can’t go on living this way, Cut my life into pieces, This is my last resort.

My response to these words:”Do you even care if I die pleading, Would it be wrong, would it be right, If I took my life tonight, Chances are that I might, and I’m contimplating suicide” is that you should plead to someone who can do something about your situation and that is Christ!!!!

Below David Powlison asserts:

How do you get the living hope that God offers you in Jesus? By asking. Jesus said, “Ask and it will be given to you; seek and you will find; knock and the door will be opened to you. For everyone who asks receives; he who seeks finds; and to him who knocks, the door will be opened” (Matthew 7:7-8).

Suicide operates in a world of death, despair, and aloneness. Jesus Christ creates a world of life, hope, and community. Ask God for help, and keep on asking. Don’t stop asking. You need Him to fill you every day with the hope of the resurrection.

Below is a portion of the article “Papa Roach—Infesting and reflecting youth culture by Walt Mueller. 

Papa Roach’s Music

In a day and age where the walls are crumbling between what had been a variety of distinctive popular music genres, Papa Roach is like many other chart-topping bands whose music combines sounds that were once distinct. Coby Dick’s raspy and throat-wrenching vocals join with music that incorporates sounds of rap, rock, thrash, funk and metal. Listeners familiar with popular music will hear the influence of Faith No More, the band Dick cites as one of his early favorites. Similar contemporary bands include Korn, Limp Bizkit, The Deftones and P.O.D.

Reviewer Tim Kennedy of Spin describes the resulting sound as “an amalgam of below-the-belt guitar riffage, punk-rock urgency, and half-sung, half-rapped vocals (10/00). Rolling Stone’s Anthony Bozza says listening to Papa Roach is “like standing on a precipice—sustained tension and the threat of a tumble” (8/31/00).

The sound combines with Dick’s lyrics in a powerful and emotional blend that addresses the reality of life for kids who have been burned over and over again. Tobin Esperance says, “We write about things that have happened to our singer, specifically, and friends around us. It’s real life stuff. We’re not writing about s___ that we don’t know about, like girls and cars and money … we only know real life bulls___ that happens” (nyrock.com). Coby Dick says of his autobiographical music, “I’m venting my emotions. It’s blunt” (Rolling Stone, 8/31/00). He says “Papa Roach, lyrically, is my counseling” (Billboard,6/10/00). 

Infest (2000)

Papa Roach released the album they now consider their first in April of 2000. The album quickly began to sell as a result of radio and MTV exposure, went gold after two months thanks to scoring with MTV’s Total Request Live audience, and had gone double platinum by September 2000.

Papa Roach offers an introduction to their music, mission, message and intentions on the album’s title cut. After introducing himself to his listeners, Coby Dick informs them his “God-given talent is to rock all the nations.” In this, the band’s “first manifesto,” the group lays out their plan to “infest” the world and young minds (“wrap you in my thoughts”) with an angry musical message of anarchy and rebellion against a messed-up world that’s let them down: “We’re going to infest/We’re getting in your head/What is wrong with the world today/The government, media or your family.” Institutions and people are not to be trusted. In fact, “First they shackle your feet/Then they stand you in a line/Then they beat you like meat/Then they grab you by your mind … people are the problem today.” Dick admits the struggle so many young people feel: “the game of life is crazy.” Alone in this sea of brokenness and hopelessness, Dick asks, “Would you cry if I died today/I think it be better if you did not say.”

The band’s place in the pop music landscape was established with the release of their breakout single, “Last Resort,” which was quickly picked up by MTV and nominated for a “Best New Artist Video” award at the 2000 Video Music Awards. The song is a gut-wrenching first-person chronicle of hopelessness that’s gone so deep the singer is seriously contemplating suicide. (See lyrics on page 7.) The fact that “Last Resort” is part of the mainstream pop music landscape indicates it is connecting with more and more kids who see it as an expression of their own inner struggles. For casual listeners, the song is very confusing. Listening to the song reveals the criticisms claiming the song promotes suicide could certainly be warranted. Kids who are riding the fence because of numerous other problems in their lives could interpret the song in a way that would give them permission to go over the edge, especially if they don’t know the story behind the song. But the band is adamant about the fact that the song is about fighting to survive by overcoming depression, rather than allowing it to lead to suicide. “It’s not saying I can’t go on living. It’s saying I can’t go on living this way,” says Dick (Spin, 10/00). He also says, “Last Resort” has “a positive edge to it, as far as like, ‘Don’t succumb to it. Keep yourself afloat.’ With these problems in your life, find a friend you can confide in” (Sonicnet.com). Based on the band’s resolve to survive like a roach, one would have to take them at their word. The song chronicles the suicide attempt of one of Coby Dick’s former roommates. After his “unsuccessful” attempt, the young man “turned to God” … Dick claims the attempt was what killed the rotting part of his roommate’s soul. The song has definitely connected. “We’ve gotten so many e-mails from people who tell us ‘Last Resort’ saved their lives,” says Dick. “It makes some people feel less alone” (Rolling Stone,8/31/00).

The album’s third cut is equally powerful. Released as a single and put in heavy rotation on MTV, “Broken Home” (See lyrics) is an overt lyrical, sonic and visual cry from the heart of one whose young life has been shattered by family breakdown. Written by Dick about his feelings after his parents’ divorce, the song offers listeners an emotional window into the reality of kids beaten up by our current culture of divorce. Every parent considering divorce should sit and watch this video. It is powerful.

“Dead Cell” has been called “a darkly sarcastic paean to Columbine kids the world over” (Alternative Press, 10/00). If that’s the case, the sarcasm is not easily heard. The dead cells are described as “born with no soul/lack of control/cut from the mold of the anti-social … sick in the head/living but dead.” Loud, angry and fast, the song could be interpreted by some who are young and angry as a call to arms: “I’m telling ya the kids are getting singled out/Let me hear the dead cells shout.”

“Between Angels and Insects” is an insightful rant against American greed and materialism. Dick says he wrote the song to remind himself that the things the band’s success will bring are not the things that make one happy. The lyrics are powerful and excerpts could serve to spark discussion with teens about the false promises of materialism: “Diamond rings get you nothing/But a life-long lesson/And your pocketbook stressin’/You’re a slave to the system/Working jobs that you hate/For s___ that you don’t need/It’s too bad the world is based on greed/Step back and stop thinking ‘bout yourself … ‘cause everything is nothing/And emptiness is in everything … Possessions they are never gonna fill the void … the things you own, own you.” When discussing the message of the song Buckner says, “all the worldly things that people equate with happiness—do they necessarily make you happy? You can have Rolexes and diamond rings and cars and houses … but really the things that make you happy are peace of mind and passion in your life” (Alternative Press, 10/00).

Relational selfishness and greed are the subject of “Blood Brothers,” a song offering powerful evidence of the depth of sin’s hold on humanity: “It’s our nature to destroy ourselves/It’s our nature to kill ourselves/It’s our nature to kill each other/It’s in our nature to kill, kill, kill.” The song speaks about allegiance in a world where you can’t trust anybody and you’ve got to watch your back. The lyrics leave one thinking the song could serve as an anthem for a street gang or other fringe subculture: “Blood brothers keep it real to the end.”

Themes of severe relational breakdown and the resulting pain continue in “Revenge,” a song about a girl who was “abused with forks, knives and razorblades” and who finally left the man who abused her in fits of rage. Listeners who have been abused will identify with the song’s mention of the ever-present and visible emotional scars they so often feel: “Chaos is what she saw in the mirror/Scared of herself/And the power that was in her/It took over and weighed heavily on her shoulders/Militant insanity is now what controlled her.” The song indicates that she exacts revenge on him, although the method and outcome is unclear.

Backstabbers are the subject of “Snakes,” an angry and threatening rant at those who betray friends. The song reflects the distrust so many kids feel because of the parade of letdowns they’ve experienced. The chorus asks, “Do you like how it feels to be bit in the neck by the snake that kills?/Do you know how it feels to be stabbed in the back then watch the blood spill?/I don’t like how it feels.”

Coby Dick chronicles his wrestling match with alcohol on “Binge,” a song that serves as a personal confession. “All I need is a bottle/And I don’t need no friends/Now wallow in my pain/I swallow as I pretend/To act like I’m happy when I drink till no end/I’m losing all my friends, I’m losing in the end … When I’m sober, life bores me/So I get drunk again.” The song is a heart cry about what drives the binge drinker, how he really feels inside and his desire to see it end. In the song’s final lines, Dick sings, “I wish things would change/Wish they’d rearrange.”

“Never Enough” is another cry for help from a confused and tortured young soul that is deeply longing for redemption. “Life’s been sucked out of me/And this routine’s killing me … somebody put me out of my misery,” Dick sings. The song will resonate with kids who are lost, purposeless and without peace. The song’s conclusion is a loud cry for help: “I feel as if I’m running/Life will knock me down.”

“Thrown Away” offers a view of life through the eyes of a kid struggling with ADD, something Coby Dick knows well as he watched his brother’s personal struggle with the disorder. “My heart is bleeding and the pain will not pass … I want to be thrown away … I am a mess, I’ve made a huge mess/I can’t control myself/I’m losing it, I’ve lost it/I’ve spilt all my marbles … sometimes I want to be thrown away.”

The album concludes with an unlisted hidden cut called “Tightrope.” The track is stylistically unlike any other cuts on the album as it is done in reggae style. The lyrics are a confusing mix of thoughts where Dick calls his words “weapons in which I murder you.” The song offers a confession regarding the ethical dilemmas faced by kids in these confusing times: “there is a thin line between what’s good and what is evil/I will tiptoe down that line/But I feel unstable/My life is a circus and I’m tripping down the tightrope/There’s nothing left to save me now so I will not look down.”

Help for the Suicidal

God offers you true, living hope–not a false hope based on your death.
By David Powlison

WHAT YOU NEED TO DO

It’s easy to see the risk factors for suicide—depression, suffering, disillusioning experiences, failure—but there are also ways to get your life back on track by building protective factors into your life.

Ask for help

How do you get the living hope that God offers you in Jesus? By asking. Jesus said, “Ask and it will be given to you; seek and you will find; knock and the door will be opened to you. For everyone who asks receives; he who seeks finds; and to him who knocks, the door will be opened” (Matthew 7:7-8).

Suicide operates in a world of death, despair, and aloneness. Jesus Christ creates a world of life, hope, and community. Ask God for help, and keep on asking. Don’t stop asking. You need Him to fill you every day with the hope of the resurrection.

At the same time you are asking God for help, tell other people about your struggle with hopelessness. God uses His people to bring life, light, and hope. Suicide, by definition, happens when someone is all alone. Getting in relationship with wise, caring people will protect you from despair and acting out of despair.

But what if you are bereaved and alone? If you know Jesus, you still have a family—His family is your family. Become part of a community of other Christians. Look for a church where Jesus is at the center of teaching and worship. Get in relationship with people who can help you, but don’t stop with getting help. Find people to love, serve, and give to. Even if your life has been stripped barren by lost relationships, God can and will fill your life with helpful and healing relationships.

Grow in godly life skills

Another protective factor is to grow in godly living. Many of the reasons for despair come from not living a godly, fruitful life. You need to learn the skills that make godly living possible. What are some of those skills?

    • Conflict resolution. Learn to problem-solve by entering into human difficulties and growing through them. (See Ask the Christian Counselor article, “Fighting the Right Way.”)
    • Seek and grant forgiveness. Hopeless thinking is often the result of guilt and bitterness.
    • Learn to give to others. Suicide is a selfish act. It’s a lie that others will be better off without you. Work to replace your faulty thinking with reaching out to others who are also struggling. Take what you have learned in this article and pass it on to at least one other person. Whatever hope God gives you, give to someone who is struggling with despair.

Live for God

When you live for God, you have genuine meaning in your life. This purpose is far bigger than your suffering, your failures, the death of your dreams, and the disillusionment of your hopes. Living by faith in God for His purposes will protect you from suicidal and despairing thoughts. God wants to use your personality, your skills, your life situation, and even your struggle with despair to bring hope to others.

He has already prepared good works for you to do. Paul says, “For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them” (Ephesians 2:10). As you step into the good works God has prepared for you—you will find that meaning, purpose, and joy.

Adrian Rogers: Dealing with Depression [#1150] (Audio)

Published on Jun 1, 2016

None of us are immune to depression. And if you’re always burning the candle at both end, frazzled and stretched too thin, you’re a prime target for Satan’s attacks. Even great men of God have struggled with depression. Find out today how God lovingly dealt with them and how you can regain victory over this debilitating emotion.

Scripture References: Numbers 11:15; 1 Kings 19:4
Series: Getting a Handle on Your Emotions
This Message: https://www.lwf.org/products/1150CD
This Series: https://www.lwf.org/products/CDA112
1. Dealing with Doubt [#1148]
2. Dealing with Depression [#1150]
3. Dealing with Loneliness [#1151]
4. Dealing with Stress [#1153]
5. Inferiority [#1155]
6. The Blight of Bitterness [#1136]
7. God’s Answer to Anger [#1009]
8. How to Handle Your Fear [#1225]

If you would like more information please visit these following websites:
Official Website: https: http://www.lwf.org/
Audio Messages: http://www.oneplace.com/ministries/lo…
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Write to: PO Box 38300, Memphis, Tennessee 38183
Call: (901) 382-7900

Somewhere I Belong (Official Video) – Linkin Park

[Verse 1: Mike Shinoda (and Chester Bennington)]
(When this began)
I had nothing to say
And I get lost in the nothingness inside of me
(I was confused)
And I let it all out to find
That I’m not the only person with these things in mind
(Inside of me)
But all the vacancy the words revealed
Is the only real thing that I’ve got left to feel
(Nothing to lose)
Just stuck, hollow and alone
And the fault is my own, and the fault is my own

[Hook: Chester and (Mike)]
I wanna heal, I wanna feel what I thought was never real
I wanna let go of the pain I’ve felt so long
(Erase all the pain till it’s gone)
I wanna heal, I wanna feel like I’m close to something real
I wanna find something I’ve wanted all along
Somewhere I belong

[Verse 2: Mike and (Chester)]
And I’ve got nothing to say
I can’t believe I didn’t fall right down on my face

(I was confused)
Looking everywhere only to find
That it’s not the way I had imagined it all in my mind

(So what am I?)
What do I have but negativity?
’Cause I can’t justify the way, everyone is looking at me
(Nothing to lose)
Nothing to gain, hollow and alone
And the fault is my own, and the fault is my own

[Hook: Chester and (Mike)]
I wanna heal, I wanna feel what I thought was never real
I wanna let go of the pain I’ve felt so long
(Erase all the pain till it’s gone)
I wanna heal, I wanna feel like I’m close to something real
I wanna find something I’ve wanted all along
Somewhere I belong

 

We are looking for somewhere we belong. The first thing we have to resolve is our relationship with our Creator.

