Monthly Archives: January 2017

Letter to President Trump Part 3 Milton Friedman is a good mentor to have!!!

Letter to President Trump Part 3 Milton Friedman is a good mentor to have!!!

(Emailed to White House on 1-22-17)

President Donald J. Trump c/o The White House 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW Washington, DC 20500

Dear Mr. President,

One of my favorite pictures is Milton Friedman at the table in the White House with Ronald Reagan.

Image result for president reagan milton friedman

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Washington is lecturing us about eating too much when they are spending addicts!!!!

Washington is lecturing us about eating too much when they are spending addicts!!!! Let’s Fix the Real Obesity Problem in Washington May 11, 2013 by Dan Mitchell Whenever someone proposes that we need more intervention from the federal government, I always go to the Constitution and check Article I, Section VIII. This is because I’m old fashioned and […]

Dan Mitchell of the Cato Institute:HUD has to go!!!! (includes political cartoon)

You want a suggestion on how to cut the government then start at HUD. I would prefer to eliminate all of it. Here are Dan Mitchell’s thoughts below: Sequestration’s Impact on HUD: Just 358 More Days and Mission Accomplished March 12, 2013 by Dan Mitchell As part of my “Question of the Week” series, I had […]

Open letter to President Obama (Part 138 B)

Real Time with Bill Maher March 16 2012 – Alexandra Pelosi Interviews Welfare Recipients in NYC Published on Mar 18, 2012 by vclubscenedotcom Real Time with Bill Maher March 16 2012 – Alexandra Pelosi Interviews Welfare Recipients __________ President Obama c/o The White House 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW Washington, DC 20500 Dear Mr. President, I […]

Are conservatives generous or are liberals?

Real Time with Bill Maher March 16 2012 – Alexandra Pelosi Interviews Welfare Recipients in NYC Published on Mar 18, 2012 by vclubscenedotcom Real Time with Bill Maher March 16 2012 – Alexandra Pelosi Interviews Welfare Recipients __________ Liberals like the idea of the welfare state while conservatives suggest charity through private organizations serve the […]

Democrats lied about spending cuts in 1982 and 1990

Washington Could Learn a Lot from a Drug Addict What kind of intervention does Congress need to get it to spend with its spending addiction? Back in 1982 Reagan was promised $3 in cuts for every $1 in tax increases but the cuts never came. In 1990 Bush was promised 2 for 1 but they […]

Senator Pryor asks for Spending Cut Suggestions! Here are a few!(Part 1) (Al Green, Famous Arkansan)

  Senator Mark Pryor wants our ideas on how to cut federal spending. Take a look at this video clip below: Senator Pryor has asked us to send our ideas to him at cutspending@pryor.senate.gov and I have done so (at 4:04 pm CST on April 7th, 2011, and will continue to do so in the […]

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 8 Blue & Lonesome is the album any Rolling Stones fan would have wished for – review Neil McCormick, music critic

MUSIC MONDAY Rolling Stones New Album Part 8

Rolling Stones – Hoo Doo Blues

Evergreen: The Rolling Stones perform in Cuba earlier this year
Evergreen: The Rolling Stones perform in Cuba earlier this year CREDIT: REX FEATURES

The Rolling Stones have got the blues. I wonder what took them so long? This is the album any Stones fan could have wished for, on which the Glimmer Twins gleam again.

It is a swaggering, heartfelt blast of dense, deft blues rock, with Charlie Watts swinging on the back beat, Keith Richards spilling slippery chords and magic licks, and Mick Jagger wailing on the blues harp like the last lonely survivor of an apocalyptic flood on the Mississippi delta. Even Ronnie Wood keeps his end up, breaking out crusty riffs and sputtering leads that mesh and weave with Richards’s ever-shifting rhythm guitar, combining in a thick, pliable electric groove that is uniquely the Stones’ own.

Being aficionados of the genre, choices are eclectic and immaculate

It is amazing they haven’t made this album before. Holed up in Mark Knopfler’s British Grove studios last December to start work on original material, they warmed up with an old blues cover and just kept going. Knocking out one old favourite after another, they recorded enough for a whole album in just three days.

It is the Stones’s first album to completely comprise cover versions. Even their 1964 debut had a trio of originals (some credited to the pseudonymous Nanker Phelge because Jagger and Richards weren’t ready to call themselves songwriters). But this has to be viewed as an overdue act of love, not a retreat to safe harbours.

The Rolling Stones are 'the world’s greatest and longest serving rock band'
The Rolling Stones are ‘the world’s greatest and longest serving rock band’

Being aficionados of the genre, choices are eclectic and immaculate, off the beaten path but straight down the blues line. They rip up Howling Wolf’s Commit A Crime, breathe steamy vigour into Memphis Slim’s Blue and Lonesome and play Magic Sam’s All Of Your Love as if they are down on their knees begging for one last chance at happiness.

There is no attempt to slavishly recreate original arrangements, the modus operandi seems to be to get the chord changes down and then play the damn thing for the sheer thrill of it. And it is a thrill because there are not many bands left who could actually do what they do in a modern studio: just set up, face each other and play with such connection and commitment that the record is essentially a performance so alive to the music it needs no adornment or improvement.

It would be wrong to say that Jagger is a revelation, because we all know what he can do, but it is a pleasure to hear him do it so well. Richards has always loved Jagger’s harmonica playing and here it is almost the featured item, with the singer taking everything he has learned from Little Walter, Howlin’ Wolf and Jimmy Reed and applying it with instinct and emotion. It is as if, unburdened by the self-consciousness that can inhabit his attempts to keep up with the kids, the frontman is free to just enjoy himself.

Mick Jagger and Keith Richards
Mick Jagger and Keith Richards

Jagger has never had a lovely voice, but his phrasing and delivery, his sheer commitment and bravery in going for notes he has absolutely no right to reach is perfectly glorious. He conjures up a dirty, growling old shaman on Otis Hicks’s sleazy Hoo Doo Blues whilst on Buddy Johnson’s Just Your Fool, the 73-year-old singer sounds like exactly like the rocking young rooster of yore, only now he’s kicking it with a band of veteran’s utterly at ease and in charge of the material (ably supported in the studio by longstanding live touring members Darryl Jones on bass and Chuck Leavell on keyboards).

