Monthly Archives: January 2017

RESPONDING TO HARRY KROTO’S BRILLIANT RENOWNED ACADEMICS! Part 115 Richard Robert Ernst  is a Swiss physical chemist and Nobel Laureate, Kroto: WHEN I DIE IS THAT IT?  Dr. Ernst: Of course. Kroto: THERE IS NO CREATIVE ENTITY WITH ANY INTEREST IN YOU?  Dr. Ernst: No.

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MUSIC MONDAY The Rolling Stones first album

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The Rolling Stones Debut Album

Published on Aug 27, 2016

Released 16 April 1964
Recorded 3 January – 25 February 1964 at Regent Studios, London
Recorded at Regent Sound Studios in London over the course of five days in January and February 1964, The Rolling Stones was produced by then-managers Andrew Loog Oldham and Eric Easton. The album was originally released by Decca Records in the UK, while the US version appeared on the London Records label.

The majority of the tracks reflect the band’s love for R&B. Mick Jagger and Keith Richards (whose professional name until 1978 omitted the “s” in his surname) were fledgling songwriters during early 1964, contributing only one original composition to the album: “Tell Me (You’re Coming Back)”. Two songs are credited to “Nanker Phelge” – a pseudonym the band used for group compositions from 1963 to 1965. Phil Spector and Gene Pitney both contributed to the recording sessions, and are referred to as “Uncle Phil and Uncle Gene” in the subtitle of the Phelge instrumental “Now I’ve Got a Witness.”

First pressings of the album, with matrix numbers ending in 1A, 2A, 1B, and 2B, have a 2:52 version of “Tell Me (You’re Coming Back)”, which was pressed from the wrong master tape. Subsequent pressings include the 4:06 version. Early labels and covers also have misprints with the fourth track on side 1 listed as “Mona”, which was later changed to “I Need You Baby””, the subtitle of “Now I’ve Got a Witness” written “Like Uncle Gene and Uncle Phil”, the word ‘If’ omitted from “You Can Make It If You Try”, and ‘Dozier’ spelt ‘Bozier’. “Route 66” is listed as “(Get Your Kicks On) Route 66” on some versions of the album, and some later versions of the album have “I Need You Baby” listed as “Mona (I Need You Baby)” and the subtitles of “Now I’ve Got a Witness” and “Tell Me (You’re Coming Back)” removed entirely.

The album cover photo was taken by Nicholas Wright. The cover bears no title or identifying information other than the photo and the Decca logo – an “unheard of” design concept originated by manager Andrew Oldham.[3][4]

Upon its release, The Rolling Stones became one of 1964’s biggest sellers in the UK, staying at No. 1 for twelve weeks.

The original British version is out-of-print on CD. In November 2010, it was made available as part of a limited edition vinyl box set titled The Rolling Stones 1964–1969, and by itself digitally at the same time. The album was only released in mono in both the UK and US; no true stereo mix was ever made.

The Rolling Stones (album)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
For the EP, see The Rolling Stones (EP).
The Rolling Stones
RS64.jpg
Studio album by The Rolling Stones
Released 16 April 1964
Recorded 3 January – 25 February 1964 at Regent Studios, London
Genre
Length 33:24
Language English
Label Decca
Producer Eric Easton, Andrew Loog Oldham
The Rolling Stones British chronology
The Rolling Stones
(1964)
The Rolling Stones No. 2
(1965)
Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 4.5/5 stars[1]

The Rolling Stones is the debut album by The Rolling Stones, released by Decca Records in the UK on 16 April 1964. The American edition of the LP, with a slightly different track list, came out on London Records on 30 May 1964, subtitled England’s Newest Hit Makers, which later became its official title.

The album is included in Robert Dimery’s 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die.[2]

Recording and releases[edit]

Recorded at Regent Sound Studios in London over the course of five days in January and February 1964, The Rolling Stones was produced by then-managers Andrew Loog Oldham and Eric Easton. The album was originally released by Decca Records in the UK, while the US version appeared on the London Records label.

The majority of the tracks reflect the band’s love for R&B. Mick Jagger and Keith Richards (whose professional name until 1978 omitted the “s” in his surname) were fledgling songwriters during early 1964, contributing only one original composition to the album: “Tell Me (You’re Coming Back)“. Two songs are credited to “Nanker Phelge” – a pseudonym the band used for group compositions from 1963 to 1965. Phil Spector and Gene Pitney both contributed to the recording sessions, and are referred to as “Uncle Phil and Uncle Gene” in the subtitle of the Phelge instrumental “Now I’ve Got a Witness.”

First pressings of the album, with matrix numbers ending in 1A, 2A, 1B, and 2B, have a 2:52 version of “Tell Me (You’re Coming Back)”, which was pressed from the wrong master tape. Subsequent pressings include the 4:06 version. Early labels and covers also have misprints with the fourth track on side 1 listed as “Mona”, which was later changed to “I Need You Baby””, the subtitle of “Now I’ve Got a Witness” written “Like Uncle Gene and Uncle Phil”, the word ‘If’ omitted from “You Can Make It If You Try“, and ‘Dozier’ spelt ‘Bozier’. “Route 66” is listed as “(Get Your Kicks On) Route 66” on some versions of the album, and some later versions of the album have “I Need You Baby” listed as “Mona (I Need You Baby)” and the subtitles of “Now I’ve Got a Witness” and “Tell Me (You’re Coming Back)” removed entirely.

The album cover photo was taken by Nicholas Wright. The cover bears no title or identifying information other than the photo and the Decca logo – an “unheard of” design concept originated by manager Andrew Oldham.[3][4]

Upon its release, The Rolling Stones became one of 1964’s biggest sellers in the UK, staying at No. 1 for twelve weeks.

The original British version is out-of-print on CD. In November 2010, it was made available as part of a limited edition vinyl box set titled The Rolling Stones 1964–1969, and by itself digitally at the same time. The original title was also re-instated as part of the Rolling Stones in Mono CD box set, released on September 30, 2016. The album was only released in mono in both the UK and US; no true stereo mix was ever made.

Track listing[edit]

Side one
No. Title Writer(s) Length
1. Route 66 Bobby Troup 2:20
2. I Just Want to Make Love to You Willie Dixon 2:17
3. “Honest I Do” Jimmy Reed 2:09
4. I Need You Baby Ellas McDaniel 3:33
5. “Now I’ve Got a Witness (Like Uncle Phil and Uncle Gene)” Nanker Phelge 2:29
6. Little by Little Nanker Phelge, Phil Spector 2:39
Side two
No. Title Writer(s) Length
7. I’m a King Bee James Moore 2:35
8. Carol Chuck Berry 2:33
9. Tell Me (You’re Coming Back) Mick Jagger, Keith Richards 4:05
10. Can I Get a Witness Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier, Eddie Holland 2:55
11. You Can Make It If You Try Ted Jarrett 2:01
12. Walking the Dog Rufus Thomas 3:10

American release[edit]

The Rolling Stones
(England’s Newest Hit Makers)
RollingStones.album.cover.jpg
Studio album by The Rolling Stones
Released 30 May 1964
Recorded 3 January – 25 February 1964, Regent Studios, London
Genre Rock and roll, rhythm and blues
Length 31:05
Language English
Label London
Producer Eric Easton and Andrew Loog Oldham
The Rolling Stones American chronology
The Rolling Stones (England’s Newest Hit Makers)
(1964)
12 X 5
(1964)
Singles from The Rolling Stones (England’s Newest Hit Makers)
  1. Not Fade Away“/”I Wanna Be Your Man“”
    Released: 6 March 1964
  2. Tell Me/”I Just Want to Make Love to You“”
    Released: 13 June 1964
Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 4.5/5 stars[1]

The American version of the album, originally subtitled but later officially called England’s Newest Hit Makers, is the band’s debut American album and was released by London Records on 30 May 1964, a month and a half after the British version.

The track “Not Fade Away” (the A-side of the band’s third UK single) replaced “I Need You Baby“,[5] and the titles of the tracks “Now I’ve Got a Witness (Like Uncle Phil and Uncle Gene)” and “Tell Me (You’re Coming Back)” were shortened to “Now I’ve Got a Witness” and “Tell Me” on most versions of the American release. Upon its release, The Rolling Stones reached No. 11 in the US, going gold in the process. To date, this is the Stones’ only American studio album that has failed to place in the top five on the Billboard album charts.[6]

In August 2002, the album, by now officially called England’s Newest Hit Makers, was reissued as a new remastered CD and SACD digipak by ABKCO.[7]

Track listing[edit]

Side one
No. Title Writer(s) Length
1. Not Fade Away Buddy Holly, Norman Petty 1:48
2. “Route 66” Bobby Troup 2:20
3. “I Just Want to Make Love to You” Willie Dixon 2:17
4. “Honest I Do” Jimmy Reed 2:09
5. “Now I’ve Got a Witness” Nanker Phelge 2:29
6. “Little by Little” Nanker Phelge, Phil Spector 2:39
Side two
No. Title Writer(s) Length
7. “I’m a King Bee” James Moore 2:35
8. “Carol” Chuck Berry 2:33
9. “Tell Me” Mick Jagger, Keith Richards 4:05
10. “Can I Get a Witness” Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier, Eddie Holland 2:55
11. “You Can Make It If You Try” Ted Jarrett 2:01
12. “Walking the Dog” Rufus Thomas 3:10

Personnel[edit]

The Rolling Stones
  • Mick Jagger – lead and backing vocals, harmonica on “Little by Little” and “I’m a King Bee”, percussion
  • Keith Richards – guitar, backing vocals
  • Brian Jones – guitar, harmonica, percussion, backing vocals, co-lead vocals on “Walking The Dog”
  • Bill Wyman – bass guitar, backing vocals
  • Charlie Watts – drums, percussion
Additional musicians

Charts and certifications[edit]

Charts[edit]

Album

Chart (1964–65) Peak
position
Australia (Kent Music Report)[8] 1
German Albums (Offizielle Top 100)[9] 2
UK Albums (OCC)[10] 1
US Billboard 200[11] 11

Singles

Year Single Chart Position
1964 “Not Fade Away” UK Singles (OCC)[10] 3
Billboard Hot 100[11] 48
“Tell Me” Billboard Hot 100[11] 24

Certifications[edit]

Region Certification Certified units/Sales
Canada (Music Canada)[12] Platinum 100,000^
United States (RIAA)[13] Gold 500,000^
*sales figures based on certification alone
^shipments figures based on certification alone

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jump up to:a b Richie Unterberger (1964-05-30). “The Rolling Stones (England’s Newest Hit Makers) – The Rolling Stones | Songs, Reviews, Credits, Awards”. AllMusic. Retrieved 2013-10-06.
  2. Jump up^ ^ Robert Dimery; Michael Lydon (23 March 2010). 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die: Revised and Updated Edition. Universe. ISBN 978-0-7893-2074-2.
  3. Jump up^ Wyman, Bill (2002). Rolling With the Stones. DK Publishing. p. 111. ISBN 0-7894-9998-3.
  4. Jump up^ Oldham, Andrew Loog (2000). Stoned. St. Martin’s Griffin. p. 327. ISBN 0-312-27094-1.
  5. Jump up^ McPherson, Ian. “The Rolling Stones’ Complete Discography Part I: 1963–1965”. Retrieved 25 February 2008.
  6. Jump up^ “The Rolling Stones – Chart History”. Billboard. Retrieved 26 March 2016.
  7. Jump up^ Walsh, Christopher (24 August 2002). “Super audio CDs: The Rolling Stones Remastered”. Billboard. Billboard. p. 27.
  8. Jump up^ Kent, David (1993). Australian Chart Book 1970–1992 (Illustrated ed.). St. Ives, N.S.W.: Australian Chart Book. ISBN 0-646-11917-6.
  9. Jump up^ Offiziellecharts.de – The Rolling Stones – The Rolling Stones” (in German). GfK Entertainment Charts. Retrieved 11 June 2016.
  10. ^ Jump up to:a b “Rolling Stones | Artist | Official Charts”. UK Albums Chart Retrieved 11 June 2016.
  11. ^ Jump up to:a b c “The Rolling Stones – Chart history” Billboard 200 for The Rolling Stones. Retrieved 11 June 2016.
  12. Jump up^ “Canadian album certifications – The Rolling Stones”. Music Canada. Retrieved 11 June 2016.
  13. Jump up^ “American album certifications – The Rolling Stones”. Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved 11 June 2016. If necessary, click Advanced, then click Format, then select Album, then click SEARCH

External links[edit]

Preceded by
With the Beatles by The Beatles
UK Albums Chart number-one album
2 May – 25 July 1964
Succeeded by
A Hard Day’s Night by The Beatles
Preceded by
A Hard Day’s Night by The Beatles
Australian Kent Music Report number-one album
16 January – 5 February 1965
Succeeded by
Beatles for Sale by The Beatles

 

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FRIEDMAN FRIDAY NOVEMBER 17, 2016 12:51PM “Unfettered” Free Trade? If Only… By SCOTT LINCICOME

 

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-Milton Friedman Speaks – Free Trade: Producer vs. Consumer

NOVEMBER 17, 2016 12:51PM

“Unfettered” Free Trade? If Only…

“Trump has heaped scorn upon those Republicans who have worshiped at the alter of unfettered free trade.”  – Joe Scarborough, May 22, 2016

“I wouldn’t say that you know this free trade obsession is something that can’t get looked at in regard to making things more fair.” – Incoming White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus, November 14, 2016

One of the most pervasive themes of the last year is the notion that America’s populist uprising, and the success of President-elect Donald Trump, has in large part been a direct response to the United States’ – and in particular the Republican Party’s – libertarian obsession with “unfettered” free trade.  MSNBC’s “Morning Joe” Scarborough, quoted above, has been a big cheerleader of this argument, which has been treated on his show and elsewhere in the media as obvious truth.  And now we see one of the few official members of the future Trump administration, Reince Priebus, repeating the notion, signaling to the country that America’s great free trade moment might be ending.  Clearly, the idea is prevalent and persuasive.

But it is also dead wrong.

First, although the United States maintains a relatively low average import tariff of around 3 percent, it also applies high tariffs on a wide array of “politically-sensitive” (read: highly lobbied) products: 131.8% on peanuts; 35% on tuna; 20% on various dairy products; 25% on light trucks; 16% on wool sweaters, just to name a few.  (Agriculture is particularly bad in this regard.)  We also maintain a long list of restrictive quotas on products like sugar, cheese, canned tuna, brooms, cotton, and baby formula.  And although the U.S. has 14 free trade agreements (FTAs) with 20 different countries and is a longstanding member of the World Trade Organization (WTO), many of these same “sensitive” products have been exempted from the agreements’ trade liberalization commitments.  Free trade for thee, but not for me.

Second, while America’s tariffs and other “formal” trade barriers have indeed been declining for decades, they are only a small part of the overall story.  U.S. non-tariff barriers – export subsidies, discriminatory regulations, “buy local” rules, “fair trade” duties, etc. – have exploded in recent years.  In fact, according to a recent analysis by Credit Suisse, when you add up all forms of trade barriers imposed between 1990 and 2013, the biggest protectionist in the world isn’t China or Mexico but none other than… the United States:

A look at U.S. “trade defense” measures (what we call “trade remedies” – anti-dumping, countervailing duty and safeguards measures) is revealing in this regard.  According to the U.S. International Trade Commission, the United States as of October 31 imposes 373 special protective duties on a wide range of products, more than 90 of which came in the last three years alone (i.e., since chart above on U.S. protectionism was produced):

AD/CVD Orders as of Oct. 31, 2016

Product Group

Total

Agricultural, forest,  and processed food products

22

Chemicals and pharmaceuticals

47

Iron & steel:  Mill products

101

Iron & steel:  Other products & castings

44

Iron & steel:  Pipe products

46

Metals and minerals

24

Miscellaneous manufactured products

64

Plastics, rubber, stone, and glass products

19

Transportation

3

Textiles and apparel

3

Total

373

 

Chinese imports face 140 of these special duties, which can often be as high as 100%, and one sector in particular has benefited from the import protection: iron & steel.  Incredibly, the U.S. industry that benefits from over half of all anti-dumping and countervailing duty (AD/CVD) orders on imports is also the same sector that has been constantly cited by President-elect Trump and his political and media cheerleaders as the biggest victim of America’s supposed religious devotion to “unfettered” free trade:

Other sectors supposedly crushed by the scourge of libertarian trade policy, such as chemicals and agricultural products, also disproportionately benefit from trade remedies protection.

These facts demonstrate quite clearly that American manufacturing and agribusiness, as well their workers, are, in fact, a far cry from being the “unprotected” victims of “unfettered” free trade.  They also should indicate that the commercial failures of U.S. steel or textiles or other sectors, as well the suffering of America’s working class, have not resulted from a lack of trade protectionism.  There is plenty of protection available, and many U.S. industries take full advantage.

If this is “free trade,” then I shudder to think of what’s coming next.

For the steel industry, at least, things are looking up: they have a true champion, former Nucor CEO Dan DiMicco, in charge of picking the next U.S. Trade Representative – a move that, you’ll be shocked to learn, has been cheered by Leo Gerard, the president of the U.S. steelworkers union.  Finally, these poor, unprotected saps will get the fair shake in the global economy that they, and President-elect Trump, think they deserve.

Unfortunately, American consumers, including the millions of workers employed in steel-consuming industries, will be stuck with the bill.

 

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John Hospers on ‘Pure’ versus ‘Impure’ Libertarianism

Published on Oct 16, 2012

John Hospers was professor emeritus of philosophy at the University of Southern California. He was also the first Libertarian Party Presidential candidate in 1972.

In this lecture given at a California Libertarian Party conference in 1989, Hospers describes the differences between what he calls ‘pure’ and ‘impure’ libertarianism. He illustrates differences of opinion between the two in three situations: consent, privacy, and endangerment/risk.

Download the .mp3 version of this lecture here: http://bit.ly/OF4kB8

The Liberal Institute


INTERVIEW


JOHN HOSPERS ran for President of the United States in 1972 on the Libertarian Party ticket. He actually received one vote from the Electoral College. Mr. Hospers is the author of books on esthetics, ethics, and politics. He was an intimate intellectual colleague of revolutionary thinker Ayn Rand from 1961 to 1963. John Hospers died in June 2011 at age 93. This may be his final interview.Liberal Institute: What made you decide to become a philosopher in the first place?