Adrian Rogers: Salvation #2067

Published on Nov 23, 2016

SALVATION: What is the greatest need of humanity? Salvation through faith in Jesus Christ. That may sound old-fashioned, but one day it will make a huge difference in your life. Learn what you gain by your salvation.
_

If you would like more information please visit these following websites:
Our Website: http://www.lwf.org/
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Write to us:
Love Worth Finding Ministries
P.O. Box 38300 Memphis, TN 38183-0300

Call us: Phone: (901) 382-7900 (8:00 am – 4:45 pm CT)
Toll-free phone for orders, donations, or questions:
1-800-274-5683

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Chris Cornell Remembered by Linkin Park’s Chester Bennington

Casey Curry/Invision/AP
Chris Cornell poses for a portrait to promote his latest album, “Higher Truth,” at The Paramount Ranch in Agoura Hills, Calif. on July 29, 2015.

Chris Cornell was good friends with Linkin Park’s Chester Bennington. When he toured with Linkin Park in the late-’00s, Bennington would join Cornell to sing Temple of the Dog’s “Hunger Strike” and Cornell would repay the favor and help sing “Crawling.”

On Thursday (May 18), in light of Chris Cornell’s death, Bennington has shared a note to remember his friend. Read it below:

 

Dear Chris,

I dreamt about the Beatles last night. I woke up with Rocky Raccoon playing in my head and a concerned look on my wife’s face. She told me my friend has just passed away. Thoughts of you flooded my mind and I wept. I’m still weeping, with sadness, as well as gratitude for having shared some very special moments with you and your beautiful family. You have inspired me in many ways you could never have known. Your talent was pure and unrivaled. Your voice was joy and pain, anger and forgiveness, love and heartache all wrapped up into one. I suppose that’s what we all are. You helped me understand that. I just watched a video of you singing ‘ A day in the life ‘ by the Beatles and thought of my dream. I’d like to think you were saying goodbye in your own way. I can’t imagine a world without you in it. I pray you find peace in the next life. I send my love to your wife and children, friends and family. Thank you for allowing me to be a part of your life.

With all of my love.
Your friend,
Chester Bennington

Chris Cornell * A Day In The Life (Beatles Cover) Live HD

 

SGT. PEPPER’S LONELY HEARTS CLUB BAND ALBUM was the Beatles’ finest work and in my view it had their best song of all-time in it. The revolutionary song was A DAY IN THE LIFE which both showed the common place part of everyday life and also the sudden unexpected side of life.  The shocking part of the song included the story of TARA BROWNE. You can read more about Tara Browne later in this post and another fine article on him was written by GLENYS ROBERTS in 2012 called, “A Day in the Life: Tragic true story behind one of the Beatles’ most famous hits revealed in new book.”

(Francis Schaeffer pictured below)

Francis Schaeffer noted that King Solomon said that death can arrive unexpectedly at anytime in Ecclesiastes 9:11-13: 

11 Again I saw that under the sun the race is not to the swift, nor the battle to the strong, nor bread to the wise, nor riches to the intelligent, nor favor to those with knowledge, but time and chance happen to them all. 12 For man does not know his time. Like fish that are taken in an evil net, and like birds that are caught in a snare, so the children of man are snared at an evil time, when it suddenly falls upon them. 13 I have also seen this example of wisdom under the sun, and it seemed great to me.

______

Death can come at anytime. Albert Camus in a speeding car with a pretty girl, then Camus dead. Lawrence of Arabia coming over the crest of a hill at 100 mph on his motorcycle and some boy stands in the road and Lawrence turns aside and dies.  

___

The Beatles reached out to those touched by this reality. No wonder in the video THE AGE OF NON-REASON (at 14 min mark) Schaeffer noted,  ” Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band…for a time it became the rallying cry for young people throughout the world. It expressed the essence of their lives, thoughts and their feelings.”

_

Let’s get back to Solomon and his search  for meaning in life in what I call the 6 big L words in the Book of Ecclesiastes. He looked into  learning (1:16-18), laughter, ladies, luxuries,  and liquor (2:1-3, 8, 10, 11), and labor (2:4-6, 18-20). After searching in all these areas just like Chris Cornell and Chester Bennington he found them to be  “vanity and a striving after the wind.”

Ecclesiastes 2:7-11 English Standard Version (ESV)

7I had also great possessions of herds and flocks, more than any who had been before me in Jerusalem. 8 I also gathered for myself silver and gold and the treasure of kings and provinces. So I became great and surpassed all who were before me in Jerusalem…10 And whatever my eyes desired I did not keep from them. 11 Then I considered all that my hands had done and the toil I had expended in doing it, and behold, all was vanity and a striving after wind, and there was nothing to be gained UNDER THE SUN.

“For what does it profit a man to gain the whole world and forfeit his soul?” Mark 8:36 (Christ’s words)

God put Solomon’s story in Ecclesiastes in the Bible with the sole purpose of telling people that without God in the picture they will find out the emptiness one feels when possessions or anything else BELOW THE SUN are trying to fill the void that God can only fill.

Then in the last chapter of Ecclesiastes Solomon returns to looking above the sun and he says that obeying the Lord is the proper way to live your life. The  answer to find meaning in life is found in putting your faith and trust in Jesus Christ. The Bible is true from cover to cover and can be trusted. If you need more evidence then go to You Tube and watch the short videos  “Francis Schaeffer – The Biblical Flow of History & Truth (1),“(3 min, 5 sec) and “Dr. Francis Schaeffer – The Biblical Flow of Truth & History (part 2),” (10 min, 46 sec).

_

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Cocaine killed Whitney Houston, list of other rockstars who died from drug related causes

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The late Amy Winehouse wins a grammy!!!!

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It was so sad to lose these people so soon. The Curse of 27 This page is in response to my most frequently asked questions – is there really a Curse of 27, how many musicians actually died at that age, and who are they. When legendary Blues man, Robert Johnson, was killed at the age […]

 

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A curve ball in the Amy Winehouse case.   Troubled Brit singer Amy Winehouse was found dead at her London home in July. / AP FILE PHOTO Written by JILL LAWLESS, | Associated Press FILED UNDER Entertainment LONDON — The coroner who oversaw the inquest into the death of singer Amy Winehouse has resigned after her […]

 

Solution to the problem of loneliness among young people

Jim Morrison’s picture above. He died way too young and many of our young people turn to drugs and suicide because of  loneliness. It is sad that this is such a pressing problem. I think of songs that point this out: Adam’s Song, The Last Resort, etc. There are two usual approaches to this problem that […]

 

 

 

 

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FRIEDMAN FRIDAY ADVICE FOR PRESIDENT TRUMP:Free to Choose Part 9: How to Cure Inflation Featuring Milton Friedman

ADVICE FOR PRESIDENT TRUMP:Free to Choose Part 9: How to Cure Inflation Featuring Milton Friedman

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Stearns Speaks on House Floor in Support of Balanced Budget Amendment Uploaded by RepCliffStearns on Nov 18, 2011 Speaking on House floor in support of Balanced Budget Resolution, 11/18/2011 ___________ Below are some of the main proposals of Milton Friedman. I highly respected his work. David J. Theroux said this about Milton Friedman’s view concerning […]

“Friedman Friday,” EPISODE “The Failure of Socialism” of Free to Choose in 1990 by Milton Friedman (Part 1)

Milton Friedman: Free To Choose – The Failure Of Socialism With Ronald Reagan (Full) Published on Mar 19, 2012 by NoNationalityNeeded Milton Friedman’s writings affected me greatly when I first discovered them and I wanted to share with you. We must not head down the path of socialism like Greece has done. Abstract: Ronald Reagan […]

Defending Milton Friedman

What a great defense of Milton Friedman!!!!   Defaming Milton Friedman by Johan Norberg This article appeared in Reason Online on September 26, 2008  PRINT PAGE  CITE THIS      Sans Serif      Serif Share with your friends: ShareThis In the future, if you tell a student or a journalist that you favor free markets and limited government, there is […]

Milton and Rose Friedman “Two Lucky People”

Milton Friedman on Hayek’s “Road to Serfdom” 1994 Interview 2 of 2 Uploaded by PenguinProseMedia on Oct 26, 2011 2nd half of 1994 interview. ________________ I have a lot of respect for the Friedmans.Two Lucky People by Milton and Rose Friedman reviewed by David Frum — October 1998. However, I liked this review below better. It […]

Video clip:Milton Friedman discusses his view of numerous political figures and policy issues in (Part 2)

Milton Friedman on Hayek’s “Road to Serfdom” 1994 Interview 1 of 2 Uploaded by PenguinProseMedia on Oct 25, 2011 Says Federal Reserve should be abolished, criticizes Keynes. One of Friedman’s best interviews, discussion spans Friedman’s career and his view of numerous political figures and public policy issues. ___________________ Here is a review of “Two Lucky People.” […]

Milton Friedman believed in liberty (Interview by Charlie Rose of Milton Friedman part 1)

Charlie Rose interview of Milton Friedman My favorite economist: Milton Friedman : A Great Champion of Liberty  by V. Sundaram   Milton Friedman, the Nobel Prize-winning economist who advocated an unfettered free market and had the ear of three US Presidents – Nixon, Ford and Reagan – died last Thursday (16 November, 2006 ) in San Francisco […]

“The Failure of Socialism” episode of Free to Choose in 1990 by Milton Friedman (Part 1)

Milton Friedman: Free To Choose – The Failure Of Socialism With Ronald Reagan (Full) Published on Mar 19, 2012 by NoNationalityNeeded Milton Friedman’s writings affected me greatly when I first discovered them and I wanted to share with you. We must not head down the path of socialism like Greece has done. Abstract: Ronald Reagan […]

Milton Friedman – The Negative Income Tax

Volume 1: Power of the Market Volume 2: The Tyranny of Control
Volume 3: Anatomy of a Crisis
Volume 4: From Cradle to Grave
Volume 5: Created Equal
Volume 6: What’s Wrong With Our Schools?
Volume 7: Who Protects the Consumer?
Volume 8: Who Protects the Worker?
Volume 9: How to Cure Inflation
Volume 10: How to Stay Free

Updated 1990 Series:
Volume 1: The Power of the Market
Volume 2: The Tyranny of Control
Volume 3: Freedom & Prosperity
Volume 4: The Failure of Socialism
Volume 5: Created Equal

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FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE PART 173 Nat Hentoff, historian,atheist, pro-life advocate, novelist, jazz and country music critic, and syndicated columnist (Featured artist is Sedrick Huckaby )

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Nat Hentoff on abortion

Secular Pro-Lifer Nat Hentoff Showed Me the Holistic Power of Truth

Image: Waring Abbott / Getty Images

Nat Hentoff—author, jazz critic, and Village Voice columnist for 50 years—died this weekend at the age of 91. Hentoff was a liberal, progressive atheist—yet he profoundly shaped my Christian belief and practice.

In 1986, when he was already a wizened old civil libertarian and secularist pundit, Hentoff researched a number of high-profile cases of disabled infants who had been denied simple, life-saving procedures and instead allowed to die of starvation and dehydration. The resulting story, “The Awful Privacy of Baby Doe,” was published in The Atlantic and marked the awakening of Hentoff’s conscience on abortion.

He had to admit, he later explained in a lecture given to Americans United for Life, that the slope from abortion to infanticide to euthanasia is “not slippery at all, but rather a logical throughway once you got on to it”:

Now, I had not been thinking about abortion at all. I had not thought about it for years. I had what W. H. Auden called in another context a “rehearsed response.” You mentioned abortion and I would say, “Oh yeah, that’s a fundamental part of women’s liberation,” and that was the end of it.

But then I started hearing about “late abortion.” The simple “fact” that the infant had been born, proponents suggest, should not get in the way of mercifully saving him or her from a life hardly worth living. At the same time, the parents are saved from the financial and emotional burden of caring for an imperfect child.

And then I heard the head of the Reproductive Freedom Rights unit of the ACLU saying—this was at the same time as the Baby Jane Doe story was developing on Long Island—at a forum, “I don’t know what all this fuss is about. Dealing with these handicapped infants is really an extension of women’s reproductive freedom rights, women’s right to control their own bodies.”

That stopped me. It seemed to me we were not talking about Roe v. Wade. These infants were born. And having been born, as persons under the Constitution, they were entitled to at least the same rights as people on death row—due process, equal protection of the law. So for the first time, I began to pay attention to the “slippery slope” warnings of pro-lifers I read about or had seen on television. Because abortion had become legal and easily available, that argument ran—as you well know—Infanticide would eventually become openly permissible, to be followed by euthanasia for infirm, expensive senior citizens.

His words, although based in reason, not faith, demonstrate that all truth is God’s truth and that the truth of the Bible governs the nature of reality in ways that even the unbeliever can recognize.

Hentoff’s growing awareness of the nature of abortion-on-demand wasn’t an isolated incident; the 1980s raised consciousness for a lot of us on the issue of abortion. In 1987, a year following his Atlantic essay, I, too, became pro-life. For me it was the result of viewing The Silent Scream, a video showing via ultrasound a first-trimester abortion taking place.

As a cradle Christian who had never doubted Jesus or my saving faith in him, I, like Hentoff, had before my pro-life conversion relied on my own “rehearsed responses.” I had never needed to defend my faith (to others or, more importantly, myself) until I began to apply my Christian beliefs to the issue of abortion amid the culture wars.

But that was just the start. The abortion issue helped me to live out my Christian worldview more consistently and courageously. From the opposite end of the worldview spectrum, Hentoff’s example helped me to understand the holism of truth. The battle over abortion—or any “issue” at any time—must always be for the Christian a greater battle for truth, wherever, as Augustine said, it may be found.

Shortly after adopting my pro-life views, I began protesting at local clinics. Coincidentally (or, more likely, providentially), I had also just begun my PhD program. Imagine a pro-life Christian activist at the most liberal department in a liberal public university in one of the most liberal states in the country. As far as I know, I was the only Christian in my department. I was certainly the only one publicly opposing abortion. In such an environment, I knew I wouldn’t likely be popular—but I had no idea that I would be hated and silenced. I had thought we were all there to pursue truth in our learning, but it seems I was mistaken.

My officemate asked me to take my pro-life flyers down from our door (offering to take down her lesbian literature in return). A professor recorded a complaint about my protest activities in my grade report. Worst was how some professors and fellow students avoided eye contact with me in the halls. One student wrote a column in a student newspaper objecting to the pro-life week my club held on campus, exhorting students to spit on and kick the pro-lifers. The university ordered our club to cancel our display.