Their raw take on Little Johnny Taylor’s Everybody Knows About My Good Thing is sensational

If you have seen the Stones on recent tours, you will know they are playing better than at any time since their Seventies glory. The truth is they have never really been outstanding virtuosos but they have the secret to locking tight as a unit and keeping things shifting.

This selection of covers allows them to just do what they do so well and not overthink it. That said, when Eric Clapton guests on two tracks (because he just happened to be mixing in the same studio complex), his nimble, sensitive playing really does switch things up a gear.

Their raw take on Little Johnny Taylor’s Everybody Knows About My Good Thing is sensational, while Clapton’s soloing on Willie Dixon’s I Can’t Quit You Baby ends with the band breaking out in spontaneous applause. Perennial new boy Ronnie Wood might be getting a bit nervous about job security. The Stones have shown they are not averse to changing the line-up, and he has only been with them 41 years.

Hopefully this will serve as a palette cleanser for the album of originals the Stones are still threatening to eventually deliver. But that would have to go some way to beat Blue And Lonesome for sheer pleasure. It may not be the kind of definitive album statement that will rock the music world to its foundations but it more than demonstrate that the world’s greatest and longest serving rock band have still got what it takes.

The Rolling Stones: Blue and Lonesome is out on December 2

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MUSIC MONDAY Paul McCartney Mull Of Kintyre

Paul McCartney Mull Of Kintyre-Original Video-HQ Uploaded on Nov 25, 2011 Paul McCartney Mull Of Kintyre Lyric Mull of kintyre Oh mist rolling in from the sea, My desire is always to be here Oh mull of kintyre Far have I traveled and much have I seen Dark distant mountains with valleys of green. Past […]

MUSIC MONDAY Paul McCartney – Wonderful Christmas Time

__ Paul McCartney – Wonderful Christmas Time Wonderful Christmastime From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia “Wonderful Christmastime” Single by Paul McCartney B-side “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reggae” Released 16 November 1979 Format 7-inch 45 rpm Recorded 30 August 1979, Lower Gate Farm, Sussex Genre Christmas pop rock synthrock Length 3:45 Label Parlophone Columbia Writer(s) Paul McCartney Producer(s) Paul […]

MUSIC MONDAY Bob Dylan Press Conference in 1965 and his interaction later with Keith Green Part 2

__  Bob Dylan Press Conference 1965 Part 2 This is a tribute to Keith Green who died 32 years ago today!!! On July 28, 1983 I was sitting by the radio when CBS radio news came on and gave the shocking news that Keith Green had been killed by an airplane crash in Texas with […]

MUSIC MONDAY Bob Dylan Press Conference in 1965 and his interaction later with Keith Green

Bob Dylan Press Conference 1965 Part 1 ___ Bob Dylan played on one of Keith Green’s last albums and on the 6:19 min mark of part 5 it shows Bob Dylan: The Keith Green Story pt 5/7    The Keith Green Story pt 3/7 Keith Green had a major impact on me back in 1978 […]

MUSIC MONDAY Brumley Music Plays Pivotal Role in the movie GREATER Bob Brumley Sings “I’ll Fly Away” and film also features “Victory in Jesus”

________ Quinton Aaron of “The Blindside” talks “Greater” and the faith and character of Brandon Burlsworth Published on Oct 28, 2015 Quinton Aaron, star of “The Blindside”, discusses why he is so proud to be a part of “Greater”, and talks about the faith and character of Brandon Burlsworth, the greatest walk-on in college football […]

MUSIC MONDAY “Foreigner Top 10 Songs” Part 3

MUSIC MONDAY “Foreigner Top 10 Songs” Part 3 Top 10 Foreigner Songs By Matt Wardlaw Elsa, Getty Images ‘Waiting for a Girl Like You’ From: ‘4’ (1981) Mick Jones calls “Waiting” the “song that wrote itself,” telling Classic Rock that he felt like the “conduit” for the track and that “something was coming down through […]

MUSIC MONDAY “Foreigner Top 10 Songs” Part 2

MUSIC MONDAY “Foreigner Top 10 Songs” Part 2 Top 10 Foreigner Songs By Matt Wardlaw Elsa, Getty Images 7 ‘Feels Like the First Time’ From: ‘Foreigner’ (1977) “Feels Like the First Time” is a pretty genius name for your first single, and it certainly paid plenty of dividends for Foreigner, striking the Top Five. For […]

MUSIC MONDAY “Foreigner Top 10 Songs” Part 1

__ MUSIC MONDAY “Foreigner Top 10 Songs” Part 1 Top 10 Foreigner Songs By Matt Wardlaw Elsa, Getty Images   Read More: Top 10 Foreigner Songs | http://ultimateclassicrock.com/top-10-foreigner-songs/?trackback=tsmclipForeigner‘s lone remaining founding member, guitarist Mick Jones, has been at the helm of the legendary American rock group since 1976. But if you’ve seen the band […]

MUSIC MONDAY Glen Campbell

__ Glen Campbell’s Greatest Hits Compilation – Complete Set Related posts: MUSIC MONDAY Washed Out: ‘I wish I could have a 9 to 5 life’ Ernest Greene’s debut album confirms his place at the forefront of the chillwave scene. So why is he so worried? August 22, 2016 – 12:36 am _ Washed Out – Life […]

MUSIC MONDAY Washed Out: ‘I wish I could have a 9 to 5 life’ Ernest Greene’s debut album confirms his place at the forefront of the chillwave scene. So why is he so worried?

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Open Letter to President Trump (Part 2) Eliminating Wasteful Departments would be a good first step!!!

