FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE Part 45 Woody Allen “Reason is Dead” (Feature on artists Allora & Calzadilla )

Love and Death [Woody Allen] – What if there is no God? [PL]

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How Should We then Live Episode 7 small (Age of Nonreason)

#02 How Should We Then Live? (Promo Clip) Dr. Francis Schaeffer

10 Worldview and Truth

Two Minute Warning: How Then Should We Live?: Francis Schaeffer at 100

Francis Schaeffer “BASIS FOR HUMAN DIGNITY” Whatever…HTTHR

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Francis Schaeffer pictured below:

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I have written on the Book of Ecclesiasteand the subject of the meaninof our lives on several occasions on this blog. Today again  I hope to show how the secular humanist person can not hope to fina lasting meaning to his life in a closed system without bringing God back into the picture. This is the same exact case with Solomon in the Book of Ecclesiastes. Three thousanyears ago, Solomon took a look at life under the sun” in his book of Ecclesiastes. Christian scholaRavi Zacharias has noted, “The key to understanding the Book of Ecclesiastes is the term ‘under the sun.’ What that literally means is you lock God out of a closed system, and you are left with only this world of time plus chance plus matter.”

Let me show you some inescapable conclusions that Francis Schaeffer said you will face if you choose to live without God in the picture. Solomon came to these same conclusions when he looked at life “under the sun.”

  1. Death is the great equalizer (Eccl 3:20, “All go to the same place; all come from dust, and to dust all return.”)
  2. Chance and time have determined the past, and they will determine the future.  (Ecclesiastes 9:11-13)
  3. Power reigns in this life, and the scales are not balanced(Eccl 4:1)
  4. Nothing in life gives true satisfaction without God including knowledge (1:16-18), ladies and liquor (2:1-3, 8, 10, 11), and great building projects (2:4-6, 18-20).

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Just like Hugh Hefner you will fail in getting satisfaction in life without God in the picture and like Solomon you will become depressed and many very learned people have discussed this issue such as Will Durant, Madalyn Murray O’Hair, Stephen Jay Gould,Richard Dawkins, Jean-Paul Sartre,Bertrand Russell, Leo Tolstoy, Loren Eiseley,Aldous Huxley, G.K. Chesterton, Ravi Zacharias, and C.S. Lewis.

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Reason is Dead

The  hallmark of the Enlightenment had been “Reason Is King.” The leading thinkers had consciously rejected the need for revelation. As Paul Hazard in European Thought in the Eighteenth Century says, they put Christianity on trial.91
Gradually, however, the problems of this enthronement of human reason emerged. The reason of man was not big enough to handle the big questions, and what man was left with relative knowledge and relative morality. The noose around the humanist’s neck tightened with every passing decade and generation.
What would he do?
Ironically, even though the basis of the humanists’ whole endeavor had been the central importance of man’s reason, when faced with the problems of relative knowledge and relative morality they repudiated reason. Rather than admit defeat in front of God’s revelation, the humanists extended the revolution further – and in a direction which would have been quite unthinkable to their eighteenth-century predecessors. Modern irrationalism was born.
We could go back as far as Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) in philosophy and to Friedrich Schleiermacher (1768-1834) in theology. Modern existentialism is also related to Søren Kierkegaard (1813-1855). However, our intention here is neither to go into the history of irrationalism, nor to examine the proponents of existentialism in our own century, but rather to concentrate on its main thesis. It is this that confronts us on all sides today, and it is impossible to understand modern man without understanding this concept.
Because we shall be using several terms a great deal now, we would ask the reader to attend carefully. When we speak of irrationalism or existentialism or the existential methodology, we are pointing to a quite simple idea. It may have been expressed in a variety of complicated ways by philosophers, but it is not a difficult concept.
Imagine that you are at the movies watching a suspense film. As the story unfolds, the tension increases until finally the hero is trapped in some impossible situation and everyone is groaning inwardly, wondering how he is going to get out of the mess. The suspense is heightened by the knowledge (of the audience, not the hero) that help is on the way in the form of the good guys. The only question is: will the good guys arrive in time?
Now imagine for a moment that the audience is slipped the information that there are no good guys, that the situation of the hero is not just desperate, but completely hopeless. Obviously, the first thing that would happen is that the suspense would be gone. You and the entire audience would simply be waiting for the axe to fall.
If the hero faced the end with courage, this would be morally edifying, but the situation itself would be tragic. If, however, the hero acted as if help were around the corner and kept buoying himself up with this thought (“Someone is on the way!” – “Help is at hand!”), all you could feel for him would be pity. It would be a means to keep hope alive within a hopeless situation. The hero’s hope would change nothing on the outside; it would be unable to manufacture, out of nothing, good guys coming to the rescue. All it would achieve would the hero’s own mental state of hopefulness rather than hopelessness.
The hopefulness itself would rest on a lie or an illusion and thus, viewed objectively, would be finally absurd. And if the hero really knew what the situation was, but consciously used the falsehood to buoy up his feelings and go whistling along, we would either say, “Poor guy!” or “He’s a fool.” It is this kind of conscious deceit that someone like Woody Allen has looked full in the face and will have none of.
Now this is what the existential methodology is about. If the universe we are living in is what the materialistic humanists say it is, then with our reason (when we stop to think about it) we could find absolutely no way to have meaning or morality or hope or beauty. This would plunge us into despair. We would have to take seriously the challenge of Albert Camus (1913-1960) in the first sentence of The Myth of Sisyphus: “There is but one truly serious philosophical problem, and that is suicide.”92 Why stay alive in an absurd universe? Ah! But that is not where we stop. We say to ourselves – “There is hope!” (even though there is no help). “We shall overcome!” (even though nothing is more certain than that we shall be destroyed, both individually at death and cosmically with the end of all conscious life). This is what confronts us on all sides today: the modern irrational-ism.