I was naïve enough to think that standing up for what I believed in would bring some respect even if others didn’t agree. Studying within the liberal arts, I thought truth might prevail. But I was mistaken. These liberals weren’t tolerant. They weren’t even truly liberal—not in the classical sense of freely pursuing knowledge.

I later came across Nat Hentoff’s 1992 book, Free Speech for Me—But Not for Thee: How the American Left and Right Relentlessly Censor Each Other. In the prologue, Hentoff explained that part of his inspiration was the oppression of pro-life activists and the failure of liberals to speak out against it—at last, a liberal thinker striving for consistency. His efforts helped me to see where Christians and conservatives must do the same.

Reading Hentoff’s work, I was awed at one for whom integrity meant more than merely marching in lockstep with his own kind. While Hentoff objected, rightly, in his book to the censoriousness of conservatives, he called out his fellow leftists for similar impulses, finding such behavior contradictory to liberal values.

As I began thinking through free speech issues, I realized that Christians, not liberal secularists, have more to lose from censorship. The legal cases piling up against my fellow pro-life activists and me attested to this. But even more important, I came to understand that not only do Christians have more to lose from restrictions on speech, but we have less reason to fear even wrong ideas.

The way to combat falsehood is not in suppressing it, but in countering it with truth. For just as light dispels darkness, so wisdom excels folly (Ecc. 2:13). The 17th century Puritan and poet John Milton was one of the first modern Christians to defend free speech. He did so by affirming truth’s undefeatable power:

For who knows not that Truth is strong, next to the Almighty? She needs no policies, nor stratagems, nor licensings to make her victorious; those are the shifts and the defences that error uses against her power. Give her but room, and do not bind her when she sleeps . . . And though all the winds of doctrine were let loose to play upon the earth, so Truth be in the field, we do injuriously, by licensing and prohibiting, to misdoubt her strength.

Let her and Falsehood grapple; who ever knew Truth put to the worse, in a free and open encounter? Her confuting is the best and surest suppressing.

In Milton’s day, suppression of truth was a matter of life and death. Nat Hentoff recognized that this is still true today. And when my university tried to prevent my pro-life student club from expressing our ideas about abortion in display of commemorative crosses, Hentoff was one of the first to call in support of our effort.

Despite my disagreements with Hentoff on other topics, to him I owe my understanding as a Christian that because we believe in and have access to the truth, we have the least to fear from the free and open exchange of ideas. When someone with such a dramatically different worldview recognized and upheld at great personal cost the belief that all lives are indeed created equal, I saw the power of truth at work.

Thank you, Nat. Your legacy of integrity and courage lives on.

Nat Hentoff like and Milton Friedman and John Hospers was a hero to Libertarians. Over the years I had the opportunity to correspond with some prominent Libertarians such as Friedman and Hospers. Friedman was very gracious, but Hospers was not. I sent a cassette tape of Adrian Rogers on Evolution to John Hospers in May of 1994 which was the 10th anniversary of Francis Schaeffer’s passing and I promptly received a typed two page response from Dr. John Hospers. Dr. Hospers had both read my letter and all the inserts plus listened to the whole sermon and had some very angry responses. If you would like to hear the sermon from Adrian Rogers and read the transcript then refer to my earlier post at this link.  Earlier I posted the comments made by Hospers in his letter to me and you can access those posts by clicking on the links in the first few sentences of this post or you can just google “JOHN HOSPERS FRANCIS SCHAEFFER” or “JOHN HOSPERS ADRIAN ROGERS.”

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Likewise I read a lot of material from Nat Hentoff and I wrote him several letters. In the post I will include one of those letters.

Nat Hentoff on abortion

Published on Nov 5, 2016

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 xxxxxxxxxxTo Nat Hentoff c/o Cato Institute,   From everettehatcher@gmail.com,        6-26-14 

 

You are one of my biggest pro-life heroes along with Leo Alexander!!!!      Just the other day I sent you the CD called “Dust in the Wind, Darwin and Disbelief.” I know you may not have time to listen to the CD but on the first 2 1/2 minutes of that CD is the hit song “Dust in the Wind” by the rock group KANSAS and was written by Kerry Ligren in 1978. Would you be kind enough to read these words of that song given below and refute the idea that accepting naturalistic evolution with the exclusion of God must lead to the nihilistic message of the song! Or maybe you agree with Richard Dawkins and other scholars below?

DUST IN THE WIND:

I close my eyes only for a moment, and the moment’s gone

All my dreams pass before my eyes, a curiosity

Dust in the wind, all they are is dust in the wind

Same old song, just a drop of water in an endless sea

All we do crumbles to the ground, though we refuse to see

Dust in the wind, all we are is dust in the wind

Now, don’t hang on, nothing lasts forever but the earth and sky

It slips away, and all your money won’t another minute buy

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Humans have always wondered about the meaning of life…life has no higher purpose than to perpetuate the survival of DNA…life has no design, no purpose, no evil and no good, nothing but blind pitiless indifference. —Richard Dawkins

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The vast majority of people believe there is a design or force in the universe; that it works outside the ordinary mechanics of cause and effect; that it is somehow responsible for both the visible and the moral order of the world. Modern biology has undermined this assumption…But beginning with Darwin, biology has undermined that tradition. Darwin in effect asserted that all living organisms had been created by a combination of chance and necessity–natural selection… First, God has no role in the physical world…Second, except for the laws of probability and cause and effect, there is no organizing principle in the world, and no purpose.  (William B. Provine, “The End of Ethics?” in HARD CHOICES ( a magazine companion to the television series HARD CHOICES, Seattle: KCTS-TV, channel 9, University of Washington, 1980, pp. 2-3).

That Man is the product of causes which had no prevision of the end they were achieving; that his origin, his growth, his hopes and fears, his loves and his beliefs, are but the outcome of accidental collocations of atoms; …that all the labors of the ages, all the devotion, all the inspiration, all the noonday brightness of human genius, are destined to extinction in the vast death of the solar system, and that the whole temple of Man’s achievement must inevitably be buried beneath the debris of a universe in ruins—all these things, if not quite beyond dispute, are yet so nearly certain, that no philosophy which rejects them can hope to stand. Bertrand Russell

The British humanist H. J. Blackham (1903-2009) put it very plainly: On humanist assumptions, life leads to nothing, and every pretense that it does not is a deceit. If there is a bridge over a gorge which spans only half the distance and ends in mid-air, and if the bridge is crowded with human beings pressing on, one after the other they fall into the abyss. The bridge leads nowhere, and those who are pressing forward to cross it are going nowhere….It does not matter where they think they are going, what preparations for the journey they may have made, how much they may be enjoying it all. The objection merely points out objectively that such a situation is a model of futility“( H. J. Blackham, et al., Objections to Humanism (Riverside, Connecticut: Greenwood Press, 1967).

In the 1986 debate on the John Ankerberg show between Paul Kurtz (1925-2012) and Norman Geisler, Kurtz reacted to the point Blackham was making by asserting:

I think you may be quoting Blackham out of context because I’ve heard Blackham speak, and read much of what he said, but Blackham has argued continuously that life is full of meaning; that there are points. The fact that one doesn’t believe in God does not deaden the appetite or the lust for living. On the contrary; great artists and scientists and poets and writers have affirmed the opposite.

I read the book FORBIDDEN FRUIT by Paul Kurtz and I had the opportunity to correspond with him but I still reject his view that optimistic humanism withstand the view of nihilism if one accepts there is no God. Christian philosopher R.C. Sproul put it best:

Nihilism has two traditional enemies–Theism and Naive Humanism. The theist contradicts the nihilist because the existence of God guarantees that ultimate meaning and significance of personal life and history. Naive Humanism is considered naive by the nihilist because it rhapsodizes–with no rational foundation–the dignity and significance of human life. The humanist declares that man is a cosmic accident whose origin was fortuitous and entrenched in meaningless insignificance. Yet in between the humanist mindlessly crusades for, defends, and celebrates the chimera of human dignity…Herein is the dilemma: Nihilism declares that nothing really matters ultimately…In my judgment, no philosophical treatise has ever surpassed or equaled the penetrating analysis of the ultimate question of meaning versus vanity that is found in the Book of Ecclesiastes. 

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Kerry Livgren is the writer of the song “Dust in the Wind” and he said concerning that song in 1981 and then in 2006:

 1981: “When I wrote “Dust in the Wind” I was  writing about a yearning emptiness that I felt which millions of people identified with because the song was very popular.” 2006:“Dust In the Wind” was certainly the most well-known song, and the message was out of Ecclesiastes. I never ceased to be amazed at how the message resonates with people, from the time it came out through now. The message is true and we have to deal with it, plus the melody is memorable and very powerful. It disturbs me that there’s only part of the [Christian] story told in that song. It’s about someone yearning for some solution, but if you look at the entire body of my work, there’s a solution to the dilemma.”

Ecclesiastes reasons that chance and time have determined the past and will determine the future (9:11-13), and power reigns in this life and the scales are not balanced(4:1). Is that how you see the world? Solomon’s experiment was a search for meaning to life “under the sun.” Then in last few words in Ecclesiastes he looks above the sun and brings God back into the picture: “The conclusion, when all has been heard, is: Fear God and keep His commandments, because this applies to every person. For God will bring every act to judgment.”

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Featured artist is Sedrick Huckaby

Artist Spotlight – Sedrick Huckaby – Painter

Published on Jul 14, 2016

His artworks hang in major museums, he was educated on the East Coast and in Europe. But Sedrick Huckaby still lives in Fort Worth and his subjects are still his own family, their quilts, their African-American neighborhood. He turns these subjects into canvases of such density, it’s like he’s compressing entire histories into paint. Part of Art&Seek’s Artist Spotlight series, exploring the personal journeys of North Texas creatives. Learn more at http://artandseek.org/spotlight.

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Sedrick Huckaby

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Sedrick Ervin Huckaby (1975) is an American artist who is known for his use of thick, impasto paint to create murals that evoke traditional quilts and to produce large portraits that represent his personal history through images of family members and neighbors.[1][2]Huckaby has worked with images from quilts for many years, moving them from background components of portraits into the subject of his work.[3] He was interviewed about his quilt-influenced abstract work in a podcast for Painters Table.[4] His work is on display at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Museum of Fine arts in Boston, the Minneapolis Institute of Art, The Art Institute of Chicago, and the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University.

Biography[edit]

Huckaby is a native of Fort Worth, Texas. As a child, Huckaby spent time drawing characters from TV shows such as Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and Battlestar Galactica. While in High School, he attended classes at the Modern Art Museum where he met fellow artist Ron Tomlinson, who encouraged Huckaby to pursue art as a career.[5] He studied art at Texas Wesleyan University before receiving a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Boston University in 1997 and a Master of Fine Arts from Yale University in 1999.[6] He has lectured on the Grant Hill Collection of African American Art at the Dallas Museum of Art, and through the The Artist’s Eye series at the Kimbell Art Museum in Fort Worth.[7] He is currently an assistant professor of painting in the Department of Art and Art History at UT Arlington, where he has been teaching since 2009. He is married to artist Letitia Huckaby.

Works[edit]

His 2008 series Big Momma’s House includes 65 paintings, pastels, and drawings created over a two-year period. The focus of this collection is his maternal grandmother, Hallie Beatrice Carpenter, the matriarch of his family and more affectionately known an “Big Momma”.[8] His work ” A Love Supreme (Spring)”, is based on the jazz song of the same name by John Coultrane, and depicts a series of quilts draped across the canvas emphasizing weight and texture. In this mural sized-oil painting, the painted folds of brightly colored fabrics mimic the rhythm and syncopation of Coultrane’s jazz hit while paying homage to his grandmother’s traditional African-American quilts.[9] His series The 99% – Highand Hills is a collection of portraits inspired by the 2011 Occupy Wall Street movement, showcasing the economic disparities of the U.S. population through sketches of community members alongside quotes from each person.[5]

Awards and Distinctions[edit]

In 1999, Huckaby was awarded the Kate Neal Kinley Memorial Fellowship from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Illinois.[8] He was awarded the Alice Kimball English Traveling Fellowship from Yale University in 1999 which funded his travels to study the works of Henry Tanner.[10] Again in 1999 he was awarded the Provincetown Fellowship from the Fine Arts Work Center and subsequently spent siz months making work there.[10][8] In 2001, he was awarded the Best of Show and subsequently held a solo exhibition for the The 20th Carrol Harris Simms National Black Art Competition and Exhibition at the African American Museum in Dallas, Texas.[8]

In 2004, Huckaby was awarded a Joan Mitchell Foundation Painters and Sculptors Grant, which is given to acknowledge “painters and sculptors creating work of exceptional quality through unrestricted career support”.[11] In 2004 he also received the Beth Lea Clardy Memorial Award (first place) at Art in the Metroplex in Fort Worth, Texas.[8] In 2008 he received a Guggenheim Fellowship, one of the most prestigious art grants in the nation.[10][12] In 2014 he received the Visiting Artist Residency and Fellowship through the Brandywine Workshop as well as the Davidson Family Fellowship sponsored by Amon Carter Museum of American Art.[10] In 2016, he was one of the winners of the Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition, which is hosted by The Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery.[13] In 2017 he received the 2016 Moss/Chumley North Texas Artist Award, which is given annually by the Meadows Museum at Southern Methodist University in Dallas.[14]

Exhibitions[edit]

Selected Solo Exhibitions[8]

Selected Collections[edit]

References[edit]

  1. Jump up^ “”A Legacy of Love and Freedom” Unfolds at the TMA–Quilt Paintings by Texas Artist Sedrick Huckaby On View”. Tyler Museum of Art. April 12, 2011. Retrieved March 17, 2016.
  2. Jump up^ Sherer, Scott. “UTSA Art Gallery features exhibit “Fare Thee Well” through Feb. 20″. UTSA Today. Retrieved March 18, 2016.
  3. Jump up^ Simek, Peter (April 23, 2010). “Letitia and Sedrick Huckaby: An Artist Couple Reaches Into Shared Memory For Inspiration”. Front Row Blog–D Magazine. Retrieved March 17, 2016.
  4. Jump up^ “Sedrick Huckaby: Interview”. Painters’ Table. Retrieved March 17, 2016.
  5. ^ Jump up to:a b Calimbahin, Samantha (2016). “Sedrick Huckaby: Local Artist Gaining National Attention”. Fort Worth Business Press. 29: 28–29.
  6. Jump up^ Samantha Calimbahin. “Sedrick Huckaby: Local artist gaining national attention.” Fort Worth Business. Friday, July 8, 2016. http://www.fortworthbusiness.com/news/arts_and_culture/sedrick-huckaby-local-artist-gaining-national-attention/article_93859204-455a-11e6-b093-e3a02701db95.html
  7. Jump up^ “Artist Biography for Sedrick Huckaby”. AskArt. Retrieved March 18, 2016.
  8. ^ Jump up to:a b c d e f Collins, Phillip (2008). “Big Momma’s House”. Valley House Gallery and Sculpture Garden: 38–41.
  9. Jump up^ Kurzner, Lisa (2008). “A patchwork of color, life: Quilts procide the texture in painter’s series”. The Atlanta Journal – Constitution. 23 March 2008.
  10. ^ Jump up to:a b c d “Sedrick E Huckaby | Explore University Of Texas At Arlington”. mentis.uta.edu. Retrieved 2017-01-28.
  11. Jump up^ “Joan Mitchell Foundation”. Retrieved March 17, 2016.
  12. Jump up^ “Fellows”. John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. Retrieved March 17, 2016.
  13. Jump up^ “UTA Assistant Art Professor Among Winners of Prestigious Smithsonian Portrait Competition”. MyArlingtonTX. Retrieved March 17, 2016.
  14. Jump up^ Michael Granberry, Dallas Morning News, January 19, 2017. “‘Interpreter and innovator’ Sedrick Huckaby wins Meadows Museum’s Moss/Chumley Award. “http://www.dallasnews.com/arts/visual-arts/2017/01/19/noted-artist-sedrick-huckaby-winner-2016-mosschumley-award-given-meadows-museum.