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Image result for trump inauguration

(This letter will be emailed to White House on 1-21-17)

President Donald J. Trump c/o The White House 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW Washington, DC 20500

Dear Mr. President,

In the next few months I will writing you about several things that Milton Friedman said should be done to give Americans more freedom in their lives. I personally serve as a JUSTICE OF THE PEACE in the 5th largest county in Arkansas and we are proud of the fact that we are one of only two counties in the whole state of Arkansas does not charge a sales tax. No wonder our Saline County has doubled in size over the last 30 years.

In order to reduce taxes wasteful spending programs must be eliminated.

Dan Mitchell has rightly noted that in order to balance the budget these steps would very helpful:

  • Get rid of the Department of Housing and Urban Development.
  • Shut down the Department of Agriculture.
  • Eliminate the Department of Transportation.
  • Abolish the Department of Education.
  • Pull the plug on the Department of Energy.
  • Phase out the Department of Veterans Affairs.
  • Dump the Small Business Administration.

Because of what he’s said on entitlements, infrastructure, child care, and other issues, I’ve been skeptical about Donald Trump.

But if recent headlines are true, I may develop a man crush.

Here’s a story from The Hill.

Donald Trump is ready to take an ax to government spending. Staffers for the Trump transition team have been meeting with career staff at the White House ahead of Friday’s presidential inauguration to outline their plans for shrinking the federal bureaucracy, The Hill has learned. The changes they propose are dramatic. The departments of Commerce and Energy would see major reductions in funding, with programs under their jurisdiction either being eliminated or transferred to other agencies. The departments of Transportation, Justice and State would see significant cuts and program eliminations. The Corporation for Public Broadcasting would be privatized, while the National Endowment for the Arts and National Endowment for the Humanities would be eliminated entirely. Overall, the blueprint being used by Trump’s team would reduce federal spending by $10.5 trillion over 10 years. …At the Department of Justice, the blueprint calls for eliminating the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, Violence Against Women Grants and the Legal Services Corporation and for reducing funding for its Civil Rights and its Environment and Natural Resources divisions. At the Department of Energy, it would…eliminate the Office of Electricity, eliminate the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and scrap the Office of Fossil Energy, which focuses on technologies to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. Under the State Department’s jurisdiction, funding for the Overseas Private Investment Corporation, the Paris Climate Change Agreement and the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change are candidates for elimination.

This warms my heart. It might even send a thrill up my leg, to borrow a phrasefrom Chris Matthews.

But that’s not all.

The Washington Examiner also has a report that has me salivating.

Making good on a promise to slash government, President-elect Trump has asked his incoming team to pursue spending and staffing cuts. Insiders said that the spending reductions in some departments could go as high as 10 percent and staff cuts to 20 percent, numbers that would rock Washington if he follows through. At least two so-called “landing teams” in Cabinet agencies have relayed the call for cuts as part of their marching orders to shrink the flab in government. …The teams also are looking at staffing cuts over four years through attrition, a hiring freeze and reorganization. The plan is winning cheers in conservative, anti-tax and anti-spending corners in Washington that have long sought massive cuts in the bureaucracy. …Trump is likely to face a wall of opposition from Democrats and federal unions who consider much of the federal workforce on their side.

Sounds great, right?

But before getting too excited, keep in mind that these articles simply refer to options that Trump’s team is preparing. It’s still an open question whether Trump actually embraces these policies.

So my man crush is on hold until I see whether Trump actually decides to do what’s right for the nation.

But if he does, I have some very helpful three-part advice for successful fiscal policy.

  1. The budget is a garden.
  2. Counterproductive agencies, programs, and departments are like weeds in the garden.
  3. Don’t trim weeds, pull them out by the roots.

In other words, don’t cut programs by 10 percent, 20 percent, or even 50 percent. If you do that, it’s like cutting off a weed at ground level. If the root system is still there, it’s just a matter of time before it regrows and begins to suffocate the good plants (i.e., the private sector).

Instead, shut them down. Eliminate them. Raze the buildings. And pour a foot of salt on the ground so nothing can regrow.

Simply stated, it’s very easy to restore a budget cut at some point in the future. But if a part of government is totally wiped out, then special interests have to go through all the effort of recreating that function. And that’s not overly easy given the separation-of-powers system that the Founding Fathers wisely created.

Another advantage of killing off programs and agencies is that voters will see that they were never needed in the first place.

Get rid of the National Endowment for the Arts and people will quickly see that the hysterical claims of its supporters were nonsense.

Shut down the Department of Commerce and, other than cronyists, folks won’t even notice that it’s gone.

Cut off all funding for the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and the only losers will be the bureaucrats who no longer get to enjoy business-class junkets to Paris.

I’ve already identified several cabinet departments that should be terminated.

  • Get rid of the Department of Housing and Urban Development.
  • Shut down the Department of Agriculture.
  • Eliminate the Department of Transportation.
  • Abolish the Department of Education.
  • Pull the plug on the Department of Energy.
  • Phase out the Department of Veterans Affairs.
  • Dump the Small Business Administration.

John Stossel also has a bunch of suggestions for Trump’s first week.

…there’s a lot of good Trump and Pence could do their first day, or, let’s be generous, their first week. …Monday: Abolish the Department of Commerce. …Commerce just happens; it doesn’t need a department. Today the Department of Commerce spends $9 billion a year subsidizing companies with political connections, gathering economic data, setting industry standards and doing a bunch of things companies ought to do for themselves. Get rid of it. Tuesday: Abolish the Department of Labor. The Department inserts itself into almost every protracted argument between workers and management. Why should we let government referee every argument? Let workers, bosses, unions and their lawyers fight it out. …The Labor Department also spends about $9 billion gathering information on workers. Top labor-union bosses make six-figure salaries. I’m sure their organizations could spend a little on statistics and workplace studies. Leave the poor, oppressed taxpayer out of it.

For the rest of the week, he suggests wiping out the Small Business Administration, the Department of Education, and the Department of Energy, so you can see we’re on the same wavelength.

The bottom line is that President Trump (I didn’t think I’d ever write those words) is in a position to…um, well…make America great again.

