MUSIC MONDAY George Harrison – Behind That Locked Door

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Behind That Locked Door – Olivia Newton-John (1973)

Behind That Locked Door (George Harrison) – Emotional Version by Norah Jones Live on Conan

George Harrison – Behind That Locked Door – Lyrics

Behind That Locked Door

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
“Behind That Locked Door”
Song by George Harrison from the album All Things Must Pass
Published Harrisongs
Released 27 November 1970
Genre Folk rock, country
Length 3:05
Label Apple
Writer(s) George Harrison
Producer(s) George Harrison, Phil Spector
All Things Must Pass track listing

Behind That Locked Door” is a song by English musician George Harrison, released on his 1970 triple album All Things Must Pass. Harrison wrote the song in August 1969 as a message of encouragement to Bob Dylan, who was making a highly publicised comeback to the concert stage, accompanied by the Band, with a headlining performance at the Isle of Wight Festival. “Behind That Locked Door” is a rare Harrison composition in the country music genre and the second song dealing with the friendship between himself and Dylan, after their 1968 collaboration “I’d Have You Anytime“. Its lyrics address Dylan’s elusive nature, and reflect the high regard in which Harrison held the American singer’s work. The same reluctance on Dylan’s part to re-engage with a concert audience led to him retreating again from live performance until August 1971, when he responded to Harrison’s request to play at the Concert for Bangladesh.

Harrison recorded “Behind That Locked Door” in London early in the summer of 1970, shortly after taking part in a session for Dylan’s New Morning album in New York. Co-produced by Phil Spector, the recording features a prominent contribution from Nashville pedal steel virtuoso Pete Drake, and twin keyboard parts from Gary Wright and Billy Preston in the tradition of the Band, whose sound influenced Harrison’s arrangement. With its understated performance, the track is a comparatively rare departure from the big production commonly associated with All Things Must Pass. On release, Alan Smith of the NME described the song as “a tremendous piece of country-meets-Hawaii” and recommended that it be sent to country singer Slim Whitman “without further delay”.[1]

An alternate take of “Behind That Locked Door” appears on the 2012 Harrison compilation Early Takes: Volume 1. Olivia Newton-John, Jim James, the Felice Brothers and Norah Jones are among the artists who have covered the song.

Background[edit]

In mid August 1969, Bob Dylan had confounded the media’s expectations by shunning the Woodstock Festival, an event he had helped to inspire.[2][3] Instead, after three years in virtual seclusion with his family, Dylan decided to make his comeback a fortnight after Woodstock, by headlining the Isle of Wight Festival at Wootton, just off the south coast of England.[4][5] Now a popular act in their own right, the Band agreed to back Dylan for the performance,[6] just as they had (as the Hawks) on his controversial 1966 world tour.[7]In a repeat of his UK concerts from 1966, leading figures in the English music scene began to gather on the island to show their support for Dylan,[8][9] the singer widely considered “the minstrel to a generation”.[10]

Alone among the many celebrity guests,[nb 1] George Harrison had spent time with Dylan during his period away from the limelight, in Bearsville, near Woodstock.[11][12] In between promoting Radha Krishna Temple (London)‘s debut single on Apple Records, his own production of “Hare Krishna Mantra“,[13] Harrison and wife Pattie Boyd stayed with Dylan’s family at Forelands Farm, near Bembridge, during the week preceding the festival.[14] The two musicians strengthened the bond they had established in upstate New York[15]and were heard performing near-perfect impersonations of the Everly Brothers in the farmhouse.[16][nb 2]

Festival poster, showing an image of Dylan circa 1966

In addition to a crowd estimated at 200,000,[18] a group of 300 American journalists descended on the Isle of Wight, adding unwelcome pressure on Dylan.[14] In the days leading up to his performance on Sunday, 31 August, the British press dubbed the event “D Day”, in reference to the Allies’ invasion of German-occupied France in June 1944;[19] in the words of music journalist John Harris, “Dylan’s show had by now been inflated into the gig of the decade.”[20] As a further impediment to Dylan’s planned comeback, audiences in 1969 expected to hear the rock music associated with his and the Hawks’ 1965–66 tours,[21] a style that he had abandoned with his recent country album, Nashville Skyline.[22]This contrast was encouraged by the organisers’ promotional campaign for the event,[23] particularly in the design for the official festival posters.[24] Referring to Dylan’s more conservative 1969 image, author Clinton Heylin writes: “There was little doubt that this was a different Dylan, even if the graphic on the fluttering posters advertising the festival was a stark black-and-white shot of a beshaded Dylan in classic ’66 pose.”[24] The arrival of Harrison’s fellow Beatles John Lennon and Ringo Starr, on Saturday, 30 August, added to the heightened speculation that one or more members of the band might make a guest appearance with Dylan the following evening.[25][26][nb 3]

Harrison gifted Dylan his vintage Gibson J-200 acoustic guitar before the show[28] and was then taken aback that Dylan arranged for “Hare Krishna Mantra” to be played over the PA minutes before he and the Band went on stage.[29]Mukunda Goswami, one of the six pioneer devotees who founded the Hare Krishna movement‘s London temple and played on the recording,[30][31] has identified this exposure as reflective of how the ancient Maha Mantra “penetrated British society” as a result of the Harrison-produced single.[32] Harrison watched Dylan’s performance from the VIP enclosure,[33] an experience that informed the lyrics to a new composition, “Behind That Locked Door”.[34]

Composition[edit]

I don’t mean to embarrass Bob or anything like that, but he’s said and done more, I think, than the lot of show business put together. You can take just one tune [of his] from back in the Sixties and it’s more meaningful than twenty or thirty years of what everybody else said …[35]

– George Harrison, commenting on the songs of Bob Dylan

John Harris describes “Behind That Locked Door” as a “sweet acknowledgement of Dylan’s shyness”.[20] According to Harrison’s recollection in a December 2000 interview for Billboard magazine, he began writing the song the night before Dylan played.[36] Further to the statement of friendship in their 1968 collaboration “I’d Have You Anytime[37] – which Harrison began as a way of getting Dylan to let down his guard and “Let me in here[38] – in “Behind That Locked Door”, he urges Dylan to confide in a friend and “let out your heart“.[39]

Author Ian Inglis notes the Isle of Wight performance as having been a “hugely important and anxious occasion” for Dylan and views Harrison’s opening verse as a “personal plea” for him to “pull out of his depression, to face the world again, and to look to the future”. After asking “Why are you still crying?“, Harrison assures Dylan that “The love you are blessed with / This world’s waiting for …[40]

In the second verse,[41] Harrison sings of how he values Dylan’s friendship, together with “the tales you have told me / From the things that you saw“.[5] For much of his career, Harrison repeatedly identified Dylan as one of his biggest musical influences,[42] along with Ravi Shankar.[35] To Inglis, these verse-two lines reflect the level of Harrison’s respect for his work, since “while millions of others may look to the Beatles for guidance, he looks to Dylan”.[42][nb 4]

Bob Dylan and the Band on stage in 1974, the year Harrison faced criticism for his own change of musical direction

Harrison musical biographer Simon Leng observes that, in the “counseling” Harrison gives Dylan in “Behind That Locked Door”, he anticipates his own “slough of despond” during 1973–75.[46] This self-styled “naughty period” of Harrison’s coincided with the failure of his marriage to Boyd and a fall from grace with music critics following his 1974 “Dark Horse Tour[47] – a tour on which, similar to Dylan in 1969, Harrison defied public expectation and attempted to break from his Beatle past.[48] In the final verse to “Behind That Locked Door”,[41] he asks for Dylan’s support in such a scenario:[42]

And if ever my love goes
If I’m rich or I’m poor
Come and let out my heart, please, please
From behind that locked door.

Musically, the song is set in a slow, country-waltz time signature[49] with, as Leng observes, melody and lyrics working “in tandem”.[46] Within each couplet, a rising musical figure presents the “problem” (“Why are you still crying?“), while the second line consists of a “falling melodic consolation” (“Your pain is now through“).[46] In his 1980 autobiography, Harrison offers little comment about “Behind That Locked Door”, aside from identifying the inspiration behind the song and admitting: “It was a good excuse to do a country tune with pedal steel guitar.”[34]

Aftermath to the Isle of Wight Festival[edit]

Dylan’s set at the festival was roundly viewed as anticlimactic,[50][51] if not a “Midnight Flop!”, in the opinion of one British tabloid.[52] Having recently told Rolling Stone editor Jann Wenner that he would return to touring that autumn, Dylan abandoned the idea and also cancelled the proposed live album from his Isle of Wight performance.[53][nb 5] Showing support for Dylan in the fallout from his comeback, in a late 1969 interview Harrison included the American singer in his personal list of essential contemporary rock artists, saying: “The Beatles, [the] Stones, Bob Dylan, Eric Clapton and Delaney & Bonnie, and that’s it. Who needs anything else?”[55]

Inglis highlights “Behind That Locked Door” as an example of how Harrison’s songwriting reflects his “fondness” for family and close friends.[56] Dylan’s reluctance to perform live again was only broken by his friendship with Harrison,[57][58] when the latter persuaded him to play at the Concert for Bangladesh shows in New York in August 1971.[59] Although Dylan had been noncommittal about playing at that event until the last minute,[60][61] a mutual friend of his and Harrison’s, journalist Al Aronowitz, had assured Boyd, “Bob wouldn’t let George down”;[62] another performer at the shows, drummer Jim Keltner, has said that Dylan felt a special closeness towards Harrison as a result of the Concert for Bangladesh.[63] Four years later, while Harrison was dejected following what author Elliot Huntley terms the “tsunami of bile that the Dark Horse album had unleashed”,[64] he spent considerable time with Dylan in Los Angeles.[65][66][nb 6] According to Mukunda Goswami, speaking in a 1982 interview with Harrison, Dylan became a regular visitor to the Los Angeles Radha Krishna temple and embraced the practice of chanting.[70]

Recording[edit]

Following the Beatles’ break-up in April 1970, and shortly before beginning work on All Things Must Pass, Harrison participated in a recording session in New York for Dylan’s New Morning album.[15][71] Among the many tracks they played were “Working on the Guru”,[72] Dylan’s “gentle prod” at Harrison’s association with the Hare Krishna movement, Harris writes,[20] and “If Not for You“, a new Dylan song that Harrison decided to cover on his own album.[73] Dylan also supplied him with a phone number for Pete Drake,[74]the Nashville-based pedal-steel guitarist and record producer whose work had graced “Lay Lady Lay” and other songs on Nashville Skyline.[75][76] Harrison later praised Drake’s pedal steel playing as “the bagpipes of country & western music“.[36]

Working at Abbey Road Studios in London with co-producer Phil Spector,[77] Harrison recorded “Behind That Locked Door” during the first batch of sessions for All Things Must Pass, between late May and early June 1970.[78] Drake’s pedal steel features strongly on the recording,[79] providing a commentary to Harrison’s vocal in the verses, as well as a mid-song solo,[80] supported by Hammond organ from Billy Preston, and Gary Wright on piano.[76] The arrangement for “Behind That Locked Door” reflects the enduring influence of the Band’s sound on Harrison[46] – through the use of two keyboard players, acoustic guitars, and a restrained backing from the rhythm section, comprising Klaus Voormann on bass and, in Huntley’s description, Alan White‘s “shuffle beat” drums.[80] For some years after the song’s release, rumours claimed that it was the Band themselves backing Harrison on the track.[78]

Leng credits all three acoustic guitar parts to Harrison,[46] although other sources suggest that Peter Frampton may have participated at the session.[76] Harrison also overdubbed all the backing vocals (credited on the album to “the George O’Hara-Smith Singers”),[81] a feat much admired by Spector, who has noted Harrison’s willingness to “experiment upon experiment” with his harmony singing on All Things Must Pass.[82]

Release and reception[edit]

“Behind That Locked Door” was released as the third track on side two of Harrison’s All Things Must Pass triple album,[83] in November 1970.[84] Ian Inglis writes of its position in the track order: “In the middle of an album whose songs sweep across the grand themes of history, religion, love, sex, and death, [‘Behind That Locked Door’] is a surprising and touching gesture of simple friendship from one man to another.”[42] The release followed speculation in the music press regarding the Dylan–Harrison joint session in May,[85] and conversely, the critics’ lambasting of Dylan’s Self Portrait double album, released in June 1970.[86] In his review of All Things Must Pass, the NMEs Alan Smith declared “Behind That Locked Door” a “standout” and “a tremendous piece of country-meets-Hawaii, which should be sent to Slim Whitman without further delay”.[1] Less impressed, Ben Gerson of Rolling Stone dismissed the song as “an inexplicable bit of C&W schlock”, although he conceded that it had a “lovely, lilting background vocal”.[87] Later in the 1970s, Beatles Forever author Nicholas Schaffner highlighted “Behind That Locked Door” and the other Dylan-influenced songs on All Things Must Pass as being “far more intimate, both musically and lyrically, than the rest of the album”.[88]

He was a giant, a great soul, with all the humanity, all the wit and humor, all the wisdom, the spirituality, the common sense of a man and compassion for people. He inspired love and had the strength of a hundred men … The world is a profoundly emptier place without him.[89]

– Dylan’s tribute to Harrison, following the latter’s death in November 2001

Reviewers and biographers in the 21st century invariably recognise its place among Bob Dylan’s work on his John Wesley Harding (1967) and Nashville Skyline albums.[46][49][76] Writing in Goldmine magazine in 2002, Dave Thompson remarked: “indeed, this tribute to Dylan’s famous reticence sounds so close to a lost Zim original that His Bobness’ own ‘Baby, Stop Crying‘ (from 1978’s Street Legal) is all but reduced to tributary status itself in comparison.”[90]

Alan Clayson approves of the more “understated production aesthetic” next to what he views as an at-times “bloated” sound found elsewhere on All Things Must Pass.[49] Simon Leng also acknowledges Harrison’s success in “temper[ing] Phil Spector’s taste for the extreme” and describes “Behind That Locked Door” as one of its composer’s “more attractive” songs, with a fine lead vocal.[46] “[It] is refreshing to hear Harrison singing about another’s pain,” Leng adds, “suggesting that, unlike some of his contemporaries, he was able to displace himself as the center of his universe for a moment or two at least.”[91] In his book Phil Spector: Out of His Head, Richard Williams identifies “Behind That Locked Door” as an example of “how sympathetic to the performer” Spector could be as a producer, in this case, by giving the recording a “mellow, autumnal mix” that “beautifully display[s]” Drake’s pedal steel.[92]

Elliot Huntley writes that the track provides a showcase for Harrison’s “melodic flair”, as well as a reason to wonder why the ex-Beatle did not record more songs in the country-music genre, since “certainly he seems perfectly at home in these comfortable surroundings”.[80] Huntley speculates on the “interesting” possibility of a whole LP side of similar “ersatz country and western” tracks, as the Rolling Stones would do on their Exile on Main St. double album in 1972.[93] Harrison biographer Joshua Greene describes the song as a celebration of “love’s victory over pain”.[94]

Alternative version[edit]

In November 2011, an early take of “Behind That Locked Door”, featuring Harrison’s vocal backed by just two acoustic guitars and Drake’s pedal steel, was included in the British deluxe-edition CD/DVD release of Martin Scorsese‘s Living in the Material World documentary.[95][96] This version appeared worldwide on the Early Takes: Volume 1 compilation in May 2012.[97] Giles Martin, who went through Harrison’s musical archive at Friar Park while compiling the album, notes the “folk-tinged spoken word quality” of Harrison’s singing on this take, an example of “a kind of conversational intimacy” that he brought to his recordings.[98]

Rolling Stone critic David Fricke describes this version of the song as a “sweet Nashville reading”.[99] Andy Gill of The Independent finds it a “[p]articularly engaging” inclusion on a compilation that allows “the sweeter side of George Harrison’s character to shine unencumbered by studio blandishments”.[100]

Cover versions[edit]

Among the country artists who have covered the song, Olivia Newton-John released a version on her Olivia album in 1972.[101][102] Drake himself recorded “Behind That Locked Door”, as well as Harrison’s “Isn’t It a Pity” and “Something“, although the recordings remained unissued until the release of the Pete Drake album, nine years after his death in July 1988.[103] Christian alt rock band the Choir covered the song on their 1989 album Wide-Eyed Wonder.[104]

Following Harrison’s death in November 2001, Jim James recorded “Behind That Locked Door” for what became a six-song Harrison covers EP, released as Tribute To in August 2009.[105] Tying in with the release of Scorsese’s George Harrison: Living in the Material World, a version by the Felice Brothers appeared on the multi-artist tribute Harrison Covered,[106][107] a CD accompanying the November 2011 issue of Mojo magazine.[108]

Singer Norah Jones performed “Behind That Locked Door” on the TBS television show Conan on 25 September 2014.[109] Her appearance was part of the show’s “George Harrison Week”,[110] celebrating the release of the Harrison box set The Apple Years 1968–75.[111]

Personnel[edit]

The musicians who performed on “Behind That Locked Door” are believed to be as follows:[46]

Notes[edit]