External links[edit]

How’d he do? George W. Bush debuts his book of portraits – and we match them up against photos of their counterparts 

  • President George W. Bush  published a book of 66 portraits of wounded veterans that he painted
  • There is also an exhibit of the paintings at the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum in Dallas
  • Bush wrote about the veteran next to their portrait about how they are recovering physically and mentally

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4279914/George-W-Bush-debuts-book-portraits-veterans.html#ixzz4ikukDTJG
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

President George W. Bush spent a year creating portraits of veterans who were wounded during his time in office and published a book of the oil paintings.

The book of 66 portraits titled ‘Portraits of Courage: A Commander in Chief’s Tribute to America’s Warriors’ honors Marines, soldiers, sailors and airmen and women who were injured in the line of duty while Bush was in power.

The book was released on February 28 and there is an exhibit of the paintings at the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum in Dallas. It is Bush’s third book he has published since leaving office.

The former president’s passion for the arts is surprising to some, including his own family. Last year at a CNN town hall, former Gov Jeb Bush said his brother’s fondness for painting was was ‘really weird,’ but added, ‘He’s gotten pretty good at it’.

Scroll down for video 

Sergeant Leslie Zimmerman deployed to Kuwait and entered Iraq at the start of Operation Iraqi Freedom. She became an EMT-Intermediate and was honorably discharged when she was diagnosed with PTSD

She became an EMT-Intermediate and was honorably discharged when she was diagnosed with PTSD

Army Sergeant Leslie Zimmerman deployed to Kuwait and entered Iraq at the start of Operation Iraqi Freedom. She became an EMT-Intermediate and was honorably discharged when she was diagnosed with PTS

President George W Bush released his book of portraits of veterans which includes Army Sergeant Leslie Zimmerman (left), and has an exhibit of the paintings at the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum in Dallas

President George W Bush released his book of portraits of veterans which includes Army Sergeant Leslie Zimmerman (left), and has an exhibit of the paintings at the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum in Dallas

President Bush said the trickiest part of the oil painting portraits was capturing the veterans' eyes

President Bush said the trickiest part of the oil painting portraits was capturing the veterans’ eyes

Sergeant First Class Ramon Padilla lost his left arm in combat while serving in Afghanistan in 2007

His portrait is featured in 'Portraits of Courage: A Commander in Chief's Tribute to America's Warriors'

Sergeant First Class Ramon Padilla lost his left arm in combat while serving in Afghanistan in 2007

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4279914/George-W-Bush-debuts-book-portraits-veterans.html#ixzz4ikufgERe
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

In the book, Bush wrote about the veterans next to their portraits about how they recovered, both physically and mentally. The stories also highlight their families’ role in the veterans’ adjustment to civilian life.

President Bush took up painting as a hobby in his retirement. Many of the servicemen and women featured in his book have videos featured on the Bush Center YouTube channel.

Part of the description of the book on Amazon reads: ‘Our men and women in uniform have faced down enemies, liberated millions, and in doing so showed the true compassion of our nation.

‘Often, they return home with injuries—both visible and invisible—that intensify the challenges of transitioning into civilian life. In addition to these burdens, research shows a civilian-military divide.’

Army Sergeant Daniel Casara underwent 24 surgeries after his being injured in an explosion in 2005

Proceeds from the book will go to the non-profit George W. Bush Presidential Center

Army Sergeant Daniel Casara underwent 24 surgeries after his being injured in an explosion in 2005

‘Seventy-one percent of Americans say they have little understanding of the issues facing veterans, and veterans agree: eighty-four percent say that the public has “little awareness” of the issues facing them and their families.’

‘Each painting in this meticulously produced hardcover volume is accompanied by the inspiring story of the veteran depicted, written by the President. Readers can see the faces of those who answered the nation’s call and learn from their bravery on the battlefield, their journeys to recovery, and the continued leadership and contributions they are making as civilians.’

‘It is President Bush’s desire that these stories of courage and resilience will honor our men and women in uniform, highlight their family and caregivers who bear the burden of their sacrifice, and help Americans understand how we can support our veterans and empower them to succeed.’

Sergeant First Class Michael R. Rodriguez told the Bush Center in a video he has PTS

He also gets severe headaches from traumatic brain injuries or TBIs

Sergeant First Class Michael R. Rodriguez told the Bush Center in a video he has PTS. He also gets severe headaches from traumatic brain injuries or TBIs

Lance Corporal Timothy John Lang served in the U.S. Marine Corps

He was injured in 2006 in Iraq and his leg was amputated below the knee

Lance Corporal Timothy John Lang served in the U.S. Marine Corps. He was injured in 2006 in Iraq and his leg was amputated below the knee

Paintings of wounded US military veterans painted by former US President George W. Bush hang in 'Portraits of Courage', a new exhibit at the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum in Dallas

Paintings of wounded US military veterans painted by former US President George W. Bush hang in ‘Portraits of Courage’, a new exhibit at the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum in Dallas

Army Lieutenant Colonel Kent Graham Solheim has served in the Army from 1994 to present

He was wounded in 2007 in Iraq where he was shot four times which led to the amputation of his leg

Army Lieutenant Colonel Kent Graham Solheim has served in the Army from 1994 to present. He was wounded in 2007 in Iraq where he was shot four times which led to the amputation of his leg

U.S. Marine Corps Sergeant Michael Joseph Leonard Politowicz served from 2010 to the present

Proceeds from the book will go to the non-profit George W. Bush Presidential Center

U.S. Marine Corps Sergeant Michael Joseph Leonard Politowicz served from 2010 to the present

President Bush was inspired to learn oil painting after reading Winston Churchill's essay 'Painting as a Pastime'

President Bush was inspired to learn oil painting after reading Winston Churchill’s essay ‘Painting as a Pastime’

Proceeds from the book will go to the non-profit George W. Bush Presidential Center. The center has a Military Service Initiative that works to ensure that post-9/11 veterans and their families make successful transitions to civilian life.

Time asked the former president how he chose the subjects. Bush responded: ‘I had painted world leaders with whom I’d served, and my instructor Sedrick Huckaby said, “You know, you ought to paint the portraits of people you know well but who others don’t”.’

‘It instantly hit me that I ought to paint these wounded warriors I’d gotten to know. Most of them I had played golf with or ridden mountain bikes with through the events we host for them at the Bush Center. I’d gotten to know some better than others, of course, but I was equally moved by their stories.’

He said the hardest part of the portraits was capturing the veterans’ eyes.

He told his art teacher that he wanted to discover his ‘inner Rembrandt’ according to CNN .

At the exhibit opening at George W. Bush Presidential Library in Dallas, Bush said: ‘You have to understand when you’re the president you are going at 100 miles per hour and the next day it’s zero. I had this anxiousness to keep moving and to learn something.

Bush said Winston Churchill’s essay ‘Painting as a Pastime’ which inspired him to take up the hobby himself.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4279914/George-W-Bush-debuts-book-portraits-veterans.html#ixzz4ikuauQLR
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UT’s visiting artist in residence uses quilts, illustration and other methods to capture people and places close to home.

FEB 20, 2014 1 PM

If the rarified, white-walled interiors of art galleries can seem far removed from everyday life, Sedrick Huckaby’s art might be the antidote. His paintings and drawings give place of pride to ordinary people — family members and people from the Fort Worth, Tex., neighborhood where he lives — as well as quilts, a homely object central to his personal history and broader American culture. In large-scale canvases, Huckaby imbues quilts with monumental presence and painterly texture; his portraits perform the same work on faces and personalities, embracing subjects well worn with love and normal hardships.
“I want them to have a type of reality to them, almost documentary in a certain way, where it really tells certain truths about life,” Huckaby says.

On Friday, the University of Tampa’s printmaking workshop, STUDIO-f, celebrates Huckaby with an open house and display of the monoprints he has created there during a residency over the past two weeks. At the same time, UT’s Scarfone/Hartley Gallery (adjacent to STUDIO-f) showcases a selection of Huckaby’s drawings and paintings, including his suite of four 7-foot-tall, 20-foot-wide paintings of draped quilts, A Love Supreme (2001-2009). The monoprints will show how Huckaby has been working to translate his chosen subjects and confident style of draftsmanship into the medium of screenprinting with UT printers, including Carl Cowden III.

“It’s a collaboration in that I’m trying to work the way that he works, and he’s working with the way we have to work with the process,” Cowden says.

The 38-year-old artist is an anomaly. Huckaby grew up in Fort Worth but moved away to pursue the gold standard in art education, an MFA in painting from Yale, after a BFA at Boston University. A 2008 Guggenheim fellowship and other honors have given him the kind of credentials that artists typically try to leverage into international careers, but Huckaby returned to Fort Worth to start a family and, as life unfolded, to make his surrounding community into one of the subjects of his art.

Through his confident handling of paint (and, in other work on view here, a lithographic pencil), Huckaby’s subjects gain universal appeal. The quilts are rendered as massive folds of patterned drapery that want to embrace a viewer, embodying both the monumental aura of abstract expressionist canvases and cozy domesticity. They are organized into a seasonal suite of colors, from warm summer to comparatively icy winter, and possess a delightful dimensionality up close, where fabric patterns are revealed as lovingly built-up in thick impasto daubs — a painterly method that echoes the careful, but creative and improvisational way quilts are stitched together.

The title of the series, A Love Supr eme, after the John Coltrane jazz composition, bolsters their association with that most noble of emotions.

“The idea is starting at a basic kind of love, like that of a mother for her children or a grandmother for her children, with the quilts,” Huckaby says.

“The thought is that, like seasons revolve, you can think about love in multiple ways. So it’s not just about the love of a grandmother. As you look and contemplate, on one level you might think about a connection with the music … then the seasons … then about the cycle of life. Alternately, I hope it would lead you to a place of thinking about a greater love, a love of God.”

The span of life, from birth to death, is the subject of two of Huckaby’s other oil paintings, which depict his grandmother and grandfather in the waning days of their lives. Set in the same bedroom about a decade apart, the images bring tenderness to an experience rarely made visible in contemporary art.

A third project called The 99 Percent focuses on members of his Fort Worth community. Loosely inspired by Occupy Wall Street, Huckaby began visiting public spaces in his neighborhood — the gas station, the Waffle House — to draw and talk to anyone who would let him. As a result, he’s made more than 100 small but robustly drawn portraits, some of which are captioned with a statement from a conversation between Huckaby and his subject about economic stress or political frustration. A selection of the images, which he made into lithographs during a residency in Pennsylvania last year, are on display here.

It’s refreshing that there’s no obscure conceptual angle to Huckaby’s work — just an earnest desire to grapple with the everyday world, and people in it, through drawing and painting.

“It might be that my work is a little too conservative for some groups, but it doesn’t concern me too much,” Huckaby
says.

“One of the things I have found out about art making is that our culture values uniqueness. Some of that uniqueness is a totally different form of art, where you come up with some unique idea. Or you can work in ways that have been worked in before, but you do it your way. That’s more the line that I follow. I’m not trying to make something that’s never been made, but I’m trying to do my own unique take on it.

See Huckaby’s works through Feb. 22 at the University of Tampa Scarfone/Hartley Gallery and STUDIO-f;  open-studio and gallery reception on Fri., Feb. 21, at 6 p.m., 310 N. Boulevard, Tampa, 813-253-6217, gallery.utarts.comstudiof.utarts.com

 

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___

WOODY WEDNESDAY  Ranking Woody Allen’s 47 movies!!!! Part 1

____________

Ranking Woody Allen’s 47 movies!!!! Part 1

The Best & The Rest: Every Woody Allen Film Ranked

This week, Woody Allen‘s 2016 title (for as we all know, there’s one each year), “Cafe Society,” starring Kristen Stewart, Jesse Eisenberg, Steve Carell, Corey Stoll, Blake Lively and Anna Camp, opens after a warm reception as the opening film at the most recent Cannes Film Festival. You can read our take from Cannes here, or hang on to scroll through and see where it lands on the list below, but we thought this would be a good time to gussy up our previous sprawling two-part Allen retrospective, and because we’ve been a little harmonious around here of late and miss the sounds of sobbing and breaking crockery, to rank it.

READ MORE: The Best And The Rest: Every Stanley Kubrick Ranked

Weathering personal scandal and coming in and out of fashion like flares, Allen’s been at constant work as a director for five decades now, and “Cafe Society” marks his 47th theatrically-released feature. Which means we have a lot to get through, so let’s get straight to it, shall we? Here, ranked worst to best, are all of Woody Allen’s theatrical features —with any list this long, there’s bound to be massive disagreement, so remember, the comments section awaits your ire. Or your congratulations, on the slim chance you agree with all of it.

Irrational Man Official Trailer #1 (2015) – Emma Stone, Joaquin Phoenix Movie HD

anything-else-woody-allen47. “Anything Else” (2003)
There are a lot of things wrong with “Anything Else.” Jason Biggs halts his speech more than Jerry Stiller after root canal surgery and often looks blankly off-camera like he’s after a batch of pastries to hump. His girlfriend, played by Christina Ricci, seemingly cast to type as a pathological neurotic with body dysmorphia and an “offbeat sexual quality,” is largely awful too. Only Stockard Channing‘s Paula —an outrageously volatile former interior designer desperate for Biggs to write her new “nightclub act”— can inject this leaden affair with any life. A couple of one-liners fly by (“I should have known something was wrong on the wedding night when her family danced around my table chanting, ‘We will make him one of us!’”), but Allen miscasts himself as reckless, apocalyptic grouch who drops in for random rants about rampant anti-Semitism and the meaninglessness of our daily existence and who is prone to increasing acts of violence. The film’s unrelenting and mirthless post-911 anhedonia is oddly car-crash compelling, but just because it’s one of Allen’s angriest films doesn’t mean it’s any good.