But that means pursuing a fiscal policy consistent with America’s founding principles.

I’m not expecting miracles, but it would be nice to see some semi-serious spending restraint when the dust settles. And any good results will be much more durable if they’re based on program terminations instead of haircuts.

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Washington is lecturing us about eating too much when they are spending addicts!!!!

Washington is lecturing us about eating too much when they are spending addicts!!!! Let’s Fix the Real Obesity Problem in Washington May 11, 2013 by Dan Mitchell Whenever someone proposes that we need more intervention from the federal government, I always go to the Constitution and check Article I, Section VIII. This is because I’m old fashioned and […]

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Open letter to President Obama (Part 138 B)

Real Time with Bill Maher March 16 2012 – Alexandra Pelosi Interviews Welfare Recipients in NYC Published on Mar 18, 2012 by vclubscenedotcom Real Time with Bill Maher March 16 2012 – Alexandra Pelosi Interviews Welfare Recipients __________ President Obama c/o The White House 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW Washington, DC 20500 Dear Mr. President, I […]

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Democrats lied about spending cuts in 1982 and 1990

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Senator Pryor asks for Spending Cut Suggestions! Here are a few!(Part 1) (Al Green, Famous Arkansan)

  Senator Mark Pryor wants our ideas on how to cut federal spending. Take a look at this video clip below: Senator Pryor has asked us to send our ideas to him at cutspending@pryor.senate.gov and I have done so (at 4:04 pm CST on April 7th, 2011, and will continue to do so in the […]

FRIEDMAN FRIDAY NOVEMBER 17, 2016 4:06PM Go Big and Grant Milton Friedman His Wish By TIM LYNCH

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Milton Friedman: The Breaking Point of Taxes

NOVEMBER 17, 2016 4:06PM

Go Big and Grant Milton Friedman His Wish

House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis) held a press conference a few days ago where he said that GOP control of the Congress and White House afforded his party the opportunity “to go big, to go bold.”  There has been talk of rolling back regulations and Obamacare.  That’s good news, but Ryan should consider a bigger and bolder move: End federal income tax withholding.

The “political establishment” has created a situation where the U.S. is trillions of dollars in debt.  How will the new Congress address that?  The fiscal scandal is too abstract for many voters to grasp so too many of them don’t think twice about supporting new spending measures, such as free college tuition or what have you.  To build the necessary political support for otherwise unpopular spending cuts, Ryan should quickly move to end federal income tax withholding.  If American households would stop viewing their tax refund checks as happy windfalls from politicians and instead better understood how much big government is costing them every year, one would expect to see louder demands to bring runaway spending under control and to downsize the scope of federal programs and operations.  The GOP honeymoon will be over in a few months.  Ending federal withholding will help build support for spending cuts over the next few years and perhaps beyond.

Ironically, it was the late, great Milton Friedman who helped devise the modern income tax withholding system when he worked in the Treasury Department during World War II.  He was fixated on tax collection efficiency at that time, not limiting the size of government.  Late in his life, Friedman said that he wished “there were some way of abolishing withholding now.”  Former congressman Dick Armey (R-Tex) proposed ending withholding when the GOP took control of the House in 1994, but Bill Clinton was never going to sign that measure into law.  Now that the GOP has both the Congress and the White House, it has a real opportunity to go big and bold.  Grant Friedman his wish and get our fiscal house in order.

For related Cato scholarship, go here.

 

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George Harrison – Behind That Locked Door

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Behind That Locked Door – Olivia Newton-John (1973)

Behind That Locked Door (George Harrison) – Emotional Version by Norah Jones Live on Conan

George Harrison – Behind That Locked Door – Lyrics

Behind That Locked Door

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
“Behind That Locked Door”
Song by George Harrison from the album All Things Must Pass
Published Harrisongs
Released 27 November 1970
Genre Folk rock, country
Length 3:05
Label Apple
Writer(s) George Harrison
Producer(s) George Harrison, Phil Spector
All Things Must Pass track listing

Behind That Locked Door” is a song by English musician George Harrison, released on his 1970 triple album All Things Must Pass. Harrison wrote the song in August 1969 as a message of encouragement to Bob Dylan, who was making a highly publicised comeback to the concert stage, accompanied by the Band, with a headlining performance at the Isle of Wight Festival. “Behind That Locked Door” is a rare Harrison composition in the country music genre and the second song dealing with the friendship between himself and Dylan, after their 1968 collaboration “I’d Have You Anytime“. Its lyrics address Dylan’s elusive nature, and reflect the high regard in which Harrison held the American singer’s work. The same reluctance on Dylan’s part to re-engage with a concert audience led to him retreating again from live performance until August 1971, when he responded to Harrison’s request to play at the Concert for Bangladesh.

Harrison recorded “Behind That Locked Door” in London early in the summer of 1970, shortly after taking part in a session for Dylan’s New Morning album in New York. Co-produced by Phil Spector, the recording features a prominent contribution from Nashville pedal steel virtuoso Pete Drake, and twin keyboard parts from Gary Wright and Billy Preston in the tradition of the Band, whose sound influenced Harrison’s arrangement. With its understated performance, the track is a comparatively rare departure from the big production commonly associated with All Things Must Pass. On release, Alan Smith of the NME described the song as “a tremendous piece of country-meets-Hawaii” and recommended that it be sent to country singer Slim Whitman “without further delay”.[1]

An alternate take of “Behind That Locked Door” appears on the 2012 Harrison compilation Early Takes: Volume 1. Olivia Newton-John, Jim James, the Felice Brothers and Norah Jones are among the artists who have covered the song.