John Hospers: I was always going to become an astronomer. From early childhood I did lots of sky-watching, identifying many stars and constellations. Then as a college freshman I took over the senior astronomy class taught by the dean, which was my first semester of actual teaching experience. And who knows what would have happened had it not been for my cousin in the same Iowa town who was about to get his university degree in literature, which I also had as an undergraduate major. So I got my Masters in English at the University of Iowa, then a scholarship to Columbia University in which at my own request I asked for a change of major to my first love, philosophy. And so I got my Ph.D. in philosophy.

I was brought up pretty much in the free market tradition: government was seen as an interferer and nuisance, not benefactor. When Roosevelt won the l932 election my uncle said: “We’ll never see freedom again.” So when I met Ayn Rand when she lectured in New York in l960 her ideas were never entirely unfamiliar to me, but fleshed out and systematized in a way I had never done. I was not an addict of metaphysics as she was, but epistemology was my forte. And aesthetics was also my specialty in philosophy, and it was in aesthetics that I did my dissertation, which became published as the book Meaning and Truth in the Arts.

I have described in some detail my conversations with Ayn Rand in my l990 article in Liberty in Context, such as why we got along so well, i.e. as long as I was the inquirer, the student, and not the lecturer. But nevertheless the relationship was very satisfying to me, as I explained in the articles.

LI: How did Ayn Rand change your life personally and intellectually?

Hospers: Did she change my life? Yes, she drummed into me the need for total intellectual honesty, and intolerance for those who were not really serious about philosophic concepts but were good at name-dropping.

LI: How much has philosophy in general, and Objectivism in particular, made you a better and happier person?

Hospers: Am I a happier person as a result of knowing her? Yes, but not always. In our final meeting, a speech she gave to the Aesthetics Society in Boston, she insulted me and was openly angry, and never spoke to me again after that. (Other people have suffered the same fate.) This incident was not exactly happiness-producing.

LI: What are the main things today’s Objectivist movement is doing wrong?

Hospers: I’d have to discuss Objectivism point by point.

LI: What are the main things the libertarian movement in general, and the US Libertarian Party in particular, are doing wrong?

But on the Libertarian Party, I think many libertarians have gone amiss. I am not an anarchist. When you have a ball game there has to be an umpire, and one strong enough to defend its values if necessary. And much of what libertarians discuss in meetings is endlessly repetitious. I think my book Libertarianism [1971] has already discussed most of what is needed. (See my article in Liberty magazine in 2007 about the original organization of the Party and why we did with it what we did.)

LI: How would you evaluate the relative merits and value of The Objectivist Center vs. The Ayn Rand Institute?

Hospers: I cannot evaluate the merits of The Ayn Rand Institute.

LI: What are the main strengths and weaknesses of Ayn Rand personally?

Hospers: Ayn herself had many strengths: TOTAL HONESTY REGARDLESS OF HOW PEOPLE FELT ABOUT WHAT SHE SAID. She was also quick to anger, and took any disagreement as a personal offense. That is why she began with many friends but alienated almost all of them in the end (except the one who inherited her estate).

LI: How would you compare Ayn Rand and Aristotle as philosophers?

Hospers: Aristotle was the greatest philosopher (along with Hume), though not in all matters, such as the doctrine of the Prime Mover. (Rand didn’t believe in the Prime Mover either.)

LI: What do you consider to be your philosophic legacy — and what do you most want to be remembered for?

John Hospers: I am most known as a writer of philosophy, in such books as Introduction to Philosophical Analysis [1967] and Human Conduct [1995]. But I always wanted to be remembered as a really good (great?) teacher. Universities, however, consider only a teacher’s scholarly works and not his/her teaching ability. And they don’t consider it at all when promotion time comes.

I want to be remembered as a philosophical instructor who could clarify questions, and present good ideas clearly, avoiding vagueness and confusion in the presentation of ideas. That is probably my main legacy as a teacher. And many of my students have come to remember me in just this way.

__

After listening to the below audio message from Adrian Rogers on Evolution Dr. John Hospers commented in his June 2, 1994 letter:

EVOLUTION HAS BEEN CONSIDERED A FACT. Yes indeed, the evidence is quite overwhelming. If you don’t see how it could have happened or how life could develop from non-life, read e.g. Richard Dawkins’ books such as THE SELFISH GENE. A wonderfully lucid account. 

___

During the 1990′s I actually made it a practice to write famous atheists and scientists that were mentioned by Adrian Rogers and Francis Schaeffer and challenge them with the evidence for the Bible’s historicity and the claims of the gospel. Usually I would send them a cassette tape of Adrian Rogers’ messages “6 reasons I know the Bible is True,” “The Final Judgement,” “Who is Jesus?” and the message by Bill Elliff, “How to get a pure heart.”  I would also send them printed material from the works of Francis Schaeffer and a personal apologetic letter from me addressing some of the issues in their work. My second cassette tape that I sent to both Antony Flew and George Wald was Adrian Rogers’ sermon on evolution and here below you can watch that very sermon on You Tube.   Carl Sagan also took time to correspond with me about a year before he died. 

(Francis Schaeffer pictured below)

Image result for francis schaeffer

Adrian Rogers pictured below

I have posted on Adrian Rogers’ messages on Evolution before but here is a complete message on it.

Evolution: Fact of Fiction? By Adrian Rogers

 

c. The Second Law of Thermodynamics
The third bridge that the evolutionist cannot logically cross is the Second Law of Thermodynamics. Now, what is the Second Law of Thermodynamics? This law says that energy is never destroyed. Everything tends to wear out, to run down, to disintegrate, and, ultimately, to die, but energy just moves to some other form. All processes, by definition, involve change, but the change—now, listen very carefully—is not in the upward direction of complexity, as the evolutionist declares. But, change left to itself is always in disintegration, not in integration. Now, that’s the Second Law of Thermodynamics. It’s called…—to itself, everything collapses, deteriorates, grows old, and dies, sooner or later—it’s called entropy.

Well, why would that be? Well, I preached on that, this morning. We have a creation that is under judgment. And, because it’s under judgment, it involves decay and death. Romans 8:22: “For we know that the whole creation groaneth and travaileth in pain together until now.” Left to themselves, things do not organize; they disorganize. They collapse; they deteriorate. They grow old; they die. They wear out. You can have a beautiful garden. Leave it alone—what happens to it? Leave your body alone; don’t exercise. Don’t take care of it, and see what will happen to it. Take a brand new automobile; park it in the woods. Go off, and come back in a few years; and, see what has happened to it. Or, even a boy’s bedroom—leave it alone; see what is going to happen to it.

Now, the evolutionist says, given enough time, these molecules are going to organize themselves; they’re going to synthesize themselves. The parts are going to come together from simplicity to intricacy.

Well, if you would take the parts of a new automobile, and fly at the height of 10,000 feet, and dump them out, would they assemble themselves into an automobile, before they hit the ground? Suppose I drop the disassembled parts of a car from an airplane at 10,000 feet. Would they assemble themselves before they hit the ground? “Well,” you say, “of course not. They’d be just spread out all over.” Well, the evolutionist would say, “Well, you just don’t have enough time.” Okay, rather than 10,000 feet, let’s take it up to 100,000 feet. Now, is it going to be more organized or less organized?

You see, the more that time goes on, the more disintegration you have. Everything we see disintegrates, not integrates, when left alone by itself. That is called the Second Law of Thermodynamics.

d. The Non-Physical Properties Found in Creation
Now, here’s the fourth bridge that the evolutionists cannot logically cross, and that is the non-physical properties found in creation. Now, what do I mean by the non-physical properties found in creation? Music, Brother Ken—the love of music, art, beauty, a hunger for God, worship. What is there in the survival of the fittest—what is there in the evolutionary process—that would produce these things? How can they be accounted for under the survival of the fittest? Where do these things come from? Genesis 1, verse 26: “And God said, Let us make man in our image, after our likeness…” (Genesis 1:26). You see, we have these inner things—this love for beauty, for art, for truth, for eternity. That didn’t come from some primordial ooze; that came from the God who created us.

Now, I’ve mentioned all of this under one heading. It’s the first of three reasons; all of this is the first of three reasons. I reject evolution for logical reasons. There are four bridges that the evolutionists cannot cross, has not crossed, will not cross.

(Charles Darwin as a young man)

B. Moral Reasons

I reject evolution for moral reasons—for moral reasons. Now, there were two atheists, who lived in the time of Darwin, who believed Darwin’s teaching and locked onto it. One was a man named Nietzsche, and the other was a man named Karl Marx. From Nietzsche we got Nazism. Hitler was a student of Nietzsche, who was a student of Charles Darwin. The other was Karl Marx. Karl Marx was the father of Communism—also a student of Darwin. And, you see, it’s easy to understand, if there is no God, how something like Communism, which is based on Godlessness, and Nazism, which is based on raw brutality, could come. People talk about all those who’ve died in religious wars—and many have, and that’s tragic. But, I want to say that far more—multiplied many more; millions, and millions, and multiplied millions—have died—not because of religion, but because of anti-godly evolution.

You think of those who were destroyed by Nazi Germany. Think of the gas camps. Think of the multiplied millions that were put to death under Stalin and the others, the atrocity of Communism. Well, why that? Why these immoral things? Well, if you believe that you came from animals, if you believe that everything is an accident, ultimately, there can be no standard of right or wrong. You teach people that they’ve come from animals; and, after a while, they’ll begin to live like animals. It follows as night follows day. What do animals live for? Self-gratification, self-preservation, self-propagation. And, that’s what the average American is living for. But, the Bible teaches that man did not spring from the beast; he is headed toward the Beast—that is, the Antichrist.

Friedrich Nietzsche pictured below

Karl Marx pictured below

Hitler pictured below

Results of Hitler’s plan

Peter Singer, who is an ethicist—so-called—at Princeton, believes that we ought to be able to kill little babies, if we don’t like them, if they’re not perfect enough for us. Now, I’m not talking about babies in the womb; I’m talking about pure infanticide. He believes that a live chimpanzee is of more value, if that chimpanzee is healthy, than an unhealthy baby.

Peter Singer

I was in Israel, I was a guest, there, of the Israeli government. They gave me the best guide that they had in Israel. And, that man in Israel—I’ll not call his name, because, thank God, I believe he listens to this program; and, I’m grateful he does, because I’m still trying to witness to him—but this man—a brilliant man, the curator of the Rockefeller Museum there—became a friend. We sat up, one night, late, talking. I said, “Sir, do you believe in God?” He said, “No, I do not.” I said, “Why don’t you believe—why don’t you believe—in God?” He said, “The Holocaust. What kind of a God would allow that to happen?” That deals with the message I preached this morning.

Because of the Holocaust. I said, “Then Hitler has caused you not to believe in God?” He said, “Yes, I detest Hitler.” I said, “Well, you’re on the same side as Hitler. Hitler didn’t believe in God, as such; you don’t believe in God. Hitler believed in evolution; you believe in evolution. Evolution is the survival of the fittest; you believe in the survival of the fittest. And, Hitler had his gas ovens, because he thought that the Aryan race was superior to your people, sir. You’ve become very much like the thing that you fight.” It’s only a short step from believing in evolution to the gas ovens, or whatever.

You see, folks, if there is no God, you can choose what you want. I said to this man, “Sir, if you don’t believe in God, then let me give you a proposition: If there’s a sick baby and a healthy dog, which one would you choose?” In a moment of honesty, he said, “If it were my dog, I would choose the dog.” Let the baby die; let the dog live—why? There’s no God, no creation. Man is not distinct from the animals. All we are is an animal with a thumb juxtaposed to five fingers, with a knee that causes him to stand upright, with the ability to articulate and to think abstractly. If that’s all the difference there is, I submit to you, the man was right. And, who can say what is right, or who can say what is wrong?

Therefore, I reject—I reject—evolution on the moral basis. And, I want to tell you, folks, the battle lines are being drawn today. Over what? Euthanasia. Over what? Genetic engineering. Over what? Abortion. Over what? A basic sense of right or wrong. Now, if evolution is true, then all of these things are up for grabs. We have morality by majority—whatever a person wishes to believe or think. Self-autonomous man wants to have it his way.

C. Theological Reasons

Now, here’s the third and final reason: I reject evolution not only for logical reasons, and not only for moral reasons, but I reject evolution for theological reasons. Now, this may not apply to others, but friend, it applies to me, because the Bible doesn’t teach it, and I believe the Bible. And, you cannot have it both ways. There are some people who say, “Well, I believe the Bible, and I believe in evolution.” Well, you can try that if you want, but you have pudding between your ears. You can’t have it both ways.

H.G. Wells

H. G. Wells, the brilliant historian who wrote The Outlines of History, said this—and I quote: “If all animals and man evolved, then there were no first parents, and no Paradise, and no Fall. If there had been no Fall, then the entire historic fabric of Christianity, the story of the first sin, and the reason for the atonement, collapses like a house of cards.” H. G. Wells says—and, by the way, I don’t believe that he did believe in creation—but he said, “If there’s no creation, then you’ve ripped away the foundation of Christianity.”

Now, the Bible teaches that man was created by God and that he fell into sin. The evolutionist believes that he started in some primordial soup and has been coming up and up. And, these two ideas are diametrically opposed. What we call sin the evolutionist would just call a stumble up. And so, the evolutionist believes that all a man needs—he’s just going up and up, and better and better—he needs a boost from beneath. The Bible teaches he’s a sinner and needs a birth from above. And, these are both at heads, in collision.

Now, remember that evolution is not a science. It may look like a science; it may talk like a science, but it is a philosophy; it is science fiction. It is anti-God; it is really the devil’s religion. And, the sad thing is that our public schools have become the devil’s Sunday School classes.
What is evolution? Evolution is man’s way of hiding from God, because, if there’s no creation, there is no Creator. And, if you remove God from the equation, then sinful man has his biggest problem removed—and that is responsibility to a holy God. And, once you remove God from the equation, then man can think what he wants to think, do what he wants to do, be what he wants to be, and no holds barred, and he has no fear of future judgment.

Aldous Huxley

Aldous Huxley admitted this in his book—and I’m almost finished, but listen to this; it’s very revealing—Aldous Huxley said in his book Ends and Means—I quote: “I had motives for not wanting the world to have a meaning. For myself, and no doubt for most of my contemporaries, the philosophy of meaninglessness was essentially an instrument of liberation. The liberation we desired was simultaneously liberation from a certain system of morality. We objected to the morality because it interfered with our sexual freedom; we objected to the political and economic system because it was unjust. The supporters of these systems claim that, in some way, they embodied meaning—a Christian meaning, they insisted—of the world. There was one admirably simple method of confuting these people and at the same time justifying ourselves in our political and erotic revolt: We could deny that the world had any meaning whatsoever.” Aldous Huxley: “We didn’t want anybody to tell us that our sexual ways and perversions were sin, so what we did—we just simply told God, ‘God, get out of the way.’”

But, as surely as I stand in this place, there is a God. He created us. And, God will bring every work in judgment, whether it be good or whether it be evil.

___________________________________

President Bush with Adrian Rogers at Prayer Breakfast

Conclusion

Those are the reasons I reject evolution: for logical reasons, for moral reasons, and for theological reasons.

Now, Darwin wrote about the destiny of the species. Man wants to know from whence he came. A bigger question than that is, “Where is he going?” Friend, where you came from is a settled thing—that’s over; it’s done. Where you’re going is not yet settled, if you don’t know Jesus. And, I want to tell you, friend, the wisest thing—the best thing you could ever do—would be to be concerned not with the origin, but the destiny, of the species, and, primarily, with your own personal destiny.

May I ask you a question? Are you saved? I didn’t ask if you were Baptist, or Methodist, Presbyterian, or whatever. Are you saved? I didn’t ask if you were moral or nice. Are you saved? I didn’t ask, “Do you know the plan of salvation?” I said, “Are you saved?” I didn’t ask, “Do you believe the plan of salvation?” I asked, “Are you saved?” You’re not saved by the plan of salvation—or even believing in it. You’re saved by Jesus Christ—and trusting in Him. Do you know Him? Do you know Him personally? Have you taken yourself off the throne and enthroned the Lord Jesus? Have you received Him as your Lord and Master, and have you yielded your life to Him? If not, I want to ask you to do that tonight, because I want to say again, from whence you came is already settled—that’s your origin. But, your destiny, right now, is in your hands.
May I lead you in a prayer? Would you pray this prayer? “Dear God, I’m a sinner; I’m lost. I need to be saved, and I want to be saved. Thank You for sending Your Son, the Lord Jesus, to pay my sin debt with His blood on the cross. Thank You, Jesus, for dying for me in agony and blood. Thank You for taking the Hell that I deserved. Thank You for being my substitute. Now, Lord Jesus, I want to invite You to come into my heart, into my life, and I want to turn my life over to You. I want You to be my Lord and Master. Save me, Lord Jesus. Jesus, You taught that salvation is a gift, so I just want to reach out my hand of faith and receive it now. Come into my life. Forgive my sin. Cleanse me. Save me, Jesus. Thank You for doing it, Jesus. I don’t deserve it. I never can earn it. It is the gift of Your love and Your grace, and I receive it now. Thank You for saving me. Begin now to make me the person You want me to be, and help me never to be ashamed of You. In Your name I pray. Amen.”

______________________

George Bush with Adrian and Joyce Rogers at Union University

__

Carl Andre – ‘Works of Art Don’t Mean Anything’ | TateShots

Published on Apr 10, 2014

In this interview filmed at the artist’s New York apartment, Carl Andre discusses how materials are a natural part of his life, and looks back at when his work hit the headlines, recalling criticism such as ‘you can’t make art out of bricks’.

Since the 1960s Carl Andre has made work that emphasises the inherent qualities of his materials. After a period carving sculpture, he began arranging everyday materials in simple geometric configurations. Andre has described his method as scavenging for ‘physical realities’ and he has often sought inspiration in the city streets.