Cassandra_27s-Dream-59478646. “Cassandra’s Dream” (2007)
Certainly the nadir of Woody’s recent “European period” and vying for the title of the worst film of his entire career, “Cassandra’s Dream” is a slow, on-the-nose, plodding, wholly unconvincing crime caper that doesn’t even crack a smile, let alone inspire any laughs. The tale of two brothers (Ewan McGregor and Colin Farrell) who agree to kill a man for their rich uncle (Tom Wilkinson), the movie is clumsily paced and lacks even the most minimal action required for a thriller to actually, you know, thrill. Even with some stellar behind-the-scenes talent (Vilmos Zsigmond shot it and Philip Glassprovided a rare original score) and notable supporting performances (eternally undervalued MVP Sally Hawkins), the movie falls unbelievably flat. It’s not a spoiler to say that in the final scene, a detective describes a double murder that’s central to the plot… and which happens completely off-screen. The film was released in the U.S. at the beginning of 2008, and the only silver lining was that later that same summer, Allen redeemed himself with the much, much better “Vicky Cristina Barcelona.”

the curse of the jade scorpion woody allen45. “The Curse of the Jade Scorpion” (2001)
Every year brings us a new Woody Allen picture, bringing with it either grousing about how the creator of Alvy Singer is tarnishing his cinematic legacy, or that this new film marks a stunning return to form and everything’s going to be okay forever. It’s a pattern critics have slid lazily into at least as far as “The Curse of the Jade Scorpion” 15 years ago. But even with the best will in the world, you can see why: the film’s period setting, slight plot (a magician hypnotizes Woody into becoming a jewel thief against his will) and Allen’s subsequent inability to find funding for his films to be made in America affirm the now-orthodox decline thesis. Allen is pretty terrible in the lead role of C.W Briggs, “a shallow, skirt-chasing egomaniac” and “myopic insurance clerk” displaying not one whit of sexual tension with co-star Helen Hunt, the ‘saucy’ efficiency expert with feminine wiles up the yin-yang. And he was frankly far too old at the time of this film to be hit on by an earthen, breast-exposing Charlize Theron.

Hollywood ending44. “Hollywood Ending” (2002)
When you shoot a movie a year, there’s no level of genius that can keep inspiration consistent every time out. And so you get the occasional “Hollywood Ending,” a remarkably tone-deaf Hollywood satire that’s both too inside-baseball and too overwhelmingly broad. Allen plays a celebrated director well past his prime (hmm…) who gets back into the film business by teaming with his ex-wife in a high-pressure situation that causes him to become psychosomatically blind. Did you guess that the punchline involves him directing the film anyway? “Hollywood Ending” isn’t helped by the fact that Allen is working with one of his least-exceptional casts, giving major screen time to the manic Tea Leoni and the bronzed, oblivious George Hamilton, resulting in a film that wants to take advantage of the lower standards of recent  yuckfests while maintaining a classic Hollywood vibe, but which falls between each.

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RESPONDING TO HARRY KROTO’S BRILLIANT RENOWNED ACADEMICS!! Part 139 Gabriel Horn neuroscientist, Cambridge, “Although well knowing that I may die, I never thought I had to get myself converted…”

On November 21, 2014 I received a letter from Nobel Laureate Harry Kroto and it said:

…Please click on this URL http://vimeo.com/26991975

and you will hear what far smarter people than I have to say on this matter. I agree with them.

Harry Kroto

I have attempted to respond to all of Dr. Kroto’s friends arguments and I have posted my responses one per week for over a year now. Here are some of my earlier posts:

Arif AhmedHaroon Ahmed,  Jim Al-Khalili, Sir David AttenboroughMark Balaguer, Horace Barlow, Michael BateSir Patrick BatesonSimon Blackburn, Colin Blakemore, Ned BlockPascal BoyerPatricia ChurchlandAaron CiechanoverNoam Chomsky, Brian CoxPartha Dasgupta,  Alan Dershowitz, Frank DrakeHubert Dreyfus, John DunnBart Ehrman, Mark ElvinRichard Ernst, Stephan Feuchtwang, Robert FoleyDavid Friend,  Riccardo GiacconiIvar Giaever , Roy GlauberRebecca GoldsteinDavid J. Gross,  Brian Greene, Susan GreenfieldStephen F Gudeman,  Alan Guth, Jonathan HaidtTheodor W. Hänsch, Brian Harrison,  Stephen HawkingHermann Hauser, Robert HindeRoald Hoffmann,  Bruce HoodGerard ‘t HooftCaroline HumphreyNicholas Humphrey,  Herbert Huppert,  Gareth Stedman Jones, Steve JonesShelly KaganMichio Kaku,  Stuart KauffmanMasatoshi Koshiba,  Lawrence KraussHarry Kroto, George Lakoff,  Rodolfo LlinasElizabeth Loftus,  Alan MacfarlaneDan McKenzie,  Mahzarin BanajiPeter MillicanMarvin MinskyLeonard Mlodinow,  P.Z.Myers,   Yujin NagasawaAlva NoeDouglas Osheroff, David Parkin,  Jonathan Parry, Roger Penrose,  Saul PerlmutterHerman Philipse,  Carolyn PorcoRobert M. PriceVS RamachandranLisa RandallLord Martin ReesColin RenfrewAlison Richard,  C.J. van Rijsbergen,  Oliver Sacks, John SearleMarcus du SautoySimon SchafferJ. L. Schellenberg,   Lee Silver Peter Singer,  Walter Sinnott-ArmstrongRonald de Sousa, Victor StengerJohn SulstonBarry Supple,   Leonard Susskind, Raymond TallisMax TegmarkNeil deGrasse Tyson,  Martinus J. G. Veltman, Craig Venter.Alexander Vilenkin, Sir John Walker, James D. WatsonFrank WilczekSteven Weinberg, and  Lewis Wolpert,

 

Gabriel Horn

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Gabriel Horn
Born 9 December 1927
Died 2 August 2012 (aged 84)[1]
Cambridge
Nationality United Kingdom
Fields Neuroscience
Institutions University of Bristol
University of Cambridge
Notable awards Royal Medal (2001)

Sir Gabriel Horn, MD, ScD, FRS,[2] FRCP (9 December 1927 – 2 August 2012) was a British neuroscientist and Professor in Natural Sciences (Zoology) at the University of Cambridge.[3] His research was into the neural mechanisms of learning and memory.

Early life[edit]

Horn was born on 9 December 1927. He attended Handsworth Technical School in Handsworth, Birmingham.[4] He left the school at 16 to work in his parents’ shop and studied part-time for a National Certificate in Mechanical Engineering, achieving distinction. He served in the Royal Air Force before studying for a Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery at the University of Birmingham.[5]

Academic career[edit]

Horn’s first academic position was in 1956 at the Department of Anatomy, University of Cambridge as a Demonstrator in Anatomy. He became a Lecturer and then a Reader, before leaving to become Professor of Anatomy at the University of Bristol in 1974.[5] In 1975, while at Bristol, he obtained his DSc degree.[5] In 1977, he returned to Cambridge to head the Department of Zoology. He retired in 1995 and was made Emeritus Professor. He was Master of Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge from 1992 to 1999 and Deputy Vice-Chancellor of the university from 1994 to 1997.[4][5] He remained a fellow of Sidney Sussex College after 1999 until his death; he had earlier been a fellow of King’s College, Cambridge, and was elected a life fellow there in 1999.[4]

Honours[edit]

He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1986,[2] receiving their Royal Medal in 2001.[5] He was given an Honorary Doctor of Science degree by the University of Birmingham in 1999 and by the University of Bristol in 2003.[5] He was knighted in the 2002 New Year Honours “for services to Neurobiology and to the Advancement of Scientific Research”.[6]

Succeeded by
Sandra Dawson

In  the third video below in the 121st clip in this series are his words and  my response is below them. 

50 Renowned Academics Speaking About God (Part 1)

Another 50 Renowned Academics Speaking About God (Part 2

A Further 50 Renowned Academics Speaking About God (Part 3)

 

 

Interview of biologist and zoologist Sir Gabriel Horn – part 1

 

 Interview of the biologist and zoologist Sir Gabriel Horn – part two

 Interview of Sir Gabriel Horn – part three

Uploaded on Jun 3, 2010

An interview of Sir Gabriel Horn by Sir Patrick Bateson on 16 January 2007, filmed by Alan Macfarlane.
For a higher quality, downloadable, version with summary, please see http://www.alanmacfarlane.com

Quote by Dr. Horn:

Yes, I did nearly die. On one occasion I was lucky to be alive after a  massive hemorrhage.  I can say one thing. I never took to religion. I was really true to myself. Although well knowing that I may die, I  never thought I had to get myself converted to Judaism properly. It actually never crossed my mind. I always thought that if on my deathbed I do something funny like that those there will understand it doesn’t mean anything at all.

 Interview of the biologist and zoologist Sir Gabriel Horn – part four

  My Response to Dr. Horn’s statement would have been this simple question:

Is Propositional Revelation Nonsense?

What I mean by that is  if God exists then would it be plausible that God would want to communicate  to us about his existence? There are those who actually believe that God has done that in the Bible. Dr. J. Gresham Machen said that he believed the Bible to be accurate in even the smallest details. The critic H.L.Mencken rightly noted, “Well, if you really want to be a Christian there is only one kind of Christian to be and that is the Machen kind.”

When Dr. Horn made his statement he acted as if he made a  deathbed conversion then his words  would meaning nothing.  I would admit that many people do say things  that they don’t mean but when  you are  on  your deathbed that would be a perfect time to  be totally honest. I salute those who are honest for their honesty, but it should be after they examine the evidence fully concerning God’s existence and that would include the historical accuracy of the Bible. I corresponded with Carl Sagan during the final year of his life and I was sad that he died as an agnostic. That was his choice. I  was appreciative that he took time to write me back and discuss these importance spiritual issues with me. Ironically,  I corresponded with Antony Flew several times, but when he died it seemed as although many secular people were very made at  the things he said in his final book There is a God: How the World’s Most Notorious Atheist Changed His Mind (2007) with Roy Abraham Varghese. 

Two of my biggest spiritual heroes were men who stood up the accuracy of the Bible.

____________

 

Francis Schaeffer

I remember like yesterday hearing my pastor Adrian Rogers in 1979 going through the amazing fulfilled prophecy of Ezekiel 26-28 and the story of the city of Tyre. In 1980 in my senior year (taught by Mark Brink) at Evangelical Christian High School, I watched the film series by Francis Schaeffer called WHATEVER HAPPENED TO THE HUMAN RACE? Later that same year I read the book by the same name and I was amazed at the historical accuracy of the Bible and the many examples from archaeology that Schaeffer gave and recently I have shared several of these in my current series on Schaeffer and the Beatles. The reason I did that was because many people in the 1960’s had taken non-rational leaps into such areas as communism, the occult, drugs, and eastern mysticism,  but sitting right there in front of them was the historical accurate Bible which contained sufficient evidence to warrant trust.

(Adrian Rogers met with Presidents Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan.)

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(This was the average sanctuary crowd when I was growing up at Bellevue Baptist in Memphis)

______________________________________

Anyone who has read my blog for any length of time knows that politically Milton Friedman and Ronald Reagan were my heroes. Spiritually my heroes have been both Francis Schaeffer and Adrian Rogers. An interesting fact about both of these two men and that is they both believed the Bible is the inspired and inerrant word of God. Both men defended the historical accuracy of the Bible even though both of the religious denominations they belonged to started to shift to the liberal view that the Bible contains errors in it.

H. L. Mencken
H l mencken.jpg

J. Gresham Machen

J. Gresham Machen

Francis Schaeffer’s battle on this issue came in the 1930’s when he got to know Dr. J. Gresham Machen was involved in a battle with  the Presbyterian Church USA over their leftward shift in theology. Francis Schaeffer observed:

H.L. Mencken died when I was a young man and I read some of the stuff he wrote and he came at just the point of the total collapse of the American consensus back in the 1930’s or a little before. H.L.Mencken was very destructive to the American consensus and he was way out. It is he who said the famous thing about Dr. J. Gresham Machen. Dr. Machen was the man who was fighting the battle for historic Christianity against the liberals in the big denominations and expressly the Presbyterian denomination and the liberals were trying to laugh Machen out of court. But H.L. Mencken said a remarkable thing, “Well, if you really want to be a Christian there is only one kind of Christian to be and that is the Machen kind.” This is wonderful. This is exactly where the battlefield is. When you take Christianity and chip away at it like the liberals wanted to do then you don’t have anything left. This is no halfway war. If you are going to be a Christian you have to be a biblical Christian. Machen and Mencken understood this and this is my position too.  

Adrian Rogers also was that type of Christian too. Recently a relative told me that his Bible Study Teacher at the church he started attended recently started a series on Genesis and he said on the front end that evolution is true. I encouraged my relative to ask the simple question: DO YOU BELIEVE IN A LITERAL “ADAM AND EVE?” I sent him the sermon on Evolution by Adrian Rogers and here is a portion of it below:

H.G. Wells

H. G. Wells, the brilliant historian who wrote The Outlines of History, said this—and I quote: “If all animals and man evolved, then there were no first parents, and no Paradise, and no Fall. If there had been no Fall, then the entire historic fabric of Christianity, the story of the first sin, and the reason for the atonement, collapses like a house of cards.” H. G. Wells says—and, by the way, I don’t believe that he did believe in creation—but he said, “If there’s no creation, then you’ve ripped away the foundation of Christianity.”

Now, the Bible teaches that man was created by God and that he fell into sin. The evolutionist believes that he started in some primordial soup and has been coming up and up. And, these two ideas are diametrically opposed. What we call sin the evolutionist would just call a stumble up. And so, the evolutionist believes that all a man needs—he’s just going up and up, and better and better—he needs a boost from beneath. The Bible teaches he’s a sinner and needs a birth from above. And, these are both at heads, in collision.

What is evolution? Evolution is man’s way of hiding from God, because, if there’s no creation, there is no Creator. And, if you remove God from the equation, then sinful man has his biggest problem removed—and that is responsibility to a holy God. And, once you remove God from the equation, then man can think what he wants to think, do what he wants to do, be what he wants to be, and no holds barred, and he has no fear of future judgment.

Francis Schaeffer & the SBC

Actually Francis Schaeffer’s good friend Paige Patterson talked Adrian Rogers into running for President of the Southern Baptist Convention in 1979 and the liberal shift was halted. In the article “Francis Schaeffer ‘indispensable’ to SBC,” (Thursday, October 30, 2014,)  David Roach wrote:

The late Francis Schaeffer was known to pick up the phone during the early years of the Southern Baptist Convention’s conservative resurgence. Paige Patterson knew to expect a call from Schaeffer around Christmas with the question, “You’re not growing weary in well-doing are you?”