Background[edit]

In mid August 1969, Bob Dylan had confounded the media’s expectations by shunning the Woodstock Festival, an event he had helped to inspire.[2][3] Instead, after three years in virtual seclusion with his family, Dylan decided to make his comeback a fortnight after Woodstock, by headlining the Isle of Wight Festival at Wootton, just off the south coast of England.[4][5] Now a popular act in their own right, the Band agreed to back Dylan for the performance,[6] just as they had (as the Hawks) on his controversial 1966 world tour.[7]In a repeat of his UK concerts from 1966, leading figures in the English music scene began to gather on the island to show their support for Dylan,[8][9] the singer widely considered “the minstrel to a generation”.[10]

Alone among the many celebrity guests,[nb 1] George Harrison had spent time with Dylan during his period away from the limelight, in Bearsville, near Woodstock.[11][12] In between promoting Radha Krishna Temple (London)‘s debut single on Apple Records, his own production of “Hare Krishna Mantra“,[13] Harrison and wife Pattie Boyd stayed with Dylan’s family at Forelands Farm, near Bembridge, during the week preceding the festival.[14] The two musicians strengthened the bond they had established in upstate New York[15]and were heard performing near-perfect impersonations of the Everly Brothers in the farmhouse.[16][nb 2]

Festival poster, showing an image of Dylan circa 1966

In addition to a crowd estimated at 200,000,[18] a group of 300 American journalists descended on the Isle of Wight, adding unwelcome pressure on Dylan.[14] In the days leading up to his performance on Sunday, 31 August, the British press dubbed the event “D Day”, in reference to the Allies’ invasion of German-occupied France in June 1944;[19] in the words of music journalist John Harris, “Dylan’s show had by now been inflated into the gig of the decade.”[20] As a further impediment to Dylan’s planned comeback, audiences in 1969 expected to hear the rock music associated with his and the Hawks’ 1965–66 tours,[21] a style that he had abandoned with his recent country album, Nashville Skyline.[22]This contrast was encouraged by the organisers’ promotional campaign for the event,[23] particularly in the design for the official festival posters.[24] Referring to Dylan’s more conservative 1969 image, author Clinton Heylin writes: “There was little doubt that this was a different Dylan, even if the graphic on the fluttering posters advertising the festival was a stark black-and-white shot of a beshaded Dylan in classic ’66 pose.”[24] The arrival of Harrison’s fellow Beatles John Lennon and Ringo Starr, on Saturday, 30 August, added to the heightened speculation that one or more members of the band might make a guest appearance with Dylan the following evening.[25][26][nb 3]

Harrison gifted Dylan his vintage Gibson J-200 acoustic guitar before the show[28] and was then taken aback that Dylan arranged for “Hare Krishna Mantra” to be played over the PA minutes before he and the Band went on stage.[29]Mukunda Goswami, one of the six pioneer devotees who founded the Hare Krishna movement‘s London temple and played on the recording,[30][31] has identified this exposure as reflective of how the ancient Maha Mantra “penetrated British society” as a result of the Harrison-produced single.[32] Harrison watched Dylan’s performance from the VIP enclosure,[33] an experience that informed the lyrics to a new composition, “Behind That Locked Door”.[34]

Composition[edit]

I don’t mean to embarrass Bob or anything like that, but he’s said and done more, I think, than the lot of show business put together. You can take just one tune [of his] from back in the Sixties and it’s more meaningful than twenty or thirty years of what everybody else said …[35]

– George Harrison, commenting on the songs of Bob Dylan

John Harris describes “Behind That Locked Door” as a “sweet acknowledgement of Dylan’s shyness”.[20] According to Harrison’s recollection in a December 2000 interview for Billboard magazine, he began writing the song the night before Dylan played.[36] Further to the statement of friendship in their 1968 collaboration “I’d Have You Anytime[37] – which Harrison began as a way of getting Dylan to let down his guard and “Let me in here[38] – in “Behind That Locked Door”, he urges Dylan to confide in a friend and “let out your heart“.[39]

Author Ian Inglis notes the Isle of Wight performance as having been a “hugely important and anxious occasion” for Dylan and views Harrison’s opening verse as a “personal plea” for him to “pull out of his depression, to face the world again, and to look to the future”. After asking “Why are you still crying?“, Harrison assures Dylan that “The love you are blessed with / This world’s waiting for …[40]

In the second verse,[41] Harrison sings of how he values Dylan’s friendship, together with “the tales you have told me / From the things that you saw“.[5] For much of his career, Harrison repeatedly identified Dylan as one of his biggest musical influences,[42] along with Ravi Shankar.[35] To Inglis, these verse-two lines reflect the level of Harrison’s respect for his work, since “while millions of others may look to the Beatles for guidance, he looks to Dylan”.[42][nb 4]

Bob Dylan and the Band on stage in 1974, the year Harrison faced criticism for his own change of musical direction

Harrison musical biographer Simon Leng observes that, in the “counseling” Harrison gives Dylan in “Behind That Locked Door”, he anticipates his own “slough of despond” during 1973–75.[46] This self-styled “naughty period” of Harrison’s coincided with the failure of his marriage to Boyd and a fall from grace with music critics following his 1974 “Dark Horse Tour[47] – a tour on which, similar to Dylan in 1969, Harrison defied public expectation and attempted to break from his Beatle past.[48] In the final verse to “Behind That Locked Door”,[41] he asks for Dylan’s support in such a scenario:[42]

And if ever my love goes
If I’m rich or I’m poor
Come and let out my heart, please, please
From behind that locked door.