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Equivalent I-VIII (1966)
Andre frequently works in series, producing an entire exhibition of sculptures from different arrangements of the same material, as he did for his influential exhibition at the Tibor de Nagy Gallery in New York in 1966. Here, each work consists of an equivalent number of white sand-lime bricks (120), although the eight stacks are all arranged according to a different rectangular formation. These eight sculptures are arguably the first sculptures that clearly demonstrate Andre’s definition of “sculpture as place.” By spreading out the bricks over the floor of the gallery, Andre wanted to generate a sense of extreme horizontality, reminiscent of the level of water. This led him to consider the layer of space between the sculptures to be just as substantial as the bricks themselves, and to emphasise this feature of the sculpture he coined the aphorism: “a thing is a hole in a thing it is not.” However, at the end of the exhibition this feature of the installation was lost, because each sculpture was sold individually. Perhaps for this reason Andre remade a version of this work in 1995 called Sand-Lime Instar, in which the entire installation is considered a single sculpture.
Sand-lime bricks – Different Museums and Private Collections

Image result for carl andre artist Equivalent I-VIII (1966)

Featured artist is Carl Andre

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Carl Andre
Born September 16, 1935 (age 81)
Quincy, MA
Nationality American
Education Phillips Academy, Andover, MA
Known for Sculpture
Movement Minimalism

Sculpture “43 Roaring forty” by Carl Andre at Kröller-Müller Museum, 1968. Netherlands

Carl Andre (born September 16, 1935) is an American minimalist artist recognized for his ordered linear format and grid format sculptures. His sculptures range from large public artworks (such as Stone Field Sculpture, 1977 in Hartford, CT[1] and Lament for the Children, 1976[2] in Long Island City, NY) to more intimate tile patterns arranged on the floor of an exhibition space (such as 144 Lead Square, 1969[3] or Twenty-fifth Steel Cardinal, 1974). In 1988, Andre was tried and acquitted in the death of his wife, artist Ana Mendieta.

Early life[edit]

Andre was born in Quincy, MA. He completed primary and secondary schooling in the Quincy public school system and studied art at Phillips Academy in Andover, MA from 1951 to 1953.[4] While at Phillips Academy he became friends with Hollis Frampton who would later influence Andre’s radical approach to sculpture through their conversations about art[5] and through introductions to other artists.[6]

Andre served in the U.S. Army in North Carolina 1955–56 and moved to New York City in 1956. While in New York, Frampton introduced Andre to Constantin Brâncuși through whom Andre became re-acquainted with a former classmate from Phillips Academy, Frank Stella, in 1958. Andre shared studio space with Stella from 1958 through 1960.[6]

Career[edit]

Andre’s early work in wood may have been inspired by Brâncuși, but his conversations with Stella about space and form led him in a different direction. While sharing a studio with Stella, Andre developed a series of wooden “cut” sculptures[5] (such as Radial Arm Saw cut sculpture, 1959, and Maple Spindle Exercise, 1959). Stella is noted as having said to Andre (regarding hunks of wood removed from Andre’s sculpture) “Carl, that’s sculpture, too.”[7]

From 1960-64 Andre worked as freight brakeman and conductor in New Jersey for the Pennsylvania Railroad. The experience with blue collar labor and the ordered nature of conducting freight trains would have a later influence on Andre’s sculpture and artistic personality. For example, it was not uncommon for Andre to dress in overalls and a blue work shirt, even to the most formal occasions.”[4]

During this period, Andre focused mainly on writing and there is little notable sculpture on record between 1960 and 1965. The poetry would resurface later, most notably in a book (finally published in 1980 by NYU press) called 12 Dialogues in which Andre and Frampton took turns responding to one another at a typewriter using mainly poetry and free-form essay-like texts.[5] Andre’s concrete poetry has exhibited in the United States and Europe, a comprehensive collection of which is in the collection of the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam.[8]

In 1965 he had his first public exhibition of work in the Shape and Structure show curated by Henry Geldzahler at the Tibor de Nagy Gallery.[9]

Andre’s controversial “Lever” was included in the seminal 1966 show at the Jewish Museum in New York entitled Primary Structures.

In 1969 Andre helped organize the Art Workers Coalition.

In 1970 he had a solo exhibition at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, and has had solo exhibitions and participated in group shows in major museums, galleries, and kunsthalles throughout America and Europe.

In 1972, Britain’s Tate Gallery acquired Andre’s Equivalent VIII, an arrangement of fireplace bricks. The piece was exhibited several times without incident, but became the center of controversy in 1976 after being featured in an article in The Sunday Times and later being defaced with paint. The “Bricks controversy” became one of the most famous public debates in Britain about contemporary art.[10][11]

Criticism[edit]

The gradual evolution of consensus about the meaning of Carl Andre’s art can be found in About Carl Andre: Critical Texts Since 1965, published by Ridinghouse in 2008. The most significant essays and exhibition reviews have been collated into one volume, including texts written by some of the most influential art historians and critics: Clement Greenberg, Donald Kuspit, Lucy R. Lippard, Robert C. Morgan, Barbara Rose and Roberta Smith.

He is represented by the Paula Cooper Gallery in New York, by Konrad Fischer Galerie in Düsseldorf and Berlin, by Sadie Coles HQ in London, and Yvon Lambert Gallery in Paris.

Personal life[edit]

Ana Mendieta death[edit]

In 1979 Andre first met Ana Mendieta through a mutual friendship with artists Leon Golub and Nancy Spero at AIR Gallery in New York City.[4] Andre and Mendieta eventually married in 1985, but the relationship ended in tragedy. Mendieta fell to her death from Andre’s 34th story apartment window in 1985 after an argument with Andre. There were no eyewitnesses. A doorman in the street below had heard a woman screaming “No, no, no, no,” before Mendieta’s body landed on the roof of a building below. Andre had what appeared to be fresh scratches on his nose and forearm, and his story to the police differed from his recorded statements to the 911 operator an hour or so earlier. The police arrested him.[12]

Andre was charged with second degree murder. He elected to be tried before a judge with no jury. In 1988 Andre was acquitted of all charges related to Mendieta’s death.[13]

Artist books[edit]

Quincy, 1973. Artist book by Carl Andre which features commissioned photographs of landscapes and monuments in his hometown of Quincy, Massachusetts. Quincy was originally printed in conjunction with Andre’s 1973 solo show at Addison Gallery. Reprinted by Primary Information in 2014.

America Drill, 2003, Les Maîtres de Forme Contemporains, mfc-michèle didier and Paula Cooper Gallery. Limited edition of 100 numbered, signed and stamped copies, 400 numbered copies and 100 artist’s proofs.[14]

Bibliography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. Jump up^ Hartford Advocate 11/13/1997 “Twenty Years After Stone Field Sculpture shook the Insurance City, Carl Andre Returns” by Patricia Rosoff[1]
  2. Jump up^ “Art Galleries on artnet”.
  3. Jump up^ “144 Lead Square”.
  4. ^ Jump up to:a b c Naked by the Window, by Robert Katz published 1990 by The Atlantic Monthly Free Press ISBN 0-87113-354-7
  5. ^ Jump up to:a b c 12 Dialogues, Carl Andre and Hollis Frampton 1962-1963 published by Nova Scotia College of Art and Design Press and New York University Press, edited by Benjamin HD Buchloh ISBN 0-8147-0579-0
  6. ^ Jump up to:a b Minimalism: Art and Polemics in the Sixties, edited by James Meyer, published 2004 by Yale University Press ISBN 0-300-10590-8, ISBN 978-0-300-10590-2
  7. Jump up^ Naked by the Window, by Robert Katz, published 1990 by The Atlantic Monthly Free Press ISBN 0-87113-354-7
  8. Jump up^ “CARL ANDRE”.
  9. Jump up^ “Oral history interview with Carl Andre, 1972 Sept”. Research collections. Archives of American Art. 2011. Retrieved 17 Jun 2011.
  10. Jump up^ John Walker. (1999). “Carl Andre’s ‘pile of bricks’- Tate Gallery acquisition controversy – 1976”. Art & outrage/artdesigncafe. Retrieved 23 December 2011.
  11. Jump up^ “[ARCHIVED CONTENT] Archive Journeys: Tate History – People, The Public – Tate”.[permanent dead link]
  12. Jump up^ Patrick, Vincent (June 10, 1990). “A Death In The Art World”. The New York Times. Retrieved July 27, 2013.
  13. Jump up^ Sullivan, Ronald (February 12, 1988). “Greenwich Village Sculptor Acquitted of Pushing Wife to Her Death”. The New York Times. Retrieved April 28, 2010.
  14. Jump up^ “mfc-michèle didier – Home”.

External links[edit]

Great article

Carl Andre Life and Art Periods

“My art springs from my desire to have things in the world which would otherwise never be there.”

CARL ANDRE SYNOPSIS

During the 1960s and 1970s, Carl Andre produced a number of sculptures which are now counted among the most innovative of his generation. Along with figures such asDonald Judd, Sol LeWitt, Dan Flavin, Eva Hesse and Robert Morris, Andre played a central role in defining the nature of Minimalist Art. His most significant contribution was to distance sculpture from processes of carving, modeling, or constructing, and to make works that simply involved sorting and placing. Before him, few had imagined that sculpture could consist of ordinary, factory-finished raw materials, arranged into straightforward configurations and set directly on the ground. In fact, during the 1960s and 1970s many of his low-lying, segmented works came to redefine for a new generation of artists the very nature of sculpture itself.

CARL ANDRE KEY IDEAS

Andre is a sculptor who neither carves into substances, nor models forms. His work involves the positioning of raw materials – such as bricks, blocks, ingots, or plates. He uses no fixatives to hold them in place. Andre has suggested that his procedure for building up a sculpture from small, regularly-shaped units is based on “the principle of masonry construction” – like stacking up bricks to build a wall.
Andre claims that his sculpture is an exploration of the properties of matter, and for this reason he has called himself a “matterist.” Some people have seen his art as “concept based,” as though each piece is merely the realization of an idea. But for Andre, this is mistaken: the characteristics of every unit of material he selects, and the arrangement and position of the sculpture in its environment, forms the substance of his art.
Andre insists on installing all new work in person, and his configurations are always carefully attuned to the scale and proportions of their immediate surroundings. However, once installed, his sculptures can be dismantled and reconstructed in other locations without his direct involvement.
In 1966, Andre began to describe his work as “sculpture as place,” a phrase which alludes both to the fact that his sculptures are produced simply by positioning units on the floor, and to their “place generating” properties. Andre defined “place” as “an area within an environment which has been altered in such a way as to make the general environment more conspicuous.”

MOST IMPORTANT ART

Cedar Piece (1959 (destroyed), remade 1964)
Andre recreated this sculpture for the exhibition “Nine Young Artists” at the Hudson River Museum in 1964, and it became the first work of his to be exhibited in public. It consists of equal lengths of standard lumber, into which he has cut simple woodworker’s joints so that the sculpture can be slotted together, and then detached for the purposes of portability. The initial version dates from 1959 when he was in close contact with Stella and was observing Stella complete his paintings using repeated, even brushstrokes. Cedar Piece can be understood as Andre’s early attempt to construct sculpture in a similar fashion, also by building up a form from identical units. Andre liked this approach because once he had established the initial premise, he did not have to make any further decisions about the formal composition of the sculpture. In fact, it could be argued that the sculpture composes itself, in that the shape of the St Andrews cross formed by the ends of the beams results from the regular positioning of the joints.
Cedar – Oeffentliche Kunstsammlung Basel, Museum fur Gegenwartskunst, Switzerland

CARL ANDRE BIOGRAPHY

Childhood

Andre has always credited his early upbringing in Quincy, Massachusetts, as having a formative influence on his art. The son of a marine architect of Swedish descent, he grew up in close proximity to the Quincy naval shipyards, which during the Second World War expanded rapidly (at their peak of productivity they employed 32,000 workers). He would later claim that one of his strongest childhood memories had been the sight of the “rusting acres of steel plates” which lay beside the yards “under the rain and sun.”

In 1951, at the age of 16, Andre was awarded a scholarship to attend Phillips Academy, the prestigious boarding school in Andover, Massachusetts. It was here, under the tutelage of the painters Maud and Patrick Morgan, that he received his only formal art training.

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CARL ANDRE LEGACY

From the late 1960s onwards, Andre’s art became an important reference point for many subsequent artists both in North America and in Western Europe – largely because he was seen to have reduced sculpture to its essential state. While Andre himself saw this as the end-point of his art, many sculptors (including Richard Serra) took his insights as the starting-point for their own practice, and built up from the principles which Andre had laid down.

CARL ANDRE QUOTES

“Art is the exclusion of the unnecessary.”

“Settle for nothing less than concrete analysis of concrete situations leading to concrete actions.”

“My art will reflect not necessarily conscious politics but the unanalyzed politics of my life.”

“…art for art’s sake is ridiculous. Art is for the sake of one’s needs.”

INFLUENCES

ARTISTS

Ezra Pound

Ad Reinhardt

Robert Morris

Constantin Brancusi

Frank Stella
FRIENDS

Hollis Frampton

Constantin Brancusi

Frank Stella
MOVEMENTS

Neo-Plasticism

Constructivism

Suprematism

Minimalism
Carl Andre Bio Photo
Carl Andre
Years Worked: 1958 – Present
ARTISTS

Eva Hesse Overview

Eva Hesse

Sol LeWitt Overview

Sol LeWitt

Donald Judd Overview

Donald Judd

Walter de Maria Overview

Walter de Maria

Richard Serra Overview

Richard Serra
FRIENDS

Michael Fried Overview

Michael Fried

Rosalind Krauss Overview

Rosalind Krauss

Leon Golub Overview

Leon Golub

Nancy Spero Overview

Nancy Spero
MOVEMENTS

Minimalism Overview

Minimalism

Conceptual Art Overview

Conceptual Art

Landscape Architecture Overview

Landscape Architecture

Land Art Overview

Land Art

Post-Minimalism Overview

Post-Minimalism

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Religious Songs That Secular People Can Love: Bob Dylan, The Byrds, Sam Cooke, Johnny Cash & Your Favorites in Music, Religion| December 15th, 2015

Religious Songs That Secular People Can Love: Bob Dylan, The Byrds, Sam Cooke, Johnny Cash & Your Favorites

Anyone with a deep affection for Western classical music probably has their share of favorite Christian music, whatever their personal beliefs. So, too, do fans of American folk, blues, and country. Some artists have covered the odd religious tune as part of a broad roots repertoire, like the Byrds’ cover of Bluegrass gospel legends the Louvin Brothers’ cornball “The Christian Life,” above, from 1968’s Sweetheart of the Rodeo. Though Gram Parsons, with the band for the recording of this album, had his traditional leanings, his musical religion was more “Cosmic American” than Christian. But before Parsons joined the band and turned ‘em full country rock for a time, the Byrds recorded another religious song, one of their biggest hits—Pete Seeger’s “Turn, Turn, Turn” (below), which cribs all of its lyrics verbatim from Chapter 3 of the Book of Ecclesiastes (easily the non-religious person’s favorite book of the Bible).

The Byrds – Turn! Turn! Turn!

Other American legends have turned to faith in dramatic conversions and have written earnest, original religious music. Most famously, we have the case of Bob Dylan, whose conversion to evangelical Christianity saw him proselytizing from the stage. He also wrote some beautiful songs like “Precious Angel,” at the top of the post, which he claimed was for the woman who brought him to Christianity (and which supposedly contains a dig at his ex-wife Sara for not converting him). Though it features some of the more disturbing lyrical turns Dylan has taken in his career, it’s one of my favorite tunes of his from this strange period, not least because of the brilliant guitar work of Mark Knopfler.

Farther Along – Sam Cooke & the Soul Stirrers

Whatever beliefs he’s claimed over the decades, Dylan’s music has always been religious in some sense, partly because of the American folk traditions he draws on. Almost all of the early R&B and rock and roll artists came from the folk gospel world, from Elvis to Little Richard to Jerry Lee Lewis. Notably, the golden-voiced Sam Cooke got his start as a gospel singer with several vocal groups, including his own The Soul Stirrers. The harmonies in their rendition of gospel classic “Farther Along” (above) give me chills every time I hear it, even though I don’t credit the song’s beliefs.

Johnny Cash – God’s Gonna Cut You Down

It’s a common feeling I get with American soul, blues, and country singers who moved in and out of the popular and gospel worlds. Then there are those artists who left gospel for outlaw stardom, then returned to the fold and embraced their church roots later in life. A prime example of this kind of spiritual, and musical, renewal is that of Johnny Cash. There are many sides of gospel Cash. Perhaps the most poignant of his religious recordings come from his final years. Though it suffers from some commercial overuse, Cash’s recording of blues classic “God’s Gonna Cut You Down” (often titled “Run On”), above, is equal parts menacing and haunting, a Christian-themed memento mori that caught on big with lots of secular music fans.

Soulsavers – Revival

The list of religious music that non-religious people love could go on and on. Though the examples here are explicitly Christian, they certainly don’t have to be. There’s Yusef Islam, formerly Cat Stevens, who came back to record stirring original music after his conversion to Islam, and whose powerful “Morning has Broken” moves believers and non-believers alike. There’s Bob Marley, or any number of popular Rastafarian reggae artists. Then there are more contemporary artists making religious music for largely secular audiences. One could reference indie darling Sufjan Stevens, whose religious beliefs are central to his songwriting. And there’s a favorite of mine, Mark Lanegan, former Screaming Trees singer and current rock and roll journeyman who often works with religious themes and imagery, most notably in the glorious “Revival,” above, with the Soulsavers project.

The love many non-religious people have for some religious music often comes from a religious upbringing, something singer/songwriter Iris Dement discussed in a recent interview on NPR’s Fresh Air. Dement has recorded one of the most moving renditions of a hymn I remember fondly from childhood church days: a powerfully spare version of “Leaning on the Everlasting Arms” from the 2010 True Grit soundtrack. She’s also written what may be one of the best religious songs for secular (or non-religious, or post-religious, whatever…) people. In “Let the Mystery Be,” above, Dement’s agnostic refrain expresses a very sensible attitude, in my view: “But no one knows for certain and so it’s all the same to me / I think I’ll just let the mystery be.”

These are but a few of the religious songs that move this mostly secular person. Whether you’re religious or not, what are some of your favorite religious songs that have broad crossover appeal? Feel free to name your favorites in the comments below.