Patterson, a leader in the movement to return the SBC to a high view of Scripture, would reply, “No, Dr. Schaeffer. I’m under fire, but I’m doing fine. And I’m trusting the Lord and proceeding on.”

To some it may seem strange that an international Presbyterian apologist and analyst of pop culture would take such interest in a Baptist controversy over biblical inerrancy.

But to Schaeffer it made perfect sense.

He believed churches were acquiescing to the world, abandoning their belief that the Bible is without error in everything it said. A watered-down theology left the SBC with decreased power to battle cultural evils. To Schaeffer the convention was the last major American denomination with hope for reversing this “great evangelical disaster,” as he put it.

Thirty years after Schaeffer’s death, Baptist leaders still remember how he took time from his speaking, writing and filmmaking schedule to quietly encourage Patterson; Paul Pressler, a judge from Texas with whom Patterson worked closely during the conservative resurgence; Adrian Rogers, a Memphis pastor who served three terms SBC president; and others.

By the early 1990s, conservatives had elected an unbroken string of convention presidents and moved in position to shift the balance of power on all convention boards and committees from the theologically moderate establishment. But at the time of Schaeffer’s annual calls, the outcome of the controversy was still in doubt.

(Paige Patterson)

“I strongly suspect that he was afraid I would not hold strong,” Patterson, now president of Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Texas, told Baptist Press. “He had seen so many people fold up under pressure that he assumed we probably would too. So he would call and ask for a report.”

Schaeffer’s interest in engaging culture made him particularly appealing to Southern Baptist conservatives. He helped provide them with a “battle plan” to fight cultural evils and what they perceived as theological drift in their denomination, Richard Land, president of Southern Evangelical Seminary, told BP.

Along with theologian Carl F.H. Henry, Schaeffer was the key intellectual influence on leaders of the conservative resurgence, Land said. When conservatives started to be elected as the executives of Baptist institutions, Henry spoke at Land’s inauguration at the Christian Life Commission (the ERLC’s precursor), R. Albert Mohler Jr.’s at Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Kentucky and Timothy George’s at Beeson Divinity School in Alabama.

“If Schaeffer had still been alive, we would have had him come,” Land said. He noted that Schaeffer was “close” to Rogers and “admired” by Bailey Smith, two conservative SBC presidents. Edith Schaeffer and Patterson’s wife Dorothy were close friends and traveled together in the early 1980s speaking on the importance of the home.

Clark Pinnock, a former New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary professor who mentored conservative resurgence leaders before taking a leftward theological turn in his own thinking, served on Schaeffer’s staff at L’Abri.

(ADRIAN ROGERS, chairman of the committee that drafted changes to the Baptist Faith & Message, joins Al Mohler, Chuck Kelley and Richard Land in a news conference shortly after the new statement of faith was adopted by messengers to the Southern Baptist Convention annual meeting in Orlando, Fla)

Mount Sinai is one of the most important sites of the entire Bible. It was here that the Hebrew people came shortly after their flight from Egypt. Here God spoke to them through Moses, giving them directions for their life as newly formed nation and making a covenant with them.

The thing to notice about this epochal moment for Israel is the emphasis on history which the Bible itself makes. Time and time again Moses reminds the people of what has happened on Mount Sinai:

Deuteronomy 4:11-12New International Version (NIV)

11 You came near and stood at the foot of the mountain while it blazed with fireto the very heavens, with black clouds and deep darkness. 12 Then the Lordspoke to you out of the fire. You heard the sound of words but saw no form;there was only a voice.

Moses emphasized that those alive at the time had actually heard God’s voice. They had received God’s direct communication  in words. They were eyewitnesses of what had occurred–they saw the cloud and the mountain burning with fire. They saw and they heard. Moses says, on the basis of what they themselves have seen and heard in their own lifetime, they are not to be afraid of their present or future enemies.

On the same basis too, Moses urges them to obey God: “Only be careful, and watch yourselves closely so that you do not forget the things your eyes have seen…” (Deuteronomy 4:9)

Thus the people’s confidence and trust in God and their obedience to Him are alike rooted in truth that is historical and open to observation…The relationship between God and His people was not based on an upward experience inside their own heads, but upon a reality which was seen and heard. They were called to obey God not because of a leap of faith, but because of God’s real acts in history. For God is the LIVING GOD….”Religious Truth” according to the Bible involves the same sort of truth which people operate on in their everyday lives. If something is true, then its opposite cannot also be true.

From the Bible’s viewpoint, all truth finally rests upon the fact that the infinite-personal God exists in contrast to His not existing. This means that God exists objectively. He exists whether or not people say He does. The Bible also teaches that God is personal.
Much of the Bible is in the sphere of normal existence and is observable. God communicated himself in language. This is not surprising for He  was the creator of people who use language in communicating with other people.
In the Hebrew (and biblical) view, truth is grounded ultimately in the existence and character of God and what has been given us by God in creation and revelation. Because people are finite, reality cannot be exhausted by human reason.
It is within this Judeo-Christian view of truth that, by its own insistence, we must understand the Bible. Moses could appeal to real historical events as the basis for Israel’s confidence and obedience into the future. He could even pass down to subsequent generations physical reminders of what God had done, so that the people could see them and remember.

________________

Dr. Francis Schaeffer – Faith, Seeing & Believing

John 21:1-14New International Version (NIV)

Jesus and the Miraculous Catch of Fish

21 Afterward Jesus appeared again to his disciples, by the Sea of Galilee.[a] It happened this way: Simon Peter, Thomas (also known as Didymus[b]), Nathanael from Cana in Galilee, the sons of Zebedee, and two other disciples were together. “I’m going out to fish,” Simon Peter told them, and they said, “We’ll go with you.” So they went out and got into the boat, but that night they caught nothing.

Early in the morning, Jesus stood on the shore, but the disciples did not realize that it was Jesus.

He called out to them, “Friends, haven’t you any fish?”

“No,” they answered.

He said, “Throw your net on the right side of the boat and you will find some.”When they did, they were unable to haul the net in because of the large number of fish.

Then the disciple whom Jesus loved said to Peter, “It is the Lord!” As soon as Simon Peter heard him say, “It is the Lord,” he wrapped his outer garment around him (for he had taken it off) and jumped into the water. The other disciples followed in the boat, towing the net full of fish, for they were not far from shore, about a hundred yards.[c] When they landed, they saw a fire of burning coals there with fish on it, and some bread.

10 Jesus said to them, “Bring some of the fish you have just caught.” 11 So Simon Peter climbed back into the boat and dragged the net ashore. It was full of large fish, 153, but even with so many the net was not torn. 12 Jesus said to them, “Come and have breakfast.” None of the disciples dared ask him, “Who are you?” They knew it was the Lord. 13 Jesus came, took the bread and gave it to them, and did the same with the fish. 14 This was now the third time Jesus appeared to his disciples after he was raised from the dead.

__________

The resurrected Christ stood there on the beach of the Sea of Galilee. Before the disciples reached the shore, He had already prepared a fire with fish cooking on it for them to eat. It was a fire that could be seen and felt; the fire cooked the fish, and the fish and bread could be eaten for breakfast.

When the fire died down, it left ashes on the beach; the disciples were well fed with bread and fish and Christ’s footprints would have been visible on the beach…

Thomas, Christ tells us,  should have believed the ample evidence given to him of the physical evidence of the resurrection by the other apostles. Christ rebuked him for not accepting this evidence.He at that time and we today have the same sufficient witness of those who have seen and heard and were able to touch the resurrected Christ and were able to observe what He had done.

Because Thomas insisted on seeing and touching we have a more sure witness than we otherwise would have  had. In the testimony of those who saw and heard we have a sure witness and this includes Thomas’ doubt and his personal verification which removed that doubt. WE SHOULD BOW BEFORE THE TOTAL WITNESS OF THE RECORD WHICH WE HAVE  IN THE BIBLE, OF THE TESTIMONY OF THE EXISTENCE OF THE UNIVERSE AND IT’S FORM AND THE UNIQUENESS OF MAN. IT IS ENOUGH! BELIEVE HE HAS RISEN.

John 20:24-29New International Version (NIV)

Jesus Appears to Thomas

24 Now Thomas (also known as Didymus[a]), one of the Twelve, was not with the disciples when Jesus came. 25 So the other disciples told him, “We have seen the Lord!”

But he said to them, “Unless I see the nail marks in his hands and put my finger where the nails were, and put my hand into his side, I will not believe.”

26 A week later his disciples were in the house again, and Thomas was with them. Though the doors were locked, Jesus came and stood among them and said, “Peace be with you!” 27 Then he said to Thomas, “Put your finger here; see my hands. Reach out your hand and put it into my side. Stop doubting and believe.”

28 Thomas said to him, “My Lord and my God!”

29 Then Jesus told him, “Because you have seen me, you have believed;blessed are those who have not seen and yet have believed.”

_______________

Is Propositional Revelation Nonsense?

Tim Brister —  July 26, 2006 — 6 Comments

In the appendix of his book, He Is There and He Is Not Silent, Francis Schaeffer wrote a little piece called “Is Propositional Revelation Nonsense?” Schaeffer explains that, “To modern man, and much modern theology, the concept of propositional revelation and the historic Christian view of infallibility is not so much mistaken as meaningless” (345). The 20th century came with many challenges to theological formulation, not the least of which was the assault on propositional truth and revelation. Such camps as existentialists and logical positivists attempted to remove religious truth from the reason and revelation while others sought to justify meaning, reality, and truth with other criterion of verification such as experience and perception. However, center to the Christian faith is the belief that God has spoken and revealed himself in the written Word of God. In this revelation, God used language as the medium to carry and convey biblical truths and realities. This is not to say that God has revealed himself exhaustively, but it does mean that he has revealed himself truly and definitively. Schaeffer makes two points which I would like to mention here:

  1. Even communication between one created person and another is not exhaustive; but that does not mean that for that reason it is not true.
  1. If the uncreated Personal really cared for the created personal, it could not be thought unthinkable for him to tell the created personal things of a propositional nature; otherwise, as a finite being, the created personal would have numerous things he could not know if he just began with himself as a limited, finite reference point.

Schaffer makes some salient points here that deserve to be brought up in the 21stcentury. While we do not disagree that revelation is also personal, we cannot flinch on the assault on propositional revelation. God has revealed himself to us, his nature and his acts, through propositional revelation (i.e. the Bible), and the implications of this truth is that we do not have the rights to reinvent or rename the God Who Is There. If we do not begin with God and his revelation, Schaeffer is correct to conclude that there are many things we could not know about God based on such a limited, finite reference point as ourselves. It is no coincidence that, at the time of Schaeffer’s publishing of this book (1972), John Hick was advancing his pluralistic hypothesis which argued for the ineffability of the “Real” which argued that one cannot know anything about God as he is (ding an sich).Adapting the Kantian model of the noumenal and phenomenal worlds, Hick argues that God (“Real”) has not and cannot reveal himself truly and definitely; furthermore, it is impossible to know anything at all about the Real (except that it is ineffable and that it exists which is something he claims to know). The result when God is not the beginning, the reference point, the apriori grounds of knowledge and revelation, then knowing and defining God is a free-for-all to anyone who wants to postulate their phenomenological interpretations as religious truth. Schaeffer concludes his little article with this important paragraph in which he said:

“The importance of all this is that most people today (including some who still call themselves evangelical) who have given up the historical and biblical concept of revelation and infallibility have not done so because of the consideration of detailed problems objectively approached, but because they have accepted, either in analyzed fashion or blindly, the other set of presuppositions. Often this has taken place by means of cultural injection, without their realizing what has happened to them” (349, emphasis added).

In the days ahead, I hope to share how propositional truth is foundational to personal truth and give a few examples of the redefinition of revelation in contemporary contexts.

Long ago, at many times and in many ways, God spoke to our fathers by the prophets, but in these last days he has spoken to us by his Son, whom he appointed the heir of all things, through whom also he created the world.
Hebrews 1:1-2

_____________

The Bible and Archaeology – Is the Bible from God? (Kyle Butt 42 min)

You want some evidence that indicates that the Bible is true? Here is a good place to start and that is taking a closer look at the archaeology of the Old Testament times. Is the Bible historically accurate? Here are some of the posts I have done in the past on the subject: 1. The Babylonian Chronicleof Nebuchadnezzars Siege of Jerusalem2. Hezekiah’s Siloam Tunnel Inscription. 3. Taylor Prism (Sennacherib Hexagonal Prism)4. Biblical Cities Attested Archaeologically. 5. The Discovery of the Hittites6.Shishak Smiting His Captives7. Moabite Stone8Black Obelisk of Shalmaneser III9A Verification of places in Gospel of John and Book of Acts., 9B Discovery of Ebla Tablets10. Cyrus Cylinder11. Puru “The lot of Yahali” 9th Century B.C.E.12. The Uzziah Tablet Inscription13. The Pilate Inscription14. Caiaphas Ossuary14 B Pontius Pilate Part 214c. Three greatest American Archaeologists moved to accept Bible’s accuracy through archaeology.

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MUSIC MONDAY George Harrison – Isn’t It A Pity

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George Harrison – Isn’t It A Pity [Remastered]

Isn’t It a Pity

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
For the song by George Gershwin, see Isn’t It a Pity?
“Isn’t It a Pity”
Isn't It A Pity US picture sleeve.jpg
Single by George Harrison
from the album All Things Must Pass
A-side My Sweet Lord
(double A-side)
Released 23 November 1970
Format 7-inch vinyl
Genre Folk rock
Length 7:10
Label Apple
Writer(s) George Harrison
Producer(s) George Harrison, Phil Spector
George Harrison singles chronology
My Sweet Lord“/
Isn’t It a Pity
(1970)
What Is Life
(1971)
All Things Must Pass track listing
“Isn’t It a Pity (Version Two)”
Song by George Harrison from the album All Things Must Pass
Published Harrisongs
Released 27 November 1970
Genre Folk rock
Length 4:45
Label Apple
Writer(s) George Harrison
Producer(s) George Harrison, Phil Spector

Isn’t It a Pity” is a song by English musician George Harrison from his 1970 solo album All Things Must Pass. It appears in two variations there: one the well-known, seven-minute version; the other a reprise, titled “Isn’t It a Pity (Version Two)“. Harrison wrote the song in 1966, but it was rejected for inclusion on releases by the Beatles. In many countries around the world, the song was also issued on a double A-side single with “My Sweet Lord“. In America, Billboard magazine listed it with “My Sweet Lord” when the single topped the Hot 100 chart, while in Canada, “Isn’t It a Pity” reached number 1 as the preferred side.