  1. Jump up^ Bill Wyman lists Rolling Stone bandmates Keith Richards and Charlie Watts among the rock musicians attending the festival, along with Liz Taylor, Richard Burton, Jane Fonda, Roger Vadim and Donald Cammell from the world of film, and leading figures in the Chelsea arts community such as John Dunbar, Michael Cooper and Robert Fraser.[8]
  2. Jump up^ To the surprise of the two Apple employees who brought them, Harrison had to organise to have a set of harmonicas delivered to the farm by helicopter, since Dylan had forgotten to bring any of his own.[17]
  3. Jump up^ According to festival co-promoter Ricki Farr, an “amazing” all-star jam did take place that weekend – featuring Dylan, Harrison, Lennon, Starr, Eric Clapton, Ginger Baker and Jackie Lomax – but only at the farmhouse, on Sunday afternoon.[25] Some members, if not all five, of the Band also took part in this session.[27]
  4. Jump up^ Even during what biographer Howard Sounes terms Dylan’s “creative nadir” of the late 1980s,[43] Harrison told Rolling Stone that “Five hundred years from now, looking back in history, I think he will still be the man.”[44] In 1988, Harrison voiced the opinion that their first album together as the Traveling Wilburys had to be a positive thing if it did nothing else but get Dylan interested in songwriting again.[45]
  5. Jump up^ Among other projects that Dylan had considered earlier that summer, according to engineer and producer Glyn Johns‘ recollection in his book Sound Man (2014), Dylan had hoped to record an album with the Beatles and the Rolling Stones. While Harrison and Keith Richards thought the idea was “fantastic”, Johns writes, Paul McCartney and Mick Jagger “said absolutely not”.[54]
  6. Jump up^ In a radio interview for WNEW-FM in April 1975,[67] Harrison likened the critical backlash he had just received to occasions when Rolling Stone and other music publications had “tried to murder” Dylan’s reputation.[68][69]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jump up to:a b Alan Smith, “George Harrison: All Things Must Pass (Apple)”, NME, 5 December 1970, p. 2; available at Rock’s Backpages (subscription required; retrieved 24 May 2013).
  2. Jump up^ Sounes, pp. 248–51.
  3. Jump up^ Heylin, pp. 306–07.
  4. Jump up^ Sounes, pp. 250–51.
  5. ^ Jump up to:a b Clayson, p. 273.
  6. Jump up^ Helm, p. 198.
  7. Jump up^ Tillery, p. 114.
  8. ^ Jump up to:a b Wyman, p. 342.
  9. Jump up^ Helm, p. 201.
  10. Jump up^ Clayson, p. 274.
  11. Jump up^ Clayson, pp. 242−43.
  12. Jump up^ Leng, pp. 51–52.
  13. Jump up^ Miles, p. 351.
  14. ^ Jump up to:a b Sounes, p. 251.
  15. ^ Jump up to:a b The Editors of Rolling Stone, p. 179.
  16. Jump up^ Harris, p. 68.
  17. Jump up^ O’Dell, pp. 83–85.
  18. Jump up^ Helm, p. 200.
  19. Jump up^ “The Isle of Wight festivals 1968–1970; Bob Dylan 1969”, ukrockfestivals.com (retrieved 19 February 2013).
  20. ^ Jump up to:a b c Harris, p. 72.
  21. Jump up^ Helm, p. 199.
  22. Jump up^ Heylin, pp. 301–02.
  23. Jump up^ Sounes, pp. 251–52.
  24. ^ Jump up to:a b Heylin, p. 307.
  25. ^ Jump up to:a b Harris, p. 69.
  26. Jump up^ Stephen Stafford, “Why the Beatles never played the Isle of Wight”, BBC Hampshire & Isle of Wight, 15 June 2010 (retrieved 24 May 2013).
  27. Jump up^ Sounes, p. 252.
  28. Jump up^ Olivia Harrison, pp. 202–03.
  29. Jump up^ Clayson, pp. 273–74.
  30. Jump up^ Dwyer & Cole, pp. 30–31.
  31. Jump up^ Greene, pp. 103, 106, 143–44.
  32. Jump up^ Olivia Harrison, p. 236.
  33. Jump up^ O’Dell, p. 87.
  34. ^ Jump up to:a b George Harrison, p. 206.
  35. ^ Jump up to:a b Olivia Harrison, p. 202.
  36. ^ Jump up to:a b Timothy White, “George Harrison: ‘All Things’ In Good Time”, billboard.com, 8 January 2001 (retrieved 3 June 2014).
  37. Jump up^ Huntley, pp. 53, 56.
  38. Jump up^ Timothy White, “George Harrison – Reconsidered”, Musician, November 1987, pp. 62, 65.
  39. Jump up^ Leng, pp. 89, 284.
  40. Jump up^ Inglis, pp. 26–27.
  41. ^ Jump up to:a b George Harrison, p. 205.
  42. ^ Jump up to:a b c d Inglis, p. 27.
  43. Jump up^ Sounes, p. 384.
  44. Jump up^ The Editors of Rolling Stone, p. 146.
  45. Jump up^ Clayson, p. 423.
  46. ^ Jump up to:a b c d e f g h Leng, p. 89.
  47. Jump up^ Tillery, p. 116.
  48. Jump up^ The Editors of Rolling Stone, pp. 128–29.
  49. ^ Jump up to:a b c Clayson, pp. 296–97.
  50. Jump up^ Sounes, pp. 252–53.
  51. Jump up^ Heylin, pp. 308, 310.
  52. Jump up^ Clayson, p. 309.
  53. Jump up^ Heylin, pp. 302, 309.
  54. Jump up^ David Greene, “Bob Dylan Wanted to Make an Album With the Beatles and Rolling Stones”, rollingstone.com, 7 November 2014 (retrieved 9 November 2014).
  55. Jump up^ Clayson, p. 277.
  56. Jump up^ Inglis, p. 141.
  57. Jump up^ Leng, p. 120.
  58. Jump up^ O’Dell, p. 199.
  59. Jump up^ Lavezzoli, pp. 189, 192–93.
  60. Jump up^ Heylin, p. 329.
  61. Jump up^ Greene, pp. 191–92.
  62. Jump up^ O’Dell, pp. 198–99.
  63. Jump up^ Lavezzoli, pp. 192, 203.
  64. Jump up^ Huntley, p. 114.
  65. Jump up^ Badman, p. 164.
  66. Jump up^ Ray Coleman, “Dark Horse”, Melody Maker, 6 September 1975, p. 28.
  67. Jump up^ Badman, p. 158.
  68. Jump up^ “No Clear Blue Skies”, Contra Band Music, 2 November 2012 (retrieved 22 May 2013).
  69. Jump up^ “George Harrison – Interview (1975)”, Paste (retrieved 12 November 2016); event occurs between 46:40 and 47:24.
  70. Jump up^ Chant and Be Happy, p. 35.
  71. Jump up^ Badman, p. 7.
  72. Jump up^ Heylin, p. 318.
  73. Jump up^ Madinger & Easter, pp. 424–25.
  74. Jump up^ Schaffner, p. 140.
  75. Jump up^ Clayson, p. 297.
  76. ^ Jump up to:a b c d Spizer, p. 223.
  77. Jump up^ Badman, p. 10.
  78. ^ Jump up to:a b Madinger & Easter, p. 429.
  79. Jump up^ Williams, p. 154.
  80. ^ Jump up to:a b c Huntley, p. 56.
  81. Jump up^ Spizer, p. 212.
  82. Jump up^ Olivia Harrison, p. 282.
  83. Jump up^ Spizer, p. 220.
  84. Jump up^ Castleman & Podrazik, p. 94.
  85. Jump up^ The Editors of Rolling Stone, pp. 179–80.
  86. Jump up^ Sounes, p. 260.
  87. Jump up^ Ben Gerson, “George Harrison All Things Must Pass, Rolling Stone, 21 January 1971, p. 46 (retrieved 24 May 2013).
  88. Jump up^ Schaffner, p. 142.
  89. Jump up^ The Editors of Rolling Stone, p. 221.
  90. Jump up^ Dave Thompson, “The Music of George Harrison: An album-by-album guide”, Goldmine, 25 January 2002, p. 15.
  91. Jump up^ Leng, pp. 89–90.
  92. Jump up^ Williams, pp. 153, 154.
  93. Jump up^ Huntley, p. 57.
  94. Jump up^ Greene, p. 181.
  95. Jump up^ Steve Leggett, “George Harrison George Harrison: Living in the Material World (Video), AllMusic (retrieved 26 September 2014).
  96. Jump up^ Joe Marchese, “Behind That Locked Door: George Harrison Demos Surface on ‘Early Takes Volume 1′”, The Second Disc, 23 March 2012 (retrieved 26 September 2014).
  97. Jump up^ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, “George Harrison: Early Takes, Vol. 1, AllMusic (retrieved 15 September 2012).
  98. Jump up^ Terry Staunton, “Giles Martin on George Harrison’s Early Takes, track-by-track”, MusicRadar, 18 May 2012 (retrieved 9 November 2014).
  99. Jump up^ David Fricke, “George Harrison, Early Takes Volume 1”, Rolling Stone, 23 May 2012 (retrieved 21 February 2013).
  100. Jump up^ Andy Gill, “Album: George Harrison, Early Takes Volume 1 (Universal)”, independent.co.uk, 5 May 2012 (retrieved 12 November 2016).
  101. Jump up^ “Albums: Olivia, onlyolivia.com (retrieved 9 October 2012).
  102. Jump up^ “Behind That Locked Door”, wer-singt.de (retrieved 9 October 2012).
  103. Jump up^ Talevski, pp. 107–08.
  104. Jump up^ Mark W.B. Allender, “The Choir Wide-Eyed Wonder, AllMusic (retrieved 21 February 2013).
  105. Jump up^ Andrew Leahey, “Yim Yames Tribute To, AllMusic (retrieved 20 August 2012).
  106. Jump up^ Michael Simmons, “Cry for a Shadow”, Mojo, November 2011, p. 86.
  107. Jump up^ Harrison Covered, Second Hand Songs (retrieved 16 September 2012).
  108. Jump up^ “MOJO Issue 216 / November 2011”, mojo4music.com (retrieved 30 October 2013).
  109. Jump up^ “Norah Jones ‘Behind That Locked Door’ 09/25/14 – CONAN on TBS”, Conan/Team Coco on YouTube, 25 September 2014 (retrieved 26 September 2014).
  110. Jump up^ Erin Strecker, “Paul Simon Performs ‘Here Comes The Sun’ for George Harrison Week on ‘Conan'”, billboard.com, 24 September 2014 (retrieved 25 September 2014).
  111. Jump up^ Ben Kaye, “Beck kicks off Conan’s week-long George Harrison tribute with ‘Wah-Wah’ – Watch”, Consequence of Sound, 23 September 2014 (retrieved 25 September 2014).

Sources[edit]

  • Keith Badman, The Beatles Diary Volume 2: After the Break-Up 1970–2001, Omnibus Press (London, 2001; ISBN 0-7119-8307-0).
  • Harry Castleman & Walter J. Podrazik, All Together Now: The First Complete Beatles Discography 1961–1975, Ballantine Books (New York, NY, 1976; ISBN 0-345-25680-8).
  • Chant and Be Happy: The Power of Mantra Meditation, Bhaktivedanta Book Trust (Los Angeles, CA, 1997; ISBN 978-0-89213-118-1).
  • Alan Clayson, George Harrison, Sanctuary (London, 2003; ISBN 1-86074-489-3).
  • Graham Dwyer & Richard J. Cole (eds), The Hare Krishna Movement: Forty Years of Chant and Change, I.B. Tauris (London, 2007; ISBN 1-84511-407-8).
  • The Editors of Rolling Stone, Harrison, Rolling Stone Press/Simon & Schuster (New York, NY, 2002; ISBN 0-7432-3581-9).
  • Joshua M. Greene, Here Comes the Sun: The Spiritual and Musical Journey of George Harrison, John Wiley & Sons (Hoboken, NJ, 2006; ISBN 978-0-470-12780-3).
  • John Harris, “A Quiet Storm”, Mojo, July 2001, pp. 66–74.
  • George Harrison, I Me Mine, Chronicle Books (San Francisco, CA, 2002; ISBN 0-8118-3793-9).
  • Olivia Harrison, George Harrison: Living in the Material World, Abrams (New York, NY, 2011; ISBN 978-1-4197-0220-4).
  • Levon Helm with Stephen Davis, This Wheel’s on Fire: Levon Helm and the Story of The Band, A Cappella Books (Chicago, IL, 2000; ISBN 978-1-55652-405-9).
  • Clinton Heylin, Bob Dylan: Behind the Shades (20th Anniversary Edition), Faber and Faber (London, 2011; ISBN 978-0-571-27240-2).
  • Elliot J. Huntley, Mystical One: George Harrison – After the Break-up of the Beatles, Guernica Editions (Toronto, ON, 2006; ISBN 1-55071-197-0).
  • Ian Inglis, The Words and Music of George Harrison, Praeger (Santa Barbara, CA, 2010; ISBN 978-0-313-37532-3).
  • Peter Lavezzoli, The Dawn of Indian Music in the West, Continuum (New York, NY, 2006; ISBN 0-8264-2819-3).
  • Simon Leng, While My Guitar Gently Weeps: The Music of George Harrison, Hal Leonard (Milwaukee, WI, 2006; ISBN 1-4234-0609-5).
  • Chip Madinger & Mark Easter, Eight Arms to Hold You: The Solo Beatles Compendium, 44.1 Productions (Chesterfield, MO, 2000; ISBN 0-615-11724-4).
  • Barry Miles, The Beatles Diary Volume 1: The Beatles Years, Omnibus Press (London, 2001; ISBN 0-7119-8308-9).
  • Chris O’Dell with Katherine Ketcham, Miss O’Dell: My Hard Days and Long Nights with The Beatles, The Stones, Bob Dylan, Eric Clapton, and the Women They Loved, Touchstone (New York, NY, 2009; ISBN 978-1-4165-9093-4).
  • Nicholas Schaffner, The Beatles Forever, McGraw-Hill (New York, NY, 1978; ISBN 0-07-055087-5).
  • Howard Sounes, Down the Highway: The Life of Bob Dylan, Doubleday (London, 2001; ISBN 0-385-60125-5).
  • Bruce Spizer, The Beatles Solo on Apple Records, 498 Productions (New Orleans, LA, 2005; ISBN 0-9662649-5-9).
  • Nick Talevski, The Encyclopedia of Rock Obituaries, Omnibus Press (London, 1999; ISBN 0-7119-7548-5).
  • Gary Tillery, Working Class Mystic: A Spiritual Biography of George Harrison, Quest Books (Wheaton, IL, 2011; ISBN 978-0-8356-0900-5).
  • Richard Williams, Phil Spector: Out of His Head, Omnibus Press (London, 2003; ISBN 978-0-7119-9864-3).
  • Bill Wyman, Rolling with the Stones, Dorling Kindersley (London, 2002; ISBN 0-7513-4646-2).

External links[edit]

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FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE PART 163 BEATLES Breaking down the song LONG AND WINDING ROAD (Featured artist is Charles Lutyens )

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(Francis Schaeffer pictured below spent a lot of time in the 1960’s analyzing the Beatles’ words and music and below he sums up the Beatles search for meaning and values in a letter that I mailed to Paul McCartney on March 20, 2016.)

March 20, 2016

Paul McCartney

Dear Paul,

I love the song THE LONG AND WINDING ROAD for several reasons. I hope you put it in your set list for Little Rock on April 30, 2016. Wikipedia noted: 

The Long and Winding Road” is a ballad written by Paul McCartney (credited to Lennon–McCartney) from the Beatles‘ album Let It Be. It became the group’s 20th and last number-one song in the United States in June 1970,[1] and was the last single released by the quartet.

While the released version of the song was very successful, the post-production modifications by producer Phil Spector angered McCartney to the point that when he made his case in court for breaking up the Beatles as a legal entity, he cited the treatment of “The Long and Winding Road” as one of six reasons for doing so. New versions of the song with simpler instrumentation were subsequently released by both the Beatles and McCartney.

In 2011, Rolling Stone ranked “The Long and Winding Road” number 90 on their list of 100 greatest Beatles songs of all time.[2]

During your time in the Beatles you obviously were searching for satisfaction in several different places and it seemed you returned to the romantic vision of love providing the big answers to life. 
The long and winding road that leads to your door
Will never disappear
I’ve seen that road before it always leads me here
Leads me to your door
The wild and windy night that the rain washed away
Has left a pool of tears crying for the day
Why leave me standing here, let me know the way
Many times I’ve been alone and many times I’ve cried
Anyway you’ll never know the many ways I’ve tried
And still they lead me back to the long and winding road
Francis Schaeffer (1912-1984) was a Christian and a philosopher who also took a deep interest in the trends in culture in the 1960’s and he spent a lot of time analyzing the Beatles search for meaning and values in life. Here is a summary statement he had on the Beatles:
The Beatles have showed us what has occurred [in the last years of the 1960’s in the culture.] The Beatles with Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band which incidentally was a very good piece of total art in the sense that it was an unit, they had many songs on this album but the songs all made one message and the whole album was an unit, and the way the songs were arranged. It all formed an unit of infiltration  of the message of modern man and of the drug culture. In fact, it could be said the  drug culture and the mentality that went with it had it’s own vehicle that crossed the frontiers of the world which were otherwise almost impassible by other means of communication. This record,  Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, became the rallying cry for young people throughout the world. It expressed the essence of their lives, thoughts and their feelings. 

(Below Francis Schaeffer holding up  Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band Album in his film HOW SHOULD WE THEN LIVE? Episode 7 which can be seen on Vimeo:

Francis Schaeffer – How Should We then Live – 07.The Age of Non Reason

from CaptanFunkyFresh6 years ago

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Image result for francis schaeffer beatles sergeant pepper's lonely hearts album

Later came psychedelic rock, an attempt to find this experience without drugs. The younger people and the older ones tried drug taking but then turned to the eastern religions. Both drugs and the eastern religions seek truth inside one’s own head, a negation of reason. The central reason of the popularity of eastern religions in the west is a hope for a nonrational meaning to life and values….

Beatles in India

Image result for beatles in india

Then the Beatles gradually came home. The last thing we find them doing is the YELLOW SUBMARINE. I am sure a lot of parents thought this is much better than the old hard rock, but I thought it was a very sad thing because it really wasn’t a children’s story at all, but what it was in fact was a romantic statement and the fact is that is all there is. Just the same as [Ingmar] Bergman after he makes the movie SILENCE [1963] then he makes a comedy [ALL THESE WOMEN in 1964]. It is the same as Picasso when he pictures his child as a clown [Paul in a Clown Suit, 1924]. So we find the Beatles making the YELLOW SUBMARINE, but there is something more to it than this because Erich Segal made his reputation by writing the script for the movie version of YELLOW SUBMARINE and then he went on and wrote LOVE STORY. So what we have done is we have come around in a big circle. There was the destruction of the romantic. Students in the 1960’s said we are tired of the romantic of giving us optimistic statements with no sufficient base.

[Paul in a Clown Suit, 1924 by Picasso].

Paul in a Clown Suit, 1924, 1903 by Pablo Picasso

LOVE STORY

So the Beatles destroyed that and then they went through these various trips into non-reason but when they came out they had nothing left but the romantic. This is the tragedy of the young people starting with Berkeley in 1964. How right they were in saying we have largely a plastic culture.    This is something the church should have been saying. These students said give us reality. Then the students tried those trips and they weren’t trips based on reality but they were separated from reason. It was trying to find answers in one’s own head whether it was the drug  trip or the Eastern Religion trip. Then they came around in a big circle and what do we find–we end up with Segal’s LOVE STORY, just the romantic thing as one can imagine but with no adequate base at all, yet giving us a lovely romantic answer, which just like the YELLOW SUBMARINE is very, very sad because the Beatles and young people were giving up the search and just accepting something like this. 

(Joan Baez sings at Free Speech Movement rally in Berkeley. November 20, 1964)

YELLOW SUBMARINE

Image result for beatles yellow submarine

 

If we are going to understand the line of despair we must understand that it is an unit saying that reason is not going to take us anywhere. After Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Søren Kierkegaard and the German philosophers Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, and Immanuel Kant there was an unity that bound all these fields of expressions together. First, it was the philosopher expressing this. Second, it was the artist. Third, it was the musician and lastly it was expressed in general culture. The giving up of hope that on the basis of reason one is going to have optimistic answers is the mark of our age. Any kind of answers to the purpose in life, love morals have nothing to do with reason for modern man. It can be expressed in John Cage’s music or in certain forms of rock music.

Chance is the king of our age and John Cage’s music best demonstrates where chance has brought us

You scientists out there who say man is only the atom but a big more complex then you come home to your wife and you say, “I love you.” You want something more than merely sex. Those of you who look to your children with some tenderness and those of you who believe in some morals but you have never settled your score with Marquis de Sade  who said it so well WHAT IS IS RIGHT.

Modern man lives in a dichotomy. Downstairs there is reason which leads to man only being a machine and upstairs there is a some kind of hope against all reason. That great high boast coming out of the Enlightenment that man beginning from himself would gather enough particulars to make his own universal to give adequate answers for life, but it has failed.

de Sade portrayed in recent movie

Karl Popper seen below

Alfred Kinsey seen below

Image result for alfred kinsey

Rationalism fails because man is finite and limited. Karl Popper in England can falsify a few things but he can’t verify anything. Alfred Kinsey tells us that all sexual behavior just comes down to sociological statistics. There is not going to be an answer for modern man unless there is something more than modern man beginning from himself, namely that there is a God there and He is not silent.

In another place Francis Schaeffer has correctly argued:

The universe was created by an infinite personal God and He brought it into existence by spoken word and made man in His own image. When man tries to reduce [philosophically in a materialistic point of view] himself to less than this [less than being made in the image of God] he will always fail and he will always be willing to make these impossible leaps into the area of nonreason even though they don’t give an answer simply because that isn’t what he is. He himself testifies that this infinite personal God, the God of the Old and New Testament is there. 

Instead of making a leap into the area of nonreason the better choice would be to investigate the claims that the Bible is a historically accurate book and that God created the universe and reached out to humankind with the Bible. Below is a piece of that evidence given by Francis Schaeffer concerning the accuracy of the Bible.

TRUTH AND HISTORY (chapter 5 of WHATEVER HAPPENED TO THE HUMAN RACE?, under footnote #94)

Consider, too, the threat in the entire Middle East from the power of Assyria. In 853 B.C. King Shalmaneser III of Assyria came west from the region of the Euphrates River, only to be successfully repulsed by a determined alliance of all the states in that area of the Battle of Qarqar. Shalmaneser’s record gives details of the alliance. In these he includes Ahab, who he tells us put 2000 chariots and 10,000 infantry into the battle. However, after Ahab’s death, Samaria was no longer strong enough to retain control, and Moab under King Mesha declared its independence, as II Kings 3:4,5 makes clear:

Now Mesha king of Moab was a sheep breeder, and he had to deliver to the king of Israel 100,000 lambs and the wool of 100,000 rams. But when Ahab died, the king of Moab rebelled against the king of Israel.

The famous Moabite (Mesha) Stone, now in the Louvre, bears an inscription which testifies to Mesha’s reality and of his success in throwing off the yoke of Israel. This is an inscribed black basalt stela, about four feet high, two feet wide, and several inches thick.