Related Content:

The Religions of Bob Dylan: From Delivering Evangelical Sermons to Singing Hava Nagila With Harry Dean Stanton

Guitar Stories: Mark Knopfler on the Six Guitars That Shaped His Career

Atheist Ira Glass Believes Christians Get the Short End of the Media Stick

Josh Jones is a writer and musician based in Durham, NC. Follow him at @jdmagness

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George Harrison’s best album is possibly ALL THINGS MUST PASS

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George Harrison – ”All Things Must Pass” [Full Album]

All Things Must Pass

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This article is about the album. For other uses, see All Things Must Pass (disambiguation).
“Apple Jam” redirects here. For jam made from apples, see apple jam and apple sauce.
All Things Must Pass
All Things Must Pass 1970 cover.jpg
Studio album by George Harrison
Released 27 November 1970
Recorded 26 May–late October 1970
Studio Abbey Road Studios, London; Trident Studios, London; Apple Studio, London
Genre
Length 105:59
Label Apple
Producer George Harrison, Phil Spector
George Harrison chronology
Electronic Sound
(1969)
All Things Must Pass
(1970)
The Concert for Bangladesh
(1971)
Singles from All Things Must Pass
  1. My Sweet Lord
    Released: 23 November 1970 (US); 15 January 1971 (UK)
  2. What Is Life
    Released: 15 February 1971 (US)
Alternative cover

Album artwork of the 2001 re-release of All Things Must Pass

All Things Must Pass is a triple album by English musician George Harrison. Recorded and released in 1970, the album was Harrison’s first solo work since the break-up of the Beatles in April that year, and his third solo album overall. It includes the hit singles “My Sweet Lord” and “What Is Life“, as well as songs such as “Isn’t It a Pity” and the title track that had been turned down for inclusion on releases by the Beatles. The album reflects the influence of Harrison’s musical activities with artists such as Bob Dylan, the Band, Delaney & Bonnie and Billy Preston during 1968–70, and his growth as an artist beyond his supporting role to former bandmates John Lennon and Paul McCartney. All Things Must Pass introduced Harrison’s signature sound, the slide guitar, and the spiritual themes that would be present throughout his subsequent solo work. The original vinyl release consisted of two LPs of songs and a third disc of informal jams, titled Apple Jam. Several commentators interpret Barry Feinstein‘s album cover photo, showing Harrison surrounded by four garden gnomes, as a statement on his independence from the Beatles.

Production began at London’s Abbey Road Studios in May 1970, with extensive overdubbing and mixing continuing through October. Among the large cast of backing musicians were Eric Clapton and Delaney & Bonnie’s Friends band – three of whom formed Derek and the Dominos with Clapton during the recording – as well as Ringo Starr, Gary Wright, Preston, Klaus Voormann, John Barham, Badfinger and Pete Drake. The sessions produced a double album’s worth of extra material, most of which remains unissued.

All Things Must Pass was critically and commercially successful on release, with long stays at number 1 on charts around the world. The album was co-produced by Phil Spector and employs his Wall of Sound production technique to notable effect; Ben Gerson of Rolling Stone described the sound as “Wagnerian, Brucknerian, the music of mountain tops and vast horizons”.[1] Reflecting the widespread surprise at the assuredness of Harrison’s post-Beatles debut, Melody Makers Richard Williams likened the album to Greta Garbo‘s first role in a talking picture and declared: “Garbo talks! – Harrison is free!”[2] According to Colin Larkin, writing in the 2011 edition of his Encyclopedia of Popular Music, All Things Must Pass is “generally rated” as the best of all the former Beatles’ solo albums.[3]

During the final year of his life, Harrison oversaw a successful reissue campaign to mark the 30th anniversary of the album’s release. Following this reissue, in March 2001, the set was certified six-times platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America. Among its appearances in critics’ best-album lists, All Things Must Pass was ranked 79th on The Times “The 100 Best Albums of All Time” in 1993, while Rolling Stone currently places it 433rd on the magazine’s “500 Greatest Albums of All Time“. In January 2014, All Things Must Pass was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame.

Background[edit]

Music journalist John Harris has identified the start of George Harrison‘s “journey” to making All Things Must Pass as his visit to America in late 1968, following the acrimonious sessions for the BeatlesWhite Album.[4] While in Woodstock in November,[5] Harrison established a long-lasting friendship with Bob Dylan[4] and experienced a creative equality among the Band that contrasted sharply with John Lennon and Paul McCartney‘s domination in the Beatles.[6][7] Coinciding with this visit was a surge in Harrison’s songwriting output,[8] following his renewed interest in the guitar, after three years spent studying the Indian sitar.[9][10] As well as being one of the few musicians to co-write songs with Dylan,[4] Harrison had recently collaborated with Eric Clapton on “Badge“,[11] which became a hit single for Cream in the spring of 1969.[12]

Billboard ad for Harrison’s Wonderwall Music soundtrack (1968)

Once back in London, and with his compositions continually overlooked for inclusion on releases by the Beatles,[13][14] Harrison found creative fulfilment in extracurricular projects that, in the words of his musical biographer, Simon Leng, served as an “emancipating force” from the restrictions imposed on him in the band.[15] His activities during 1969 included producing Apple signings Billy Preston and Doris Troy, two American singer-songwriters whose soul and gospel roots proved as influential on All Things Must Pass as the music of the Band.[16] He also recorded with artists such as Leon Russell[17] and Jack Bruce,[18] and accompanied Clapton on a short tour with Delaney Bramlett‘s soul revue, Delaney & Bonnie and Friends.[19] In addition, Harrison identified his involvement with the Hare Krishna movement as providing “another piece of a jigsaw puzzle” that represented the spiritual journey he had begun in 1966.[20] As well as embracing the Vaishnavist branch of Hinduism, Harrison produced two hit singles during 1969–70 by the UK-based devotees, credited as Radha Krishna Temple (London).[21] In January 1970,[22] Harrison invited American producer Phil Spector to participate in the recording of Lennon’s Plastic Ono Band single “Instant Karma![23][24] This association led to Spector being given the task of salvaging the Beatles’ Get Back rehearsal tapes, released officially as the Let It Be album (1970),[25][26] and later co-producing All Things Must Pass.[27]

Harrison first discussed the possibility of making a solo album of his unused songs during the ill-tempered Get Back sessions, held at Twickenham Film Studios in January 1969.[28][29][nb 1] At Abbey Road Studios on 25 February, his 26th birthday,[32] Harrison recorded demos of “All Things Must Pass” and two other compositions that had received little interest from Lennon and McCartney at Twickenham.[33][34] With the inclusion of one of these songs – “Something” – and “Here Comes the Sun” on the Beatles’ Abbey Road album in September 1969, music critics acknowledged that Harrison had bloomed into a songwriter to match Lennon and McCartney.[35][36] Although he began talking publicly about recording his own album from the autumn of 1969,[37][38] it was only after McCartney announced that he was leaving the Beatles, in April 1970, signalling the band’s break-up,[39] that Harrison committed to the idea.[40] Despite having already made Wonderwall Music (1968), a mostly instrumental soundtrack album, and the experimental Electronic Sound (1969),[41] Harrison considered All Things Must Pass to be his first solo album.[42][nb 2]

Content[edit]

Main body[edit]

I went to George’s Friar Park … and he said, “I have a few ditties for you to hear.” It was endless! He had literally hundreds of songs and each one was better than the rest. He had all this emotion built up when it was released to me.[47]

– Phil Spector, on first hearing Harrison’s backlog of songs in early 1970

Spector first heard Harrison’s stockpile of unreleased compositions early in 1970, when visiting his recently purchased home, Friar Park.[47] “It was endless!” Spector later recalled of the recital, noting the quantity and quality of Harrison’s material.[47] Harrison had accumulated songs from as far back as 1966; both “Isn’t It a Pity” and “Art of Dying” date from that year.[48] He co-wrote at least two songs with Dylan while in Woodstock,[49] one of which, “I’d Have You Anytime“, appeared on All Things Must Pass.[50] Harrison wrote “Let It Down” in late 1968 also.[51]

He introduced the Band-inspired[52] “All Things Must Pass”, along with “Hear Me Lord” and “Let It Down”, at the Beatles’ Get Back rehearsals, only to have them rejected by Lennon and McCartney.[53][54][nb 3] The tense atmosphere at Twickenham fuelled another All Things Must Pass song, “Wah-Wah“,[58] which Harrison wrote in the wake of his temporary departure from the band on 10 January 1969.[59]Run of the Mill” followed soon afterwards, its lyrics focusing on the failure of friendships within the Beatles[60] amid the business problems surrounding their Apple organisation.[61] Harrison’s musical activities outside the band during 1969 inspired other compositions on the album: “What Is Life” came to him while driving to a London session that spring for Preston’s That’s the Way God Planned It album;[62]Behind That Locked Door” was Harrison’s message of encouragement to Dylan,[63] written the night before the latter’s comeback performance at the Isle of Wight Festival;[64] and Harrison began “My Sweet Lord” as an exercise in writing a gospel song[65] during Delaney & Bonnie’s stopover in Copenhagen in December 1969.[66][nb 4]

I Dig Love” resulted from Harrison’s early experiments with slide guitar, a technique that Bramlett had introduced him to,[65] in order to cover for guitarist Dave Mason‘s departure from the Friends line-up.[69] Other songs on All Things Must Pass, all written during the first half of 1970, include “Awaiting on You All“, which reflected Harrison’s adoption of chanting through his involvement with the Hare Krishna movement;[70][71]Ballad of Sir Frankie Crisp (Let It Roll)“, a tribute to the original owner of Friar Park;[72] and “Beware of Darkness“.[73] The latter was another composition influenced by Harrison’s association with the Radha Krishna Temple,[74] and was written while some of the devotees were staying with him at Friar Park.[75]

Shortly before beginning work on All Things Must Pass, Harrison attended a Dylan session in New York on 1 May 1970,[76] during which he acquired a new song of Dylan’s, “If Not for You“.[58] Harrison wrote “Apple Scruffs“, which was one of a number of Dylan-influenced compositions on the album,[77] towards the end of production on All Things Must Pass, as a tribute to the diehard fans who had kept a vigil outside the studios where he was working.[71][78]

According to Leng, All Things Must Pass represents the completion of Harrison’s “musical-philosophical circle”, in which his 1966–68 immersion in Indian music found a Western equivalent in gospel music.[79] While identifying hard rock, country and western, and Motown among the other genres on the album, Leng writes of the “plethora of new sounds and influences” that Harrison had absorbed through 1969 and now incorporated, including “Krishna chants, gospel ecstasy, Southern blues-rock [and] slide guitar”.[80] The melodies of “Isn’t It a Pity” and “Beware of Darkness” have aspects of Indian classical music, and on “My Sweet Lord”, Harrison combined the Hindu bhajan tradition with gospel.[81] The recurrent lyrical themes on the album are Harrison’s spiritual quest, as it would be throughout his solo career,[82] and friendship, particularly the failure of relationships among the Beatles.[83][84] Rob Mitchum of Pitchfork Media describes the album as “dark-tinged Krishna folk-rock”.[85]

Apple Jam[edit]

On the original LP‘s third disc, entitled Apple Jam, four of the five tracks – “Out of the Blue”, “Plug Me In”, “I Remember Jeep” and “Thanks for the Pepperoni” – are improvised instrumentals built around minimal chord changes,[86] or in the case of “Out of the Blue”, a single-chord riff.[87] The title for “I Remember Jeep” originated from the name of Clapton’s dog, Jeep,[88] and “Thanks for the Pepperoni” came from a line on a Lenny Bruce comedy album.[89] In a December 2000 interview with Billboard magazine, Harrison explained: “For the jams, I didn’t want to just throw [them] in the cupboard, and yet at the same time it wasn’t part of the record; that’s why I put it on a separate label to go in the package as a kind of bonus.”[90][nb 5]

The only vocal selection on Apple Jam is “It’s Johnny’s Birthday”, sung to the tune of Cliff Richard‘s 1968 hit “Congratulations“, and recorded as a gift from Harrison to Lennon to mark the latter’s 30th birthday.[92] Like all the “free” tracks on the bonus disc,[93] “It’s Johnny’s Birthday” carried a Harrison songwriting credit on the original UK release of All Things Must Pass,[94] while on the first US copies, the only songwriting information on the record’s face labels was the standard inclusion of a performing rights organisation, BMI.[95] In December 1970, “Congratulations” songwriters Bill Martin and Phil Coulter claimed for royalties,[92] with the result that the composer’s credit for Harrison’s track was swiftly changed to acknowledge Martin and Coulter.[88]

Demo tracks and outtakes[edit]

Aside from the seventeen compositions issued on discs one and two of the original album,[96] Harrison recorded at least twenty other songs – either in demo form for Spector’s benefit, just before recording got officially under way in late May, or as outtakes from the sessions.[97][98] In a 1992 interview, Harrison commented on the volume of material: “I didn’t have many tunes on Beatles records, so doing an album like All Things Must Pass was like going to the bathroom and letting it out.”[99][nb 6] As well as “Wah-Wah”, “Art of Dying” and others that would soon be developed in a band setting, Harrison’s solo performance for Spector included the following songs,[100] all of which remain unreleased:[29][nb 7]

  • “Window, Window” – another composition turned down by the Beatles in January 1969[102]
  • “Everybody, Nobody” – the melody of which Harrison adapted for “Ballad of Sir Frankie Crisp”[100]
  • “Nowhere to Go” – a second Harrison–Dylan collaboration from November 1968, originally known as “When Everybody Comes to Town”[103]
  • “Cosmic Empire”, “Mother Divine” and “Tell Me What Has Happened to You”.[29][104]

Also from this performance were two tracks that Harrison returned to in later years.[97]Beautiful Girl” appeared on his 1976 album Thirty Three & 1/3,[29] and the Dylan-written “I Don’t Want to Do It” was Harrison’s contribution to the soundtrack for Porky’s Revenge! (1985).[58]

During the main sessions for All Things Must Pass, Harrison taped or routined early versions of “You“, “Try Some, Buy Some” and “When Every Song Is Sung“.[105][106] Harrison offered these three songs to Ronnie Spector in February 1971 for her proposed (and soon abandoned) solo album on Apple Records.[107] After releasing his own versions of “Try Some, Buy Some” and “You” between 1973 and 1975,[108] he offered “When Every Song Is Sung” (since retitled “I’ll Still Love You”) to former bandmate Ringo Starr for his 1976 album Ringo’s Rotogravure.[109]Woman Don’t You Cry for Me“, written in December 1969 as his first slide-guitar composition,[110] was another song that Harrison revisited on Thirty Three & 1/3.[69] Harrison included “I Live for You” as the only all-new bonus track on the 2001 reissue of All Things Must Pass.[111] “Down to the River” remained unused until he reworked it as “Rocking Chair in Hawaii[112] for his final studio album, the posthumously released Brainwashed (2002).[113]

Harrison recorded the following compositions during the All Things Must Pass sessions but they have never received an official release:[106]

Contributing musicians[edit]

That was the great thing about [the Beatles] splitting up: to be able to go off and make my own record … And also to be able to record with all these new people, which was like a breath of fresh air.[29]

– George Harrison, December 2000

The precise line-up of contributing musicians is open to conjecture.[116][117] Due to the album’s big sound and the many participants on the sessions, commentators have traditionally referred to the grand, orchestral nature of this line-up.[118][119][120] In 2002, music critic Greg Kot described it as “a who’s who of the decade’s rock royalty”,[53] while Harris writes of the cast taking on “a Cecil B. De Mille aspect”.[58]

Jim Gordon, Carl Radle, Bobby Whitlock and Eric Clapton formed Derek and the Dominos while participating in the sessions for All Things Must Pass.

The musicians included Bobby Whitlock, Jim Gordon, Carl Radle, Bobby Keys, Jim Price and Dave Mason,[121] all of whom had recently toured with Delaney & Bonnie.[122] Along with Eric Clapton, there were also musicians whose link with Harrison went back some years, such as Ringo Starr and Billy Preston, and German bassist Klaus Voormann,[123] formerly of Manfred Mann and a friend since the Beatles’ years in Hamburg.[124] Handling much of the keyboard work with Whitlock was Gary Wright,[116] who went on to collaborate regularly with Harrison throughout the 1970s.[125]

From within Apple’s stable of musicians, Harrison recruited the band Badfinger, future Yes drummer Alan White, and Beatles assistant Mal Evans on percussion.[126][127] Badfinger drummer Mike Gibbins‘ powerful tambourine work led to Spector giving him the nickname “Mr Tambourine Man”, after the Dylan song,[58] while bandmates Pete Ham, Tom Evans and Joey Molland provided rhythm acoustic-guitar parts that, in keeping with Spector’s Wall of Sound principles, were to be “felt but not heard”.[71] Orchestral arranger John Barham also sat in on the sessions, occasionally contributing on harmonium and vibraphone.[128] Other guests included Nashville pedal steel player Pete Drake, Procol Harum‘s Gary Brooker and a pre-Genesis Phil Collins.[129] An uncredited Peter Frampton played acoustic guitar on the country tracks featuring Drake.[130]

For contractual reasons, on UK pressings of All Things Must Pass, Clapton’s participation on the first two discs of the album remained unacknowledged for many years,[119][131] although he was listed among the musicians appearing on the Apple Jam disc in Britain.[132][133][nb 8] Harrison was unaware of Collins’s contribution until putting together the 30th anniversary reissue of the album in 2000,[139] at which point he offered Collins his belated thanks.[140] Clapton’s former bandmate in Cream and Blind Faith, Ginger Baker, participated in the session for “I Remember Jeep” only, according to the album’s sleeve notes.[106]

Simon Leng consulted Voormann, Barham, Molland and Delaney Bramlett for his chapter covering the making of All Things Must Pass and credits Tony Ashton as one of the keyboard players on both versions of “Isn’t It a Pity”.[141][nb 9] Unsubstantiated claims exist regarding possible guest appearances from John Lennon,[144] Maurice Gibb[145] and Pink Floyd‘s Richard Wright.[146][147] In addition, for some years after the album’s release, rumours claimed that the Band backed Harrison on the country-influenced “Behind That Locked Door”.[148]

Production[edit]

Initial recording[edit]

You could feel after the first few sessions that it was going to be a great album.[149]

– Klaus Voormann, 2003

The date for Harrison’s run-through of songs for Spector, at Abbey Road Studios, is generally thought to have been 20 May 1970, the same day as the Let It Be film’s world premiere,[150] with recording sessions beginning on 26 May.[29][98][151][nb 10] With assistance from former Beatles engineers Ken Scott and Phil McDonald,[126] Spector recorded most of the album’s backing tracks live,[153] in some cases featuring multiple drummers and keyboard players, and as many as five rhythm guitarists.[58][139]

Abbey Road Studios, where Harrison recorded much of All Things Must Pass

According to authors Chip Madinger and Mark Easter, the majority of these backing tracks were taped on 8-track at Abbey Road, with the first batch of sessions taking place from late May through to the second week of June.[154] The first song recorded was “Wah-Wah”;[155] “What Is Life”, versions one and two of “Isn’t It a Pity”, and the songs on which Drake participated, such as “All Things Must Pass” and “Ballad of Sir Frankie Crisp”, were among the other tracks taped then.[156][nb 11] The Apple Jam instrumentals “Thanks for the Pepperoni” and “Plug Me In”, featuring Harrison, Clapton and Mason each taking extended guitar solos,[160] were recorded later in June, at the Beatles’ Apple Studio, and marked the formation of Clapton, Whitlock, Radle and Gordon’s short-lived band Derek and the Dominos.[161] Harrison also contributed on guitar to both sides of the band’s debut single, “Tell the Truth[162] and “Roll It Over”,[163] which were produced by Spector and recorded at Apple on 18 June.[161][164] The eleven-minute “Out of the Blue” featured contributions from Keys and Price,[165] both of whom began working with the Rolling Stones around this time.[166]