How Should We then Live Episode 7 small (Age of Nonreason)

Featured artists are Allora & Calzadilla

[ARTS 315] Course Introduction: Introducing the Avant-Garde – Jon Anderson

Published on Apr 5, 2012

Contemporary Art Trends [ARTS 315], Jon Anderson

Course Introduction: Introducing the Avant-Garde

August 26, 2011

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2nd in series

[ARTS 315] Postmodern Strategies: The Canvas as an Arena: Jackson Pollock – Jon Anderson

Published on Apr 5, 2012

Contemporary Art Trends [ARTS 315], Jon Anderson

The Canvas as an Arena: Jackson Pollock

August 26, 2011

Tom Wolfe on Modern Art in Sept of 2011

Uploaded on Oct 11, 2011

Washington and Lee University alumnus Tom Wolfe presented a lecture on Modern Art during the 60th reunion of his class, the Class of 1951, held on the campus in September 2011

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Allora & Calzadilla
The bird of Hermes is my name, eating my wings to make me tame, 2010

Painted bronze

60 x 50 x 40 cm

Allora & Calzadilla magnify areas of political tension in the public realm through a wide-ranging body of work. They identify and stress the hairline fractures in societal systems – nationhood, environmentalism, states of war and resistance – through performance, sculpture, sound, video and photography. Meticulous researchers both, an understanding of material is central to their practice and they home in on its symbolic dimension, tracing the many marks of history, culture and politics. In the alternative monument Chalks (1998–2006), pieces of this most fragile and soluble of materials were scaled up to man-size and placed in public squares in Lima, New York and Paris, inviting passersby to take part in a collective drawing that would quickly disappear underfoot. Elsewhere the human body itself bears the marks of history: in the series of videos about the Caribbean island of Vieques, controlled by the US government since the 1940s and where locals were displaced for an environmentally disastrous military exclusion zone. In Half Mast\Full Mast (2010), a split channel video is unified by a flagpole aligned between two images that show sites of victory or loss; one gymnast at a time enters either top or bottom screen and physically raises his body to a 90-degree angle, a human flag at either full or half-mast. This image, like many of the duo’s works, balloons with irony or absurdity to what the artists call a ‘monstrous dimension’.

Allora & Calzadilla live and work in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1974, Jennifer Allora received a BA from the University of Richmond in Virginia (1996) and an MS from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (2003). Guillermo Calzadilla was born in 1971 in Havana, Cuba and received a BFA from Escuela de Artes Plásticas, San Juan, Puerto Rico (1996) and an MFA from Bard College (2001). Collaborating since 1995, Allora & Calzadilla represented the USA in the 54th Venice Biennale (2011). Solo exhibitions include Indianapolis Museum of Art (2012), Haus der Kunst, Munich (2008), Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (2008), Kunsthalle Zurich (2007) and Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (2004). Among numerous group exhibitions, they participated in documenta 13, Kassel, Germany (2012); the 29th São Paulo Biennial (2010) and Performance 9 at the Museum of Modern Art, New York (2011).