Moabite (Mesha) Stone seen below

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Actually the answer to find meaning in life is found in putting your faith and trust in Jesus Christ. The Bible is true from cover to cover and can be trusted. Here are some of the posts I have done in the past on the subject and if you like you could just google these subjects: 1. The Babylonian Chronicleof Nebuchadnezzars Siege of Jerusalem, 2. Hezekiah’s Siloam Tunnel Inscription.13. The Pilate Inscription14. Caiaphas Ossuary14 B Pontius Pilate Part 214c. Three greatest American Archaeologists moved to accept Bible’s accuracy through archaeology.

Thanks for your time.

Sincerely,

Everette Hatcher, everettehatcher@gmail.com, http://www.thedailyhatch.org, cell ph 501-920-5733, Box 23416, LittleRock, AR 72221

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Featured artist is Charles Lutyens

Contemporary Christian Art – The Rt Revd Lord Harries of Pentregarth

Image result for charles lutyens artist

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Published on Apr 10, 2012

Contrary to much opinion, the current scene of faith-related art is very much alive. There are new commissions for churches and cathedrals, a number of artists pursue their work on the basis of a deeply convinced faith, and other artists often resonate with traditional Christian themes, albeit in a highly untraditional way. The challenge for the artist, stated in the introduction to the course of lectures above, is still very much there: how to retain artistic integrity whilst doing justice to received themes.

This lecture is part of Lord Harries’ series on ‘Christian Faith and Modern Art’. The last century has seen changes in artistic style that have been both rapid and radical. This has presented a particular problem to artists who have wished to express Christian themes.

The transcript and downloadable versions of the lecture are available from the Gresham College website:
http://www.gresham.ac.uk/lectures-and…

Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website.
http://www.gresham.ac.uk

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Charles Lutyens, 1933

Fire Angel Mosaic, 1968

Image result for charles lutyens artist Fire Angel Mosaic

Charles Lutyens studied at the Chelsea, Slade, St Martin’s and CentralSchools of Art in London and later in Paris. Though mainly a painter he has worked in a range of media and has exhibited widely. From 1963 to 1968 he worked on a commission to produce a mosaic mural of “Angels of the Heavenly Host” on the four long panels high above and surrounding the congregation and altar of St Paul’s Bow, with light flooding down from the large lantern on top. At 800 square feet it is almost certainly the largest contemporary mural in the British Isles. Lutyens was commissioned by the architects of the church because they thought his work consistently revealed “a feeling for states of mind or spirit.” They thought that as we do not know what angels look like it was important that the work be not to too representational and as they put it, they thought the work had achieved just the right balance “between the figurative and the abstract, between severity and empathy, between assertiveness and recession.”[1] Mainly a portrait and landscape painter, Lutyens has turned to Christian themes from time to time as in this recently exhibited The Mocking, 1968. What is interesting about this is the way the tormentors hide behind a great sheet as though they do not want to see what they are doing.

 

Outraged Christ

Image result for charles lutyens artist Outraged Christ

The highlight of a recent exhibition, however, was a work which has also just been completed and was on view for the first time. This is the much larger than life, in fact 15’ Outraged Christ, made of carved and recycled timber shaped in the form of slats. The first Christians liked to show Christ victorious on the cross. The Mediaeval period focussed on his suffering for the sins of the world. The 20th century too focussed almost exclusively on the suffering of Christ but more often than not as a paradigm of the suffering of a terrible century with its innumerable victims.

 

The Outraged Christ.

The depiction of an outraged Christ is, so far as I know, a fresh addition to Christian iconography. It is a moving, impressive work. Instead of Christ being shown battered or anguished, it depicts him with mouth open, slightly to one side, with his knees pushing forward from the cross, in rage. But here is rage, indeed fury, not just at what is being inflicted on him but at what we humans do to one another.

 

[1] Charles Lutyens: Being in the World, paintings, drawings, sculptures, mosaic info@charleslutyens.co.uk, 2011,p.64

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From his website:

Profile

Born in 1933, Charles Lutyens has been an artist all his life. He grew up during the war living in Berkshire and discovered his enjoyment to paint when he was seven years old whilst at school in Shropshire. During his time at Bryanston School in Dorset he realised his commitment to being an artist and would use his academic assignment periods to work in the art room. Through later training at the Slade, St. Martin’s and Central Schools of Art, he developed his skills in oil painting and sculpture.

Lutyens’ work is diverse and has always taken an individual direction using a variety of materials including clay, wood, stone, mosaic, as well as drawn and painted images on paper, board and canvas. His images emerge out of his own experience of life, looking inwardly, with a focus on the condition of “Man’s being in the World”.

Between 1958 and 1964, Lutyens lived in London working in his Fulham studio developing his own personal approach to painting. A body of images then painted were exhibited at the Wildenstein Gallery in New York, where critics compared his work to expressionists, Munch and Ensor.

From 1963 to 1968, Lutyens worked on a commission to produce a tesserae mosaic mural of “Angels of the Heavenly Host” at the newly consecrated church of St. Paul’s, Bow Common, E3.

Charles moved to Oxford with his family in 1978, where together with other commitments, teaching and running related workshops he continued to explore his studio painting and sculpting as well as his landscape work.

Throughout his artistic life he has exhibited in his studio, partaken in mixed exhibitions and has held one-man shows at St. Martin’s Gallery in London and Hollerhaus Gallery, near Munich.

His work is in private collections in England, Germany, Austria, France, Ireland, Spain and USA.

He has recently moved with his wife to Hampshire and is currently working on a 15ft wooden sculpture, a Crucifixion of an “Outraged Christ”.

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WOODY WEDNESDAY Reviews of past Woody Allen Movies PART 1

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Reviews of past Woody Allen Movies

Thursday, June 16, 2011

Top form or not, Woody’s “Midnight in Paris” charms


Midnight in Paris (2011)
94 min., rated PG-13.
Grade: B +

Woody Allen has always interpreted his beloved Manhattan as not only a romanticized city but a state of mind. Continuing his change of scenery (since 2005’s “Match Point”) but not losing that sense of place, Paris follows suit in his latest, “Midnight in Paris.” It’s a truly charming valentine to the City of Lights and for being the Woodman’s 41st film, a literate, witty, playfully clever lark. Judging by how European cities bring out the best in this film auteur, Allen has announced that next he’s shooting in Rome. We’re there. 
 
Owen Wilson, as the Woody Allen stand-in, stars as Gil Pender, a distracted Hollywood screenwriter on holiday in Paris with his fiancee Inez (Rachel McAdams) and her conservative, disapproving parents (Kurt Fuller, Mimi Kennedy). Instantly enraptured by Paris, Gil is the type of person who feels like he should’ve lived in the 1920s and wants to reinvent himself as a novelist. While Inez is more interested in fine dining, accessory shopping, and late-night dancing, Gil loves the city and wants to take in more of it. 
 
SPOILER ALERT!
 
One night after a wine tasting, Gil gets lost on his way back to the hotel. But at the stroke of midnight, he slips into a twilight zone, being transported to the golden-aged 1920s. Suddenly, he’s on a first-name basis with Ernest Hemingway (Corey Stoll), Zelda and F. Scott Fitzgerald (Alison Pill and Tom Hiddleston), Gertrude Stein (Kathy Bates), and Salvador Dali (Adrien Brody), gets to witness Cole Porter on his piano, and even finds his muse in Pablo Picasso’s alluring mistress, Adriana (the very lovely and fetching Marion Cotillard). Meanwhile, Enid’s dad has a detective follow Gil during his late-night strolls. 
 
Like the story itself, “Midnight in Paris” is a piece of magic. Allen doesn’t fuss with scrutiny for Gil’s time-travel because like a Dali painting, it’s quite surreal and fantastic. Looking for logic would just defeat its intent. Though he wouldn’t sound like the first choice as a surrogate for Allen’s neuroses, Wilson need not mimic his director and in fact makes his understated portrayal of Gil more sympathetic. The once-shoehorned surfer dude’s easy-going persona is perfect here and makes the role all his own. 
 
McAdams’ Inez is portrayed as a very status-concious, princessy harpy that you could never see her giving Gil the time of day. Needless to say, they might not be a right fit for one another, even if they share the same taste in Indian restaurants’ Naan. If Gil doesn’t throttle her, you’ll want him to, and soon. The role is more or less a means to an end; as Inez is all over the map as Zelda is, Gil still loves her as F. Scott loves his wife. But given the thankless part, McAdams handles it with more aplomb than what any other actress, like maybe Katherine Heigl, could bring. Fuller and Kennedy, as Inez’s parents, as well as Michael Sheen, as pedantic know-it-all acquaintance Paul, are game as the butt of every Ugly American joke. Of the actors playing the colorful greats of the arts, they’re all scene-stealers, even Brody who’s funny, despite his Dali whittled down to a cameo. Even nicely fitting in her surroundings is France’s First Lady, Carla Bruni, as a tour guide. 
 
Allen brings a very relaxed, romantic, and dream-like mood and tone to “Midnight in Paris” that just delights you. Opening with a tourist montage of mundane snapshots of the anything-but-mundane Paris, “Midnight in Paris” counts as one of Woody’s most visually resplendent films. Paris, much like New York in his earlier films, becomes a character unto itself. No wonder, since his cinematographer Darius Khondji (last hired by Allen on “Anything Else”) shoots Paris with such a warm, beautiful glow. And it’s nice to see the Seine banks again as it was last seen in Allen’s “Everyone Says I Love You” (1996). 
 
As light and inconsequential as the film is, what it says about nostalgia, the love of art and literature, death being one’s greatest fear, and being unhappy in one’s present is actually quite universal and profound. Many criticize Allen for not yet returning to form, but in this day and age, finding a film that’s transportive and smile-inducing is not such a small feat. It might mean more to have knowledge of and recognize all the artists on display, but “Midnight in Paris” will make you desire a stroll through Paris in the rain. 
 

Tuesday, June 14, 2011

Woody Allen’s Canon

Upon the release of Woody Allen’s 41st film, “Midnight in Paris,” here are my critiques of the Woodman’s work. 
Interiors (1978)
93 min., rated PG.
Grade: B + 

Woody Allen breaks the mold with “Interiors,” a decidedly somber, Ingmar Bergman-esque piece and his first film that doesn’t include comic relief or himself. Three sisters, poet Renata (Diane Keaton), unhappy artist Joey (Mary Beth Hurt), and actress Flyn (Kristin Griffith), must deal with the separation and divorce of their emotional mother (Geraldine Page) and impatient father (E.G. Marshall). 

Page acts from her heart in a delicate, heartbreaking performance as Eve, and Maureen Stapleton is very good too as Pearl, their father’s twice-married girlfriend from Florida. All of the performances are open and vulnerable, and the conversations are interesting. Gordon Willis elegantly shoots with a painterly eye for detail in the space of empty rooms and characters staring out windows. Sure, the final scene is cinematically contrived but understated and it stays with you long after. 

Deliberate, downbeat, and often painfully devastating, “Interiors” is experimental Allen, staged very much like a play, but it’s powerfully acted and maturely done. 


Manhattan (1979)
96 min., rated R.
Grade: A –

“Manhattan,” writer-director Woody Allen’s love poem to New York and relationships, is a worthy follow-up to “Annie Hall” and among his best. His adoration for the city he calls home shows especially in the romantic, celebratory opening with Gordon Willis’ magnificent black-and-white cinematography of the Brooklyn Bridge and fireworks over Central Park and George Gershwin’s grand “Rhapsody in Blue” music on the soundtrack. 

Allen stars as Isaac Davis, a neurotic 40-something comedy writer who’s dating a high schooler, Tracy (Mariel Hemmingway). His married best friend Yale (Michael Murphy) is having an affair with a kooky Philadelphia journalist, Mary (Diane Keaton), who criticizes Ingmar Bergman. Isaac’s second ex-wife (Meryl Streep), now in a lesbian relationship, is writing a whole book about their marriage. 

“Manhattan” is scathingly bittersweet and witty if not as endearing as two years ago with Allen and Keaton in “Annie Hall.” Allen really shows his brilliant sense of humor and timing, and Keaton is nothing less than wonderful. There’s the memorable, visually magical scene of Isaac and Mary sitting in silhouette facing the Hudson River. In one of her first bigger roles, 17-year-old Hemmingway is smart and innocent. 

After Annie Hall, “Manhattan” is just the right companion piece to that earlier film, both wistful odes to love and loss rather than fantasy happy endings. 

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_____

RESPONDING TO HARRY KROTO’S BRILLIANT RENOWNED ACADEMICS!! Part 129  Sir Andrew Fielding Huxley OM PRS (22 November 1917 – 30 May 2012) was a Nobel Prize-winning English physiologist and biophysicist and  the grandson of Thomas H. Huxley and half-brother of Julian and Aldous Huxley, “Richenda (his late wife) was an agnostic as I am, a word invented by my grandfather (Thomas H. Huxley)”

On November 21, 2014 I received a letter from Nobel Laureate Harry Kroto and it said:

…Please click on this URL http://vimeo.com/26991975

and you will hear what far smarter people than I have to say on this matter. I agree with them.

Harry Kroto

I have attempted to respond to all of Dr. Kroto’s friends’ arguments and I have posted my responses one per week for over a year now. Here are some of my earlier posts:

Arif AhmedHaroon Ahmed,  Jim Al-Khalili, Sir David AttenboroughMark Balaguer, Horace Barlow, Michael BateSir Patrick BatesonSimon Blackburn, Colin Blakemore, Ned BlockPascal BoyerPatricia ChurchlandAaron CiechanoverNoam Chomsky, Brian CoxPartha Dasgupta,  Alan Dershowitz, Frank DrakeHubert Dreyfus, John DunnBart Ehrman, Mark ElvinRichard Ernst, Stephan Feuchtwang, Robert FoleyDavid Friend,  Riccardo GiacconiIvar Giaever , Roy GlauberRebecca GoldsteinDavid J. Gross,  Brian Greene, Susan GreenfieldStephen F Gudeman,  Alan Guth, Jonathan HaidtTheodor W. Hänsch, Brian Harrison,  Stephen HawkingHermann Hauser, Robert HindeRoald Hoffmann,  Bruce HoodGerard ‘t HooftCaroline HumphreyNicholas Humphrey,  Herbert Huppert,  Gareth Stedman Jones, Steve JonesShelly KaganMichio Kaku,  Stuart KauffmanMasatoshi Koshiba,  Lawrence KraussHarry Kroto, George Lakoff,  Rodolfo LlinasElizabeth Loftus,  Alan MacfarlaneDan McKenzie,  Mahzarin BanajiPeter MillicanMarvin MinskyLeonard Mlodinow,  P.Z.Myers,   Yujin NagasawaAlva NoeDouglas Osheroff, David Parkin,  Jonathan Parry, Roger Penrose,  Saul PerlmutterHerman Philipse,  Carolyn PorcoRobert M. PriceVS RamachandranLisa RandallLord Martin ReesColin RenfrewAlison Richard,  C.J. van Rijsbergen,  Oliver Sacks, John SearleMarcus du SautoySimon SchafferJ. L. Schellenberg,   Lee Silver Peter Singer,  Walter Sinnott-ArmstrongRonald de Sousa, Victor StengerJohn SulstonBarry Supple,   Leonard Susskind, Raymond TallisMax TegmarkNeil deGrasse Tyson,  Martinus J. G. Veltman, Craig Venter.Alexander Vilenkin, Sir John Walker, James D. WatsonFrank WilczekSteven Weinberg, and  Lewis Wolpert,

Andrew Huxley

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
For the physicist, see Andrew D. Huxley.
Sir Andrew Huxley
OM PRS
Andrew Fielding Huxley nobel.jpg

Huxley in 1963
Born Andrew Fielding Huxley
22 November 1917
Hampstead, London, England
Died 30 May 2012 (aged 94)
Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England
Residence Grantchester, Cambridge, England
Citizenship British
Nationality English
Fields Physiology and biophysics
Institutions
Alma mater Trinity College, Cambridge
Known for Nerve action potentials, muscle contraction
Notable awards
Spouse J. Richenda G. Pease
(1947–2003)
Children 1 son and 5 daughters

Sir Andrew Fielding Huxley OM PRS (22 November 1917 – 30 May 2012) was a Nobel Prize-winning English physiologist and biophysicist.[1][2] He was born into the prominent Huxley family. After graduating from Westminster School in Central London, from where he won a scholarship to Trinity College, Cambridge, he joined Alan Lloyd Hodgkin to study nerve impulses. Their eventual discovery of the basis for propagation of nerve impulses (called an action potential) earned them the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1963. They made their discovery from the giant axon of the Atlantic squid. Soon after the outbreak of the Second World War, Huxley was recruited by the British Anti-Aircraft Command and later transferred to the Admiralty. After the war he resumed research at The University of Cambridge, where he developed interference microscopy that would be suitable for studying muscle fibres. In 1952 he was joined by a German physiologist Rolf Niedergerke. Together they discovered in 1954 the mechanism of muscle contraction, popularly called the “sliding filament theory“, which is the foundation of our modern understanding of muscle mechanics. In 1960 he became head of the Department of Physiology at University College London. He was elected a Fellow of theRoyal Society in 1955, and President in 1980. The Royal Society awarded him the Copley Medal in 1973 for his collective contributions to the understanding of nerve impulses and muscle contraction. He was conferred a Knight Bachelor by Queen Elizabeth II in 1974, and was appointed to the Order of Merit in 1983. He was a fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, until his death.

Early life and education[edit]

See also: Huxley family

Huxley was born in Hampstead, London, England, on 22 November 1917. He was the youngest son of the writer and editor Leonard Huxley by Leonard Huxley’s second wife Rosalind Bruce, and hence half-brother of the writer Aldous Huxley and fellow biologist Julian Huxley, and grandson of the biologist T. H. Huxley.

When he was about 12, Andrew and his brother David were given a lathe by their parents. Andrew soon became proficient at designing, making and assembling mechanical objects of all kinds, from wooden candle sticks to a working internal combustion engine. He used these practical skills throughout his career, building much of the specialized equipment he needed for his research. It was also in his early teens that he formed his lifelong interest in microscopy.[3]

He was educated at University College School and Westminster School in Central London, where he was a King’s Scholar.[4] He graduated and won a scholarship to Trinity College, Cambridge, to read natural sciences. He had intended to become an engineer but switched to physiology after taking the subject to fulfill an elective.[5]

Career[edit]

Having entered Cambridge in 1935, Huxley graduated with a bachelor’s degree in 1938. In 1939, Alan Lloyd Hodgkin returned from the USA to take up a fellowship at Trinity College, and Huxley became one of his postgraduate students. Hodgkin was interested in the transmission of electrical signals along nerve fibres. Beginning in 1935 in Cambridge, he had made preliminary measurements on frog sciatic nerves suggesting that the accepted view of the nerve as a simple, elongated battery was flawed. Hodgkin invited Huxley to join him researching the problem. The work was experimentally challenging. One major problem was that the small size of most neurons made it extremely difficult to study them using the techniques of the time. They overcame this by working at the Marine Biological Association laboratory in Plymouth using the giant axon of the Atlantic squid (Loligo pealei), which have the largest neurons known. The experiments were still extremely challenging as the nerve impulses only last a fraction of a millisecond, during which time they needed to measure the changing electrical potential at different points along the nerve. Using equipment largely of their own construction and design, including one of the earliest applications of a technique of electrophysiology known as the voltage clamp, they were able to record ionic currents. In 1939, they jointly published a short paper in Nature reporting on the work done in Plymouth and announcing their achievement of recording action potentials from inside a nerve fibre.[6]

Then World War II broke out, and their research was abandoned. Huxley was recruited by the British Anti-Aircraft Command, where he worked on radar control of anti-aircraft guns. Later he was transferred to the Admiralty to do work on naval gunnery, and worked in a team led by Patrick Blackett. Hodgkin, meanwhile, was working on the development of radar at the Air Ministry. When he had a problem concerning a new type of gun sight, he contacted Huxley for advice. Huxley did a few sketches, borrowed a lathe and produced the necessary parts.