Musically, the song is set in a slow, country-waltz time signature[49] with, as Leng observes, melody and lyrics working “in tandem”.[46] Within each couplet, a rising musical figure presents the “problem” (“Why are you still crying?“), while the second line consists of a “falling melodic consolation” (“Your pain is now through“).[46] In his 1980 autobiography, Harrison offers little comment about “Behind That Locked Door”, aside from identifying the inspiration behind the song and admitting: “It was a good excuse to do a country tune with pedal steel guitar.”[34]

Aftermath to the Isle of Wight Festival[edit]

Dylan’s set at the festival was roundly viewed as anticlimactic,[50][51] if not a “Midnight Flop!”, in the opinion of one British tabloid.[52] Having recently told Rolling Stone editor Jann Wenner that he would return to touring that autumn, Dylan abandoned the idea and also cancelled the proposed live album from his Isle of Wight performance.[53][nb 5] Showing support for Dylan in the fallout from his comeback, in a late 1969 interview Harrison included the American singer in his personal list of essential contemporary rock artists, saying: “The Beatles, [the] Stones, Bob Dylan, Eric Clapton and Delaney & Bonnie, and that’s it. Who needs anything else?”[55]

Inglis highlights “Behind That Locked Door” as an example of how Harrison’s songwriting reflects his “fondness” for family and close friends.[56] Dylan’s reluctance to perform live again was only broken by his friendship with Harrison,[57][58] when the latter persuaded him to play at the Concert for Bangladesh shows in New York in August 1971.[59] Although Dylan had been noncommittal about playing at that event until the last minute,[60][61] a mutual friend of his and Harrison’s, journalist Al Aronowitz, had assured Boyd, “Bob wouldn’t let George down”;[62] another performer at the shows, drummer Jim Keltner, has said that Dylan felt a special closeness towards Harrison as a result of the Concert for Bangladesh.[63] Four years later, while Harrison was dejected following what author Elliot Huntley terms the “tsunami of bile that the Dark Horse album had unleashed”,[64] he spent considerable time with Dylan in Los Angeles.[65][66][nb 6] According to Mukunda Goswami, speaking in a 1982 interview with Harrison, Dylan became a regular visitor to the Los Angeles Radha Krishna temple and embraced the practice of chanting.[70]

Recording[edit]

Following the Beatles’ break-up in April 1970, and shortly before beginning work on All Things Must Pass, Harrison participated in a recording session in New York for Dylan’s New Morning album.[15][71] Among the many tracks they played were “Working on the Guru”,[72] Dylan’s “gentle prod” at Harrison’s association with the Hare Krishna movement, Harris writes,[20] and “If Not for You“, a new Dylan song that Harrison decided to cover on his own album.[73] Dylan also supplied him with a phone number for Pete Drake,[74]the Nashville-based pedal-steel guitarist and record producer whose work had graced “Lay Lady Lay” and other songs on Nashville Skyline.[75][76] Harrison later praised Drake’s pedal steel playing as “the bagpipes of country & western music“.[36]

Working at Abbey Road Studios in London with co-producer Phil Spector,[77] Harrison recorded “Behind That Locked Door” during the first batch of sessions for All Things Must Pass, between late May and early June 1970.[78] Drake’s pedal steel features strongly on the recording,[79] providing a commentary to Harrison’s vocal in the verses, as well as a mid-song solo,[80] supported by Hammond organ from Billy Preston, and Gary Wright on piano.[76] The arrangement for “Behind That Locked Door” reflects the enduring influence of the Band’s sound on Harrison[46] – through the use of two keyboard players, acoustic guitars, and a restrained backing from the rhythm section, comprising Klaus Voormann on bass and, in Huntley’s description, Alan White‘s “shuffle beat” drums.[80] For some years after the song’s release, rumours claimed that it was the Band themselves backing Harrison on the track.[78]

Leng credits all three acoustic guitar parts to Harrison,[46] although other sources suggest that Peter Frampton may have participated at the session.[76] Harrison also overdubbed all the backing vocals (credited on the album to “the George O’Hara-Smith Singers”),[81] a feat much admired by Spector, who has noted Harrison’s willingness to “experiment upon experiment” with his harmony singing on All Things Must Pass.[82]

Release and reception[edit]

“Behind That Locked Door” was released as the third track on side two of Harrison’s All Things Must Pass triple album,[83] in November 1970.[84] Ian Inglis writes of its position in the track order: “In the middle of an album whose songs sweep across the grand themes of history, religion, love, sex, and death, [‘Behind That Locked Door’] is a surprising and touching gesture of simple friendship from one man to another.”[42] The release followed speculation in the music press regarding the Dylan–Harrison joint session in May,[85] and conversely, the critics’ lambasting of Dylan’s Self Portrait double album, released in June 1970.[86] In his review of All Things Must Pass, the NMEs Alan Smith declared “Behind That Locked Door” a “standout” and “a tremendous piece of country-meets-Hawaii, which should be sent to Slim Whitman without further delay”.[1] Less impressed, Ben Gerson of Rolling Stone dismissed the song as “an inexplicable bit of C&W schlock”, although he conceded that it had a “lovely, lilting background vocal”.[87] Later in the 1970s, Beatles Forever author Nicholas Schaffner highlighted “Behind That Locked Door” and the other Dylan-influenced songs on All Things Must Pass as being “far more intimate, both musically and lyrically, than the rest of the album”.[88]

He was a giant, a great soul, with all the humanity, all the wit and humor, all the wisdom, the spirituality, the common sense of a man and compassion for people. He inspired love and had the strength of a hundred men … The world is a profoundly emptier place without him.[89]

– Dylan’s tribute to Harrison, following the latter’s death in November 2001

Reviewers and biographers in the 21st century invariably recognise its place among Bob Dylan’s work on his John Wesley Harding (1967) and Nashville Skyline albums.[46][49][76] Writing in Goldmine magazine in 2002, Dave Thompson remarked: “indeed, this tribute to Dylan’s famous reticence sounds so close to a lost Zim original that His Bobness’ own ‘Baby, Stop Crying‘ (from 1978’s Street Legal) is all but reduced to tributary status itself in comparison.”[90]

Alan Clayson approves of the more “understated production aesthetic” next to what he views as an at-times “bloated” sound found elsewhere on All Things Must Pass.[49] Simon Leng also acknowledges Harrison’s success in “temper[ing] Phil Spector’s taste for the extreme” and describes “Behind That Locked Door” as one of its composer’s “more attractive” songs, with a fine lead vocal.[46] “[It] is refreshing to hear Harrison singing about another’s pain,” Leng adds, “suggesting that, unlike some of his contemporaries, he was able to displace himself as the center of his universe for a moment or two at least.”[91] In his book Phil Spector: Out of His Head, Richard Williams identifies “Behind That Locked Door” as an example of “how sympathetic to the performer” Spector could be as a producer, in this case, by giving the recording a “mellow, autumnal mix” that “beautifully display[s]” Drake’s pedal steel.[92]