Although Harrison had estimated in a New York radio interview that the solo album would take no more than eight weeks to complete,[167][168] recording, overdubbing and mixing on All Things Must Pass lasted for five months, until late October.[161][169] Part of the reason for this was Harrison’s need to make regular visits to Liverpool to tend to his mother, who had been diagnosed with cancer.[170][171] Participants at the recording sessions identify Spector’s erratic behaviour as another factor affecting progress on the album.[58][161][172] Harrison later referred to Spector needing “eighteen cherry brandies” before he could start work, a situation that forced much of the production duties onto Harrison alone.[58][171] In July 1970, by which time sessions had resumed at Trident Studios,[97] Spector fell over in the studio and broke his arm.[149] Early that month, work on All Things Must Pass was temporarily brought to a halt as Harrison headed north to see his dying mother for the last time.[173][nb 12] EMI‘s growing concerns regarding studio costs added to the pressure on Harrison,[149] and a further complication, John Harris notes, was that Clapton had become infatuated with Harrison’s wife, Pattie Boyd, and adopted a heroin habit as a means of coping with his guilt.[58][nb 13]

Overdubbing[edit]

In Spector’s absence, Harrison had completed the album’s backing tracks and preliminary overdubs by 12 August.[161] He then sent early mixes of many of the songs to his co-producer, who was convalescing in Los Angeles,[126] and Spector replied by letter dated 19 August with suggestions for further overdubs and final mixing.[161] Among Spector’s comments were detailed suggestions regarding “Let It Down”,[60] the released recording of which Madinger and Easter describe as “the best example of Spector running rampant with the ‘Wall of Sound'”, and an urging that he and Harrison carry out further work on the songs at the superior, 16-track Trident Studios facility.[178] Spector then returned to oversee conversion of the 8-track recordings to 16-track masters,[171] a process that allowed for more freedom when overdubbing new instruments.[126]

John Barham’s orchestrations were recorded during the next phase of the album’s production,[155] starting in early September, along with many further contributions from Harrison, such as his lead vocals, slide guitar parts and multi-tracked backing vocals (the latter credited to “the George O’Hara-Smith Singers”).[179] Leng recognises Barham’s arrangements on “pivotal” songs such as “Isn’t It a Pity”, “My Sweet Lord”, “Beware of Darkness” and “All Things Must Pass” as important elements of the album’s sound,[115] while Spector has praised Harrison’s guitar and vocal work on the overdubs, saying: “Perfectionist is not the right word. Anyone can be a perfectionist. He was beyond that …”[47] Harrison’s style of slide guitar playing incorporated aspects of both Indian music and the blues tradition;[52] from its introduction on All Things Must Pass, Leng writes, Harrison’s slide guitar became his musical signature – “as instantly recognisable as Dylan’s harmonica or Stevie Wonder‘s”.[180]

Mixing and mastering[edit]

If I were doing [All Things Must Pass] now, it would not be so produced. But it was the first record … And anybody who’s familiar with Phil [Spector]’s work – it was like Cinemascope sound.[42]

– George Harrison, January 2001

On 9 October, while carrying out final mixing at Abbey Road, Harrison presented Lennon with the recently recorded “It’s Johnny’s Birthday”.[181][nb 14] The track featured Harrison on vocals, harmonium and all other instruments, and vocal contributions from Mal Evans and assistant engineer Eddie Klein.[92] That same month, Harrison finished his production work on Starr’s 1971 single “It Don’t Come Easy“, the basic track for which they had recorded with Voormann in March at Trident.[183] Aside from his contributions to projects by Starr, Clapton, Preston and Ashton during 1970, over the following year Harrison would reciprocate the help that his fellow musicians on All Things Must Pass had given him by contributing to albums by Whitlock, Wright, Badfinger and Keys.[184][nb 15]

On 28 October, Harrison and Boyd arrived in New York, where he and Spector carried out final preparation for the album’s release, such as sequencing.[126] Harrison harboured doubts about whether all the songs they had finished were worthy of inclusion; Allan Steckler, Apple Records’ US manager, was “stunned” by the quality of the material and assured Harrison that he should issue all the songs.[29] Spector’s signature production style gave All Things Must Pass a heavy, reverb-oriented sound, which Harrison came to regret with the passage of time.[186][187][188] Outtakes from the recording sessions became available on bootlegs in the 1990s.[189] One such unofficial release, the three-disc The Making of All Things Must Pass,[190] contains multiple takes of some of the songs on the album, providing a work-in-progress on the sequence of overdubs onto the backing tracks.[155]

Artwork[edit]

Harrison commissioned Tom Wilkes to design a hinged box in which to house the three vinyl discs, rather than have them packaged in a triple gatefold cover.[88] Apple insider Tony Bramwell later recalled: “It was a bloody big thing … You needed arms like an orang-utan to carry half a dozen.”[134] The packaging caused some confusion among retailers, who, at that time, associated boxed albums with opera or classical works.[134]

The stark black-and-white cover photo was taken on the main lawn at Friar Park[71] by Wilkes’ Camouflage Productions partner, Barry Feinstein.[88] Commentators interpret the photograph – showing Harrison seated in the centre of, and towering over, four comical-looking garden gnomes – as representing his removal from the Beatles’ collective identity.[191][192] The gnomes had recently been delivered to Friar Park and placed on the lawn;[193] seeing the four figures there, and mindful of the message in the album’s title, Feinstein immediately drew parallels with Harrison’s former band.[134] Author and music journalist Mikal Gilmore has written that Lennon’s initial negativity regarding All Things Must Pass was possibly because he was “irritated” by this cover photo;[170] Harrison biographer Elliot Huntley attributes this reaction to envy on Lennon’s part during a time when “everything [Harrison] touched turned to gold”.[194][nb 16]

Apple included a poster with the album, showing Harrison in a darkened corridor of his home, standing in front of an iron-framed window.[198] Wilkes had designed a more adventurous poster, but according to Beatles author Bruce Spizer, Harrison was uncomfortable with the imagery.[199][nb 17] Some of the Feinstein photographs that Wilkes had incorporated into this original poster design appeared instead on the picture sleeves for the “My Sweet Lord” single and its follow-up, “What Is Life”.[88]

Release[edit]

Music should be used for the perception of God, not jitterbugging.[170]

– George Harrison, January 1971

EMI and its US counterpart, Capitol Records, had originally scheduled the album for release in October 1970, and advance promotion began in September.[161] An “intangible buzz” had been “in the air for months” regarding Harrison’s solo album, according to Alan Clayson, and “for reasons other than still-potent loyalty to the Fab Four”.[200] Harrison’s stature as an artist had grown over the past year through the acclaim afforded his songs on Abbey Road,[201][202] as well as the speculation caused by his and Dylan’s joint recording session in New York.[203] Noting also Harrison’s role in popularising new acts such as the Band and Delaney & Bonnie, and his association with Clapton and Cream, NME critic Bob Woffinden concluded in 1981: “All in all, Harrison’s credibility was building to a peak.”[201]

Trade ad for the “What Is Life” single, February 1971

All Things Must Pass was released on 27 November 1970 in the United States, and on 30 November in Britain,[197] with the rare distinction of having the same Apple catalogue number (STCH 639) in both countries.[93] Often credited as rock‘s first triple album,[170] it was the first triple set of previously unissued music by a single act, the multi-artist Woodstock live album having preceded it by six months.[171] Adding to the commercial appeal of Harrison’s songs, Clayson writes, All Things Must Pass appeared at a time when religion and spirituality had become “a turn-of-the-decade craze” among Western youth, just as the Twist had been in 1960.[204] Another factor behind the album’s first weeks of release was Harrison’s meeting with McCartney in New York,[197] the failure of which led to McCartney filing suit in London’s High Court to dissolve the Beatles’ legal partnership.[205]

Apple issued “My Sweet Lord” as the album’s first single, as a double A-side with “Isn’t It a Pity” in the majority of countries.[206] It was highly successful,[202] topping singles charts around the world during the first few months of 1971,[71]on its way to becoming the most performed song of that year.[207][nb 18] Discussing the song’s cultural impact, Gilmore credits “My Sweet Lord” with being “as pervasive on radio and in youth consciousness as anything the Beatles had produced”.[170] Issued in February 1971, the second single, “What Is Life” backed with “Apple Scruffs”,[209] was also successful.[210]

All Things Must Pass was number 1 on the UK’s official albums chart for eight weeks, although until 2006, chart records incorrectly stated that it had peaked at number 4.[211][nb 19] On Melody Makers national chart, the album was also number 1 for eight weeks, from 6 February to 27 March, six of which coincided with “My Sweet Lord” topping the magazine’s singles chart.[212] In America, All Things Must Pass spent seven weeks at number 1 on the Billboard Top LP’s chart, from 2 January until 20 February, and a similarly long period atop the listings compiled by Cash Box and Record World;[213] for three of those weeks, “My Sweet Lord” held the top spot on the Billboard Hot 100.[214] Writing in the April 2001 issue of Record Collector, managing editor Peter Doggett described Harrison as “arguably the most successful rock star on the planet” at the start of 1971, with All Things Must Pass “easily outstripping other solo Beatles projects later in the year, such as [McCartney’s] Ram and [Lennon’s] Imagine“.[215] Harrison’s so-called “Billboard double” – whereby one artist simultaneously holds the top positions on the magazine’s albums and singles listings – was a feat that none of his former bandmates equalled until Paul McCartney and Wings repeated the achievement in June 1973.[216][nb 20] At the 1972 Grammy Awards, All Things Must Pass was nominated for Album of the Year and “My Sweet Lord” for Record of the Year, but Harrison lost out in both categories to Carole King.[218][219]

All Things Must Pass was awarded a gold disc by the Recording Industry Association of America on 17 December 1970[220] and it has since been certified six times platinum.[213][221] According to John Bergstrom of PopMatters, as of January 2011, All Things Must Pass had sold more than Imagine and McCartney and Wings’ Band on the Run (1973) combined.[222] Also writing in 2011, Lennon and Harrison biographer Gary Tillery describes it as “the most successful album ever released by an ex-Beatle”.[223] In his 2004 book The 100 Best-Selling Albums of the 70s, Hamish Champ ranks it as the 36th best-selling album of that decade.[224]

Critical reception[edit]

Contemporary reviews[edit]

All Things Must Pass received almost universal critical acclaim on release – as much for the music and lyrical content as for the fact that, of all the former Beatles, it was the work of supposed junior partner George Harrison.[2][187][225] Beatles author Robert Rodriguez has written of critics’ attention being centred on “a major talent unleashed, one who’d been hidden in plain sight all those years” behind Lennon and McCartney.[226] “That the Quiet Beatle was capable of such range,” Rodriguez continues, “from the joyful ‘What Is Life’ to the meditative ‘Isn’t It a Pity’ to the steamrolling ‘Art of Dying’ to the playful ‘I Dig Love’ – was revelatory.”[226] Most reviewers tended to discount the third disc of studio jams, accepting that it was a “free” addition to justify the set’s high retail price,[86][132]although Anthony DeCurtis recognises Apple Jam as further evidence of the album’s “bracing air of creative liberation”.[227]

Ben Gerson of Rolling Stone deemed All Things Must Pass “both an intensely personal statement and a grandiose gesture, a triumph over artistic modesty” and referenced the three-record set as an “extravaganza of piety and sacrifice and joy, whose sheer magnitude and ambition may dub it the War and Peace of rock and roll”.[1] Gerson also lauded the album’s production as being “of classic Spectorian proportions, Wagnerian, Brucknerian, the music of mountain tops and vast horizons”.[1] In the NME, Alan Smith referred to Harrison’s songs as “music of the mind”, adding: “they search and they wander, as if in the soft rhythms of a dream, and in the end he has set them to words which are often both profound and profoundly beautiful.”[94] Billboard magazine hailed All Things Must Pass as “a masterful blend of rock and piety, technical brilliance and mystic mood, and relief from the tedium of everyday rock”.[228]

Melody Makers Richard Williams summed up the surprise many felt at Harrison’s apparent transformation: All Things Must Pass, he said, provided “the rock equivalent of the shock felt by pre-war moviegoers when Garbo first opened her mouth in a talkie: Garbo talks! – Harrison is free!”[2] In another review, for The Times, Williams opined that, of all the Beatles’ solo releases thus far, Harrison’s album “makes far and away the best listening, perhaps because it is the one which most nearly continues the tradition they began eight years ago”.[225][nb 21] William Bender of Time magazine described it as an “expressive, classically executed personal statement … one of the outstanding rock albums in years”, while Don Heckman wrote in The New York Times: “If anyone had any doubts that George Harrison was a major talent, they can relax … This is a release that shouldn’t be missed.”[231]

That the album sounded so contemporary in 1970 contributed to All Things Must Pass seeming dated and faddish later in the decade.[131] Village Voice critic Robert Christgau, having bemoaned in 1971 that the album was characterised by “overblown fatuity” and uninteresting music,[232] wrote in a 1981 review of its “featurelessness”, “right down to the anonymity of the multitracked vocals”.[233] In their book The Beatles: An Illustrated Record, Roy Carr and Tony Tyler were likewise lukewarm in their assessment, criticising the “homogeneity” of the production and “the lugubrious nature of Harrison’s composing”.[132] Writing in The Beatles Forever in 1977, however, Nicholas Schaffner praised the album as the “crowning glory” of Harrison and Spector’s careers, and highlighted “All Things Must Pass” and “Beware of Darkness” as the “two most eloquent songs … musically as well as lyrically”.[234]

Retrospective reviews and legacy[edit]

Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
AllMusic 5/5 stars[45]
Blender 5/5 stars[235]
Christgau’s Record Guide C[233]
Encyclopedia of Popular Music 4/5 stars[236]
Mojo 5/5 stars[188]
MusicHound 5/5[237]
Pitchfork Media 9.0/10[238]
Q 5/5 stars[239]
Rolling Stone 4.5/5 stars[227]
Uncut 5/5 stars[240]

AllMusic‘s Richie Unterberger views All Things Must Pass as “[Harrison’s] best … a very moving work”,[45] while Roger Catlin of MusicHound describes the set as “epic and audacious”, its “dense production and rich songs topped off by the extra album of jamming”.[237] Q magazine considers it to be an exemplary fusion of “rock and religion”, as well as “the single most satisfying collection of any solo Beatle”.[239] Filmmaker Martin Scorsese has written of the “powerful sense of the ritualistic on the album”, adding: “I remember feeling that it had the grandeur of liturgical music, of the bells used in Tibetan Buddhist ceremonies.”[241] Writing for Rolling Stone in 2002, Greg Kot described this grandeur as an “echo-laden cathedral of rock in excelsis” where the “real stars” are Harrison’s songs;[53] in the same publication, Mikal Gilmore labelled the album “the finest solo work any ex-Beatle ever produced”.[242] In his July 2001 feature for Mojo, John Harris called it “the inaugural solo album that still stands as the best Beatles solo record”,[4] while earlier that year the magazine’s album review read in part: “This remains the best Beatles solo album … oozing both the goggle-eyed joy of creative emancipation and the sense of someone pushing himself to the limit …”[243]

George Harrison confronted the breakup head-on, with the graceful, philosophical All Things Must Pass. A series of elegies, dream sequences, and thoughts on the limits of idealism, it is arguably the most fully realized solo statement from any of the Beatles.[244]

– Author Tom Moon, in 1,000 Recordings to Hear Before You Die (2008)

In his PopMatters review, John Bergstrom likens All Things Must Pass to “the sound of Harrison exhaling”, noting: “He was quite possibly the only Beatle who was completely satisfied with the Beatles being gone.”[222] Bergstrom credits the album with heavily influencing bands such as ELO, My Morning Jacket, Fleet Foxes and Grizzly Bear, as well as helping bring about the dream pop phenomenon.[222] Another Rolling Stone critic, James Hunter, commented in 2001 on how All Things Must Pass “helped define the decade it ushered in”, in that “the cast, the length, the long hair falling on suede-covered shoulders … foretold the sprawl and sleepy ambition of the Seventies.”[245] In The Rolling Stone Album Guide (2004), Mac Randall writes that the album is exceptional, but “a tad overrated” by those critics who tend to overlook how its last 30 minutes comprise “a bunch of instrumental blues jams that nobody listens to more than once”.[246] Unterberger similarly cites the inclusion of Apple Jam as “a very significant flaw”, while recognising that its content “proved to be of immense musical importance”, with the formation of Derek and the Dominos.[45] Writing for Pitchfork Media in 2016, Jayson Green said that Harrison was the only former Beatle who “changed the terms of what an album could be” since, although All Things Must Pass was not the first rock triple LP, “in the cultural imagination, it is the first triple album, the first one released as a pointed statement.”[247]

Among Harrison’s biographers, Simon Leng views All Things Must Pass as a “paradox of an album”: as eager as Harrison was to break free from his identity as a Beatle, Leng suggests, many of the songs document the “Kafkaesque chain of events” of life within the band and so added to the “mythologized history” he was looking to escape.[248] Ian Inglis notes 1970’s place in an era marking “the new supremacy of the singer-songwriter”, through such memorable albums as Simon & Garfunkel‘s Bridge Over Troubled Water, Neil Young‘s After the Gold Rush, Van Morrison‘s Moondance and Joni Mitchell‘s Ladies of the Canyon, but that none of these “possessed the startling impact” of All Things Must Pass.[249] Harrison’s triple album, Inglis writes, “[would] elevate ‘the third Beatle’ into a position that, for a time at least, comfortably eclipsed that of his former bandmates”.[249]