Huxley was elected to a research fellowship at Trinity College, Cambridge, in 1941. In 1946, with the war ended, he was able to take this up and to resume his collaboration with Hodgkin on understanding how nerves transmit signals. Continuing their work in Plymouth, they were, within six years, able to solve the problem using equipment they built themselves. The solution was that nerve impulses, or action potentials, do not travel down the core of the fiber, but rather along the outer membrane of the fiber as cascading waves of sodium ions diffusing inward on a rising pulse and potassium ions diffusing out on a falling edge of a pulse. In 1952, they published their theory of how action potentials are transmitted in a joint paper, in which they also describe one of the earliest computational models[7] in biochemistry. This model forms the basis of most of the models used in neurobiology during the following four decades.[8]

In 1952, having completed work on action potentials, Huxley was teaching physiology at Cambridge and became interested in another difficult, unsolved problem: how does muscle contract? To make progress on understanding the function of muscle, new ways of observing how the network of filaments behave during contraction were needed. Prior to the war, he had been working on a preliminary design for interference microscopy, which at the time he believed to be original, though it turned out to have been tried 50 years before and abandoned. He, however, was able to make interference microscopy work and to apply it to the problem of muscle contraction with great effect. He was able to view muscle contraction with greater precision than conventional microscopes, and to distinguish types of fiber more easily. By 1953, with the assistance of Rolf Niedergerke, he began to find the features of muscle movement. Around that time, Hugh Huxley and Jean Hanson came to a similar observation. Authored in pairs, their papers were simultaneously published in the 22 May 1954 issue of Nature.[9][10] Thus the four people introduced what is called the sliding filament theory of muscle contractions.[11] Huxley synthesized his findings, and the work of colleagues, into a detailed description of muscle structure and how muscle contraction occurs and generates force that he published in 1957.[12] In 1966 his team provided the proof of the theory, and has remained the basis of modern understanding of muscle physiology.[13]

In 1953, Huxley worked at Woods Hole, Massachusetts, as a Lalor Scholar. He gave the Herter Lectures at Johns Hopkins Medical School in 1959 and the Jesup Lectures at Columbia University in 1964. In 1961 he lectured onneurophysiology at Kiev University as part of an exchange scheme between British and Russian professors.

He was an editor of the Journal of Physiology from 1950 to 1957 and also of the Journal of Molecular Biology. In 1955, he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society and served on the Council of the Royal Society from 1960 to 1962.

Huxley held college and university posts in Cambridge until 1960, when he became head of the Department of Physiology at University College London. In 1963, he was jointly awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his part in discoveries concerning the ionic mechanisms of the nerve cell.[14] In 1969 he was appointed to a Royal Society Research Professorship, which he holds in the Department of Physiology at University College London.

In 1980, Huxley was elected as President of the Royal Society, a post he held until 1985. In his Presidential Address in 1981, he chose to defend the Darwinian explanation of evolution, as his ancestor, T. H. Huxley had in 1860. Whereas T. H. Huxley was defying the bishops of his day, Sir Andrew was countering new theories of periods of accelerated change. In 1983, he defended the Society’s decision to elect Margaret Thatcher as a fellow on the ground of her support for science even after 44 fellows had signed a letter of protest.

In 1984, he was elected Master of Trinity, succeeding his longtime collaborator, Sir Alan Hodgkin. His appointment broke the tradition that the office of Master of Trinity alternates between a scientist and an arts man. He was Master until 1990 and was fond of reminding interviewers that Trinity College had more Nobel Prize winners than did the whole of France. He maintained up to his death his position as a fellow at Trinity College, Cambridge, teaching inphysiology, natural sciences and medicine.[15] He was also a fellow of Imperial College London in 1980.[16]

From his experimental work with Hodgkin, Huxley developed a set of differential equations that provided a mathematical explanation for nerve impulses—the “action potential”. This work provided the foundation for all of the current work on voltage-sensitive membrane channels, which are responsible for the functioning of animal nervous systems. Quite separately, he developed the mathematical equations for the operation of myosin “cross-bridges” that generate the sliding forces between actin and myosin filaments, which cause the contraction of skeletal muscles. These equations presented an entirely new paradigm for understanding muscle contraction, which has been extended to provide understanding of almost all of the movements produced by cells above the level of bacteria. Together with the Swiss physiologist Robert Stämpfli, he evidenced the existence of saltatory conduction in myelinated nerve fibres.

Awards[edit]

Huxley, Alan Hodgkin and John Eccles jointly won the 1963 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine “for their discoveries concerning the ionic mechanisms involved in excitation and inhibition in the peripheral and central portions of the nerve cell membrane”. Huxley and Hodgkin won the prize for experimental and mathematical work on the process of nerve action potentials, the electrical impulses that enable the activity of an organism to be coordinated by a central nervous system.[17] Eccles had made important discoveries on synaptic transmission.

Huxley was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS) in 1955, and was awarded its Copley Medal in 1973 “in recognition of his outstanding studies on the mechanisms of the nerve impulse and of activation of muscular contraction.”[18] He was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II on 12 November 1974. He was appointed to the Order of Merit on 11 November 1983. In 1976–77, he was President of the British Science Association and from 1980 to 1985 he served as President of the Royal Society.

Huxley’s portrait by David Poole hangs in Trinity College’s collection.[19]

Personal life[edit]

In 1947, Huxley married Jocelyn “Richenda” Gammell (née Pease), the daughter of the geneticist Michael Pease (a son of Edward R. Pease) and his wife Helen Bowen Wedgwood, eldest daughter of the first Lord Wedgwood (see alsoDarwin-Wedgwood family). They had one son and five daughters – Janet Rachel Huxley (born 20 April 1948), Stewart Leonard Huxley (born 19 December 1949), Camilla Rosalind Huxley (born 12 March 1952), Eleanor Bruce Huxley (born 21 February 1959), Henrietta Catherine Huxley (born 25 December 1960), and Clare Marjory Pease Huxley (born 4 November 1962).

Death[edit]

Huxley died on 30 May 2012. He was survived by his six children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren. His wife Richenda, Lady Huxley died in 2003, aged 78. A funeral service was held in Trinity College Chapel on 13 June 2012, followed by a private cremation.[20]

Interview with Sir Andrew Huxley – part one

Interview with Sir Andrew Huxley, second part

Uploaded on Jan 2, 2012

An interview on the life and work of Sir Andrew Huxley, grand-son of T.H. Huxley, sometime Master of Trinity and Nobel Prize Winner.
Filmed on 7 November 2007 in his home.

All revenues to World Oral Literature Project

In  the third video below in the 100th clip in this series are his words and  my response is below them. 

50 Renowned Academics Speaking About God (Part 1)

Another 50 Renowned Academics Speaking About God (Part 2

A Further 50 Renowned Academics Speaking About God (Part 3)

Andrew Huxley Quote:

Richenda (his late wife) was an agnostic as I am, a word invented by my grandfather (Thomas H. Huxley). 

__________

One of my favorite messages by Adrian Rogers is called  “WHO IS JESUS?”and he goes through the Old Testament and looks at the scriptures that describe the Messiah.  I want to encourage you to listen to this audio message which I will send to anyone anywhere anytime. I have given thousands of these CD’s away over the years that contain this message and they all contain the following story from Adrian Rogers.  Here is how the story goes:

Years ago Adrian Rogers counseled with a NASA scientist and his severely depressed wife. The wife pointed to her husband and said, “My problem is him.” She went on to explain that her husband was a drinker, a liar, and an adulterer. Dr. Rogers asked the man if he were a Christian. “No!” the man laughed. “I’m an atheist.”

“Really?” Dr. Rogers replied. “That means you’re someone who knows that God does not exist.”

“That’s right,” said the man.

“Would it be fair to say that you don’t know all there is to know in the universe?”

“Of course.”

“Would it be generous to say you know half of all there is to know?”

“Yes.”

“Wouldn’t it be possible that God’s existence might be in the half you don’t know?”

“Okay, but I don’t think He exists.”

“Well then, you’re not an atheist; you’re an agnostic. You’re a doubter.”

“Yes, and I’m a big one.”

“It doesn’t matter what size you are. I want to know what kind you are.”

“What kinds are there?”

“There are honest doubters and dishonest doubters. An honest doubter is willing to search out the truth and live by the results; a dishonest doubter doesn’t want to know the truth. He can’t find God for the same reason a thief can’t find a policeman.”

“I want to know the truth.”

“Would you like to prove that God exists?”

“It can’t be done.”

“It can be done. You’ve just been in the wrong laboratory. Jesus said, ‘If any man’s will is to do His will, he will know whether my teaching is from God or whether I am speaking on my own authority’ (John 7:17). I suggest you read one chapter of the book of John each day, but before you do, pray something like this, ‘God, I don’t know if You’re there, I don’t know if the Bible is true, I don’t know if Jesus is Your Son. But if You show me that You are there, that the Bible is true, and that Jesus is Your Son, then I will follow You. My will is to do your will.”

The man agreed. About three weeks later he returned to Dr. Rogers’s office and invited Jesus Christ to be his Savior and Lord.

Adrian Rogers is pictured below and Francis Schaeffer above.

Watching the film HOW SHOULD WE THEN LIVE? in 1979 impacted my life greatly

Francis Schaeffer in the film WHATEVER HAPPENED TO THE HUMAN RACE?

Francis and Edith Schaeffer

 

_______

On May 15, 1994 on the 10th anniversary of the passing of Francis Schaeffer I attempted to send a letter to almost every living Nobel Prize winner and I believe  Dr. Andrew Huxley was probably among that group and here is a portion of that letter below:

I have enclosed a cassette tape by Adrian Rogers and it includes  a story about  Charles Darwin‘s journey from  the position of theistic evolution to agnosticism. Here are the four bridges that Adrian Rogers says evolutionists can’t cross in the CD  “Four Bridges that the Evolutionist Cannot Cross.” 1. The Origin of Life and the law of biogenesis. 2. The Fixity of the Species. 3.The Second Law of Thermodynamics. 4. The Non-Physical Properties Found in Creation.  

Evolution Fact of Fiction Adrian Rogers (same message I put on cassette tape back in 1994)

Uploaded on Nov 13, 2011

The Theory of Evolution Destroyed!!

In the first 3 minutes of the cassette tape is the hit song “Dust in the Wind.” Below I have given you some key points  Francis Schaeffer makes about the experiment that Solomon undertakes in the book of Ecclesiastes to find satisfaction by  looking into  learning (1:16-18), laughter, ladies, luxuries,  and liquor (2:1-3, 8, 10, 11), and labor (2:4-6, 18-20).

Schaeffer noted that Solomon took a look at the meaning of life on the basis of human life standing alone between birth and death “under the sun.” This phrase UNDER THE SUN appears over and over in Ecclesiastes. The Christian Scholar Ravi Zacharias noted, “The key to understanding the Book of Ecclesiastes is the term UNDER THE SUN — What that literally means is you lock God out of a closed system and you are left with only this world of Time plus Chance plus matter.”

Here the first 7 verses of Ecclesiastes followed by Schaeffer’s commentary on it:

The words of the Preacher, the son of David, king in Jerusalem. Vanity of vanities, says the Preacher, vanity of vanities! All is vanity. What does man gain by all the toil at which he toils under the sun? A generation goes, and a generation comes, but the earth remains forever. The sun rises, and the sun goes down, and hastens to the place where it rises. The wind blows to the south and goes around to the north; around and around goes the wind, and on its circuits the wind returns. All streams run to the sea, but the sea is not full; to the place where the streams flow, there they flow again.  

Solomon is showing a high degree of comprehension of evaporation and the results of it.  Seeing also in reality nothing changes. There is change but always in a set framework and that is cycle. You can relate this to the concepts of modern man. Ecclesiastes is the only pessimistic book in the Bible and that is because of the place where Solomon limits himself. He limits himself to the question of human life, life under the sun between birth and death and the answers this would give.

Solomon doesn’t place man outside of the cycle. Man doesn’t escape the cycle. Man is in the cycle. Birth and death and youth and old age.

There is no doubt in my mind that Solomon had the same experience in his life that I had as a younger man (at the age of 18 in 1930). I remember standing by the sea and the moon arose and it was copper and beauty. Then the moon did not look like a flat dish but a globe or a sphere since it was close to the horizon. One could feel the global shape of the earth too. Then it occurred to me that I could contemplate the interplay of the spheres and I was exalted because I thought I can look upon them with all their power, might, and size, but they could contempt nothing. Then came upon me a horror of great darkness because it suddenly occurred to me that although I could contemplate them and they could contemplate nothing yet they would continue to turn in ongoing cycles when I saw no more forever and I was crushed.

Let me show you some inescapable conclusions if you choose to live without God in the picture. Schaeffer noted that Solomon came to these same conclusions when he looked at life “under the sun.”

  1. Death is the great equalizer (Eccl 3:20, “All go to the same place; all come from dust, and to dust all return.”)
  2. Chance and time have determined the past, and they will determine the future.  (Ecclesiastes 9:11-13 “I have seen something else under the sun:  The race is not to the swift
    or the battle to the strong, nor does food come to the wise or wealth to the brilliant  or favor to the learned; but time and chance happen to them all.  Moreover, no one knows when their hour will come: As fish are caught in a cruel net, or birds are taken in a snare, so people are trapped by evil times  that fall unexpectedly upon them.”)
  3. Power reigns in this life, and the scales are not balanced(Eccl 4:1; “Again I looked and saw all the oppression that was taking place under the sun: I saw the tears of the oppressed—
    and they have no comforter; power was on the side of their oppressors—  and they have no comforter.” 7:15 “In this meaningless life of mine I have seen both of these: the righteous perishing in their righteousness,  and the wicked living long in their wickedness. ).
  4. Nothing in life gives true satisfaction without God including knowledge (1:16-18), ladies and liquor (2:1-3, 8, 10, 11), and great building projects (2:4-6, 18-20).
  5. There is no ultimate lasting meaning in life. (1:2)

By the way, the final chapter of Ecclesiastes finishes with Solomon emphasizing that serving God is the only proper response of man. Solomon looks above the sun and brings God back into the picture in the final chapter of the book in Ecclesiastes 12:13-14, “ Now all has been heard; here is the conclusion of the matter: Fear God and keep his commandments, for this is the whole duty of man.  For God will bring every deed into judgment, including every hidden thing, whether it is good or evil.”

The answer to find meaning in life is found in putting your faith and trust in Jesus Christ. The Bible is true from cover to cover and can be trusted. In 1978 I heard the song “Dust in the Wind” by Kansas when it rose to #6 on the charts. That song told me that Kerry Livgren the writer of that song and a member of Kansas had come to the same conclusion that Solomon had and that “all was meaningless UNDER THE SUN,” and looking ABOVE THE SUN was the only option.  I remember mentioning to my friends at church that we may soon see some members of Kansas become Christians because their search for the meaning of life had obviously come up empty even though they had risen from being an unknown band to the top of the music business and had all the wealth and fame that came with that.

Livgren wrote, “All we do, crumbles to the ground though we refuse to see, Dust in the Wind, All we are is dust in the wind, Don’t hang on, Nothing lasts forever but the Earth and Sky, It slips away, And all your money won’t another minute buy.”

Both Kerry Livgren and Dave Hope of Kansas became Christians eventually. Kerry Livgren first tried Eastern Religions and Dave Hope had to come out of a heavy drug addiction. I was shocked and elated to see their personal testimony on The 700 Club in 1981.  Livgren lives in Topeka, Kansas today where he teaches “Diggers,” a Sunday school class at Topeka Bible Church. Hope is the head of Worship, Evangelism and Outreach at Immanuel Anglican Church in Destin, Florida.

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MUSIC MONDAY The song IF NOT FOR YOU written by Bob Dylan

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Bob Dylan – If Not For You

Uploaded on Oct 8, 2008

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George Harrison – If Not For You – Lyrics

If Not for You

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
For other uses, see If Not for You (disambiguation).
“If Not For You”
If Not For You single cover.jpg

Artwork for some continental European countries (Dutch vinyl single pictured)
Single by Bob Dylan
from the album New Morning
B-side “New Morning”
Released October 19, 1970
Recorded August 12, 1970
Genre Country rock
Length 2:39
Label Columbia
Writer(s) Bob Dylan
Producer(s) Bob Johnston
Bob Dylan singles chronology
Wigwam
(1970)
If Not For You
(1971)
Watching the River Flow
(1971)

If Not for You” is a song by Bob Dylan, recorded for his 1970 album New Morning. Dylan recorded the album version in August 1970, having first recorded the song in a session with George Harrison on May 1 of that year. In addition to appearing on the album in October 1970, the August recording was released as a single in Europe; the May recording remained unreleased until its inclusion on The Bootleg Series Volumes 1–3 (Rare & Unreleased) in 1991.

In November 1970, a month after Dylan’s original had appeared, George Harrison released a version of the song on his triple album All Things Must Pass. Another well-known cover of the song was recorded by Olivia Newton-John, who had the only U.S. charting version of the song in 1971.

Bob Dylan’s version[edit]

Release[edit]

Bob Dylan recorded “If Not for You” for his album New Morning, on August 12, 1970. The song was released as a single in Europe. It was later included on the Dylan compilations Bob Dylan’s Greatest Hits Vol. II (1971),[1]Masterpieces (1978),[2] Biograph (1985),[3] The Essential Bob Dylan (2000),[4] The Very Best of Bob Dylan (2000),[5] Best of Bob Dylan Vols 1 & 2 (2001),[6] Greatest Hits Vol 1–3 (2003),[7] The Best of Bob Dylan (2005),[8] Dylan (2007),[9] Playlist: The Very Best of Bob Dylan ’70s (2009),[10] and The Real… (2012),[11] as well as on the various artist compilation The Best Year of My Life: 1970 (2011).[12]

A June 2, 1970 outtake of “If Not for You,” featuring only vocal, piano, and violin, is included on The Bootleg Series Vol. 10 – Another Self Portrait (1969–1971).

A previously unreleased version was included on the 2015 album Dylan, Cash, and The Nashville Cats: A New Music City.

Live performances[edit]

Dylan performed “If Not for You” with George Harrison during rehearsals for the Concert for Bangladesh in New York in 1971, but did not perform the song at the concert itself. Since then, however, Dylan has performed the song over 80 times.[13]

Charts[edit]

Chart Peak
position
Dutch Single Top 100 30[14]

George Harrison’s version[edit]

“If Not for You”
Song by George Harrison from the album All Things Must Pass
Released 27 November 1970
Genre Folk rock
Length 3:29
Label Apple
Writer(s) Bob Dylan
Producer(s) George Harrison, Phil Spector
All Things Must Pass track listing

George Harrison had sat in on a session for Dylan’s New Morning album, on May 1, 1970, at Columbia’s Studio B in New York, where he had played on an early take of “If Not for You” (later included on the Bob Dylan box set The Bootleg Series Volumes 1–3 (Rare & Unreleased)).[15] News of the collaboration between Dylan and the recently ex-Beatle caused great excitement in the music press, even though Columbia Records had made a point of announcing that neither artist deemed the results worthy of release.[16]

Over the following months, and despite having a wealth of extra material of his own, Harrison thought enough of the song to record it in London for his All Things Must Pass set. His was a characteristically melody-centric version of the track, which more clearly defined the song’s verse and bridge sections and eschewed the Dylan preference for spontaneity.[17] Harrison’s “If Not for You” immediately met with favour from critics and album reviewers: Mikal Gilmore describes it as “surprisingly beautiful”,[18] while to musical biographer Simon Leng, it’s a “gleaming pop creation”.[17]

Live performances[edit]

The following year, Dylan and Harrison duetted on “If Not for You” during a soundcheck for the historic Concert for Bangladesh in New York.[19] Judging by this, and from Harrison’s early notes for a possible setlist,[20] the pair had considered performing it at the UNICEF benefit later that day. (This soundcheck performance was later released on the 2005 remastered DVD of The Concert for Bangladesh.)

Harrison finally got a chance to perform “If Not for You” live, again at Madison Square Garden, on 16 October 1992 during the all-star concert celebrating Dylan’s first three decades in the music industry.[21] Backed by the house band for the night, Harrison performed “startling versions” of “If Not for You” and “Absolutely Sweet Marie“,[22] but only the latter found its way onto the officially released album the following August.