An anthemic ballad and one of Harrison’s most celebrated compositions, “Isn’t It a Pity” has been described as the emotional and musical centrepiece of All Things Must Pass[1] and “a poignant reflection on The Beatles’ coarse ending”.[2] Co-produced by Phil Spector, the recording employs multiple keyboard players, rhythm guitarists and percussionists, as well as orchestration by arranger John Barham. In its extended fadeout, the song references the closing refrain of the Beatles’ 1968 hit “Hey Jude“. Other musicians on the recording include Ringo Starr, Billy Preston, Gary Wright and the band Badfinger, while the reprise version features Eric Clapton on lead guitar.

The song appeared as the closing track on Harrison’s career-spanning compilation Let It Roll (2009), and a live version, from his 1991 tour with Clapton, was included on Live in Japan (1992). Clapton and Preston performed the song together at the Concert for George tribute in November 2002. “Isn’t It a Pity” has been covered by numerous artists, including Nina Simone, Matt Monro, Cowboy Junkies, Paul Young, Elliott Smith, Galaxie 500, Jonathan Wilson and Graham Nash, Tedeschi Trucks Band, and Roberta Flack.

Background and composition[edit]

While no longer the “really tight” social unit they had been throughout the chaos of Beatlemania[3] – or the “four-headed monster”, as Mick Jagger famously called them[4][5] – the individual Beatles were still bonded by genuine friendship during their final, troubled years as a band,[6] even if it was now more of a case of being locked together at a deep psychological level after such a sustained period of heightened experience.[7] Eric Clapton has described this bond as being just like that of a typical family, “with all the difficulties that entails”.[8] When the band finally split, in April 1970 – a “terrible surprise” for the outside world, in the words of author Mark Hertsgaard, “like the sudden death of a beloved young uncle”[9] – even the traditionally most disillusioned Beatle, George Harrison, suffered a mild bereavement.[10]

[Following the Beatles’ break-up], he wasn’t covered with a blanket anymore. You see, George played me a bunch of songs when he was with me, and I kept saying, “Why aren’t some of these on those Beatles records, George?” … I didn’t think he had much to develop – he was ready. How much development does a man need?[11]

– Musician Delaney Bramlett, 2003, commenting on Harrison’s largely unrealised potential as a songwriter during the Beatles‘ career

Towards the end of May that year, among the dozens of tracks that would be considered and/or recorded for his All Things Must Pass triple album, Harrison returned to a number of unused songs that he had written during the late 1960s.[12] “Isn’t It a Pity” was one of these, having most recently been rejected by the Beatles during the January 1969 Get Back sessions that resulted in their final album, Let It Be.[13][14] According to Abbey Road engineer Geoff Emerick, however, the song had been offered for inclusion on 1967’s Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, while Mark Lewisohn, the band’s acknowledged recording historian, has stated that it was first presented during sessions for the previous year’s Revolver.[15] Lewisohn’s opinion appears to tally with a bootlegged conversation from the Get Back sessions, where Harrison reveals that John Lennon had vetoed “Isn’t It a Pity” three years before, and that he (Harrison) considered offering the song to Frank Sinatra.[16] (Harrison had recently met Sinatra in Los Angeles while working there with Apple signing Jackie Lomax.[17])

Harrison considered giving “Isn’t It a Pity” to American singer Frank Sinatra (pictured in New York in 1947)

Despite its relative antiquity by 1970, the song’s lyrics lent themselves well to the themes of spiritual salvation and friendship that define All Things Must Pass,[18][19] being consistent with the karmic subject matter of much of the album.[20] In his 1980 autobiography, Harrison explains: “‘Isn’t It a Pity’ is about whenever a relationship hits a down point … It was a chance to realise that if I felt somebody had let me down, then there’s a good chance I was letting someone else down.”[21] His lyrics adopt a nonjudgmental tone throughout:[22]

Isn’t it a pity, isn’t it a shame
How we break each other’s hearts, and cause each other pain
How we take each other’s love without thinking any more
Forgetting to give back, now isn’t it a pity.

Harrison biographer Ian Inglis has referred to the song’s “surprisingly complex” lyrics, which in one sense can be seen as a personal observation on a “failed love affair” yet at the same time serve as a comment on “the universal love for, and among, humankind”.[23] This theme had featured in previous Harrison songs such as “Within You Without You” and “While My Guitar Gently Weeps” and would remain prominent in much of his subsequent compositions.[24] The same parallels regarding the universality of love in Harrison’s work has been noted by Dale Allison, author of the first “spiritual biography” on the ex-Beatle; “When George asks, ‘Isn’t It A Pity?’,” Allison writes, “the scope of his question is vast: it embraces almost everything.”[25]

Speaking to Billboard editor-in-chief Timothy White in 2000, Harrison said of “Isn’t It a Pity”: “It’s just an observation of how society and myself were or are. We take each other for granted – and forget to give back. That was really all it was about.”[26]

Recording[edit]

Two contrasting versions of the song were recorded in London in mid 1970 during the sessions for All Things Must Pass,[27] both of which were intended for release, from the outset.[28] According to Harrison, after recording the first version, he had decided he was unhappy with it, and the second version came about by chance “weeks later”, when one of the backing musicians began playing the song during a session.[29] The so-called “Isn’t It a Pity (Version Two)” is noticeably slower than the better known, seven-minute “epic” reading of the song.[30] Eric Clapton‘s lead guitar fills, phased piano from Tony Ashton, and John Barham-arranged woodwinds dominate Version Two,[30] which is also more in keeping with the Beatles’ earlier attempts on the track; as with “Ballad of Sir Frankie Crisp“, it features extensive use of the Leslie speaker sound so familiar from the band’s Abbey Road album.[31]

Studio Two, Abbey Road Studios

Inside Studio Two at EMI’s Abbey Road Studios

Like the concurrently recorded “My Sweet Lord“, the album’s other “Isn’t It a Pity” betrays the influence of co-producer Phil Spector more so than the comparatively sedate Version Two.[30][31] It is also the most extreme example of Harrison’s stated intention to allow some of the songs on All Things Must Pass to run longer and feature instrumentation to a greater degree than had been possible within the confines of the more pop-oriented Beatles approach to recording.[19] “Isn’t It a Pity” (Version One, in its All Things Must Pass context) starts small and builds[32] – “and it builds and it builds”, NMEs Alan Smith would soon write.[33] Taping of the backing track took place at Abbey Road Studios on 2 June,[34] and judging by Spector’s comments regarding Harrison’s early mixes, the orchestral arrangement was not added until late August at the earliest.[28] The first slide-guitar break on the released recording, quite possibly overdubbed some time after the June sessions also, would adopt a near-identical melody to the one Harrison had vocalised when routining the song for the other Beatles on 26 January 1969[34] – reflecting a quality admired by Elton John in the latter’s 2002 tribute to Harrison: “All his solos are very melodic – you can almost sing his solos.”[35] Inglis writes that the effect of Harrison’s “elaborate patterns” on slide guitar is to “counterbalance the underlying atmosphere of pessimism with shafts of beauty”, similar to the “notes of light and dark” provided by Pete Drake‘s pedal steel on the song “All Things Must Pass“.[36]

Now in the key of G (two semitones down from the Get Back performance), “Isn’t It a Pity” begins “dirge”-like[37] with a two-note pedal point provided by layers of keyboards and acoustic guitars.[22] Only at the one-minute mark, at the start of verse two, does the rhythm section come in, after which the instruments begin to “break out of their metronomic straitjacket to attain an almost ecstatic release”, as Beatles Forever author Nicholas Schaffner put it in 1977.[37] The “balmy” slide guitar passage, supported by Barham’s string section,[22] follows this second verse, and from that point on – around 2:38 – the same, circular chord structure continues for the remaining four-and-a-half minutes of the song.[24][32] The long fade-out sees what Schaffner termed the “pseudo-symphonic tension” burst into a frenzy of brass and timpani, further bottleneck soloing, and the “What a pitymantra joined by “Hey Jude“-style “Na-na-na-na” chorus.[22][37]

One of the most obvious examples of what Rolling Stone magazine’s album reviewer later termed “the music of mountain tops and vast horizons”,[38] “Isn’t It a Pity” featured the largest line-up of musicians found on the album – including three or four keyboard players, a trio of extra rhythm guitarists, the orchestral strings, brass and tympani, and a male choir.[39][40] Harrison’s former bandmate Ringo Starr and two musicians with well-established links to the Beatles, Klaus Voormann and Billy Preston, were among the participants, on drums, bass and organ, respectively.[22] Members of Apple band Badfinger provided the “felt but not heard” acoustic guitars (behind Harrison’s), consistent with Spector’s criteria for his Wall of Sound technique,[37] while author Bruce Spizer has suggested that Peter Frampton may have been among the rhythm guitarists also.[34] Pianist Gary Wright, who would go on to collaborate regularly with Harrison over the subsequent decades,[41][42] recalls the session for “Isn’t It a Pity” as being his first with Harrison.[43] Bobby Whitlock, the other main keyboard player on All Things Must Pass, with Wright,[44] recalls playing a “phase-shifted pump organ, or harmonium” on the track.[45] Another possible participant is Maurice Gibb, Starr’s Highgate neighbour at the time,[46]who claimed to have played piano on the song.[47]

Release[edit]

Originally, the intention had been to release “Isn’t It a Pity” as the lead single from All Things Must Pass in October 1970,[28] until Spector and others persuaded Harrison that “My Sweet Lord” was the most obvious choice.[48] The full, seven-minute “Isn’t It a Pity” was therefore issued as a double A-side with “My Sweet Lord” on 23 November in the United States and Canada (as Apple 2995), four days before the album’s release there.[49][50] Reflecting the equal status of the two tracks, both sides of the single’s picture sleeve featured the same Barry Feinstein-shot photo of Harrison, the only differences being the song title below Harrison’s name and the fact that the green Apple Records logo and catalogue number appeared only on the side for “My Sweet Lord”.[51]

The single was phenomenally successful in North America, and around the world.[37][52][53] Both songs were listed at number 1 on America’s Billboard Hot 100 chart,[54][55] for four weeks starting on 26 December.[56][57] On the Cash Box chart, which listed single sides separately, it peaked at number 46.[58] In Canada, “Isn’t It a Pity” was the lead side when the single topped the RPM 100 chart for five weeks, through to mid January 1971.[59] “Isn’t It a Pity” was issued on All Things Must Pass as the final track on side one of the LP format, providing, in biographer Elliot Huntley’s words, an “elegiac, plaintive song of reconciliation” after the angry “Wah-Wah“.[32] Author Robert Rodriguez writes of the public’s perception of “Isn’t It a Pity” on release: “All Things Must Pass was replete with songs that could easily be interpreted as commentary on the Beatles’ breakup; though this particular song predated the events of 1969–1970, the subtext [wasn’t] diminished in the least.”[60] “Isn’t It a Pity (Version Two)” appeared as the penultimate track on side four of the original three-record set,[61] thus serving as what Rodriguez terms “a bookend to a nearly completed journey”.[62]

Despite the song’s commercial success, and its standing as one of the most-covered compositions among Harrison’s post-Beatles output,[63] “Isn’t It a Pity” was omitted from EMI/Capitol‘s The Best of George Harrison in November 1976.[64] It was included on the 2009 compilation Let It Roll: Songs by George Harrison, however.[20] A demo version of the song, recorded during the Get Back sessions, is also available on Let It Roll as an iTunes Store exclusive.

A live version from December 1991, again with Clapton, appears on the album Live in Japan.[20]

Reception[edit]

“Isn’t It a Pity” remains one of Harrison’s most popular songs with critics and fans alike. AllMusic calls it “deeply moving and powerful”,[20] while in their book on the solo Beatles’ recording history, Eight Arms to Hold You, Chip Madinger and Mark Easter declare: “If any George Harrison song can be called ‘majestic’, ‘Isn’t It a Pity’ would be the one.”[28] In his December 1970 album review for the NME, Alan Smith described it as a track that “catches the mood of aching tolerance of pain, which Harrison can do so well” and “a ballad which will stand out from the album with the passing of the years”.[33] While reviewing the song’s pairing with “My Sweet Lord”, Billboard magazine wrote of a “powerhouse two-sided winner” with “equally potent lyric lines and infectious rhythms”.[65]

Simon Leng identifies the song as musically “sumptuous” and praises Harrison’s melody and “unique” use of notes beyond the key signature, as well as John Barham’s “evocative, suspended orchestration”.[66] He notes also the similarity of their combined musical counterbalance with elements of Indian raga, in the number of swaras (tones) in both ascending and descending scales.[66] To Leng, “Isn’t It a Pity” is the “pivotal song”, the “essence” of All Things Must Pass, encapsulating the album’s struggle between “gospel ecstasy and the failure of human relationships”.[1] He concludes: “Ever bittersweet, ‘Isn’t It a Pity’ records the last dying echoes of the Beatles.”[66]

Writing in the late 1970s, Nicholas Schaffner noted the song’s “towering simplicity” and the “endlessly repetitive fade-out that somehow manages to be hypnotic instead of boring”.[37] Like Leng and Schaffner, a number of commentators have remarked on the significance of “Isn’t It a Pity” in the context of the Beatles’ demise,[2][24][67][68] starting with the song’s length: 7:10 – just a second under “Hey Jude“.[19][37] Ben Gerson, in his 1971 Rolling Stone review, described the song as a “lament … whose beginning is the broken thirds of John’s ‘I Am the Walrus‘ and whose end is the decadent, exultant last half of Paul’s ‘Hey Jude'”.[38] Peter Doggett considers “Isn’t It a Pity” a “remarkably non-judgemental commentary on the disintegration of the Beatles’ spirit”.[69]

Elliot Huntley has complained of the song’s enforced period in hibernation: “[It] simply beggars belief that the track was rejected by Martin, Lennon and McCartney – three men whose reputations rested on their ability to spot a good tune when they heard one.”[70]Huntley views “Isn’t It a Pity” as worthy of “fully fledged standard” status, with Barham’s “soaring” strings and Harrison’s “sublime” slide guitar combining to take the song “into the heavens, where it stays”.[32] Mojo contributor John Harris highlights the song in his review of one of the few “truly essential” solo albums by a former Beatle, writing: “The faster songs [on All Things Must Pass] (eg Wah Wah) are delightful; the slowies (Isn’t It A Pity, Beware Of Darkness) simply jaw-dropping.”[71]