All Things Must Pass features in music reference books such as The Mojo Collection: The Greatest Albums of All Time,[250] Robert Dimery’s 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die[251] and Tom Moon’s 1,000 Recordings to Hear Before You Die.[252] In 1999, All Things Must Pass appeared at number 9 on The Guardians “Alternative Top 100 Albums” list, where the editor described it as the “best, mellowest and most sophisticated” of all the Beatles’ solo efforts.[253] In 2006, Pitchfork Media placed it at number 82 on the site’s “Top 100 Albums of the 1970s”.[85] Six year later, it was voted 433rd on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the “500 Greatest Albums of All Time“.[254] According to the website Acclaimed Music, All Things Must Pass has also appeared in the following critics’ best-album books and lists, among others: Paul Gambaccini‘s The World Critics Best Albums of All Time (1977; ranked number 79), The Times “100 Best Albums of All Time” (1993; number 79), Allan Kozinn‘s The 100 Greatest Pop Albums of the Century (published in 2000), Qs “The 50 (+50) Best British Albums Ever” (2004), Mojos “70 of the Greatest Albums of the 70s” (2006), the NMEs “100 Greatest British Albums Ever” (2006; number 86), Paste magazine’s “The 70 Best Albums of the 1970s” (2012; number 27), and Craig Mathieson and Toby Creswell‘s The 100 Best Albums of All Time (2013).[251] In January 2014, All Things Must Pass was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame,[255] an award bestowed by the Recording Academy “to honor recordings of lasting qualitative or historical significance that are at least 25 years old”.[256]

Subsequent releases[edit]

2001[edit]

Front cover of the 2001 album booklet, reflecting Harrison’s environmental concerns at the start of the 21st century; copyright Gnome Records

To mark the 30th anniversary of the album’s release, Harrison supervised a remastered edition of All Things Must Pass, which was issued in January 2001, less than a year before his death from cancer at the age of 58.[257][nb 22] The reissue appeared on Gnome Records, a label specifically set up by him for the project.[259] Harrison oversaw revisions to Wilkes and Feinstein’s album artwork,[140] which included a colorised “George & the Gnomes” front cover[140]and, on the two CD sleeves and the album booklet, further examples of this cover image showing an imaginary, gradual encroachment of urbanisation on the Friar Park landscape.[91][nb 23] The latter series served to illustrate Harrison’s dismay at “the direction the world seemed headed at the start of the millennium”, Gary Tillery observes, a direction that was “so far afield from the Age of Aquarius that had been the dream of the sixties”.[260][nb 24] Harrison launched a website dedicated to the reissue, which offered, in the description of Chuck Miller of Goldmine magazine, “graphics and sounds and little Macromedia-created gnomes dancing and giggling and playing guitars in a Terry Gilliam-esque world”.[262] As a further example of his willingness to embrace modern media,[263] Harrison prepared an electronic press kit, which he described as “not exactly an EPK but it is a threat to world order as we know it”.[264]

Titled All Things Must Pass: 30th Anniversary Edition, the new album contained five bonus tracks, including “I Live For You”,[265] two of the songs performed for Spector at Abbey Road in May 1970 (“Beware of Darkness” and “Let It Down“) and “My Sweet Lord (2000)“, a partial re-recording of Harrison’s biggest solo hit.[266] In addition, Harrison resequenced the content of Apple Jam so that the album closed with “Out of the Blue”, as he had originally intended.[90][140] Assisting Harrison with overdubs on the bonus tracks were his son, Dhani Harrison, singer Sam Brown and percussionist Ray Cooper,[90] all of whom contributed to the recording of Brainwashed around this time.[267]

With Harrison undertaking extensive promotional work, the 2001 reissue was a critical and commercial success.[268] Having underestimated the album’s popularity, Capitol faced a back order of 20,000 copies in America.[269] There, the reissue debuted at number 4 on Billboards Top Pop Catalog Albums chart[270] and topped the magazine’s Internet Album Sales listings.[271] In the UK, it peaked at number 68 on the national albums chart.[272] Writing in Record Collector, Doggett described this success as “a previously unheard-of achievement for a reissue”.[273]

Following Harrison’s death on 29 November 2001, All Things Must Pass returned to the US charts, climbing to number 6 and number 7, respectively, on the Top Pop Catalog and Internet Album Sales charts.[274] With the release on iTunes of much of the Harrison catalogue, in October 2007,[275] the album re-entered the US Top Pop Catalog chart, peaking at number 3.[276]

2010[edit]

For the 40th anniversary of All Things Must Pass, EMI reissued the album in its original configuration, in a limited-edition box set of three vinyl LPs.[277][278] Available via participating Record Store Day retailers, with each copy individually numbered,[279] the release took place on 26 November 2010.[280] In what Bergstrom notes as a contrast to the more aggressive marketing campaign run simultaneously by John Lennon’s estate, to commemorate Lennon’s 70th birthday,[222] a digitally remastered 24-bit version of the album was made available for download from Harrison’s official website.[277][278] The reissue coincided with the Harrison estate’s similarly low-key[281] release of the Ravi Shankar–George Harrison box set Collaborations[282] and East Meets West Music‘s reissue of Raga, the long-unavailable documentary on Shankar that Harrison had helped release through Apple Films in 1971.[283][284]

2014[edit]

All Things Must Pass was remastered again for inclusion in the eight-disc Harrison box set The Apple Years 1968–75,[285] issued in September 2014.[286] Also available as a separate, double CD release, the reissue reproduces Harrison’s 2001 liner notes[287] and includes the same five bonus tracks that appeared on the 30th anniversary edition.[285] In addition, the box set’s DVD contains the promotional film created for the 2001 reissue.[288]

Track listing[edit]

All tracks written by George Harrison, except where noted.

Original release[edit]

Side one

  1. I’d Have You Anytime” (Harrison, Bob Dylan) – 2:56
  2. My Sweet Lord” – 4:38
  3. Wah-Wah” – 5:35
  4. Isn’t It a Pity (Version One)” – 7:10

Side two

  1. What Is Life” – 4:22
  2. If Not for You” (Dylan) – 3:29
  3. Behind That Locked Door” – 3:05
  4. Let It Down” – 4:57
  5. Run of the Mill” – 2:49

Side three

  1. Beware of Darkness” – 3:48
  2. Apple Scruffs” – 3:04
  3. Ballad of Sir Frankie Crisp (Let It Roll)” – 3:48
  4. Awaiting on You All” – 2:45
  5. All Things Must Pass” – 3:44

Side four

  1. I Dig Love” – 4:55
  2. Art of Dying” – 3:37
  3. Isn’t It a Pity (Version Two)” – 4:45
  4. Hear Me Lord” – 5:46

Side five (Apple Jam)

  1. “Out of the Blue” – 11:14
  2. “It’s Johnny’s Birthday” (Bill Martin, Phil Coulter, Harrison) – 0:49
  3. “Plug Me In” – 3:18

Side six (Apple Jam)

  1. “I Remember Jeep” – 8:07
  2. “Thanks for the Pepperoni” – 5:31

2001 remaster[edit]

Disc one

Tracks 1–9 as per sides one and two of original issue, with the following additional tracks:

  1. I Live for You” – 3:35
  2. Beware of Darkness” (acoustic demo) – 3:19
  3. Let It Down” (alternate version) – 3:54
  4. What Is Life” (backing track/alternate mix) – 4:27
  5. My Sweet Lord (2000)” – 4:57

Disc two

Tracks 1–9 as per sides three and four of original issue, followed by the reordered Apple Jam tracks, for which all participants are believed to now be credited as composers also.[nb 25]

  1. “It’s Johnny’s Birthday” (Martin, Coulter; new lyrics by Mal Evans, Harrison, Eddie Klein) – 0:49
  2. “Plug Me In” (Eric Clapton, Jim Gordon, Harrison, Dave Mason, Carl Radle, Bobby Whitlock) – 3:18
  3. “I Remember Jeep” (Ginger Baker, Clapton, Harrison, Billy Preston, Klaus Voormann) – 8:07
  4. “Thanks for the Pepperoni” (Clapton, Gordon, Harrison, Mason, Radle, Whitlock) – 5:31
  5. “Out of the Blue” (Al Aronowitz, Clapton, Gordon, Harrison, Bobby Keys, Jim Price, Radle, Whitlock, Gary Wright) – 11:16

Personnel[edit]

The following musicians are either credited on the 2001 reissue of All Things Must Pass[289] or are acknowledged as having contributed after subsequent research:[292]

Accolades[edit]

Grammy Awards[edit]

Year Nominee/work Award Result
1972 All Things Must Pass Album of the Year[218] Nominated
“My Sweet Lord” Record of the Year[218] Nominated
2014 All Things Must Pass Hall of Fame Award[256] Won

Charts[edit]

Weekly charts[edit]

Original release
Chart (1970–71) Position
Australian Kent Music Report[295] 1
Canadian RPM 100 Albums[296] 1
Dutch MegaCharts Albums[297] 1
Italian Albums Chart[298] 2
Japanese Oricon LP Chart[299] 4
Norwegian VG-lista Albums[300] 1
Spanish Albums Chart[301] 1
Swedish Kvällstoppen Chart[302] 1
UK Albums Chart[272] 1
US Billboard Top LP’s[271] 1
West German Media Control Albums Chart[303] 10
Reissue
Chart (2001) Position
French SNEP Albums Chart[304] 68
Japanese Oricon Albums Chart[299] 46
UK Albums Chart[272] 68
US Billboard Top Pop Catalog Albums[276] 3

Year-end charts[edit]

Chart (1971) Position
Australian Kent Music Report[295] 5
Dutch Albums Chart[305] 11
Italian Albums Chart[298] 18
US Billboard Year-End[306] 18

Certifications[edit]

Region Certification Certified units/Sales
Canada (Music Canada)[307] Gold 50,000^
United Kingdom (BPI)[308] Gold 100,000^
United States (RIAA)[309] 6× Platinum 6,000,000^
*sales figures based on certification alone
^shipments figures based on certification alone

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Everything We Know About Woody Allen’s 2017 Film With Kate Winslet And Justin Timberlake

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Woody Allen has, it seems, wrapped production on his 2017 Film. The new film stars Kate Winlset and Justin Timberlake. And despite some very public days of shooting, We still don’t know that much about the new film, but here’s what we know so far.

Minor spoilers below!

Premise

The new film is set in the 1950s, in and around an amusement park. Allen had started talking about these elements at Cannes, although it seemed to take longer than usual for him and his team to set production.

We know the film will be a drama. The little plot we know – completely unconfirmed – is that Kate Winslet’s character is on the run, and finds herself at this amusement park.

The cast and characters

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It seems clear that it’s the Kate Winslet show. She is the star who sets the story off. We saw her in scenes on the beach, and working as a waitress in a clam bar. She was the first person cast in the film.

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Justin Timberlake plays a lifeguard. Reports of his character’s name is Mickey Rubin. He spent many days filming on the beach, with several other characters. It is unclear if that relationship is romantic.

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Juno Temple was also spotted in production. She is a waitress along with Winslet’s character, and has some interaction with Timberlake as well.

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Tony Sirico and Steven Schirripa were also spotted. Both Sopranos co-stars were announced as joining the film at different times. They were spotted on the street, unsure if they were supposed to be in costume.

There’s a number of cast members we didn’t see at all including Jack Gore, Jim Belushi and Max Casella.

Locations

At Cannes, he expressed his preference to shoot at Coney Island in New York. Near where Allen himself grew up and referenced in his 1977 classic Annie Hall. And that’s where most of filming has happened in the last weeks.

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Most of the filming we saw took place on the beach, and the main promenade, which was changed to look like it did in 1950.

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Additional filming took place in Brooklyn and Manhattan, where streets were changed to reflect the 1950s. There was also filming on Staten Island at Sailor’s Snug Harbour.

Production took place for three weeks outdoors, and then switched to interiors and perhaps studio shooting. Which means there is a big part of this film we didn’t see at all, and likely involves many of the characters we didn’t spot.

Crew, Production, Release

Vittorio Storaro is back as cinematographer, Santo Loquasto is back as production designer and Suzy Benzinger is back as costume designer.

Production started a lot later for Allen, who usually shoots in the heart of summer. The September/October shoot shouldn’t delay the film too much. We would reckon Allen is in the editing room right now.

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If you were a betting man, you’d be looking at a late July 2017 release date. Word is that Amazon are looking to acquire the film as well, but no deal has been announced and remains to be seen.

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George Harrison’s song MY SWEET LORD and what the word GOD actually means according to Francis Schaeffer

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Image result for beatles in india

George Harrison is the only member of the Beatles who stuck with Hinduism while the other three abandoned it shortly after their one trip to India.  Francis Schaeffer noted, ” The younger people and the older ones tried drug taking but then turned to the eastern religions. Both drugs and the eastern religions seek truth inside one’s own head, a negation of reason. The central reason of the popularity of eastern religions in the west is a hope for a nonrational meaning to life and values. The reason the young people turn to eastern religion is simply the fact as we have said and that is that man having moved into the area of nonreason could put anything up there and the heart of the eastern religions  is a denial of reason just exactly as the idealistic drug taking was.”

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George Harrison My Sweet Lord

Francis Schaeffer in his book HOW SHOULD WE THEN LIVE? (page 191 Vol 5) asserted:

But this finally brings them to the place where the word GOD merely becomes the word GOD, and no certain content can be put into it. In this many of the established theologians are in the same position as George Harrison (1943-) (the former Beatles guitarist) when he wrote MY SWEET LORD (1970). Many people thought he had come to Christianity. But listen to the words in the background: “Krishna, Krishna, Krishna.” Krishna is one Hindu name for God. This song expressed  no content, just a feeling of religious experience. To Harrison, the words were equal: Christ or Krishna. Actually, neither the word used nor its content was of importance. 

This problem has been around for a long time because people need to clarify what they mean when they say the word GOD. Many years ago Charles Darwin even had to clarify this same issue when he responded to different letters. Recently I read the online book  Charles Darwin: his life told in an autobiographical chapter, and in a selected series of his published letters, and in it I noticed that Francis Darwin wrote In 1879 Charles Darwin was applied to by a German student, in a similar manner. The letter was answered by a member of my father’s family, who wrote:–

“Mr. Darwin…considers that the theory of Evolution is quite compatible with the belief in a God; but that you must remember that different persons have different definitions of what they mean by God.” 

Francis Schaeffer commented:

You find a great confusion in Darwin’s writings although there is a general structure in them. Here he says the word “God” is alright but you find later what he doesn’t take is a personal God. Of course, what you open is the whole modern linguistics concerning the word “God.” is God a pantheistic God? What kind of God is God? Darwin says there is nothing incompatible with the word “God.”

(Francis Schaeffer pictured below)

“My Sweet Lord”

I really want to know you
Really want to go with you
Really want to show you lord
That it won’t take long, my lord (hallelujah)
Hm, my lord (hallelujah)
My, my, my lord (hare krishna)
My sweet lord (hare krishna)
My sweet lord (krishna krishna)
My lord (hare hare)
Hm, hm (Gurur Brahma)
Hm, hm (Gurur Vishnu)
Hm, hm (Gurur Devo)
Hm, hm (Maheshwara)
My sweet lord (Gurur Sakshaat)
My sweet lord (Parabrahma)
My, my, my lord (Tasmayi Shree)
My, my, my, my lord (Guruve Namah)
My sweet lord (Hare Rama)Look at the first two lines above, “I really want to know you, Really want to go with you.” Is this just a mumbo jumbo kind of talk or did krishna, Gurur Brahma, Vishnu,  Devo, Maheshwara, Parabrahma, Tasmayi Shree, Namah and Rama all speak of a historical faith rooted in history that can be researched?

Thought Snack: What Christian Faith Really Is

“Suppose we are climbing in the Alps and are very high on the bare rock, and suddenly the fog shuts down. The guide turns to us and says that the ice is forming and there is no hope; before morning we will all freeze to death here on the shoulder of the mountain. Simply to keep warm the guide keeps us moving in the dense fog further out on the shoulder until none of us have any idea where we are. After an hour or so, someone says to the guide, ‘Suppose I dropped and hit a ledge ten feet down in the fog. What would happen then?’ The guide would say that you might make it until the morning and thus live. So, with absolutely no knowledge or any reason to support his action, one of the group hangs and drops into the fog. This would be one kind of faith, a leap of faith.Suppose, however, after we have worked out on the shoulder in the midst of the fog and the growing ice on the rock, we had stopped and we heard a voice which said, ‘You cannot see me, but I know exactly where you are from your voices. I am on another ridge. I have lived in these mountains, man and boy, for over sixty years and I know every foot of them. I assure you that ten feet below you there is a ledge. If you hang and drop, you can make it through the night and I will get you in the morning.’I would not hang and drop at once, but would ask questions to try to ascertain if the man knew what he was talking about and if he was not my enemy. In the Alps, for example, I would ask him his name. If the name he gave me was the name of a family from that part of the mountains, it would count a great deal to me. In the Swiss Alps there are certain family names that indicate mountain families of that area. In my desperate situation, even though time would be running out, I would ask him what to me would be the adequate and sufficient questions, and when I became convinced by his answers, then I would hang and drop.This is faith, but obviously it has no relationship to the other use of the word. As a matter of fact, if one of these is called faith, the other should not be designated by the same word. The historic Christian faith is not a leap of faith in the post-Kierkegaardian sense because [God] is not silent, and I am invited to ask the adequate and sufficient questions, not only in regard to details, but also in regard to the existence of the universe and its complexity and in regard to the existence of man. I am invited to ask adequate and sufficient questions and then believe Him and bow before Him metaphysically in knowing that I exist because He made man, and bow before Him morally as needing His provision for me in the substitutionary, propitiatory death of Christ.” – Francis Schaeffer, Francis A. Schaeffer Trilogy: The God Who Is There, Escape From Reason, He Is There and He Is Not Silent__________________________

In the 1960’s when so many young people from the USA jumped into eastern religions Francis Schaeffer called it a leap into non-reason and Schaeffer also asserted:

The universe was created by an infinite personal God and He brought it into existence by spoken word and made man in His own image. When man tries to reduce [philosophically in a materialistic point of view] himself to less than this [less than being made in the image of God] he will always fail and he will always be willing to make these impossible leaps into the area of nonreason even though they don’t give an answer simply because that isn’t what he is. He himself testifies that this infinite personal God, the God of the Old and New Testament is there. 

Instead of making a leap into the area of non-reason the better choice would be to investigate the claims that the Bible is a historically accurate book and that God created the universe and reached out to humankind with the Bible. Below is a piece of that evidence given by Francis Schaeffer concerning the accuracy of the Bible.

TRUTH AND HISTORY (chapter 5 of WHATEVER HAPPENED TO THE HUMAN RACE?, under footnote #95)

Two things should be mentioned about the time of Moses in Old Testament history.