Personnel[edit]

The musicians who performed on Harrison’s studio version of the song are believed to be as follows:[17]

Olivia Newton-John version[edit]

“If Not For You”
Single by Olivia Newton-John
from the album If Not For You
B-side “The Biggest Clown”
Released May 1971
Format 7″
Genre Country, pop
Length 2:50
Label Uni 55281
Writer(s) Bob Dylan
Producer(s) Bruce Welch, John Farrar
Olivia Newton-John singles chronology
“Till You Say You’ll Be Mine”
(1966)
If Not For You
(1971)
“Banks of the Ohio”
(1971)

Basing her version on the Harrison arrangement rather than Dylan’s,[23] Australian singer Olivia Newton-John enjoyed considerable international success with “If Not for You”. It was the title track of her debut album, and became her first hit single, reaching the Top 10 in several countries. In addition, the single spent three weeks at No. 1 on the United States Easy Listening charts.[24][25]

Chart performance[edit]

Weekly charts[edit]

Chart (1971) Peak
position
Australia[26] 7
Belgium[27] 29
Canadian RPM Top Singles[28] 18
Netherlands[29] 11
New Zealand Listener[30] 8
Norway[31] 6
UK[32] 7
U.S. Billboard Hot 100[33] 25
U.S. Billboard Easy Listening[25] 1
U.S. Cash Box Top 100[34] 23

Year-end charts[edit]

Chart (1971) Rank
Australia[35] 71
UK 84
U.S.[36] 76

Other cover versions[edit]

Numerous other artists have covered “If Not For You”. These include Rod Stewart,[37] Bryan Ferry,[38] Richie Havens,[39] Sarah Vaughan,[40] Glen Campbell,[41] Barb Jungr,[42] Katie Buckhaven,[43] Susan McKeown and Lindsey Horner,[44] Phil Keaggy,[45] Lee Everton, Karl Blau, Ed Kuepper,[46] and the Flatmates.[47]Melinda Schneider and Beccy Cole covered the song on their album Great Women of Country (2014).

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. Jump up^ Erlewine (Bob Dylan’s Greatest Hits, Vol. 2 Review)
  2. Jump up^ Ruhlmann
  3. Jump up^ Erlewine (Biograph Review)
  4. Jump up^ Erlewine (The Essential Bob Dylan Review)
  5. Jump up^ Leggett (The Very Best of Bob Dylan Review)
  6. Jump up^ Best of Bob Dylan Vols. 1 & 2 Overview
  7. Jump up^ Jurek
  8. Jump up^ Erlewine (Best of Bob Dylan Review)
  9. Jump up^ Erlewine (Dylan (2007) Review)
  10. Jump up^ Leggett (Playlist: The Very Best of Bob Dylan ’70s Review)
  11. Jump up^ The Real… Overview
  12. Jump up^ The Best Year of My Life: 1970 Overview
  13. Jump up^ If Not For You: Discover
  14. Jump up^ Bob Dylan – If Not for You
  15. Jump up^ Badman 2001, p. 7
  16. Jump up^ Harrison (Rolling Stone Press/Simon & Schuster), pp. 179–180
  17. ^ Jump up to:a b c Leng 2006, p. 88
  18. Jump up^ Harrison (Rolling Stone Press/Simon & Schuster), p. 40
  19. Jump up^ Leng 2006, p. 120
  20. Jump up^ Harrison 2011, p. 288
  21. Jump up^ Leng 2006, p. 273
  22. Jump up^ Harrison (Rolling Stone Press/Simon & Schuster), p. 48
  23. Jump up^ Clayson 2003, p. 296
  24. Jump up^ Whitburn 2002, p. 181
  25. ^ Jump up to:a b Top 40 Easy Listening
  26. Jump up^ Steffen Hung. “Forum – 1970 (ARIA Charts: Special Occasion Charts)”. Australian-charts.com. Archived from the originalon 2016-06-02. Retrieved 2016-10-03.
  27. Jump up^ Olivia Newton-John – If Not For You (Ultratop)
  28. Jump up^ Top Singles – Volume 16, No. 4, September 11, 1971
  29. Jump up^ Top 40 (1971-04-03)
  30. Jump up^ “flavour of new zealand – search listener”. Flavourofnz.co.nz. Retrieved 2016-10-03.
  31. Jump up^ Olivia Newton-John – If Not For You (Norwegiancharts.com)
  32. Jump up^ Olivia Newton-John: Singles
  33. Jump up^ Olivia Newton-John Billboard Singles
  34. Jump up^ “Archived copy”. Archived from the original on 2016-03-04. Retrieved 2016-06-03.
  35. Jump up^ David Kent’s “Australian Chart Book 1970-1992” ArchivedMarch 5, 2016, at the Wayback Machine.
  36. Jump up^ Whitburn, Joel (1999). Pop Annual. Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin: Record Research Inc. ISBN 0-89820-142-X.
  37. Jump up^ Erlewine (Still the Same: Great Rock Classics of Our Time Overview)
  38. Jump up^ Erlewine (Dylanesque Review)
  39. Jump up^ Eder (Sings Beatles & Dylan Review)
  40. Jump up^ Eder (Time in My Life Review)
  41. Jump up^ Worbois
  42. Jump up^ Swihart
  43. Jump up^ Katie Buckhaven Overview
  44. Jump up^ Mighty Rain Overview
  45. Jump up^ Acoustic Cafe Overview
  46. Jump up^ Out-Takes, Castaways, Pirate Women and Takeaways Overview
  47. Jump up^ Sendra

References[edit]

External links[edit]

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 Is Love All You Need? Jesus v. Lennon

Posted on January 19, 2011 by

0

all-you-need-is-love_the-beatles

On June 25, 1967, the Beatles participated in the first worldwide TV special called “Our World”. During this special, the Beatles introduced “All You Need is Love”; one of their most famous and recognizable songs. In it, John Lennon with Paul McCartney spelled out the mantra of the anti-war-pro-peace-youth of their day with the slogan: “Love is all you need”.

The “love” of the sixties generation has become the philosophical foundation of our moral scene which affirms, “if it feels good, then do it”; accordingly, love is suppose to be of the non-judgmental variety. For example, as long as two lovers are cohabitating out of “love”, then it is intolerant and unloving to openly speak against it.

Love of this kind is a license to practice, or behave any way we want never mind the moral implications; specifically, because there is only one moral guide – love that feels good and is non-judgmental. According to this line of reasoning, neighbor has no ability to judge another person.

Is Lennon and those like him right? Who would have the audacity to disagree with the countless masses who believe “love is all you need”? Enter Jesus of Nazareth, Son of God. The Gospel Accounts reveal that He taught that love is not extended in a vacuum, there are at the very least two relationships involved which are necessary components to living out love.

When asked about the “greatest commandment” that God had given to mankind in the Scriptures, Jesus said the following words:

You shall love the Lord you God with all you heart and with all your soul and with all your mind. This is the great and first commandment. And a second is like it: You shall love you neighbor as yourself. (Matt. 22.36-39, Mark 12.29-31; Deut. 6.4-5, Lev. 19.18)

Jesus said that living out love is built upon two relationships: (1) our relationship with God, (2) our relationship with our neighbor. In this way, Jesus summarizes the commandments and themes of the Old Testament regarding God, his Word, and our life in balance to them.[1]

According to Jesus, the Scriptures teach that “feeling” is not enough; but instead, a relationship with God and neighbor is based upon a love (agape) that (1) does what is right as the Lord’s Scriptures teach it, and (2) does what is in the best interest of another, independent of a desire to receive anything in return.

Despite its popularity, Lennon’s song needs revision. Love is not all we need; we need love that is lived out in the framework of God’s Word, our relationship with Him, and our relationship with our neighbor:

By this we know we have come to know him, if we keep his commandments… whoever keeps his word, in him truly the love of God is perfected… if God so loved us, we also ought to love one another. (1 John 2.3, 5, see vv. 3-7; 4.11)

Contrary to the belief of some well intended souls, love and commands are not mutually exclusive. Commands are issued from God’s love, and we obey these commandments out our love to Him, and consequently, we love others because we have experienced God’s love and want others to be enraptured in this love. For those seeking a biblical Christian experience, this is the love we need.

SOURCES

  1. D. Turner and D.L. Bock, Matthew and Mark (Carol Stream, Ill.: Tyndale, 2005) 287. “After citing these two texts, Jesus stated that all of the law and prophets depend (lit. “hang”) on them. In other words, the entire OT may be viewed as an exposition of the ideals expressed in these two verses.”

_

The Beatles were searching for a lasting meaning for their lives and they wanted to see if the Sexual Revolution of the 1960’s was a piece of the puzzle that was missing for them. It reminds me of Solomon’s search in this area in the Book of Ecclesiastes.

‘King Solomon and the Iron Worker’ by Christian Schussele, 1863

File:'King Solomon and the Iron Worker' by Christian Schussele, 1863.JPG

I have written on the Book of Ecclesiastes and the subject of the meaning of our lives on several occasions on this blog. In this series on Ecclesiastes I hope to show how secular humanist man can not hope to find a lasting meaning to his life in a closed system without bringing God back into the picture. This is the same exact case with Solomon in the Book of Ecclesiastes. Three thousand years ago, Solomon took a look at life “under the sun” in his book of Ecclesiastes. Christian scholar Ravi Zacharias has noted, “The key to understanding the Book of Ecclesiastes is the term ‘under the sun.’ What that literally means is you lock God out of a closed system, and you are left with only this world of time plus chance plus matter.” 

HERE BELOW IS SOLOMON’S SEARCH IN THE AREA OF THE 6 “L” WORDS. He looked into  learning (1:16-18), laughter, ladies, luxuries,  and liquor (2:1-3, 8, 10, 11), and labor (2:4-6, 18-20). TODAY WE WANT TO LOOK AT SOLOMON’S SEARCH INTO THE WORD “LADIES.” 

Ecclesiastes 2:8-10The Message (MSG)

I piled up silver and gold,
        loot from kings and kingdoms.
I gathered a chorus of singers to entertain me with song,
    and—most exquisite of all pleasures—
    voluptuous maidens for my bed.

9-10 Oh, how I prospered! I left all my predecessors in Jerusalem far behind, left them behind in the dust. What’s more, I kept a clear head through it all. Everything I wanted I took—I never said no to myself. I gave in to every impulse, held back nothing. I sucked the marrow of pleasure out of every task—my reward to myself for a hard day’s work!

1 Kings 11:1-3 English Standard Version (ESV)

11 Now King Solomon loved many foreign women, along with the daughter of Pharaoh: Moabite, Ammonite, Edomite, Sidonian, and Hittite women, from the nations concerning which the Lord had said to the people of Israel, “You shall not enter into marriage with them, neither shall they with you, for surely they will turn away your heart after their gods.” Solomon clung to these in love. He had 700 wives, who were princesses, and 300 concubines. And his wives turned away his heart.

Francis Schaeffer observed concerning Solomon, “You can not know woman but knowing 1000 women.”

King Solomon in Ecclesiastes 2:11 sums up his search for meaning in the area of the Sexual Revolution with these words, “…behold, all was vanity and a striving after wind, and there was nothing to be gained under the sun.”

How about today’s most well known playboy Hugh Hefner? Schaeffer said that Hefner’s goal with the “playboy mentality is just to smash the puritanical ethnic.” My pastor, Adrian Rogers of Bellevue Baptist Church in Memphis, Tennessee noticed an article where Hugh Hefner said he would be willing to trade all of his riches for the experience of just falling in love with one girl of his dreams and getting married. Rogers went on to say that the playboy lifestyle was bankrupt of lasting satisfaction and that God’s plan of marriage was best. In fact, the Book of Ecclesiastes shows that Solomon came to the conclusion that nothing in life gives true satisfaction without God including knowledge (1:16-18), ladies and liquor (2:1-3, 8, 10, 11), and great building projects (2:4-6, 18-20). You can only find a lasting meaning to your life by looking above the sun and bring God back into the picture.

Solomon’s experiment was a search for meaning to life “under the sun.” Then in last few words in the Book of Ecclesiastes he looks above the sun and brings God back into the picture: “The conclusion, when all has been heard, is: Fear God and keep His commandments, because this applies to every person. For God will bring every act to judgment, everything which is hidden, whether it is good or evil.”

The answer to find meaning in life is found in putting your faith and trust in Jesus Christ. The Bible is true from cover to cover and can be trusted.

Off the internet I found these words from a sermon,Ecclesiastes 2 — The Quest For Meaning,” dated January 20, 2013:

Of course we have seen this pursuit of finding meaning in pleasure continue full steam in the latter half of the 20th century. Hugh Hefner built his Playboy Empire. Drugs and Alcohol have proliferated in pursuit of a pleasure that allows one to drop out from this reality. Multiple Marriages combined with Multiple divorces have characterized our culture’s mad pursuit of pleasure. The gaming industry which is a multi-billion dollar industry is pursued in the name of pleasure. Our obsession with sports and entertainment outlets to the neglect of all other considerations reveals that 21st century man is still characterized as one who seeks to find his or her meaning of life in the pursuit of pleasure.

Now, pleasure, in and of itself, is not evil, as it is practiced consistent with God’s Law-Word, but pleasure will not give meaning if it is pursued as an end in itself as the Teacher tells us.

And yet we continue to embrace pleasure as a way to find meaning.

Ravi Zacharias says something that we here in this wealthy nation should take special note of:

“I am absolutely convinced that meaninglessness does not come from being weary of pain; meaninglessness comes from being weary of pleasure.”

 Paul McCartney (1/9) – Wingspan

At 5:18 mark Paul says At a  a certain age you start to think “Wow, I have to get serious. I can’t just be a playboy all of my life.” HERE PAUL IS SHOWING HOW EMPTY HE FOUND THE PLAYBOY EXPERIENCE AND HOW HE WANTED SOMETHING MORE MEANINGFUL!!!!!!!!!

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JOHN LENNON – All You Need Is Love

BEATLES: JOHN LENNON, ALL YOU NEED IS LOVE Trailer

Published on Dec 10, 2013

John Lennon was a creative talent who inspired a legacy of songs that would define the 1960s. ALL YOU NEED IS LOVE follows John through his life as he performs with the Beatles, falls in love, and ultimately meets his tragic and untimely death. With never before seen footage, sit down with John and Yoko for a rare fifteen-minute interview, from 1968, as they discuss their first meeting and the artistic respect they have for each other.

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Across the universe- all we need is love

Actually all you need is Christ and Christ demonstrated perfect love for you when he died on the cross to pay for your sins.

Tuesday, February 5, 2013

All You Need is Love (A sermon based on 1 Corinthians 12:27-13:13)

What do you need in life? Food? clothes? Shelter? What about friendship? Purpose and meaning? You need air and water and sleep. Or maybe you don’t need all that. Maybe John Lennon was right when he said, “All you need is love.” Wait…Really? Love is all you need?! What about money and security? And surely you need food and water! Well, if we’re talking about human love, it is insufficient. But if we’re talking about God’s love to us in Christ, that really is all we need. Read or listen to (download or stream) this sermon based on 1 Corinthians 12:27 — 13:13 and rejoice that you have all that you need: God’s love in Christ….

All You Need is Love
A sermon based on 1 Corinthians 12:27-13:13
Sunday, February 3, 2013 – Epiphany 4C

All I need is little more sleep. All I need is a little more cash. All I need is a better job. Or better behaved kids. All I need is food and shelter and clothes. With that I’ll be just fine. But what do you really need in life?

In 1967 the Beatles released the single to their already popular hit, “All You Need Is Love.” Written for a live television show which was broadcast in 26 countries and viewed by 350 million people, John Lennon wanted to tell the world that “Love is all anyone needs.”

But what do you think? Were the Beatles right? “I don’t need money or sleep or cash. All I need is love!” Is that true? Well, in a sense, it is. But it depends on what you mean by love. “I love summer sausage.” “I love my wife.” I love all four of my sons.” “I love the color blue.” “I love God.” But hopefully I mean something entirely different in each of ways I just used the word “love.”

If by “love” John Lennon meant “a fuzzy feeling you get around someone else,” that love just won’t cut it. If he meant a self-sacrificing love that we have for each other and that we demonstrate in our words and actions and the attitudes of our heart, well, he’d be closer but still wrong, since our love for each other is far from perfect.

But, if John Lennon meant the love of Christ for us sinners—a love so great that it took him to the cross to pay for our loveless actions—(and I don’t really think that’s what John Lennon was getting at, but if he did) then he was spot on. All any of us need is that love.

This morning we’ll take a look at this Biblical concept of love—a love in action. We’ll see how Jesus is revealed as love. He’s revealed as love to us unloving sinners. He’s revealed as love through us forgiven believers.

I.              Christ’s Love for Us

 

II.            Christ’s Love Through Us

Paul wrote to the Corinthians, “13:1 If I speak in the tongues of men and of angels, but have not love, I am only a resounding gong or a clanging cymbal. 2 If I have the gift of prophecy and can fathom all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I have a faith that can move mountains, but have not love, I am nothing.3 If I give all I possess to the poor and surrender my body to the flames, but have not love, I gain nothing.

…where there are prophecies, they will cease; where there are tongues, they will be stilled; where there is knowledge, it will pass away. 9 For we know in part and we prophesy in part, 10 but when perfection comes, the imperfect disappears. 11 When I was a child, I talked like a child, I thought like a child, I reasoned like a child. When I became a man, I put childish ways behind me. 12 Now we see but a poor reflection as in a mirror; then we shall see face to face. Now I know in part; then I shall know fully, even as I am fully known.13 And now these three remain: faith, hope and love. But the greatest of these is love.

Some of Corinthians boasted in what they thought were the better gifts—in having the ability to prophesy about the future, in the ability to speak in tongues, in languages they never learned, in having the most wisdom and knowledge. Others were envious of those who had these gifts when they didn’t. But all of those gifts were incomplete without love.

There were no better gifts, no worse gifts, just different gifts. But none of them amounted to anything unless they were coupled with love. They were incomplete. And they would eventually become obsolete in heaven. But not love. Love would never be obsolete. And love completed the rest of the gifts. They could put away such childish, selfish use of their gifts and use them with maturity, in serving others.

You see, it didn’t matter if they were a foot or an eye or a hand. Whatever gifts they had been given they could use to serve God out of love for him. They could use those gifts, no longer for personal gain, but out of thanks to Jesus for the perfect love he had shown to them, they could use their gifts to love each other. As the apostle John put it, “This is how we know what love is: Jesus Christ laid down his life for us. And we ought to lay down our lives for our brothers. let us not love with words or tongue but with actions and in truth.” (1 John 3:16,18)

In thanks to Jesus, for his perfect love, they could be patient, kind, content, humble, and polite. They could be selfless, calm, forgiving and honest. They could be trusting and hopeful. They could persevere unfailing to the end.

And the same is true of us. Recognizing how great is the love the Father has lavished on us! (1 John 3:1) and how perfect the love that Jesus has shown to us, laying down his very life for us, we can’t help but reflect that love toward others.

And it doesn’t matter what gifts you have—whether you can work miracles or you’re a natural teacher or leader. It doesn’t matter if you have gifts of administration or the ability to speak in other languages. It doesn’t matter if your gifts are none of these. No matter what your ability or position, you have been appointed by God to be in this place at this time. And you’ve been given the gifts you have to serve others in love.

Recognizing Jesus’ perfect love for us, we can’t help but love others, not with some shallow emotion, but with loving actions and in truth. We will be patient, kind, content, humble, and polite. We will be selfless, calm, forgiving and honest. We will be trusting and hopeful. We will persevere unfailing to the end. “We love because he first loved us.” (1 John 4:19) And through us, forgiven believers, Jesus will be revealed as perfect love to others.

Maybe John Lennon was on to something. Because all we need is love—Jesus’ love shown to us unloving sinners, which leads to Jesus love being shown through us forgiven believers. “This is love: not that we loved God, but that he loved us and sent his Son as an atoning sacrifice for our sins. Dear friends, since God so loved us, we also ought to love one another. if we love one another, God lives in us and his love is made complete.” (1 John 4:10-12) All you need is love. Amen.

In Him,
Pastor Rob Guenther
 
Grace Evangelical Lutheran Church
47585 Ciechanski Road, Kenai, AK 99611

1 Corinthians 13 English Standard Version (ESV)

The Way of Love

13 If I speak in the tongues of men and of angels, but have not love, I am a noisy gong or a clanging cymbal. And if I have prophetic powers, and understand all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I have all faith,so as to remove mountains, but have not love, I am nothing. If I give away all I have, and if I deliver up my body to be burned,[a] but have not love, I gain nothing.

Love is patient and kind; love does not envy or boast; it is not arrogantor rude. It does not insist on its own way; it is not irritable or resentful;[b] it does not rejoice at wrongdoing, but rejoices with the truth. Love bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things.