Allora & Calzadilla

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Allora & Calzadilla
Stoprepairprepair.jpg

Allora & Calzadilla, “Stop Repair, Prepare”, 2008
Born Jennifer Allora March 20, 1974 (age 39) Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Guillermo Calzadilla January 10, 1971 (age 42) Havana, Cuba
Field performance, sculpture, video and sound
Training Jennifer Allora: University of Richmond, Virginia, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Guillermo Calzadilla: Escuela de Artes Plasticas, San Juan and Bard College

Jennifer Allora (born 20 March 1974) and Guillermo Calzadilla (born 10 January 1971) are a collaborative duo of visual artists who live and work in San Juan, Puerto Rico. They represented the USA in the 2011 Venice Biennale.

Work and career

Jennifer Allora was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; she received a BA from the University of Richmond in Virginia (1996), a Master of Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2003 and was a fellow at the Whitney Museum of American Art Independent Study Program.[1]

Guillermo Calzadilla was born in Havana, Cuba; he received a BFA from Escuela de Artes Plásticas, San Juan, Puerto Rico (1996) and an MFA from Bard College in 2001.[1]

The artists met while studying abroad in Florence, Italy. They have worked together since 1995.

In 2007, Allora and Calzadilla exhibited at the Renaissance Society. The show included compositions from ten other Chicago-area musicians.[2]

In 2008 Allora & Calzadilla were featured in the PBS series Art:21.[3]

Allora & Calzadilla participated in the 5th and 7th Gwangju Biennale (2004 and 2008).

The artists were finalists for the Hugo Boss Prize in 2005. Their works are held in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, Tate Modern, and Centre Georges Pompidou, among others.

Allora & Calzadilla have also been shortlisted for London’s 2011 Fourth Plinth commission. Fourth Plinth

Allora & Calzadilla have collaboratively produced an expansive interdisciplinary body of work including sculpture, photography, performance, sound and video. Their artistic practice engages with history and contemporary geo-political realities, destabilizing and re-ordering them in ways that can be alternately humorous, poetic, and revelatory. Their work has been featured in solo exhibitions internationally, including Haus der Kunst, Münich (2008),[4] Serpentine Gallery and Whitechapel Art Gallery, London (2007),[5] Les Rencontres d’Arles festival, France (2008), Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam (2008),[6] Kunsthalle Zurich (2007),[7] National Museum of Art, Oslo (2009) [8] and the Renaissance Society, Chicago (2007).[9]

2011 Venice Biennale

On September 8, 2010, the United States Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) announced the selection of Allora & Calzadilla as the American representative to the 2011 Venice Biennale,[10] marking the first time for artists living in Puerto Rico represent the U.S. The Indianapolis Museum of Art will present their work, which will consist of 6 new commissions. In The Brooklyn Rail, writer David St.-Lascaux describes the pavilion installation Gloria: “First, there’s the tank, lying upside down in the gravel. Then there’s the architrave: STATI UNITI D’AMERICA, in Trajan column capitals. And then there’s the 7’6” copy of the U.S. Capitol’s crowning Statue of Freedom, in blackened bronze, lying inside the ‘Solaris 442 sun bed.'”[11]

Other Awards & Grants

Literature

  • Yates McKee, “Allora & Calzadilla. The monstrous dimension of art,” Flash Art, Milan, no. 240, January–February 2005.
  • J.J. Charlesworth, “Allora & Calzadilla: Power Plays,” Art Review, London, Issue 15, October 2007.
  • Tom McDonough, “Use What Sinks: Allora & Calzadilla,” Art in America, New York City, no. 1, January 2008.
  • Yates McKee, “Wake, Vestige, Survival: Sustainability and the Politics of the Trace in Allora and Calzadilla’s Land Mark”, October #133, MIT Press, summer 2010.

Reviews and criticism

The Year in Art: Times are Tough? Bring on Vermeer and the Pianos by Holland Cotter, The New York Times, December 20, 2009 [18]

Art in Review: Allora & Calzadilla by Holland Cotter, The New York Times, January 30, 2009[19]

Allora & Calzadilla by Ingrid Chu, Frieze Online Blog, February 23, 2009 [20]

Trumpets and Turtles by Sally O’Reilly, Frieze, Issue 108, June-August 2007[21]

Sound Tracks: Hannah Feldman on the Art of Jennifer Allora & Guillermo Calzadilla by Hannah Feldman, Artforum, May 2007[22]

References

External links

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