Elliot Huntley writes that the track provides a showcase for Harrison’s “melodic flair”, as well as a reason to wonder why the ex-Beatle did not record more songs in the country-music genre, since “certainly he seems perfectly at home in these comfortable surroundings”.[80] Huntley speculates on the “interesting” possibility of a whole LP side of similar “ersatz country and western” tracks, as the Rolling Stones would do on their Exile on Main St. double album in 1972.[93] Harrison biographer Joshua Greene describes the song as a celebration of “love’s victory over pain”.[94]

Alternative version[edit]

In November 2011, an early take of “Behind That Locked Door”, featuring Harrison’s vocal backed by just two acoustic guitars and Drake’s pedal steel, was included in the British deluxe-edition CD/DVD release of Martin Scorsese‘s Living in the Material World documentary.[95][96] This version appeared worldwide on the Early Takes: Volume 1 compilation in May 2012.[97] Giles Martin, who went through Harrison’s musical archive at Friar Park while compiling the album, notes the “folk-tinged spoken word quality” of Harrison’s singing on this take, an example of “a kind of conversational intimacy” that he brought to his recordings.[98]

Rolling Stone critic David Fricke describes this version of the song as a “sweet Nashville reading”.[99] Andy Gill of The Independent finds it a “[p]articularly engaging” inclusion on a compilation that allows “the sweeter side of George Harrison’s character to shine unencumbered by studio blandishments”.[100]

Cover versions[edit]

Among the country artists who have covered the song, Olivia Newton-John released a version on her Olivia album in 1972.[101][102] Drake himself recorded “Behind That Locked Door”, as well as Harrison’s “Isn’t It a Pity” and “Something“, although the recordings remained unissued until the release of the Pete Drake album, nine years after his death in July 1988.[103] Christian alt rock band the Choir covered the song on their 1989 album Wide-Eyed Wonder.[104]

Following Harrison’s death in November 2001, Jim James recorded “Behind That Locked Door” for what became a six-song Harrison covers EP, released as Tribute To in August 2009.[105] Tying in with the release of Scorsese’s George Harrison: Living in the Material World, a version by the Felice Brothers appeared on the multi-artist tribute Harrison Covered,[106][107] a CD accompanying the November 2011 issue of Mojo magazine.[108]

Singer Norah Jones performed “Behind That Locked Door” on the TBS television show Conan on 25 September 2014.[109] Her appearance was part of the show’s “George Harrison Week”,[110] celebrating the release of the Harrison box set The Apple Years 1968–75.[111]

Personnel[edit]

The musicians who performed on “Behind That Locked Door” are believed to be as follows:[46]

Notes[edit]