Love never ends. As for prophecies, they will pass away; as for tongues, they will cease; as for knowledge, it will pass away. For we know in part and we prophesy in part, 10 but when the perfect comes, the partial will pass away. 11 When I was a child, I spoke like a child, I thought like a child, I reasoned like a child. When I became a man, I gave up childish ways. 12 For now we see in a mirror dimly, but then face to face. Now I know in part; then I shall know fully, even as I have been fully known.

13 So now faith, hope, and love abide, these three; but the greatest of these is love.

The Beatles All You Need is Love (HQ).mp4

 

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I have featured many artists on my blog and here are links to them.

Marina AbramovicIda Applebroog,  Matthew Barney, Aubrey Beardsley, Larry BellWallace BermanPeter BlakeDerek BoshierPauline BotyBrenda Bury,  Allora & Calzadilla,   Christo and Jeanne-Claude, Heinz Edelmann Olafur EliassonTracey EminJan Fabre, Makoto Fujimura, Hamish Fulton, Ellen GallaugherRyan GanderFrancoise GilotJohn Giorno, Rodney Graham,  Cai Guo-QiangBrion GysinJann HaworthArturo HerreraOliver HerringDavid Hockney, David Hooker,  Nancy HoltRoni HornPeter HowsonRobert Indiana, Jasper Johns, Martin KarplusMargaret KeaneMike Kelley, Peter KienJeff Koons Annie Leibovitz, John LennonRichard LinderSally MannKerry James MarshallTrey McCarley, Linda McCartney, Paul McCartneyPaul McCarthyJosiah McElhenyBarry McGee, Richard MerkinNicholas MonroYoko OnoTony Oursler, John OutterbridgeNam June PaikEduardo PaolozziGeorge PettyWilliam Pope L.Gerhard Richter, Anna Margaret Rose,  James RosenquistSusan RothenbergGeorges Rouault, Richard SerraShahzia Sikander, Raqub ShawThomas Shutte, Grace Slick,  Saul SteinbergHiroshi SugimotoStuart SutcliffeMika Tajima,Richard TuttleLuc Tuymans, Alberto Vargas,  Banks Violett, H.C. Westermann,  Fred WilsonKrzysztof Wodiczko, Ronnie WoodAndrew WyethJamie Wyeth, Bill WymanDavid WynneAndrea Zittel,

Today’s featured artist is Grace Slick

Grace Slick Profile – CBS 08/03/09

Jefferson Airplane – Somebody To Love (Live at Woodstock Music & Art Fair, 1969)

Grace Slick shows her artwork on CNN during the 40th anniversery of Woodstock

Jefferson Airplane – White Rabbit (HQ) ~ (ReEdit)

Starship – “Nothing’s Gonna Stop Us Now” – ORIGINAL VIDEO – HQ

John Lennon by Grace Slick

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Grace Slick at Wentworth Gallery focuses on art in a post-rock ‘n’ roll career
1965 by Grace Slick Bookmark and Share
by By Skip SheffieldFormer Jefferson Airplane lead singer Grace Slick will greet her public and talk about her flourishing career in art from 6 to 9 p.m. Saturday at Wentworth Gallery at Town Center at Boca Raton. Slick will also appear from 6 to 9 tonight at Wentworth Gallery in the Gardens Mall in Palm Beach Gardens.Grace Slick was always feisty and outspoken as front woman of Jefferson Airplane and Starship, and she is no shrinking violet at age 65.She gave up performing in 1998 because she felt it was silly for a woman her age to sing rock music and try and act like a teenager. She had her first public art show in Fort Lauderdale in 1989, and art is where she channels her creative energy now.“There a lot of us former rock people who are doing art now,” he offers by telephone from Malibu, California. “My old bandmate Marty Balin is doing quite well. So is Ronnie Wood of the Rolling Stones, and so was Jerry Garcia before he died.”
Slick first painted furry animals (the white rabbit is still a favorite) and beautiful nudes. Her agent suggested she begin doing portraits of musicians she knew, and she has obliged with portraits of Jim Morrison, Jerry Garcia, Janis Joplin and Sting.

“I let my agent deal with the so-called art world,” she says. “He makes suggestions and sets up my appearances. I just paint every day as the spirit strikes.”

Slick was born Grace Wing Oct. 30, 1939 in Evanston, Illinois, but she was raised in San Francisco. She attended the University of Miami in 1958-1959, but admits she was more a partier than a scholar. After graduating from Finch College she returned to San Francisco and married Gerald “Jerry” Slick, a cinematographer. She joined Jefferson Airplane in 1966, replacing original singer Signe Anderson, and sang two of the group’s signature songs, “White Rabbit” and “Somebody to Love.”

Slick divorced and remarried and divorced and became an outspoken anti-war activist as well as a self-admitted rowdy drunk. In 1971 she and Jefferson Airplane guitarist Paul Kantner had a daughter, China Wing Kantner, with whom Slick remains close.

“China is now working on a Ph.D,” Slick reveals proudly. “Her special study is spirituality.”

Although she performed with former bandmates Marty Balin and Paul Kantner for a post-9/11 concert, Slick says she is officially retired from public performance.

“I don’t walk to be one of those old relics doing the oldies circuit,” she protests. “There are a few signature groups that can get away with it. The Rolling Stones need it, evidently, and they are still one of the best rock ‘n’ roll groups in the world. I’m going to be 66 next month, for God sakes. Art is my focus now. I do it all the time. I’m just grateful some people like it well enough to buy it.

Andy Warhol &; Grace Slick

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Janis Joplin, Grace Slick,

Based on her tempestuous rock-star career as lead singer for Jefferson Airplane in the 1960s, no one would expect Grace Slick to be shy or demure, even at age 73.

And sure enough, she isn’t.

“I’ve lived a good life,” she said by phone from her Malibu home. “Now I’m an old broad.”

In her second career as an artist, Slick produces paintings just as colorful and provocative as her songs. She’ll appear Saturday, May 18, at the Norcal Modern Gallery in Healdsburg, which is hosting her “Once Upon a Time” exhibit.

Her work is filled with “Alice in Wonderland” images reminiscent of Slick’s 1967 hit, “White Rabbit,” but her interest in art, and Alice, predates her rock and roll career, she said.

“I knew I could draw when I was very little. I used to draw angels when I was about 5,” she said.

“The story of ‘Alice in Wonderland’ was the only one that was read to me where some Prince Charming doesn’t come along and save her,” Slick said. “She has a lot of guts. She does it all herself. She doesn’t stop.”

While Slick’s income comes from her music royalties, she doesn’t deny the commercial appeal of her iconic White Rabbit paintings.

“People will, for obvious reasons, buy pictures of white rabbits from me. Now I’m getting real good at drawing rabbits,” Slick said.

“I have an agent, and his job is to sell stuff,” she added. “He finds that my portraits of other rock musicians also sell, and I enjoy doing that, too.”

Slick wrote “White Rabbit” while in a Bay Area Band called The Great Society, formed in 1965. After joining Jefferson Airplane the following year, she recorded the song for the “Surrealistic Pillow” album.

She also performed in the band’s later incarnations — Jefferson Starship, from 1981 to 1984, and Starship, until 1988. She retired from rock and roll in 1989, and began painting in the mid-1990s.

Her first art show was in Florida in 2000, and she has had more than 100 exhibits since then, creating fanciful images with bright acrylic paints.

“I like really heavy, knock-your-brains-out color,” Slick said. “I paint in acrylic, because it’s fast, and I don’t have a lot of time left to sit around and let oil paint dry.”

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1965 by Grace Slick

Jimi Hendrix by Grace slick artist

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New Year’s Eve 1963

Published on Dec 30, 2013

Audio recording from live broadcast of “The Tonight Show” with Johnny Carson made 50 years ago. Guests include Rudy Vallee and Woody Allen. Also included is the count down from Times Square with Ben Grauer.

Woody Allen Bob Hope Tonight Show 1971

TIME Interviews Woody Allen

Liked the book MOBY DICK during the filming of LOVE AND DEATH.

Woody Allen talks ‘Midnight in Paris’

AT THE 27 MIN MARK Woody Allen says:

I have never gotten to the point where I can give an optimistic view of anything. I have these ideas for stories that I hope are entertaining and I am always criticized for being pessimistic or nihilistic. To me this is just a realistic appraisal of life. There are these little Oasis’s these little distractions you get. Last night I was caught up in the Bulls and Heat basketball game on television and for the time being I was thinking about who was going to win. I wasn’t thinking about my mortality or the fact that I am finite and aging. That was not on my mind. Labron James was on my mind and the game. That is the best you can do is get a little  detraction. What I have learned over the years is that there is no other solution to it. There is no satisfying answer. There is no optimistic answer I can give anybody.

The outcome of that basketball game is no less meaningful or no more meaningful than human life if you take the long view of it. You could look at the earth and say who cares about those creatures running around there and just brush it. Ernest Hemingway in one of his stories ( A FAREWELL TO ARMS) is looking at a burning log with ants running on it. This is the kind of thinking that has over powered me over the years and slips into my stories.

I have always been an odd mixture, completely accidentally, I was a nightclub comic joke writer whose two biggest influences were Groucho Marx, who I have always adored and he still makes me laugh  and Igmar Bergman. I have always had a morbid streak in my work and I when I do something that works , it works to my advantage because it gives some substance and depth to the story, but I when I fail the thing could be too grim or too moralizing or not interesting enough. Then someone will say we only like you when you are funny.

 

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CANNES, FRANCE - MAY 15: Director Woody Allen attends the "You Will Meet A Tall Dark Stranger" press conference at the Palais des Festivals during the 63rd Annual Cannes Film Festival on May 15, 2010 in Cannes, France. (Photo by Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images)

EXCLUSIVE: The 79-year-old director Woody Allen comes to the Cannes Film Festival’s Palais tomorrow to premiere Irrational Man, a comedy about an existentially challenged professor that stars Joaquin Phoenix, Emma Stone and Parker Posey. It’s Allen’s 46th film as a director, a total he reached by making one a year like clockwork, for as long as anyone can remember.

For Deadline’s Cannes Q&A, Allen invited us to his Manhattan screening room. There, he explained how he has managed a storied career without ever showing a script or cast list to a financier, or getting a script note. And how, despite a groundbreaking TV series deal with Amazon, he doesn’t own a computer or understand what a streaming service is; all he knows is, he regrets a deal that has taken him out of his comfort zone. And despite his four Oscars, and the seven won by actors in his films, Allen believes he has never done anything of real consequence in all the years of generating stand-up comedy, books, plays and movies. The room is a warm, cozy dimly lit place with dated drapes and upholstered chairs and couches. It has the vibe of a place where people might play bridge, which is exactly what they did until he got hold of it.

DEADLINE: What is this place?
ALLEN: A bridge club years ago that we took over and made into a screening room with a projector, to screen films recreationally. I found it a great place to work. So we edit in the other room, and come in here and look at it. Then we become depressed, go back in that room and try to fix it.

DEADLINE: How long is it from depression to finished film?
ALLEN: It used to take a long time, when we worked with celluloid. Now with the Avid I can edit a film in seven to eight days and it is no big deal.

DEADLINE: Purists like Scorsese and Tarantino are dedicated to preserving film. You?
ALLEN: I have no strong feeling on it. I’m happy to go whichever way everyone is. Digital looks very good to me if it’s done well. Film always looks great if it’s done well. I’ve never shot anything in digital, but I think I will shoot my next film digitally to see what that’s like. It is more than the wave of the future; it’s the wave of the present, really.

DEADLINE: What are the advantages compelling you to try it for the first time?
ALLEN: They seem minimal. It’s all the after-stuff of not having to cut celluloid, but digital is really not cheaper and it’s not faster. It’s just that that’s the way everything has moved and it looks pretty. I see digital shot by good cameramen that is beautiful and I wouldn’t be able to tell the difference, so I don’t mind it. I like that I can edit fast. You just punch electronics where it used to be you’d cut and then have to splice it and tape it and then look at it and un-tape it. Now, it’s bang, bang, bang, bang, bang and it’s done. I never start editing a film until it’s completely shot; I don’t edit along the way, ever. When it’s finished I come in here and we start with reel one, scene one and start editing shot by shot by shot until we’re finished. Once we get in here, going from nothing to the first draft is the longest part and that’s only about eight days for me. Then you look at it and the big problems become apparent, the ones you can’t get rid of by cutting or speeding it up.

DEADLINE: Like?
ALLEN: You need to make a character less likable or more likable or a relationship more believable. Maybe you add a music track or narration. Or certain things aren’t coherent in that version that’s two hours and ten minutes long. By the time you’re done running back and forth, it’s an hour and forty minutes. And you’ve removed all the junk, the stuff you were so gung-ho about, that you thought was so great. Reality sets in, and it’s gone.

DEADLINE: Are you a ruthless executioner of lines you loved when you wrote them on the page?
ALLEN: Ruthless. I think probably over the years I’ve been too ruthless, mainly because I’m anxiety-ridden. I’ve cut jokes and bits out of movies that would have played just great, if only I had had the nerve to leave them in. I regret having cut different jokes and different bits out of pictures and in retrospect I think they would have worked fine. I just didn’t have the nerve at the time. I worried they wouldn’t work.

DEADLINE: Afraid of overstaying your welcome with audiences with an overly long film?
ALLEN: Sometimes it didn’t even get to that. Once you’ve tested it, if they laugh they laugh; if they didn’t then you could always throw it away. There is a number of funny things that I never even tested with audience because I didn’t have the nerve to even show them, I was so anxiety-ridden they might be embarrassing or terrible or unfunny. They never saw the light of day. A number of them I regret because they were funny…probably.

DEADLINE: Can you recall specific jokes you killed that you regret?
ALLEN: I can recall many bits. InBananas, there was a very funny bit when the dictator came to the United States and was on the Cousin Brucie show. We cut that because I just didn’t have the nerve. There was a wonderful bit in Bananas too where the guys were in the jungle and all of a sudden a plane lands and the troops come out and it’s allegedly Bob Hope entertaining them. But then my character realizes, the guy’s not Bob Hope, he’s one of the police underground acting like Bob Hope; he’s a Latin American version, doing Hope jokes with the golf club, and all of a sudden when I realized that, the shooting starts and everybody scatters. I remember walking out of my house in Love And Death in the cold of winter, and the snow is covering the front door, and my having to dig a tunnel straight through. It looked very funny at the time. I cut it. There were a couple of great jokes in Manhattan that were too out of character, too broad for the tone of the picture. They would have been good in Take The Money And Run or Bananas. They were funny. In one, I was bicycling in a park with Mariel Hemingway and Michael Murphy and Anne Byrne Hoffman and Diane Keaton, and I got somehow sidetracked into a team of very fast cyclists. I was just riding this bike and made a turn and suddenly I was in with six guys who were going a mile a minute. It looked fun as I tried to escape that, but I worried it stood out like a sore thumb in the movie.

DEADLINE: Some would call that discipline. What you call it?
ALLEN: Anxiety. It’s easy for me to cut length, I never care about that. I notice a lot of people don’t like to cut, they’re reluctant to part with lines in stage plays and bits in movies. But I was brought up to cut stuff. When I learned how to write, the person I was most influenced by was always telling me, any doubt, cut it.

DEADLINE: Who was that?
ALLEN: Danny Simon. Neil Simon’s brother, who was really very helpful to me when I was 20 years old. He was a merciless editor and that rubbed off on me. This was when I was writing television. Danny and I would work on a skit. It would be coming along fine and then either he or I might come up with a great joke. And he would say, “Yes, it’s a great joke but it’s an expensive laugh.” He meant you’re stopping the action for the joke. I didn’t want to part with it because the joke was great, but then you thought, maybe the joke is too inside and only 100 people would get it. And nobody knows who Thelonious Monk is. Danny was a merciless cutter.

DEADLINE: Irrational Man marks the 11th time you’ve brought a film to Cannes, 12 if you count your contribution to the anthology New York Stories. You didn’t want to premiere in competition. Why?
ALLEN: I’ve never had a film in competition in my life. I just don’t feel you can say one film is better than another. Who’s to say some arbitrarily appointed group of judges can decide one is better? Is The Godfather better than Goodfellas, or whatever came out the same calendar year? You don’t make these films to compete. People make films for different reasons. For money. Or, they make them because something in them demands artistic expression. I do it because I enjoy the work. Once a film is over and I see it in this room and we’ve taken it as far as we can go, with no room for improvement… that’s it. It leaves this room and I never see it again ever, for the rest of my life.

DEADLINE: Ever?
ALLEN: Ever. I’ve never seen Take The Money And Run since I made it. I never sawAnnie Hall again, or Bananas or Manhattan or any of them. Because, you can only have regrets. If I was to screen any of my films now I would only see what I could have done, what I did badly, where I screwed up, how much worse it is than the way I remembered it. You’re never going to think “Oh, God, this thing is great.” Many years ago I was in Europe making What’s New Pussycat. I was having lunch in a cafeteria in France on this film set. Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor were making a film there, I think it was The Sandpiper. I was chatting with him for a moment, I hardly knew him, and he said, “I never see my films after I make them, ever.” This was a great actor, but I thought, gee, that’s so strange. I was just a writer on my first film and I didn’t know anything. When I got into directing films myself, I understood completely what he meant.

DEADLINE: Daniel Day-Lewis once told me he rigorously prepares for roles and lives in the character’s skin through the shoot, and can’t watch the results because he sees only flaws. What’s it like when you have to watch yourself over and over in editing? Are you self-conscious or does that only kick in after you’re done?
ALLEN: Well, a little of both. If I’m in it it’s tougher. It’s like if you’ve ever heard your own voice on a tape recorder? It’s worse when you see and hear yourself. If I’m not in the film and it has delightful people like Diane Keaton or Emma Stone, I have no problem editing it. But then it’s finished, I have to let go because I get that feeling. Oh, God, I had such great people here and I let them down, whether it’s Dianne Wiest, Naomi Watts one all these wonderful actresses who I’ve worked with, and I’ve worked with so many over the years. They trusted me completely and they do my films for very little money and I always feel, ‘Oh, God, I let them down.’ So… the less I have to do with the movie when it’s done, the better.

Emma Stone Woody Allen Magic in the Moonlight

DEADLINE: Directors say, don’t ask me to choose my favorite film; they are all my children.
ALLEN: Yeah, well I hate them all. None are different, and all are…unsatisfying, when you’re finished. Once, I had a generally positive feeling when I finished Match Point. I thought I was very lucky with this film. I was going to use an actress and she fell out a week before we shot and by sheer luck I stumbled onto Scarlett Johansson, who was luckily available. I was shooting in London. I needed a cloudy day, and that day it was cloudy. I needed it to be rainy for two hours — it would rain. I wanted a week of sun, we got it. I could do nothing wrong; I couldn’t screw up no matter how hard I tried. Everything fell into place. When the picture was over, I had a nice feeling about it. I felt that every actor, even those who had one line or two made a contribution to the picture. They didn’t just say the line in a neutral tone. If some guy was repairing our clock or delivering a sandwich, whatever they did they did beautifully and made a contribution. Everybody brought their own thing to this movie and I felt by wonderful good luck, that picture came out very, very close if not right on to what I had conceived to begin with.

DEADLINE: If you watched it now?
ALLEN: I would never watch it because I remembered it so fondly and it would be like, my God what was I thinking?

Irrational ManDEADLINE: What of Joaquin Phoenix’s work made him right forIrrational Man, playing this tormented philosophy professor who seems reinvigorated by a death wish?
ALLEN: Often, I write a part with an actor in mind; I didn’t in this case. I finished the story because I thought I had a good idea. Then, who would be good for this? The first thought I had was certainly Emma Stone because she’s great for practically anything. She’s young and beautiful and gifted and she plays comedy, romance, drama. I saw her singing and dancing on Broadway…she was an easy choice. And then Juliet Taylor, the casting director, mentioned Joaquin. All of us thought he was a great actor. I wondered to myself, would he be a crazy or hard guy to work with? But he wasn’t. He was a very sweet nice person and very, very self-deprecating and insecure. He doesn’t appreciate how good he is and my job was not to direct him as much as to explain to him that his last take was not bad, it was great. He has such a high bar for himself and you explain to him that he is reaching the high bar that he set for himself. We knew as soon as Juliet mentioned his name, oh, he’s perfect.