Speaking in 2001 during promotion for the 30th anniversary reissue of All Things Must Pass, Harrison named the song among his three favourite tracks on the album,[72] along with “Run of the Mill” and “Awaiting on You All“.[73] In 2010, AOL Radio listeners voted “Isn’t It a Pity” seventh in a poll to find the ten best post-Beatles George Harrison songs.[74] Both Eric Clapton[75] and Tom Petty have named “Isn’t It a Pity” among their favourite two Harrison compositions, Petty calling the song “a masterpiece”.[76] According to Acclaimed Music, “Isn’t It a Pity” is featured in Bruce Pollock’s 2005 book The 7,500 Most Important Songs of 1944–2000, while in 2013, Holland’s Radio 2 program Het Theater van het Sentiment listed the song at number 1 (ahead of Lennon’s “Imagine“)[77] in its “Top 40 Songs by Year” for 1971.[78]

Personnel[edit]

The musicians who performed on the two All Things Must Pass versions of “Isn’t It a Pity” are believed to be as follows.[22]

Version One

Version Two

Chart positions[edit]

Chart (1970–71) Peak
position
Canadian RPM 100 Singles Chart[59] 1
US Billboard Hot 100[54] 1
US Cash Box Top 100[58] 46

Cover versions[edit]

  • In May 1971, singer Matt Monro released a UK single of “Isn’t It a Pity” (produced by George Martin).[63]
  • Nicky Thomas recorded the song for his 1971 album Tell It Like It Is.[80]
  • Ireland’s 1970 Eurovision Song Contest winner, Dana, covered the song in 1971, a rendition that has been described as a “poignant” commentary to the political upheaval then gripping Ulster.[63]
  • The Three Degrees recorded “Isn’t It a Pity” during their period on Roulette Records in 1970–72, later released on the 1995 compilation The Roulette Years.[81]
  • Nina Simone‘s “intense”, eleven-minute reworking of “Isn’t It a Pity” was released on her 1972 album Emergency Ward!, a statement on the Vietnam War which also includes a cover of “My Sweet Lord”.[82] A six-minute version of “Isn’t It a Pity” was issued on the 51-track compilation The Essential Nina Simone in 1993.[83] In his autobiography, Harrison says he was influenced by Simone’s treatment when he came to record his song “The Answer’s at the End” in 1975.[84]
  • Galaxie 500 covered the song on their On Fire album in 1989.[85]
  • A version by Pete Drake appeared on his eponymous solo album, released in 1997.[86]
  • The song appears on Television Personalities‘ 1998 album Don’t Cry Baby … It’s Only a Movie.[85]
  • In March 2001, 18th Dye contributed a version of “Isn’t It a Pity” to Snowstorm – A Tribute to Galaxie 500.[80]
  • At the Concert for George on 29 November 2002, a year to the day after Harrison’s death, Eric Clapton and Billy Preston performed the song with backing from Dhani Harrison, Jeff Lynne, Gary Brooker, Jim Keltner, Ray Cooper, Jim Horn, Tom Scott and others.[87]
  • Jay Bennett and Edward Burch recorded “Isn’t It a Pity” for Songs from the Material World: A Tribute to George Harrison, a multi-artist compilation released in February 2003.[88]
  • Classical guitarist Joseph Breznikar recorded a version of the song for his 2003 tribute album George Harrison Remembered: A Touch of Class.[89]
  • Cowboy Junkies covered the song on their Early 21st Century Blues album in 2005.[80]
  • Joel Harrison recorded “Isn’t It a Pity” for his album Harrison on Harrison: Jazz Explanations of George Harrison, released in October 2005.[90]
  • A cover version by Les Fradkin was released in 2005 on his Something for George tribute album.[91]
  • Spanish singer Rafo de la Cuba covered the song in December 2005.[92]
  • A version by Paul Young was included on his 2006 album Rock Swings.[85]
  • Pedro Aznar covered the song as “No Es Una Pena?”, with Spanish lyrics, on his album Quebrado in 2008.[93]
  • In September 2008, members of Heard of Buffalo performed the song for the Jerry Lewis MDA Telethon.[94]
  • “Isn’t It a Pity” was among a number of Harrison and Beatle covers recorded or performed by Elliott Smith;[95] a version appears on the 1998-08-12: Hoboken, NJ, USA album.[85]
  • Soul singer Bettye LaVette covered the song on Interpretations: The British Rock Songbook in 2010.[96]
  • David McAlmont and Bernard Butler’s performance of “Isn’t It a Pity” was released on the Live From Leicester Square album in February 2011.[80]
  • A version by Jonathan Wilson and Graham Nash appeared on Harrison Covered,[97] a tribute CD accompanying the November 2011 issue of Mojo magazine.[98]
  • Also in November 2011, marking the ten-year anniversary of Harrison’s death, Keane recorded a version of the song.[99]
  • Roberta Flack covered “Isn’t It a Pity” on her album Let It Be Roberta – Roberta Flack Sings The Beatles, released in February 2012.[80]
  • My Morning Jacket have included “Isn’t It a Pity” in their live performances; when playing the song at the Forecastle Festival in July 2012, they were joined on stage by Dean Wareham of Galaxie 500.[100]

All Things Must Pass 10 ( 1970 )
I’d Have You Anytime / My Sweet Lord / Wah-Wah / Isn’t It A Pity / What Is Life / If Not For You / Behind That Locked Door / Let It Down / Run Of The Mill / Beware Of Darkness / Apple Scruffs / Ballad Of Sir Frankie Crisp (Let It Roll) / Awaiting On You All / All Things Must Pass / I Dig Love / Art Of Dying / Isn’t It A Pity #2 / Hear Me Lord / It’s Johnny’s Birthday / Plug Me In / I Remember Jeep / Thanks For The Pepperoni / Out Of The Blue

Nobody would have predicted George Harrison arriving as the most popularly acclaimed ex-beatle in the immediate aftermath of their split. Nobody did predict that. Whilst Paul seemed to be running away, whilst John seemed to be deliberately aiming two fingers at his past, George merely set about releasing not one, but two albums to follow ‘that’. Paul has often said “How do you follow ‘that’?”, referring to The Beatles, of course. John learned a lesson, as ‘Plastic Ono Band’ was a relatively poor seller and amid Paul seemingly not even trying, George emerged as the biggest selling ex-beatle, circa 1970. The Phil Spector production works brilliantly here, a masterpiece of production. George never had as pretty a voice as Paul or as expressive a voice as John. Whilst the Spector production of Lennon solo albums sometimes attracted complaints and/or controversy, here, everything is perfect. The band of supporting muscians take nothing away from the immense spirituality this albums evokes. You don’t have to share George’s particular beliefs, just wallow in the feel this record produces. As Brian Wilson and The Beach Boys never nailed their mast openly, just wrote spiritual songs such as ‘God Only Knows’ – George Harrison wrote a whole bunch of songs for ‘All Things Must Pass’. True, some were initially thrown as possible Beatles songs, and unfairly ignored, but nevermind. George could have written all but, let’s say, four of the songs on ‘Abbey Road’, and if he had, it would have been a better album of actual songs than it was. But, ‘Abbey Road’ was barely about songs, it was about creating a mood. That second side? George had little to no involvement in that.

Listening to the first disc, here. It’s flawless, absolutely flawless. You’ve songs that have been name-dropped and recommended and repeated. You’ve songs that haven’t, but are equally as compelling. Buried towards the end of the first disc ( on cd ) is the beautiful ‘Behind That Locked Door’. Before that, you’ve got the name-dropped songs. The huge hit ‘My Sweet Lord’. ‘Isn’t It A Pity’ which out-epics both ‘Hey Jude’ and ‘Let It Be’ and emerges as a better song than either. Imagine ‘Isn’t It A Pity’ released as a new Beatles song, circa 1970? Aint too hard to do, aint too hard to imagine it selling trillions of copies. As a George Harrison song, it was a b-side to one of his singles. You know? Oh, ‘Isn’t It A Pity’ is one of the most ‘Beatles’ sounding songs here, by the way. As I said, it ain’t hard to imagine. Oh, OH!!!!! Sorry for the exclamation marks, but i’d never read or heard of this song i’m mentioning next as ‘a classic’ until I got the actual album, and decided that it was for myself. ‘What Is Life’ beautifully evokes Sixites pop songs, a kind of ‘Keep On Running’ rhythmic feel. ‘What Is Life’ is another song here that deserved to be a number one single all over the world. This is music, man. It’s a song I can listen to over and over, so very catchy. Oh, Spector produces Dylan?? Now, that would be something to witness, preferably at a distance! But, George covers the Dylan tune ‘If Not For You’. Rightly so, he played with Dylan and helped Dylan create the song in the first place. Harrison’s version sports a very soulful vocal, beautiful piano and overall backing. I’ll end this paragraph by mentioning the storming ‘Wah-Wah’. Not going into any detail, i’ll just mention that it sounds so fucking good.

As for the second half or so of the album? Well. More spirtual numbers, a few seemingly throwaway numbers. Ah, let’s expand. Let’s take ‘Apple Scruffs’. It’s homely, it’s natural, it’s…. egoless. It seems to be nothing as such, but surrounded as it is, by the songs it IS surrounded by… genuis. ‘Ballad Of Sir Frankie Crisp’? There’s a song written by a guy who spent years with Lennon and who spent years admiring Dylan. The title song, perfection. ‘Art Of Dying’? Spector works wonders here. The closing five numbers last another LP in themselves, loose jams recorded with future members of Derek And The Domino’s. The closing ‘Out Of The Blue’ is eleven minutes long, but ‘All Things Must Pass’ is that kind of album. It literally offers everything. Isolate a few numbers here and there, you could be mean and say, ‘hey, it’s not that hot’ – but ‘Out Of The Blue’ contains groove, and besides, it arrives after such an emotional trip, that this is exactly what you need. A jam, a coda. No solution to life’s problems, just an album to make life a little more bearable.

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Readers Comments

Simon B slb23@shaw.ca
IMHO, I don’t think that ALL THINGS MUST PASS is a 10/10 album. There’s a more than a few classic tracks, a bunch of great melodies and riffs, and most of the songs are as good (if not better than) the songs he was allowed to put on the Beatles albums. There is, however, “Wah Wah”, “Run of the Mill”, “Let It Down”, “Apple Scruffs”, “I Dig Love”, and most of the “jam” record; which, IMHO, aren’t as good as the rest of the album. The rest of the album contains quite a few great songs: the up-beat pop hits “My Sweet Lord” and “What is Life”, an excellent cover of Dylan’s “If Not For You”, the catchy “Awaiting On You All”, the proto-disco of “Art of Dying”, and the reflective, somber ballads “Isn’t it a Pity (Version 1)”, “Beware of Darkness”, ‘All things must Pass”, and “Hear Me Lord”. 7.5/10

Ben Fishes_Inc@hotmail.com
I didn’t exactly believe all the hype behind this record, but for the most part it delivers. The song “I Dig Love” proves that he did indeed play in a band with John Lennon.
Andy Hanrahanhanrahan_us@yahoo.com
I bought this album on the strength of your review and was not disappointed. There are so many beautiful songs here that a 10/10 rating is spot on. The song ‘The ballad of Sir Frankie Crisp(let it roll)’ is one of the nicest songs I’ve ever heard.

gavin thorburn gavinthorburn@hotmail.co.uk
george harrison never topped this album,never even came close.and frankly he didnt need to.this triple album astonished me when i first heard it and it still does many many listens later.an incredible collection of moving songs and the best solo album by an ex beatle.and has anybody else noticed the melody of hey jude on isnt it a pity version 2….

Mike Harrison cathairball5000@yahoo.com
ATMP probably IS the best solo album Harrison ever recorded, but like a lot of double or triple albums (well, there aren’t TOO many triple albums out there, come to think of it), there’s some excess that could’ve been eliminated. Personally, ATMP isn’t one of my favorite sets, but there’s no doubt that a single LP with the best songs would’ve been a KILLER release. Actually, as it stands I think the first five songs are the highlights, and it gets less interesting as it goes on. I think the more spiritual songs weigh it down a bit, but still, I would want a few of these on a single record because it exemplifies Harrison’s diversity…..and in 1970 he was the most diverse and interesting of the Beatles, in my opinion.

Gazza garyhess44@hotmail.com
George was always a born disciple , john and paul,dylan,clapton,krishna but could george stand on his own ? The answer is a resounding yes , but i think stretching it to a treble album was a bit much. “id have you anytime” is a sweet pretty opener , “isnt it a pity” a sad look at the end of the beatles with more than a touch of hey jude but the best tracks are the countryish “if not for you” (which suits george more than dylan) and his country waltz to dylans reclusivity “behind the locked door”. Other tracks that should be mentioned are the stately “beware of darkness” “let it roll” which is just beautiful and shows lennon was listening too (the melody is very similar to his later oh yoko) “i dig love” makes me smile so simple and yet so beatles- its the kind of thing that paul would have loved and really got his teeth into . Georges genorosity of spirit shows on “apple scruffs” and the joyous “let it down” . But Is it a classic though? not quite , the! title track is a lovely song but i prefer the “get back” version done at twickenham where the beatles harmonies bring so much more to the song, making it almost mantra like. My sweet lord and wah wah have brill melodies but are way too long – And alas awaiting on you all and the art of dying are tune free zones and the spector kitchen sink production doesnt always work – some more variety in the sound would have been nice and you know what ? “what is life” is “keep on running” (george was prone to a bit of plagiarism) and the apple jam session is just horrible – Why george ??? The beatles missed george but he also showed here that he missed their focussed editing and pruning,for as a single LP this would have been the best beatle solo LP by some way .

David yodasling@aol.com
All Things Must Pass, is more evidence that the Beatles were nothing more than the Britney Spears of their day. It’s all about production, guest artists, and excess of the worst kind. Each album after this one gone thinner and thinner in form and content because the usual troop of collaborators were not around to inject inflation to the final product. There are a few good songs here, most the spiritual ones, because George actually “felt” those personally. The rest are just fillers, forced droppings produced for the pop music threadmill. And as for the Jam… well, who ever played those more than once? Did anyone care at all that these “important” could play their intruments without a “script” and without a big deal producer? No, no one did and still done. Death to the Beatles.

D I Kertis USA
In contrast to another writer, I love Let it Down and Run of the Mill in particular, definitely more than If Not For You (a good cover, but still a cover) and Behind that Locked Door. The stripped down version of Let it Down on the 30th anniversary reissue, with just George on acoustic guitar and a very subtle string synthesizer, is amazing. I Dig Love is another one people tend to regard as one of the weaker tracks. I kinda… dig it, though. Better than Apple Scruffs, I’d say, and although I like both versions of Isn’t it a Pity?, I’d easily lose the second one, along with the Dylan cover, before I Dig Love. I Live for You, another bonus track from the reissue, is beautiful and I think it’s better than the other country/western song, Behind that Locked Door. All in all, at least a 9/10 for me. A really powerful, substantial album.

– See more at: http://www.adriandenning.co.uk/george.html#sthash.R3K2RhO9.dpuf

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