The form of the covenant made at Sinai has remarkable parallels with the covenant forms of other people at that time. (On covenants and parties to a treaty, the Louvre; and Treaty Tablet from Boghaz Koi (i.e., Hittite) in Turkey, Museum of Archaeology in Istanbul.) The covenant form at Sinai resembles just as the forms of letter writings of the first century after Christ (the types of introductions and greetings) are reflected in the letters of the apostles in the New Testament, it is not surprising to find the covenant form of the second millennium before Christ reflected in what occurred at Mount Sinai. God has always spoken to people within the culture of their time, which does not mean that God’s communication is limited by that culture. It is God’s communication but within the forms appropriate to the time.

The Pentateuch tells us that Moses led the Israelites up the east side of the Dead Sea after their long stay in the desert. There they encountered the hostile kingdom of Moab. We have firsthand evidence for the existence of this kingdom of Moab–contrary to what has been said by critical scholars who have denied the existence of Moab at this time. It can be found in a war scene from a temple at Luxor (Al Uqsor). This commemorates a victory by Ramses II over the Moabite nation at Batora (Luxor Temple, Egypt).

Also the definite presence of the Israelites in west Palestine (Canaan) no later than the end of the thirteenth century B.C. is attested by a victory stela of Pharaoh Merenptah (son and successor of Ramses II) to commemorate his victory over Libya (Israel Stela, Cairo Museum, no. 34025). In it he mentions his previous success in Canaan against Aschalon, Gize, Yenom, and Israel; hence there can be no doubt the nation of Israel was in existence at the latest by this time of approximately 1220 B.C. This is not to say it could not have been earlier, but it cannot be later than this date.

Merneptah Stele, Israel 1200 BC

____

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RESPONDING TO HARRY KROTO’S BRILLIANT RENOWNED ACADEMICS!! Part 114 Robert Foley  is a British anthropologist, archaeologist, and academic, specializing in human evolution: “I go to Chapel but technically I am an agnostic in the Huxley sense, that one cannot be absolutely certain, but for all practical purposes I am an atheist”

On November 21, 2014 I received a letter from Nobel Laureate Harry Kroto and it said:

…Please click on this URL http://vimeo.com/26991975

and you will hear what far smarter people than I have to say on this matter. I agree with them.

Harry Kroto

Nick Gathergood, David-Birkett, Harry-Kroto

I have attempted to respond to all of Dr. Kroto’s friends arguments and I have posted my responses one per week for over a year now. Here are some of my earlier posts:

Arif Ahmed, Sir David AttenboroughMark Balaguer, Horace Barlow, Michael BatePatricia ChurchlandAaron CiechanoverNoam Chomsky,Alan DershowitzHubert Dreyfus, Bart Ehrman, Stephan FeuchtwangDavid Friend,  Riccardo GiacconiIvar Giaever , Roy GlauberRebecca GoldsteinDavid J. Gross,  Brian Greene, Susan GreenfieldStephen F Gudeman,  Alan Guth, Jonathan HaidtTheodor W. Hänsch, Brian Harrison,  Hermann HauserRoald Hoffmann,  Bruce HoodHerbert Huppert,  Gareth Stedman Jones, Steve JonesShelly KaganMichio Kaku,  Stuart Kauffman,  Lawrence KraussHarry Kroto, George LakoffElizabeth Loftus,  Alan MacfarlanePeter MillicanMarvin MinskyLeonard Mlodinow,  Yujin NagasawaAlva NoeDouglas Osheroff,  Jonathan Parry,  Saul PerlmutterHerman Philipse,  Carolyn PorcoRobert M. PriceLisa RandallLord Martin Rees,  Oliver Sacks, John SearleMarcus du SautoySimon SchafferJ. L. Schellenberg,   Lee Silver Peter Singer,  Walter Sinnott-ArmstrongRonald de Sousa, Victor StengerBarry Supple,   Leonard Susskind, Raymond TallisNeil deGrasse Tyson,  .Alexander Vilenkin, Sir John WalkerFrank WilczekSteven Weinberg, and  Lewis Wolpert,

Robert Foley (academic)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Professor
Robert Foley
FBA
Professor Robert Foley,Wadi Mathendous, January 2011.jpg

Foley in 2011
Born Robert Andrew Foley
18 March 1953 (age 63)
Sussex, England
Nationality British
Fields Human evolution
Prehistoric archaeology
Institutions University of Durham
University of Cambridge
Alma mater Peterhouse, Cambridge
Thesis  (1980)
Notable awards Fellow of the British Academy(2007)

Robert Andrew Foley, FBA (born 18 March 1953) is a British anthropologist, archaeologist, and academic, specialising in human evolution. From 1977 to 1985, he was a lecturer in anthropology at the University of Durham. He has been a fellow of King’s College, Cambridge since 1987, and Leverhulme Professor of Human Evolution at the University of Cambridge since 2003.[1]

Early career[edit]

Foley was born on 18 March 1953 in Sussex, England, to Nelson and Jean Foley.[2][1] He was educated at Ardingly College and Peterhouse, Cambridge where he earned an MA and PhD in archaeology.

Academic career[edit]

From 1977 to 1985, Foley was a Lecturer in Anthropology at the University of Durham. He then returned to the University of Cambridge to take up a post in the Department of Biological Anthropology. From 1986 to 1998, he was a lecturer in Biological Anthropology. Since 1987, he has been a Fellow of King’s College, Cambridge. From 1998 to 2003, he was Reader in Evolutionary Anthropology. He co-founded the Leverhulme Centre for Human Evolutionary Studies in 2001 with Marta Mirazón Lahr, and has been its director since its inception. The Centre was designed to provide a home for the Duckworth Collection, and first class laboratories and facilities to support research in human evolution which integrated genetics, anthropology, and other fields.[3] In 2003, he was appointed Leverhulme Professor of Human Evolution.[1][4]

Research[edit]

Foley has carried out research in many aspects of evolutionary theory, human evolution, prehistory and more recently human evolutionary genetics. His early work was on the Later Stone Age of East Africa, where he developed methods and ideas to study the landscape distributions of artefacts, giving rise to the sub-field of Off-Site Archaeology.[5] In his work on human evolution he has emphasized an evolutionary ecological approach, seeing human adaptations as solutions to the problems faced by hominins in the environments in which they were living.[6] This evolutionary research has also explored the relationship between climate and evolutionary change,[7] the evolution of social behavior (finite social space model), and patterns of hominin diversity. This approach was summarized in two books – Another Unique Species, and Humans Before Humanity.

Since the 1990s, Foley has collaborated with Marta Mirazón Lahr on research relating to the evolution of modern humans and their diversity. Their work has argued for multiple dispersals of early humans out of Africa, and the use of the ‘southern route’. Their approach has emphasized the role of geographical factors in shaping human evolution, and a central role for dispersals as the process by which diversity evolves.[8][9][10]

He has co-led expeditions and archaeological excavations with Mirazon Lahr in the Solomon Islands, the Central Sahara, and Kenya, particularly in the Turkana Basin. In Turkana, Foley and Mirazon Lahr study the late Quaternary record of human occupation in the basin, and have recently described a group of 10,000 year-old skeletons from the site of Nataruk that died as part of conflict between hunter-gatherer bands.[11]

In the last decade, Foley has been involved in several aspects of evolutionary psychology and linguistics, exploring questions related to the evolution of human cognition, human language and its use as a mechanism is the evolution of society and social boundaries.

Honours[edit]

In 2007, Foley was elected a Fellow of the British Academy (FBA).[12]

Categories:

In  the first video below in the 48th clip in this series are his words and  my response is below them. 

50 Renowned Academics Speaking About God (Part 1)

Another 50 Renowned Academics Speaking About God (Part 2)

A Further 50 Renowned Academics Speaking About God (Part 3)

_________________________________

Below is a letter I wrote to Dr. Foley and in it I respond to his quote from You Tube:

Before I gEt to the letter to Dr. Foley, I want to say that part of the letter below includes a story by Brandon Barnard about the experience of sitting COURT SIDE at a basketball game with thousands of people attending. I just recently got to experience that on January 14, 2017. I got to see  the Arkansas State Red Wolves at University of Arkansas Little Rock Trojans basketball game COURT SIDE. It an unique situation because we got the red carpet treatment with the concessions being delivered to our seats and the errant passes landing in our lap. Then when I got home I noticed Luke and I on the news. You can see us below on the right.  Luke has on  his red Razorback sweater and shorts and I am wearing my blue shirt behind the UALR player (white jersey) on the right side of the screen.

I told Luke, “It took me 55 years to get a seat COURT SIDE!” He responded, “Well, it took me 10 years.”

img_2255

Below is the letter to Dr. Foley which includes the story about sitting COURT SIDE

  

March 27, 2016

Professor Robert Foley, c/o Cambridge Language Sciences Strategic Initiative, Dept. of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics, 9 West Road, Cambridge, CB3 9DP

Dear Dr. Foley,

I learned much from your in-depth interview with Dr. Alan MacFarlane. Since you have studied science all your life I thought you would be interested in the subject of this letter today and when I heard your interview with Dr. MacFarlane that  that prompted me to send you two CD’s today. Recently I had the opportunity to come across a very interesting article by Michael Polanyi, LIFE TRANSCENDING PHYSICS AND CHEMISTRY, in the magazine CHEMICAL AND ENGINEERING NEWS, August 21, 1967, and I also got hold of a 1968 talk by Francis Schaeffer based on this article. Polanyi’s son John actually won the 1986 Nobel Prize for Chemistry. This article by Michael Polanyi concerns Francis Crick and James Watson and their discovery of DNA in 1953. Polanyi noted:

Mechanisms, whether man-made or morphological, are boundary conditions harnessing the laws of in
animate nature, being themselves irreducible to those laws. The pattern of organic bases in DNA which functions as a genetic code is a boundary condition irreducible to physics and chemistry. Further controlling principles of life may be represented as a hierarchy of boundary conditions extending, in the case of man, to consciousness and responsibility.

____

James Watson (1928-) and Francis Crick  (8 June 1916 – 28 July 2004)

Michael Polanyi, FRS[1] (11 March 1891 – 22 February 1976)

John Charles Polanyi,  (born 23 January 1929)

I am sending you this two CD’s of this talk because I thought you may find it very interesting. It includes references to not only James D. Watson, and Francis Crick but also  Maurice Wilkins, Erwin Schrodinger, J.S. Haldane (his son was the famous J.B.S. Haldane), Peter Medawar, and Barry Commoner.

___

John Scott Haldane (2 May 1860 – 14/15 March 1936)

J. B. S. Haldane
J. B. S. Haldane.jpg

Haldane in 1914

(5 November 1892 – 1 December 1964)

Maurice Wilkins (15 December 1916 – 5 October 2004)

Erwin Schrödinger (12 August 1887 – 4 January 1961)

Sir Peter Medawar ( 28 February 1915 – 2 October 1987)

Barry Commoner (May 28, 1917 – September 30, 2012)

In the You Tube video “A Further 50 Renowned Academics Speaking About God (Part 1),” you asserted:

 As a high Anglican school, everybody was expected to be confirmed; I did lessons with the chaplain and at the end he told us to go away and think deeply about why we were being confirmed; I did so and told him that I was only doing it because if I did so I would get an extra Sunday out; as this was the only reason I did not feel I should be confirmed; I was about fourteen at the time and I did not give much thought to religion after that time; I love going to church, and my wife, who was brought up a Catholic, is horrified by my aesthetic enjoyment of it; like many English people I like the sounds, the familiarity, the rhythms, and music; I go to Chapel but technically I am an agnostic in the Huxley sense, that one cannot be absolutely certain, but for all practical purposes I am an atheist; I don’t remember ever having a great deal of anxiety about that; religion for me is a nice social backdrop; obviously, being interested in human evolution I have then thought much about the nature of religion; I am fairly convinced that religion plays a major role in human evolution, which has nothing to do with whether it is true or not; Pascal Boyer’s ideas are very sensible, that religion plays an important role in forming communities, forming largely antagonistic relationships between groups, in providing mechanisms for coercion or conformism – all those things work better with religion; there is a tendency to believe, and to believe what others believe – very few of us think in ways different to those immediately around us – suggest there are strong conformism genes; this is also true of politics and other things, not just religion; on the actual content of religion, I would say that most religions allow you to increase your self belief; I think that Darwinism is one of the least adaptive beliefs in the world as it is basically saying that we are not important in the big scheme of things; one of the reasons that it is not widely accepted is that it is too simple, and this goes against the grain of much of social science; the second is that as a system of belief it downplays the egocentric view; if I want a reason to dominate the world, Darwinism is not going to give it to me; for me, religious belief is a very interesting thing, and I diverge from someone like Dawkins who I think has a very old-fashioned, Frazerian, notion of religion, that magic, witchcraft, religion, science, are somehow a progressive system of thought; …I think the problem with having an Anglican background is that one has a very benign view of religion; we have learned throughout history as well as our own immediate experiences that religion can be very brutal and nasty; that would make me much closer to Dawkins’ position; one can see in Islam with the oppression of women; I am fanatically opposed to capital punishment, so in Saudi Arabia and so on, what is done in the name of religion is appalling; there have been times when religion has made the world a better place, at others, worse, so we have to make ad-hoc decisions; what I would fight very strongly against is the creeping back of religion into governance; I am a child of the Enlightenment, and would not want to see us go back

I am going to answer you in an indirect way. Today is Easter and sometimes a song will just minister to a person in a special way and I heard this song at church today and I wanted to share it with you. It is  called MAN OF SORROWS and it can be found on You Tube Man Of Sorrows – Hillsong Live (2013 Album Glorious Ruins) Worship Song with Lyrics and here are the lyrics:

“Man Of Sorrows”

Man of sorrows Lamb of God
By His own betrayed
The sin of man and wrath of God
Has been on Jesus laid

Silent as He stood accused
Beaten mocked and scorned
Bowing to the Father’s will
He took a crown of thorns

Oh that rugged cross
My salvation
Where Your love poured out over me
Now my soul cries out
Hallelujah
Praise and honour unto Thee

Sent of heaven God’s own Son
To purchase and redeem
And reconcile the very ones
Who nailed Him to that tree

Now my debt is paid
It is paid in full
By the precious blood
That my Jesus spilled

Now the curse of sin
Has no hold on me
Whom the Son sets free
Oh is free indeed

See the stone is rolled away
Behold the empty tomb
Hallelujah God be praised
He’s risen from the grave

We sang that song at our Easter service.

On Easter morning March 27, 2016 at FELLOWSHIP BIBLE CHURCH our teaching pastor Brandon Barnard delivered the message THIS CHANGES EVERYTHING based on I Corinthians chapter 15 and I wanted to share a portion of that sermon with you today.

Image result for brandon barnard fellowship bible church

This day is the day that changes everything. The resurrection changes everything and that is why we are gathered here today to celebrate the resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ because it changes everything. HAVE YOU EVER EXPERIENCED A LIFE CHANGING MOMENT? Have you ever had something unexpected happen in your world that really changed the whole experience for you?

Recently I took my son Caleb on a getaway weekend. It was a Father/Son Manhood weekend for us, one of the milestones we do here at Fellowship Bible Church.

We decided to go to San Antonio and a San Antonio Spurs game. It was the  same weekend that Star Wars was coming out. So I booked a hotel down at the River Walk. We fly down and went to Star Wars during the day and that evening we had trouble buying tickets to the San Antonio Spurs game but we dropped $200 on some seats pretty high up in the area.

Image result for december 18, 2015 LA Clippers at San Antonio Spurs pictures

After taking selfies we go to the concession stand and as we are approaching the counter and all of a sudden a guy comes out of no where and says, “Hey, is it just you and your son tonite?”

I responded, “Yet it is.” He said, “How would you like to sit  COURT-SIDE?”

Image result for december 18, 2015 LA Clippers at San Antonio Spurs pictures

My son’s eyes got as big as bowling balls. This guy says,  “My brother and his wife and I have season tickets and he is not going to be here tonite and if you want to sit court-side these tickets are yours. Merry Christmas.”

I was speechless. We follow this guy to our court-side seats.  We went from near the roof to court-side. My son Caleb was giving Hi-Fives to the LA Clipper players. It is a good seat when you have to tell the ref to move.

Image result for december 18, 2015 LA Clippers at San Antonio Spurs pictures

My wife and Dad and everyone else is texting me, “We see you on TV every time down the court!” At one point the basketball comes out of bounds and I catch it and my son and I are [freaking out.]

The fans behind us tell us that with these tickets you get free access to the buffet and we could eat and drink all we wanted.

Image result for december 18, 2015 LA Clippers at San Antonio Spurs pictures

At one point I looked down at the tickets they gave us and I saw the price and it was $1650 each ticket. My son Caleb said, “I don’t want this day to end!!”

We were blown away. It was a game changer. I was blown away that someone would give us that kind of opportunity.  It was a once in a lifetime opportunity, and it changed everything for us that evening.

Image result for december 18, 2015 LA Clippers at San Antonio Spurs pictures

 

 

This day is the day that changes everything. The resurrection changes everything and that is why we are gathered here today to celebrate the resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ because it changes everything.

Some of you are going to be blown away by the opportunity before you this Easter morning because the resurrection of Jesus Christ stands at the very heart of Christianity. If what we we are gathered here to celebrate did not happen then people need to pity us as believers.  They need to feel sorry for you and me more than anyone on earth because we have set our hopes firmly on a lie.

But if the resurrection really did happen, then we need to repent and we need to believe in Jesus and we need to rejoice that we have hope in this life and the life to come. 

Paul wrote this to the believers in Corinth.

1 Corinthians 15:3-6, 13-21 English Standard Version (ESV)

3 For I delivered to you as of first importance what I also received: that Christ died for our sins in accordance with the Scriptures, that he was buried, that he was raised on the third day in accordance with the Scriptures, and that he appeared to Cephas, then to the twelve. Then he appeared to more than five hundred brothers at one time, most of whom are still alive, though some have fallen asleep.

13 But if there is no resurrection of the dead, then not even Christ has been raised. 14 And if Christ has not been raised, then our preaching is in vain and your faith is in vain. 15 We are even found to be misrepresenting God, because we testified about God that he raised Christ, whom he did not raise if it is true that the dead are not raised.16 For if the dead are not raised, not even Christ has been raised. 17 And if Christ has not been raised, your faith is futile and you are still in your sins. 18 Then those also who have fallen asleep in Christ have perished.19 If in Christ we have hope[a] in this life only, we are of all people most to be pitied.

20 But in fact Christ has been raised from the dead, the firstfruits of those who have fallen asleep. 21 For as by a man came death, by a man has come also the resurrection of the dead.