DEADLINE: I’ve covered the casting of your films for years and young actors consider your invitation to be real validation of their talent. How does a young actor get on your radar and how voracious are you in watching movies to keep current?
ALLEN: I see movies, but not to keep current. I watch strictly for enjoyment. But you do get exposed to the ones that come along. I saw Winter’s Bone and became aware of Jennifer Lawrence. And Juliet Taylor has an encyclopedic knowledge and will so often say, I want you to meet so-and-so. Like Chazz Palminteri. He had not appeared in anything and I was doing Bullets Over Broadway and the second he stepped into this room…I didn’t even have to hear him say anything. I just cast him right away.

DEADLINE: How does your audition process work?
ALLEN: Sometimes I read them but very briefly. I don’t like that as much as just hearing them say something. They don’t have to read from my movie; I just like to hear them and so they come in, sit down here and read for one minute. Half a page maximum and you can tell. Juliet also shows me videos, says here’s three things this actress has done. I see her and she looks interesting and we ask her to come in here and if she’s normal, not incoherent or crazy…I hate casting and keep it short. The person walks in and I do a quick look, just to see them live. I get them out in less than a minute. I say I’m doing a film next April, and Juliet thought you’d be right for something in it. I just wanted to say hello so I don’t have to cast strictly from video. And they say hello and I say OK. I’ve got nothing more to say than thanks for coming in. That’s the way we cast. Once in a while, we’ll read somebody if we’re not sure they sound correct for the character.

DEADLINE: If I was a young actor, auditioning for Woody Allen, I’d be crushed if I was out of there in one minute. Does your assistant routinely say, it’s OK, that’s how he works?
ALLEN: They warn them beforehand that I cast quickly. Actors of course are so insecure. We never turn anybody down because they’re bad; we don’t hire them because we found somebody that suits the part better. But naturally every actor that comes in and doesn’t get the role thinks it’s because they’re no good or they screwed up. It’s never that. Once in a great while if a big actor comes in…say like Joaquin, who actually didn’t come in. Juliet says, he flew in from California; you’ve got to let him sit down for a minute. Please. And I’ve got nothing to say to him. So I make up meaningless stuff. I say, ‘Well, what are you in town for? What was your last picture? Oh, great.’ And, was it boring in Mexico? And then I turn to Juliet and say, you know, I’m out of stuff to say…and I think they don’t want to stay there either. They have a life to lead and they’re not interested in sitting in here getting interrogated. Worse is that very annoying thing of having to read in a room with three people looking at you. I’ve seen the people on tape and it’s painful for me to put actors through that. I know what I would feel like if I had to come in to a room and say hello and you hand me a sheet of paper and I start to act.

DEADLINE: I recall the time when Hollywood studios backed your films, you gave them a bare-bones idea of what you wanted to do, a budget and they said yes without seeing a script. Do you still do it that way?
ALLEN: It’s even freer, now that I’m backed independently. I’ve never had a script note in my life. I write the script; nobody sees it, not the people that put the money in the picture. I cast who I want, and make the film. That’s why I’ve always felt the only thing standing between me and greatness, is me. There’s no excuse for me not to be great except that I’m not. What can I say? Nobody tells me who to cast, how long to shoot, what to shoot, what themes to do, what stories, what line to take out. The backing arrives, and I show up at some point with the film. It could be horror, a comedy; it could be a black-and-white tragedy in medieval Prussia. Nobody knows. What they’re buying is me and the assumption that over many years, he hasn’t done anything that outlandish. The budgets are small compared to most film budgets. If you were backing me my whole film career you would have made money. But also, a film opens like The Avengers and in one weekend, one weekend, it makes more money than six of my films make in ten years.

DEADLINE: It must take discipline not to waver from that formula. Did somebody say something early on that made you realize you’re better not having your confidence rocked by some silly suggestion?
ALLEN: No, I never had that problem. Now, once in a while I will sit down with my wife or with Juliet Taylor and say, who do you think would be better here, Joaquin Phoenix or Alec Baldwin? Every once in a while I bounce something off somebody to get feedback. But I was very lucky from day one, when I made my first film, Take The Money And Run. It was a new film company, Palomar, and the film only cost a million dollars and we brought it in for less. At that time they felt there were certain people like me or Mel Brooks, who had some inexplicable magic comic thing, and that we knew what we were doing and didn’t want to mess with it. They were wrong; I floundered and stumbled all the way through, but they let me alone completely. My second film I did for United Artists, whose policy was to leave the artist alone. Again, I did the whole film for a million dollars. By the time I was up to my third or fourth film, we were saying he gets final cut. I’ve never made a film in my life, outside of the first two when it didn’t matter, where I didn’t have final cut, where I had to show scripts to people, where I had to check with anybody on casting. I’ve never had that problem in my life.

match-pointDEADLINE: Did your transition from studios to overseas funding come because of a slump, or because the game was changing?
ALLEN: The studio game was changing. It started on Match Point. I wrote Match Point for New York. When we began raising the money, people from London called and said if you do a film here we’ll back it. I thought, gee, this film wouldn’t work in Africa, but it would work in London. So I did it over there and I had a wonderful time. The weather was cool in the summer, the skies were gray, the people were lovely that I worked with, the British crews were great. So I made four films in London. And then other countries started calling me. Would you make one in Spain, would you make one in Rome, would you make one in Sweden? If they’d said, make a film in Egypt, well I don’t have an idea for Egypt. But I knew Rome well enough. So I started doing that and it worked out very nicely. My family liked going away in the summers, and they were backing the film there and then the films were successful.

When private backers contacted me, we would tell them what it amounted to in a certain sense is, you put the money in a brown paper bag and you get the film when it’s done. There’s nothing else to do. And some would say OK, but when it came down to contract discussions they would say, well I would like to at least know that it’s going to have somebody in it whose name I recognize. And we would get rid of them. We would say no, this is not going to work out, because we can’t guarantee anything. But there were a few who said look, we have faith in you as an artist, and if that’s the way you want to work, we’ll back your films. I don’t try and be difficult. If someone said, can I come on the set? Sure, I don’t care. If I didn’t want them I’d say well don’t come Tuesday because that’s a very dramatic scene. But come after that. I’m not looking to make people’s life miserable. If somebody putting money in my film asks, who’ll be in your film and I know I’m using Emma Stone or Joaquin, I don’t say you can’t know. I just like to feel I have the final say. Same with the distribution company; I have final say on ads. But I’ve never had to use it, at all. They send me posters. I pick a poster I like and I send it back and if they say to me we don’t really love this one, could you consider some of these others, I do; I’m very easy to work with, and flexible.

DEADLINE: So what are you looking for?
ALLEN: I just want to know in the end that nobody can say to me, ‘well, that’s the one we’re using,’ even if I feel it doesn’t represent the picture at all or if it was cheap and burlesque-y and they could say, ‘too bad, we’re using it.’ David Picker tells the story in his book when I first went to United Artists and they made a deal where I could do anything I wanted. I brought in the script that 25 or 30 years later becameSweet And Lowdown with Sean Penn. David Picker read it and they didn’t want to do it. I said hey, no problem. I could have forced them; the contract was they do what I want. I said, don’t be silly; I don’t want to do a project you’re not enthused over. Give it back to me, I’ll give you another script. My manager, Jack Rollins, who just celebrated his 100th birthday, taught me years ago that no deal is worth the paper it’s printed on. I’ve been with Jack for 50 years, on a handshake. And that’s really how I work. If the guys who put money in my films are not satisfied then I don’t want to be with them.

DEADLINE: You might have started shooting these cities for financial reasons, but I’ve watched the way you shot them in Vicky Cristina Barcelona, Midnight In Paris orTo Rome With Love, and wanted to go there. There is such romanticism…
ALLEN: That’s because I’m a city freak. I love cities, cosmopolitan areas. Not all of them but almost all of them. Paris, Barcelona, London; these are fantastic places. I don’t think I could do that if I made a movie in Albuquerque. But just like with Manhattan, if you’re going to be in Paris or London or Rome or Spain, these cities became part of the story.

DEADLINE: When did it go from hardship of leaving home to reinvigorating your storytelling?
ALLEN: Right away it was artistically provocative to shoot in those cities. I’d like to go back to Paris and make a film. I did four in London and I always wanted to make another in Spain. Maybe where the festival is in San Sebastian. Just a great visual place. I knew those cities, and over the years I’d been to Barcelona, and Paris a million times. London a lot and Rome. But it wouldn’t feel that way in all cities. I contemplated making a film in Sweden; I’ve been there several times and have some sense of it. But if I had to make a film in Japan, I’d have to be shown around. I don’t have any feel for it at all.

DEADLINE: Everybody is courting China. How about there?
ALLEN: That is one of the countries that asked me to come and make a film. I don’t think I can. I’d have to make a film in a place I could live in for four months for the pre-production and shooting. I can live in Paris for four months or London or, you know, Barcelona. These are places that are like New York. But I don’t think I could live in many places. When I had to make a film in the United States I picked San Francisco because to me it’s one of the great cities of America.

DEADLINE: What’s your favorite Cannes memory? And did global media react differently when you started making movies outside New York?
ALLEN: I’ve always been very lucky abroad. Europe, South America, the Far East, they’ve always supported my films enthusiastically. Right from the start with Take The Money And Run.Bananas was a big hit in Europe and I remember being surprised that it was seen as a movie about politics. To me, it was just a bunch of jokes. They have supported me devotedly. If I show a film at Cannes, the audience there comes to enjoy movies. They’re not going there with a chip on their shoulder, or to be nasty. They see a lot of new movies, mine among them, and the publicity I do permeates the whole of Europe and beyond into Israel, Argentina, Japan, Tokyo. The film gets off to a tremendous commercial start there. America is a totally different. You open in America, and you either get good press or bad press. If you get bad press usually nobody comes. These blockbusters, you can get the worst press in the world and make a hundred million dollars. If I get bad press, people won’t come. If I get great press? Maybe they’ll come and maybe they won’t.

DEADLINE: Culture, from books to movies, is increasingly consumed on smart phones and iPads. I imagine a room in your house with a floor-to-ceiling wall of cherished hardcover books that kids probably consider to be dusty relics. How does the reverence for literature and films shown on big screens compare to when you were imprinting authors and filmmakers who influenced your growth as an artist?
ALLEN: Big difference from when I grew up, and I’m talking about not just my childhood in the ’40s but when I was a young adult, living in Manhattan at twenty-five with my peer group. We were not intellectuals, by any means. I was thrown out of school and none of us were intellectuals. We were sports fans. It was a big talk when the next film by Truffaut, Fellini or De Sica was coming out. This is what we waited to see. We were thrilled to see those pictures and we talked about them. Now, if I talk to young, bright kids, they don’t know from Citizen Kane, La Grande Illusion; they don’t know who Ingmar Bergman or Bunuel is, or the first thing about their films. There are people who’ve seen Citizen Kane on a screen this size [he holds his fingers two inches apart]. So there is no reverence; it’s a different time. I think it’s a big loss. They don’t and I can understand that because they are the future and I’m not. But I think that’s a huge loss for them to go and see Treasure Of The Sierra Madre on a three-inch screen, but they don’t. As far as books go, it’s exactly as you said and what Marshall McLuhan said years ago, that as time passes, books will become art objects.

DEADLINE: How invested are you in the digital age?
ALLEN: I don’t own a computer. I’ve never seen anything online at all — nothing. I don’t own a word processor. I have none of that stuff. It’s not an act of rebellion. I’m just not a gadget person.

DEADLINE: But you’ll shoot your next film digital. Aren’t you curious about what else technology offers?
ALLEN: Yeah, but to me it doesn’t make any difference. I don’t work in it. I set the shot up, I compose, I do all that. But it’s irrelevant to me whether they push the button on the camera; it doesn’t matter.

DEADLINE: How do you reconcile your avoidance of computers and iPads, when you signed on to create a TV series forAmazon’s streaming service?
ALLEN: I don’t even know what a streaming service is; that’s the interesting thing. When you said streaming service, it was the first time I’ve heard that term connected with the Amazon thing. I never knew what Amazon was. I’ve never seen any of those series, even on cable. I’ve never seen The Sopranos, or Mad Men. I’m out every night and when I come home, I watch the end of the baseball or basketball game, and there’s Charlie Rose and I go to sleep. Amazon kept coming to me and saying, please do this, whatever you want. I kept saying I have no ideas for it, that I never watch television. I don’t know the first thing about it. Well, this went on for a year and a half, and they kept making a better deal and a better deal. Finally they said look, we’ll do anything that you want, just give us six half hours. They can be black and white, they can take place in Paris, in New York and California, they can be about a family, they can be comedy, you can be in them, they can be tragic. We don’t have to know anything, just come in with six half hours. And they offered a lot of money and everybody around me was pressuring me, go ahead and do it, what do you have to lose?

DEADLINE: So you said yes…
ALLEN: And I have regretted every second since I said OK. It’s been so hard for me. I had the cocky confidence, well, I’ll do it like I do a movie…it’ll be a movie in six parts. Turns out, it’s not. For me, it has been very, very difficult. I’ve been struggling and struggling and struggling. I only hope that when I finally do it — I have until the end of 2016 — they’re not crushed with disappointment because they’re nice people and I don’t want to disappoint them. I am doing my best. I fit it in between films, so it’s not like, no film this year, I’m doing Amazon. It’s a job within my usual schedule. But I am not as good at it as I fantasized I might be. It’s not a piece of cake; it’s a tough thing and I’m earning every penny that they’re giving me and I just hope that they don’t feel, ‘My God, we gave him a very substantial amount of money and freedom and this is what he gives us?’

DEADLINE: But haven’t you just voiced the anxiety and insecurity that fueled your entire creative career?
ALLEN: I hope it’s just the anxiety again, but this is hard. I’m like a fish out of water. Movies I’ve been doing for decades, and even the stage stuff, I know the stage and have seen a million plays. But this…how to begin something and end it after a half an hour and then come back the next time. It’s not me.

DEADLINE: You really regret that deal?
ALLEN: Oh, it’s amazing how you can regret. I haven’t had a pleasurable moment since I undertook it.

DEADLINE: You mentioned review-proof blockbusters. There is an obsession with global box office, sequels, cross pollination of branded content. You’ve never made a sequel. How do you feel about the way the movie business is going?
ALLEN: Well, I think it’s terrible. To me, movies are valuable as an art form and as a wonderful means of popular entertainment. But I think movies have gone terribly wrong. It was much healthier when the studios made a hundred films a year instead of a couple, and the big blockbusters for the most part are big time wasters. I don’t see them. I can see what they are: eardrum-busting time wasters. I think Hollywood has gone in a disastrous path. It’s terrible. The years of cinema that were great were the ’30s, ’40s, not so much the ’50s…but then the foreign films took over and it was a great age of cinema as American directors were influenced by them and that fueled the ’50s and ’60s and ’70s. Then it started to turn. Now it’s just a factory product. They can make a billion dollars on a film and spend hundreds of millions making it. They spend more money on the advertising budget of some of those films than all the profits of everything Bergman, Fellini and Bunuel made on all their films put together in their lifetimes. If you took everything that Bergman made in profit, everything Bunuel made and everything that Fellini made in their lifetimes and added it all together, you wouldn’t equal one weekend with the The Avengers and its $185 million to $200 million.

DEADLINE: Hasn’t the movie business always been art meeting commerce? Isn’t it just that the pendulum shifting toward the latter?
ALLEN: Hollywood is just commerce, and it’s a shame. There are all these wonderfully gifted actors out there that, as you said before, will be in a film of mine for virtually nothing, union minimum, for what you called validation. Really, it’s because they want to work on something that doesn’t insult their intelligence; they don’t want to have to get in to a suit and practice stunts for two months and then do stunts and then… they want to be in something that doesn’t demean their artistic impulses.

DEADLINE: Some of your peers, Martin Scorsese and Ridley Scott for example, are making big-budget broad canvas movies. Was there ever a big story you wanted to tell so badly that you have been tempted to compromise your creative control so you could get the financing?
ALLEN: No. I don’t have any interest in that. I’ve got to say though, the guys you just mentioned, I have nothing but amazed admiration for them. How a guy like Scorsese or Ridley Scott can make a big film, and still put their artistic vision into it and deal with the studios and stars and triumph over that to make the fabulous films that they make is something that is beyond me. I don’t have the personal resources, the character, the intelligence; I don’t know how they do it but they do it. They make wonderful films that work. Those directors compromise but the results are not artistically demeaning. They manipulate and navigate the waters and come up with great movies, fighting the battle against the Philistine studios, the money people, and triumph artistically. I have nothing but awe and admiration for them. I can’t imagine how they do it. Me, I don’t want to be bothered or have to talk to anybody. I don’t want to have to talk to anyone. I just don’t have the temperament for it. I couldn’t survive it so I’d rather get my little 18 million dollar budget and make my film. And if I go over, I give away a portion of my salary and that’s fine with me. Over the years I’ve given away a lot of monies, starting right from the beginning. I get the film I want, I never have to think about it but I still admire that those guys can make big-canvas, high-budget movies, these beautiful, wonderful films and they can finesse the terrible burden of having to deal with the suits.

DEADLINE: Quentin Tarantino has told me he will retire a couple of movies from now, on the grounds that he wants to stop before feeling that his next film can’t be his greatest, at which point he begins repeating himself. What is your feeling about a filmmaker’s longevity? Is there a time to stop?
ALLEN: Only when you want to. It depends. Some guys only make a few films, and then a guy like Bunuel made them his whole life. I enjoy the making of the film and it’s something for me to do. If nobody ever comes to my films, if people don’t want to give me money to make films, that will stop me. But as long as people come all over the world and I have an audience and I have ideas for films, I will do them for as long as I enjoy the process. And I like the whole process of making a film.

DEADLINE: So until you get that tap on the shoulder…
ALLEN: I’ll keep going. Now, sometimes I come out with a film and nobody wants to see it. But it doesn’t matter to me. I’m already working on another film and having the enjoyment of that and maybe that film a lot of people will come and see, but then I’m on the next one anyway. I never look back. When I was a little boy, I thought the fun in the movies would be the fame and the adulation and the money. Then when I started making films, I realized the fun in the film is not that it’s well-reviewed or that people line up and see it or it’s heartbreaking if they don’t or you’re a great hero if you win an award. All that stuff is nonsense. If it’s not fun when you’re spending the three months writing the film, and then three months shooting the film and the three months editing… if that comprises most of your year and it’s not fun, then why do it? It’s fun for me. I’m in contact with beautiful women and charming guys and art directors and costumes and Cole Porter’s music…it’s a wonderful way to earn a living.

DEADLINE: In that PBS Masters special on your early years, you were a prolific comedy writer, and did great stand-up comedy and you make a movie each year like clockwork. What’s the biggest thing that you struggle with as a creator?
ALLEN: The constant desire to do something great and the knowledge that it’s not really in me. I’ve had more than my share of opportunity over the decades to do something great, to break new ground, to find a new form, to electrify, to really stun people. After a while I had to realize, well, wait a minute, nobody’s stopping me. I mean, go ahead and do it. You can do anything you want to. You can have a blank screen for an hour and a half in the movie house if you wanted; you’re the boss. And then I start to think the reason it is not coming is that you can’t do it. You don’t have it in you. You do not have greatness in you; you’re not Kurosawa, or Fellini. You’re a comic turned film director with a modest talent to amuse, to entertain. But true greatness is not in you. You’re not William Faulkner or Cole Porter. You’re one of the entertainers of your lifetime and that’s it. So I’m constantly struggling to say no, this isn’t so, wait until you see what I do next. Then I see what I do next and it’s truly fine and nice but it’s not…I can’t live up to my own egotistical image of myself, I guess.

DEADLINE: Well, if it’s any consolation, this interview takes one item off my bucket list.
ALLEN: I’m 79. You got it in, just under the wire.

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RESPONDING TO HARRY KROTO’S BRILLIANT RENOWNED ACADEMICS!! Part 128 Quentin Skinner, Professor of the Humanities at Queen Mary University of London and a historian, “I am an atheist; think that if we know anything it is that none of that could be true; of course we may not know anything, so atheist is a bold word”

On November 21, 2014 I received a letter from Nobel Laureate Harry Kroto and it said:

…Please click on this URL http://vimeo.com/26991975

and you will hear what far smarter people than I have to say on this matter. I agree with them.

Harry Kroto

I have attempted to respond to all of Dr. Kroto’s friends arguments and I have posted my responses one per week for over a year now. Here are some of my earlier posts:

Arif AhmedHaroon Ahmed,  Jim Al-Khalili, Sir David AttenboroughMark Balaguer, Horace Barlow, Michael BateSir Patrick BatesonSimon Blackburn, Colin Blakemore, Ned BlockPascal BoyerPatricia ChurchlandAaron CiechanoverNoam Chomsky, Brian CoxPartha Dasgupta,  Alan Dershowitz, Frank DrakeHubert Dreyfus, John DunnBart Ehrman, Mark ElvinRichard Ernst, Stephan Feuchtwang, Robert FoleyDavid Friend,  Riccardo GiacconiIvar Giaever , Roy GlauberRebecca GoldsteinDavid J. Gross,  Brian Greene, Susan GreenfieldStephen F Gudeman,  Alan Guth, Jonathan HaidtTheodor W. Hänsch, Brian Harrison,  Stephen HawkingHermann Hauser, Robert HindeRoald Hoffmann,  Bruce HoodGerard ‘t HooftCaroline HumphreyNicholas Humphrey,  Herbert Huppert,  Gareth Stedman Jones, Steve JonesShelly KaganMichio Kaku,  Stuart KauffmanMasatoshi Koshiba,  Lawrence KraussHarry Kroto, George Lakoff,  Rodolfo LlinasElizabeth Loftus,  Alan MacfarlaneDan McKenzie,  Mahzarin BanajiPeter MillicanMarvin MinskyLeonard Mlodinow,  P.Z.Myers,   Yujin NagasawaAlva NoeDouglas Osheroff, David Parkin,  Jonathan Parry, Roger Penrose,  Saul PerlmutterHerman Philipse,  Carolyn PorcoRobert M. PriceVS RamachandranLisa RandallLord Martin ReesColin RenfrewAlison Richard,  C.J. van Rijsbergen,  Oliver Sacks, John SearleMarcus du SautoySimon SchafferJ. L. Schellenberg,   Lee Silver Peter Singer,  Walter Sinnott-ArmstrongRonald de Sousa, Victor StengerJohn SulstonBarry Supple,   Leonard Susskind, Raymond TallisMax TegmarkNeil deGrasse Tyson,  Martinus J. G. Veltman, Craig Venter.Alexander Vilenkin, Sir John Walker, James D. WatsonFrank WilczekSteven Weinberg, and  Lewis Wolpert,

Quentin Skinner

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Quentin Robert Duthie Skinner (born 26 November 1940, Oldham, Lancashire)[1] is the Barber Beaumont Professor of the Humanities at Queen Mary University of London and an intellectual historian.


Quentin Skinner was born the second son of Alexander Skinner, CBE (died 1979), and Winifred Rose Margaret, née Duthie (died 1982). Educated at Bedford School and Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, he was elected into a Fellowship there in 1962 upon obtaining a double-starred First in History, but immediately gained a teaching Fellowship at Christ’s College, Cambridge, where he remained until moving to the University of London in 2008. He is now an Honorary Fellow of both Christ’s College and Gonville and Caius College.Biography
[edit]

In the middle 1970s he spent four formative years at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. It was there that he met Raymond Geuss, later a colleague at Cambridge. Together with John Dunn and J. G. A. Pocock, Skinner has been said to have founded the “Cambridge School” of the history of political thought. In 1978 he was appointed to the chair of Political Science at the University of Cambridge, and in 1996 he was appointed Regius Professor of History. He was pro-vice-chancellor of Cambridge in 1999. In 1979 he married Susan James, Professor of Philosophy at Birkbeck College London; they have a daughter and a son. He was previously married to Patricia Law Skinner, who was later married to Bernard Williams.

Skinner has delivered lectures at the Christian Gauss Seminars in Criticism at Princeton (1980), the Carlyle Lectures at Oxford (1980), the Messenger Lectures at Cornell (1983), the Tanner Lectures on Human Values at Harvard(1984), the T. S. Eliot Memorial Lectures at Kent (1995), the Ford Lectures at Oxford (2003), the Clarendon Lectures at Oxford (2011), the Clark Lectures at Cambridge (2012), the Academia Sinica Lectures in Taiwan (2013) and the Spinoza Lectures at University of Amsterdam (2014).

Skinner was Distinguished Visiting Professor at Queen Mary, University of London for the 2007–2008 academic year, and has been Barber Beaumont Professor of the Humanities at Queen Mary since October 2008.[2] In 2014 he held the Spinoza Chair of Philosophy at the University of Amsterdam[3]

Skinner is a fellow at the British Academy, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Academia Europaea, the American Philosophical Society and the Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei. He has won the Wolfson History Prize(1979); the Sir Isaiah Berlin Prize of the British Political Studies Association (2006); the Benjamin Lippincott Award (2001) and the David Easton Award (2007) of the American Political Science Association; the Bielefelder Wissenschaftspreis (2008); and a Balzan Prize (2006). He holds honorary degrees from Aberdeen, Athens, Copenhagen, East Anglia, Chicago, Harvard, Helsinki, Leuven, Oslo, Oxford, Santiago and St Andrews. Since 2009 he has been a member of the Balzan Prize Committee.

In  the first video below in the 36th clip in this series are his words and  my response is below them. 

50 Renowned Academics Speaking About God (Part 1)

Another 50 Renowned Academics Speaking About God (Part 2

A Further 50 Renowned Academics Speaking About God (Part 3)

___

Interview of Professor Quentin Skinner – part 1

Uploaded on Jun 2, 2008

Interview with the Regius Professor of History at Cambridge University on his life and work in 2008. For a downloadable version and textual summary, please see http://www.alanmacfarlane.com

All revenues donated to World Oral Literature Project

Interview of Professor Quentin Skinner – part 2

__________

Below is a letter I sent to Dr. Skinner and in the letter I respond to his quote:

Bertrand Russell pictured below:

____

Francis Schaeffer (30 January 1912 – 15 May 1984[1])  and his wife Edith  (November 3, 1914 – March 30, 2013)

James Watson (1928-) and Francis Crick  (8 June 1916 – 28 July 2004)

Michael Polanyi, FRS[1] (11 March 1891 – 22 February 1976)

John Charles Polanyi,  (born 23 January 1929)

___

John Scott Haldane (2 May 1860 – 14/15 March 1936)

J. B. S. Haldane
J. B. S. Haldane.jpg

Haldane in 1914

(5 November 1892 – 1 December 1964)

Maurice Wilkins (15 December 1916 – 5 October 2004)

Erwin Schrödinger (12 August 1887 – 4 January 1961)

Sir Peter Medawar ( 28 February 1915 – 2 October 1987)

Barry Commoner (May 28, 1917 – September 30, 2012)

Enjoy the pictures of an amazing life

dadnmeinboat jpg

Harry Kroto with his father above

Marg and Steve and David

Margaret with David and Stephen

Image21 (2)
leaving Liverpool for Canada 1964

Kroto and his wife, Margaret.

Kroto and his wife, Margaret.

______________

July 16, 2016

Dr. Quentin Skinner, Professor of the Humanities, Queen Mary University of London,

Dear. Dr. Skinner,

I was very sad to learn of the passing of the great scientist Harry Kroto. Judging from comments of his close friends, Kroto was not only a great scientist but an even better man personally.

Tim Logan, chair of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Florida State“What always brought out the best in Harry was his wife, Margaret. Margaret and Harry were always together, until the end of Harry’s life. She served as his business manager, scheduling his many speaking engagements around the world, organizing the travel, and supporting him in many, many ways. What I found so remarkable is that even after 57 years together, they were so obviously in love. Harry would include photos and sketches he made of her in his lectures, and he always acknowledged her as his moral compass.” 

HAVE YOU EVER WONDERED WHY I WAS PROMPTED ORIGINALLY TO WRITE YOU? It was because Harry Kroto took the time in 2014 to correspond with me. After I wrote him in  the spring and summer of 2014 he emailed me twice and then sent me a letter in November of 2014. In that letter he referred me to a film series  Renowned Academics talk about God that featured your comments. 

I have always been fascinated by brilliant individuals and recently I had the opportunity to come across a very interesting article by Michael Polanyi, LIFE TRANSCENDING PHYSICS AND CHEMISTRY, in the magazine CHEMICAL AND ENGINEERING NEWS, August 21, 1967, and I also got hold of a 1968 talk by Francis Schaeffer based on this article. ISN’T IT AMAZING THAT JUST LIKE KROTO’S FAMILY POLANYI HAD TO FLEE EUROPE BECAUSE OF HITLER’S INSANE GRUDGE AGAINST THE JEWS!!!!I know you don’t believe in God or the Devil but if anyone was demon-possessed it had to be Hitler.

Polanyi’s son John actually won the 1986 Nobel Prize for Chemistry. This article by Michael Polanyi concerns Francis Crick and James Watson and their discovery of DNA in 1953. Polanyi noted:

Mechanisms, whether man-made or morphological, are boundary conditions harnessing the laws of in
animate nature, being themselves irreducible to those laws. The pattern of organic bases in DNA which functions as a genetic code is a boundary condition irreducible to physics and chemistry. Further controlling principles of life may be represented as a hierarchy of boundary conditions extending, in the case of man, to consciousness and responsibility.

I am sending you this two CD’s of this talk because I thought you may find it very interesting. It includes references to not only James D. Watson, and Francis Crick but also  Maurice Wilkins, Erwin Schrodinger, J.S. Haldane (his son was the famous J.B.S. Haldane), Peter Medawar, and Barry Commoner.

Adrian Rogers noted that Evolution has no answer for these three points:

1. The fossil record. Not only is the so-called missing link still missing, all of the transitional life forms so crucial to evolutionary theory are missing from the fossil record. There are thousands of missing links, not one!

2. The second law of thermodynamics. This law states that energy is winding down and that matter left to itself tends toward chaos and randomness, not greater organization and complexity. Evolution demands exactly the opposite process, which is observed nowhere in nature.

3. The origin of life. Evolution offers no answers to the origin of life. It simply pushes the question farther back in time, back to some primordial event in space or an act of spontaneous generation in which life simply sprang from nothing. 

Let me start off by saying that this is not the first time that I have written you. Earlier I shared several letters of correspondence I had with Carl Sagan, and Antony Flew. Both men were strong believers in evolution as you are today. Instead of talking to you about their views today I wanted to discuss the views of Bertrand Russell since you are a big fan of his writings.

Your QUOTE from your interview with Alan Macfarlane: 

Quote:

I am an atheist; think that if we know anything it is that none of that could be true; 
of course we may not know anything, so atheist is a bold word; 
I'm a Richard Dawkins kind of atheist; there are two kinds, 
the Marxists who think that though they are materialists
 what is interesting about religion in all forms is that it deformed very deep human yearnings
 and aspirations and that it is a very powerful route into trying to understand human psychology;
 another kind of atheist - David Hume or Bertrand Russell - 
who mostly can't understand what these people are claiming, but in so far that I do it is obviously false, 
and I am that kind of atheist, it just doesn't interest me at all;

On You Tube in the clip “Sir Harold Kroto – Beyond Belief 2008,” at the 14:35 mark  Harry Kroto said, “As Bertrand Russell and really of course anytime I read anything [of his] I think it is fantastic and he said this about INTELLECTUAL INTEGRITY:

I mean by intellectual integrity the habit of deciding vexed questions in accordance with the evidence, or of leaving them undecided where the evidence is inconclusive.
Bertrand Russell, “Can Religion Cure Our Troubles?” (1954)

While corresponding back and forth with Harry Kroto I did send this letter below that talked about Bertrand Russell and I wanted to share it with you:

To Harry Kroto, Dept of Chemistry and Biochemistry, c/o Florida State Univ,

6-26-14

Just the other day I sent you the CD called “Dust in the Wind, Darwin and Disbelief.” I know you may not have time to listen to the CD but on the first 2 1/2 minutes of that CD is the hit song “Dust in the Wind” by the rock group KANSAS and was written by Kerry Livgren in 1978. Would you be kind enough to read these words of that song given below and refute the idea that accepting naturalistic evolution with the exclusion of God must lead to the nihilistic message of the song! Or maybe you agree with Richard Dawkins and other scholars below?

DUST IN THE WIND:

I close my eyes only for a moment, and the moment’s gone

All my dreams pass before my eyes, a curiosity

Dust in the wind, all they are is dust in the wind

Same old song, just a drop of water in an endless sea

All we do crumbles to the ground, though we refuse to see

Dust in the wind, all we are is dust in the wind

Now, don’t hang on, nothing lasts forever but the earth and sky

It slips away, and all your money won’t another minute buy

_________________________________

Humans have always wondered about the meaning of life…life has no higher purpose than to perpetuate the survival of DNA…life has no design, no purpose, no evil and no good, nothing but blind pitiless indifference. —Richard Dawkins

______________

The vast majority of people believe there is a design or force in the universe; that it works outside the ordinary mechanics of cause and effect; that it is somehow responsible for both the visible and the moral order of the world. Modern biology has undermined this assumption…But beginning with Darwin, biology has undermined that tradition. Darwin in effect asserted that all living organisms had been created by a combination of chance and necessity–natural selection… First, God has no role in the physical world…Second, except for the laws of probability and cause and effect, there is no organizing principle in the world, and no purpose.  (William B. Provine, “The End of Ethics?” in HARD CHOICES ( a magazine companion to the television series HARD CHOICES, Seattle: KCTS-TV, channel 9, University of Washington, 1980, pp. 2-3).

That Man is the product of causes which had no prevision of the end they were achieving; that his origin, his growth, his hopes and fears, his loves and his beliefs, are but the outcome of accidental collocations of atoms; …that all the labors of the ages, all the devotion, all the inspiration, all the noonday brightness of human genius, are destined to extinction in the vast death of the solar system, and that the whole temple of Man’s achievement must inevitably be buried beneath the debris of a universe in ruins—all these things, if not quite beyond dispute, are yet so nearly certain, that no philosophy which rejects them can hope to stand. Bertrand Russell

The British humanist H. J. Blackham (1903-2009) put it very plainly: On humanist assumptions, life leads to nothing, and every pretense that it does not is a deceit. If there is a bridge over a gorge which spans only half the distance and ends in mid-air, and if the bridge is crowded with human beings pressing on, one after the other they fall into the abyss. The bridge leads nowhere, and those who are pressing forward to cross it are going nowhere….It does not matter where they think they are going, what preparations for the journey they may have made, how much they may be enjoying it all. The objection merely points out objectively that such a situation is a model of futility“( H. J. Blackham, et al., Objections to Humanism (Riverside, Connecticut: Greenwood Press, 1967).

In the 1986 debate on the John Ankerberg show between Paul Kurtz (1925-2012) and Norman Geisler, Kurtz reacted to the point Blackham was making by asserting:

I think you may be quoting Blackham out of context because I’ve heard Blackham speak, and read much of what he said, but Blackham has argued continuously that life is full of meaning; that there are points. The fact that one doesn’t believe in God does not deaden the appetite or the lust for living. On the contrary; great artists and scientists and poets and writers have affirmed the opposite.

I read the book FORBIDDEN FRUIT by Paul Kurtz and I had the opportunity to correspond with him but I still reject his view that optimistic humanism withstand the view of nihilism if one accepts there is no God. Christian philosopher R.C. Sproul put it best:

Nihilism has two traditional enemies–Theism and Naive Humanism. The theist contradicts the nihilist because the existence of God guarantees that ultimate meaning and significance of personal life and history. Naive Humanism is considered naive by the nihilist because it rhapsodizes–with no rational foundation–the dignity and significance of human life. The humanist declares that man is a cosmic accident whose origin was fortuitous and entrenched in meaningless insignificance. Yet in between the humanist mindlessly crusades for, defends, and celebrates the chimera of human dignity…Herein is the dilemma: Nihilism declares that nothing really matters ultimately…In my judgment, no philosophical treatise has ever surpassed or equaled the penetrating analysis of the ultimate question of meaning versus vanity that is found in the Book of Ecclesiastes. 

________________

Kerry Livgren is the writer of the song “Dust in the Wind” and he said concerning that song in 1981 and then in 2006:

 1981: “When I wrote “Dust in the Wind” I was  writing about a yearning emptiness that I felt which millions of people identified with because the song was very popular.” 2006:“Dust In the Wind” was certainly the most well-known song, and the message was out of Ecclesiastes. I never ceased to be amazed at how the message resonates with people, from the time it came out through now. The message is true and we have to deal with it, plus the melody is memorable and very powerful. It disturbs me that there’s only part of the [Christian] story told in that song. It’s about someone yearning for some solution, but if you look at the entire body of my work, there’s a solution to the dilemma.”

Ecclesiastes reasons that chance and time have determined the past and will determine the future (9:11-13), and power reigns in this life and the scales are not balanced(4:1). Is that how you see the world? Solomon’s experiment was a search for meaning to life “under the sun.” Then in last few words in Ecclesiastes he looks above the sun and brings God back into the picture: “The conclusion, when all has been heard, is: Fear God and keep His commandments, because this applies to every person. For God will bring every act to judgment.”

In 2006 in the publication CROSSWALK Livgren noted:

Dust In the Wind” was certainly the most well-known song, and the message was out of Ecclesiastes. I never ceased to be amazed at how the message resonates with people, from the time it came out through now. The message is true and we have to deal with it, plus the melody is memorable and very powerful. It disturbs me that there’s only part of the [Christian] story told in that song. It’s about someone yearning for some solution, but if you look at the entire body of my work, there’s a solution to the dilemma.

__________

On 9-18-16 Dr. Kroto emailed twice:

Dear Everette
Thank you for your letter
re your question
“How does our life have any ultimate meaning”
I have no idea how others deal with this question
and do not even know whether it “means” anything
to ask such a question…I do not ask it of myself

re “ultimate meaning”
I give my own life “personal meaning” by doing “what I do”
that is all that matters to me

David Hume whom I consider to be a great philosopher said
“The life of man is of no greater importance to the universe than that of an oyster.”
….other good quotes for you here:
http://www.goodreads.com/author/quotes/45726.David_Hume

The simple words of Dust in the wind…seems to makes sense to me
I do not need to analyse the words any more deeply

as I have said above…yes I agree with Myers re “my significance”

harry
PS  NB
Thank you for writing to me but note that
I really am sorry that I have nothing more to say on any of the matters
which seem to interest you…

____

SECOND EMAIL from Dr. Kroto

Thank you
great story

I think we may see the good things the same way
but I do not gloss over the bad aspects of religiosity
but …some of the bad…cf ISIS

“With or without religion, you would have good people doing good things and evil people doing evil things. But for good people to do evil things, that takes religion.”
― Steven Weinberg
“Religion is an insult to human dignity. Without it you would have good people doing good things and evil people doing evil things.
But for good people to do evil things, that takes religion.”
― Steven Weinberg

https://www.goodreads.com/author/quotes/86758.Steven_Weinberg

__________

DR. SKINNER:

The answer to find meaning in life is found in putting your faith and trust in Jesus Christ. The Bible is true from cover to cover and can be trusted.

Thank you again for your time and I know how busy you are.

Everette Hatcher, everettehatcher@gmail.com, http://www.thedailyhatch.org, cell ph 501-920-5733, Box 23416, LittleRock, AR 72221, United States

_______________________________________

Is the Bible historically accurate? Here are some of the posts I have done in the past on the subject: 1. The Babylonian Chronicleof Nebuchadnezzars Siege of Jerusalem2. Hezekiah’s Siloam Tunnel Inscription. 3. Taylor Prism (Sennacherib Hexagonal Prism)4. Biblical Cities Attested Archaeologically. 5. The Discovery of the Hittites6.Shishak Smiting His Captives7. Moabite Stone8Black Obelisk of Shalmaneser III9A Verification of places in Gospel of John and Book of Acts., 9B Discovery of Ebla Tablets10. Cyrus Cylinder11. Puru “The lot of Yahali” 9th Century B.C.E.12. The Uzziah Tablet Inscription13. The Pilate Inscription14. Caiaphas Ossuary14 B Pontius Pilate Part 214c. Three greatest American Archaeologists moved to accept Bible’s accuracy through archaeology.

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