_____

If Christ hasn’t been raised then these facts are true:

  1. PREACHING AND FAITH ARE IN VAIN.
  2. WE ARE FALSE WITNESSES
  3. WE ARE STILL IN OUR SINS.
  4. THOSE WHO DIED IN FAITH ARE STILL DEAD
  5. WE ARE TO BE PITIED MORE THAN ANYONE ELSE IN THE WORLD.

Verse 20 says, “but Christ has been raised!!! Therefore, these things are true:

  1. Our faith is significant, valuable and eternal.
  2. we are truth tellers!!
  3. we are forgiven of our sins.
  4. death is not our final stop.
  5. don’t pity us but join us in believing in Jesus Christ.

You said above that you are an atheist. However, would you agree that if the Bible is correct in regards to history then Jesus did rise from the grave? Let’s take a closer look at evidence concerning the accuracy of the Bible.

I know that you highly respected Surgeon General C. Everett Koop and he co-authored with Francis Schaeffer the book WHATEVER HAPPENED TO THE HUMAN RACE? Below is a piece of evidence from that book.

 

Francis Schaeffer (30 January 1912 – 15 May 1984[1])  and his wife Edith  (November 3, 1914 – March 30, 2013)

C. Everett Koop, MD (October 14, 1916 – February 25, 2013) 13th Surgeon General of the United States

  

 

 

__

Two things should be mentioned about the time of Moses in Old Testament history.

First, consider the archaeological evidence that relates to the period. True, it is not of the same explicitness that we have found, say, in relation to the existence of Ahab or Jehu or Jehoiakim. We have no inscription from Egypt which refers to Moses being taken out of the bulrushes and removed from the waterproof basket his mother had made him. But this does not mean that the Book of Exodus is a fictitious account, as some critics has suggested. Some say it is simply an idealized reading-back into history by the Jews under the later monarchy. There is not a reason why these “books of Moses,” as they are called, should not be treated as history, just as we have been forced to treat the Books of Kings and Chronicles dating 500 years later.

There is ample evidence about the building projects of the Egyptian kings, and the evidence we have fits well with Exodus. There are scenes of brick-making (for example, Theban Tomb 100 of Rekhmire). Contemporary parchments and papyri tell of production targets which had to be met. One speaks of a satisfied official report of his men as “making their quota of bricks daily” (Papyrus Anastasi III vso, p.3, in the British Museum. Also Louvre Leather Roll in the Louvre, Paris, col ii, mentions quotes of bricks and “taskmasters”). Actual bricks found show signs of straw which had to be mixed in with the clay, just as Exodus says. This matter of bricks and straw is further affirmed by the record that one despairing official complained, “There are no men to make bricks nor straw in my area.”

We know from contemporary discoveries that Semites were found at all levels of Egypt’s cosmopolitan society. (Brooklyn Museum, New York, no. 35, 1446. Papyrus Brooklyn). There is nothing strange therefore about Joseph’s becoming so important in the pharaoh’s court.

The store cities of Pithom and Raamses (Rameses) mentioned in Exodus 1:11 are well known in Egyptian inscriptions. Raamses was actually in the east-Delta capital, Pi-Ramses (near Goshen), where the Israelites would have had ample experience of agriculture. Thus, the references to agriculture found in the law of Moses would not have been strange to the Israelites even though they were in the desert at the time the law was given. Certainly there is no reason to say, as some critics do, that these sections on agriculture were an indication of a reading-back from a latter period when the Jews were settled in Canaan.

The form of the covenant made at Sinai has remarkable parallels with the covenant forms of other people at that time. (On covenants and parties to a treaty, the Louvre; and Treaty Tablet from Boghaz Koi (i.e., Hittite) in Turkey, Museum of Archaeology in Istanbul.) The covenant form at Sinai resembles just as the forms of letter writings of the first century after Christ (the types of introductions and greetings) are reflected in the letters of the apostles in the New Testament, it is not surprising to find the covenant form of the second millennium before Christ reflected in what occurred at Mount Sinai. God has always spoken to people within the culture of their time, which does not mean that God’s communication is limited by that culture. It is God’s communication but within the forms appropriate to the time.

The Pentateuch tells us that Moses led the Israelites up the east side of the Dead Sea after their long stay in the desert. There they encountered the hostile kingdom of Moab. We have firsthand evidence for the existence of this kingdom of Moab–contrary to what has been said by critical scholars who have denied the existence of Moab at this time. It can be found in a war scene from a temple at Luxor (Al Uqsor). This commemorates a victory by Ramses II over the Moabite nation at Batora (Luxor Temple, Egypt).

Also the definite presence of the Israelites in west Palestine (Canaan) no later than the end of the thirteenth century B.C. is attested by a victory stela of Pharaoh Merenptah (son and successor of Ramses II) to commemorate his victory over Libya (Israel Stela, Cairo Museum, no. 34025). In it he mentions his previous success in Canaan against Aschalon, Gize, Yenom, and Israel; hence there can be no doubt the nation of Israel was in existence at the latest by this time of approximately 1220 B.C. This is not to say it could not have been earlier, but it cannot be later than this date.

Christ came and laid his life down to die for our sins and there is evidence that indicates the Bible is true!!!!! Some 400 years before crucifixion was invented, both Israel’s King David and the prophet Zechariah described the Messiah’s death in words that perfectly depict that mode of execution. Further, they said that the body would be pierced and that none of the bones would be broken, contrary to customary procedure in cases of crucifixion (Psalm 22 and 34:20; Zechariah 12:10). Again, historians and New Testament writers confirm the fulfillment: Jesus of Nazareth died on a Roman cross, and his extraordinarily quick death eliminated the need for the usual breaking of bones. A spear was thrust into his side to verify that he was, indeed, dead.

Psalm 22 New American Standard Bible (NASB)

A Cry of Anguish and a Song of Praise.

For the choir director; upon [a]Aijeleth Hashshahar. A Psalm of David.

22 My God, my God, why have You forsaken me?
[b]Far from my deliverance are the words of my [c]groaning.
O my God, I cry by day, but You do not answer;
And by night, but [d]I have no rest.
But I am a worm and not a man,

A reproach of men and despised by the people.
7 All who see me [g]sneer at me;
They [h]separate with the lip, they wag the head, saying,
[i]Commit yourself to the Lord; let Him deliver him;
Let Him rescue him, because He delights in him.”

12 Many bulls have surrounded me;
Strong bulls of Bashan have encircled me.
13 They open wide their mouth at me,
As a ravening and a roaring lion.
14 I am poured out like water,
And all my bones are out of joint;
My heart is like wax;
It is melted within [l]me.
15 My strength is dried up like a potsherd,
And my tongue cleaves to my jaws;
And You lay me [m]in the dust of death.
16 For dogs have surrounded me;
[n]A band of evildoers has encompassed me;
[o]They pierced my hands and my feet.
17 I can count all my bones.
They look, they stare at me;
18 They divide my garments among them,
And for my clothing they cast lots.

Francis Schaeffer ended HOW SHOULD WE THEN LIVE? Episode 7 with these words:

When we think of Christ of course we think of his substitutionary death upon the cross when he who claimed to be God died in a substitutionary way and as such his death had infinite value and as we accept  that gift raising the empty hands of faith with no humanistic elements we have that which is real life and that is being in relationship to the infinite personal God who is there and being in a personal relationship to Him. But Christ brings life in another way that is not as often clearly thought about perhaps. He connects himself with what the Bible teaches in his teaching and as such he is a prophet as well as a savior. It is upon the basis of what he taught  and the Bible teaches because he himself wraps these together that we have life instead of death in the sense of having some knowledge that is more than men can have from himself, beginning from himself alone. Both of these elements are the place where Christ gives us life.  

The answer to find meaning in life is found in putting your faith and trust in Jesus Christ. The Bible is true from cover to cover and can be trusted.

Thanks for your time.

Sincerely,

Everette Hatcher, everettehatcher@gmail.com, http://www.thedailyhatch.org, cell ph 501-920-5733, Box 23416, LittleRock, AR 72221

Interview with Professor Robert Foley, Part 1

Uploaded on Jan 24, 2012

An interview of Professor Robert Foley on his life and work as a biological anthropologist. Please see http://www.alanmacfarlane.com for the wider context.
Filmed on 27 April 2010
All revenues to World Oral Literature Project

______________________

Interview with Professor Robert Foley, Part 2

Uploaded on Jan 27, 2012

An interview of Professor Robert Foley on his life and work as a biological anthropologist. Please see http://www.alanmacfarlane.com for the wider context.
Filmed on 27 April 2010
All revenues to World Oral Literature Project

 

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The song IF NOT FOR YOU written by Bob Dylan

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Bob Dylan – If Not For You

Uploaded on Oct 8, 2008

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George Harrison – If Not For You – Lyrics

If Not for You

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
For other uses, see If Not for You (disambiguation).
“If Not For You”
If Not For You single cover.jpg

Artwork for some continental European countries (Dutch vinyl single pictured)
Single by Bob Dylan
from the album New Morning
B-side “New Morning”
Released October 19, 1970
Recorded August 12, 1970
Genre Country rock
Length 2:39
Label Columbia
Writer(s) Bob Dylan
Producer(s) Bob Johnston
Bob Dylan singles chronology
Wigwam
(1970)
If Not For You
(1971)
Watching the River Flow
(1971)

If Not for You” is a song by Bob Dylan, recorded for his 1970 album New Morning. Dylan recorded the album version in August 1970, having first recorded the song in a session with George Harrison on May 1 of that year. In addition to appearing on the album in October 1970, the August recording was released as a single in Europe; the May recording remained unreleased until its inclusion on The Bootleg Series Volumes 1–3 (Rare & Unreleased) in 1991.

In November 1970, a month after Dylan’s original had appeared, George Harrison released a version of the song on his triple album All Things Must Pass. Another well-known cover of the song was recorded by Olivia Newton-John, who had the only U.S. charting version of the song in 1971.

Bob Dylan’s version[edit]

Release[edit]

Bob Dylan recorded “If Not for You” for his album New Morning, on August 12, 1970. The song was released as a single in Europe. It was later included on the Dylan compilations Bob Dylan’s Greatest Hits Vol. II (1971),[1]Masterpieces (1978),[2] Biograph (1985),[3] The Essential Bob Dylan (2000),[4] The Very Best of Bob Dylan (2000),[5] Best of Bob Dylan Vols 1 & 2 (2001),[6] Greatest Hits Vol 1–3 (2003),[7] The Best of Bob Dylan (2005),[8] Dylan (2007),[9] Playlist: The Very Best of Bob Dylan ’70s (2009),[10] and The Real… (2012),[11] as well as on the various artist compilation The Best Year of My Life: 1970 (2011).[12]

A June 2, 1970 outtake of “If Not for You,” featuring only vocal, piano, and violin, is included on The Bootleg Series Vol. 10 – Another Self Portrait (1969–1971).

A previously unreleased version was included on the 2015 album Dylan, Cash, and The Nashville Cats: A New Music City.

Live performances[edit]

Dylan performed “If Not for You” with George Harrison during rehearsals for the Concert for Bangladesh in New York in 1971, but did not perform the song at the concert itself. Since then, however, Dylan has performed the song over 80 times.[13]

Charts[edit]

Chart Peak
position
Dutch Single Top 100 30[14]

George Harrison’s version[edit]

“If Not for You”
Song by George Harrison from the album All Things Must Pass
Released 27 November 1970
Genre Folk rock
Length 3:29
Label Apple
Writer(s) Bob Dylan
Producer(s) George Harrison, Phil Spector
All Things Must Pass track listing

George Harrison had sat in on a session for Dylan’s New Morning album, on May 1, 1970, at Columbia’s Studio B in New York, where he had played on an early take of “If Not for You” (later included on the Bob Dylan box set The Bootleg Series Volumes 1–3 (Rare & Unreleased)).[15] News of the collaboration between Dylan and the recently ex-Beatle caused great excitement in the music press, even though Columbia Records had made a point of announcing that neither artist deemed the results worthy of release.[16]

Over the following months, and despite having a wealth of extra material of his own, Harrison thought enough of the song to record it in London for his All Things Must Pass set. His was a characteristically melody-centric version of the track, which more clearly defined the song’s verse and bridge sections and eschewed the Dylan preference for spontaneity.[17] Harrison’s “If Not for You” immediately met with favour from critics and album reviewers: Mikal Gilmore describes it as “surprisingly beautiful”,[18] while to musical biographer Simon Leng, it’s a “gleaming pop creation”.[17]

Live performances[edit]

The following year, Dylan and Harrison duetted on “If Not for You” during a soundcheck for the historic Concert for Bangladesh in New York.[19] Judging by this, and from Harrison’s early notes for a possible setlist,[20] the pair had considered performing it at the UNICEF benefit later that day. (This soundcheck performance was later released on the 2005 remastered DVD of The Concert for Bangladesh.)

Harrison finally got a chance to perform “If Not for You” live, again at Madison Square Garden, on 16 October 1992 during the all-star concert celebrating Dylan’s first three decades in the music industry.[21] Backed by the house band for the night, Harrison performed “startling versions” of “If Not for You” and “Absolutely Sweet Marie“,[22] but only the latter found its way onto the officially released album the following August.

Personnel[edit]

The musicians who performed on Harrison’s studio version of the song are believed to be as follows:[17]

Olivia Newton-John version[edit]

“If Not For You”
Single by Olivia Newton-John
from the album If Not For You
B-side “The Biggest Clown”
Released May 1971
Format 7″
Genre Country, pop
Length 2:50
Label Uni 55281
Writer(s) Bob Dylan
Producer(s) Bruce Welch, John Farrar
Olivia Newton-John singles chronology
“Till You Say You’ll Be Mine”
(1966)
If Not For You
(1971)
“Banks of the Ohio”
(1971)

Basing her version on the Harrison arrangement rather than Dylan’s,[23] Australian singer Olivia Newton-John enjoyed considerable international success with “If Not for You”. It was the title track of her debut album, and became her first hit single, reaching the Top 10 in several countries. In addition, the single spent three weeks at No. 1 on the United States Easy Listening charts.[24][25]

Chart performance[edit]

Weekly charts[edit]

Chart (1971) Peak
position
Australia[26] 7
Belgium[27] 29
Canadian RPM Top Singles[28] 18
Netherlands[29] 11
New Zealand Listener[30] 8
Norway[31] 6
UK[32] 7
U.S. Billboard Hot 100[33] 25
U.S. Billboard Easy Listening[25] 1
U.S. Cash Box Top 100[34] 23

Year-end charts[edit]

Chart (1971) Rank
Australia[35] 71
UK 84
U.S.[36] 76

Other cover versions[edit]

Numerous other artists have covered “If Not For You”. These include Rod Stewart,[37] Bryan Ferry,[38] Richie Havens,[39] Sarah Vaughan,[40] Glen Campbell,[41] Barb Jungr,[42] Katie Buckhaven,[43] Susan McKeown and Lindsey Horner,[44] Phil Keaggy,[45] Lee Everton, Karl Blau, Ed Kuepper,[46] and the Flatmates.[47]Melinda Schneider and Beccy Cole covered the song on their album Great Women of Country (2014).

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. Jump up^ Erlewine (Bob Dylan’s Greatest Hits, Vol. 2 Review)
  2. Jump up^ Ruhlmann
  3. Jump up^ Erlewine (Biograph Review)
  4. Jump up^ Erlewine (The Essential Bob Dylan Review)
  5. Jump up^ Leggett (The Very Best of Bob Dylan Review)
  6. Jump up^ Best of Bob Dylan Vols. 1 & 2 Overview
  7. Jump up^ Jurek
  8. Jump up^ Erlewine (Best of Bob Dylan Review)
  9. Jump up^ Erlewine (Dylan (2007) Review)
  10. Jump up^ Leggett (Playlist: The Very Best of Bob Dylan ’70s Review)
  11. Jump up^ The Real… Overview
  12. Jump up^ The Best Year of My Life: 1970 Overview
  13. Jump up^ If Not For You: Discover
  14. Jump up^ Bob Dylan – If Not for You
  15. Jump up^ Badman 2001, p. 7
  16. Jump up^ Harrison (Rolling Stone Press/Simon & Schuster), pp. 179–180
  17. ^ Jump up to:a b c Leng 2006, p. 88
  18. Jump up^ Harrison (Rolling Stone Press/Simon & Schuster), p. 40
  19. Jump up^ Leng 2006, p. 120
  20. Jump up^ Harrison 2011, p. 288
  21. Jump up^ Leng 2006, p. 273
  22. Jump up^ Harrison (Rolling Stone Press/Simon & Schuster), p. 48
  23. Jump up^ Clayson 2003, p. 296
  24. Jump up^ Whitburn 2002, p. 181
  25. ^ Jump up to:a b Top 40 Easy Listening
  26. Jump up^ Steffen Hung. “Forum – 1970 (ARIA Charts: Special Occasion Charts)”. Australian-charts.com. Archived from the originalon 2016-06-02. Retrieved 2016-10-03.
  27. Jump up^ Olivia Newton-John – If Not For You (Ultratop)
  28. Jump up^ Top Singles – Volume 16, No. 4, September 11, 1971
  29. Jump up^ Top 40 (1971-04-03)
  30. Jump up^ “flavour of new zealand – search listener”. Flavourofnz.co.nz. Retrieved 2016-10-03.
  31. Jump up^ Olivia Newton-John – If Not For You (Norwegiancharts.com)
  32. Jump up^ Olivia Newton-John: Singles
  33. Jump up^ Olivia Newton-John Billboard Singles
  34. Jump up^ “Archived copy”. Archived from the original on 2016-03-04. Retrieved 2016-06-03.
  35. Jump up^ David Kent’s “Australian Chart Book 1970-1992” ArchivedMarch 5, 2016, at the Wayback Machine.
  36. Jump up^ Whitburn, Joel (1999). Pop Annual. Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin: Record Research Inc. ISBN 0-89820-142-X.
  37. Jump up^ Erlewine (Still the Same: Great Rock Classics of Our Time Overview)
  38. Jump up^ Erlewine (Dylanesque Review)
  39. Jump up^ Eder (Sings Beatles & Dylan Review)
  40. Jump up^ Eder (Time in My Life Review)
  41. Jump up^ Worbois
  42. Jump up^ Swihart
  43. Jump up^ Katie Buckhaven Overview
  44. Jump up^ Mighty Rain Overview
  45. Jump up^ Acoustic Cafe Overview
  46. Jump up^ Out-Takes, Castaways, Pirate Women and Takeaways Overview
  47. Jump up^ Sendra

References[edit]

External links[edit]

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