  1. Jump up^ Bill Wyman lists Rolling Stone bandmates Keith Richards and Charlie Watts among the rock musicians attending the festival, along with Liz Taylor, Richard Burton, Jane Fonda, Roger Vadim and Donald Cammell from the world of film, and leading figures in the Chelsea arts community such as John Dunbar, Michael Cooper and Robert Fraser.[8]
  2. Jump up^ To the surprise of the two Apple employees who brought them, Harrison had to organise to have a set of harmonicas delivered to the farm by helicopter, since Dylan had forgotten to bring any of his own.[17]
  3. Jump up^ According to festival co-promoter Ricki Farr, an “amazing” all-star jam did take place that weekend – featuring Dylan, Harrison, Lennon, Starr, Eric Clapton, Ginger Baker and Jackie Lomax – but only at the farmhouse, on Sunday afternoon.[25] Some members, if not all five, of the Band also took part in this session.[27]
  4. Jump up^ Even during what biographer Howard Sounes terms Dylan’s “creative nadir” of the late 1980s,[43] Harrison told Rolling Stone that “Five hundred years from now, looking back in history, I think he will still be the man.”[44] In 1988, Harrison voiced the opinion that their first album together as the Traveling Wilburys had to be a positive thing if it did nothing else but get Dylan interested in songwriting again.[45]
  5. Jump up^ Among other projects that Dylan had considered earlier that summer, according to engineer and producer Glyn Johns‘ recollection in his book Sound Man (2014), Dylan had hoped to record an album with the Beatles and the Rolling Stones. While Harrison and Keith Richards thought the idea was “fantastic”, Johns writes, Paul McCartney and Mick Jagger “said absolutely not”.[54]
  6. Jump up^ In a radio interview for WNEW-FM in April 1975,[67] Harrison likened the critical backlash he had just received to occasions when Rolling Stone and other music publications had “tried to murder” Dylan’s reputation.[68][69]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jump up to:a b Alan Smith, “George Harrison: All Things Must Pass (Apple)”, NME, 5 December 1970, p. 2; available at Rock’s Backpages (subscription required; retrieved 24 May 2013).
  2. Jump up^ Sounes, pp. 248–51.
  3. Jump up^ Heylin, pp. 306–07.
  4. Jump up^ Sounes, pp. 250–51.
  5. ^ Jump up to:a b Clayson, p. 273.
  6. Jump up^ Helm, p. 198.
  7. Jump up^ Tillery, p. 114.
  8. ^ Jump up to:a b Wyman, p. 342.
  9. Jump up^ Helm, p. 201.
  10. Jump up^ Clayson, p. 274.
  11. Jump up^ Clayson, pp. 242−43.
  12. Jump up^ Leng, pp. 51–52.
  13. Jump up^ Miles, p. 351.
  14. ^ Jump up to:a b Sounes, p. 251.
  15. ^ Jump up to:a b The Editors of Rolling Stone, p. 179.
  16. Jump up^ Harris, p. 68.
  17. Jump up^ O’Dell, pp. 83–85.
  18. Jump up^ Helm, p. 200.
  19. Jump up^ “The Isle of Wight festivals 1968–1970; Bob Dylan 1969”, ukrockfestivals.com (retrieved 19 February 2013).
  20. ^ Jump up to:a b c Harris, p. 72.
  21. Jump up^ Helm, p. 199.
  22. Jump up^ Heylin, pp. 301–02.
  23. Jump up^ Sounes, pp. 251–52.
  24. ^ Jump up to:a b Heylin, p. 307.
  25. ^ Jump up to:a b Harris, p. 69.
  26. Jump up^ Stephen Stafford, “Why the Beatles never played the Isle of Wight”, BBC Hampshire & Isle of Wight, 15 June 2010 (retrieved 24 May 2013).
  27. Jump up^ Sounes, p. 252.
  28. Jump up^ Olivia Harrison, pp. 202–03.
  29. Jump up^ Clayson, pp. 273–74.
  30. Jump up^ Dwyer & Cole, pp. 30–31.
  31. Jump up^ Greene, pp. 103, 106, 143–44.
  32. Jump up^ Olivia Harrison, p. 236.
  33. Jump up^ O’Dell, p. 87.
  34. ^ Jump up to:a b George Harrison, p. 206.
  35. ^ Jump up to:a b Olivia Harrison, p. 202.
  36. ^ Jump up to:a b Timothy White, “George Harrison: ‘All Things’ In Good Time”, billboard.com, 8 January 2001 (retrieved 3 June 2014).
  37. Jump up^ Huntley, pp. 53, 56.
  38. Jump up^ Timothy White, “George Harrison – Reconsidered”, Musician, November 1987, pp. 62, 65.
  39. Jump up^ Leng, pp. 89, 284.
  40. Jump up^ Inglis, pp. 26–27.
  41. ^ Jump up to:a b George Harrison, p. 205.
  42. ^ Jump up to:a b c d Inglis, p. 27.
  43. Jump up^ Sounes, p. 384.
  44. Jump up^ The Editors of Rolling Stone, p. 146.
  45. Jump up^ Clayson, p. 423.
  46. ^ Jump up to:a b c d e f g h Leng, p. 89.
  47. Jump up^ Tillery, p. 116.
  48. Jump up^ The Editors of Rolling Stone, pp. 128–29.
  49. ^ Jump up to:a b c Clayson, pp. 296–97.
  50. Jump up^ Sounes, pp. 252–53.
  51. Jump up^ Heylin, pp. 308, 310.
  52. Jump up^ Clayson, p. 309.
  53. Jump up^ Heylin, pp. 302, 309.
  54. Jump up^ David Greene, “Bob Dylan Wanted to Make an Album With the Beatles and Rolling Stones”, rollingstone.com, 7 November 2014 (retrieved 9 November 2014).
  55. Jump up^ Clayson, p. 277.
  56. Jump up^ Inglis, p. 141.
  57. Jump up^ Leng, p. 120.
  58. Jump up^ O’Dell, p. 199.
  59. Jump up^ Lavezzoli, pp. 189, 192–93.
  60. Jump up^ Heylin, p. 329.
  61. Jump up^ Greene, pp. 191–92.
  62. Jump up^ O’Dell, pp. 198–99.
  63. Jump up^ Lavezzoli, pp. 192, 203.
  64. Jump up^ Huntley, p. 114.
  65. Jump up^ Badman, p. 164.
  66. Jump up^ Ray Coleman, “Dark Horse”, Melody Maker, 6 September 1975, p. 28.
  67. Jump up^ Badman, p. 158.
  68. Jump up^ “No Clear Blue Skies”, Contra Band Music, 2 November 2012 (retrieved 22 May 2013).
  69. Jump up^ “George Harrison – Interview (1975)”, Paste (retrieved 12 November 2016); event occurs between 46:40 and 47:24.
  70. Jump up^ Chant and Be Happy, p. 35.
  71. Jump up^ Badman, p. 7.
  72. Jump up^ Heylin, p. 318.
  73. Jump up^ Madinger & Easter, pp. 424–25.
  74. Jump up^ Schaffner, p. 140.
  75. Jump up^ Clayson, p. 297.
  76. ^ Jump up to:a b c d Spizer, p. 223.
  77. Jump up^ Badman, p. 10.
  78. ^ Jump up to:a b Madinger & Easter, p. 429.
  79. Jump up^ Williams, p. 154.
  80. ^ Jump up to:a b c Huntley, p. 56.
  81. Jump up^ Spizer, p. 212.
  82. Jump up^ Olivia Harrison, p. 282.
  83. Jump up^ Spizer, p. 220.
  84. Jump up^ Castleman & Podrazik, p. 94.
  85. Jump up^ The Editors of Rolling Stone, pp. 179–80.
  86. Jump up^ Sounes, p. 260.
  87. Jump up^ Ben Gerson, “George Harrison All Things Must Pass, Rolling Stone, 21 January 1971, p. 46 (retrieved 24 May 2013).
  88. Jump up^ Schaffner, p. 142.
  89. Jump up^ The Editors of Rolling Stone, p. 221.
  90. Jump up^ Dave Thompson, “The Music of George Harrison: An album-by-album guide”, Goldmine, 25 January 2002, p. 15.
  91. Jump up^ Leng, pp. 89–90.
  92. Jump up^ Williams, pp. 153, 154.
  93. Jump up^ Huntley, p. 57.
  94. Jump up^ Greene, p. 181.
  95. Jump up^ Steve Leggett, “George Harrison George Harrison: Living in the Material World (Video), AllMusic (retrieved 26 September 2014).
  96. Jump up^ Joe Marchese, “Behind That Locked Door: George Harrison Demos Surface on ‘Early Takes Volume 1′”, The Second Disc, 23 March 2012 (retrieved 26 September 2014).
  97. Jump up^ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, “George Harrison: Early Takes, Vol. 1, AllMusic (retrieved 15 September 2012).
  98. Jump up^ Terry Staunton, “Giles Martin on George Harrison’s Early Takes, track-by-track”, MusicRadar, 18 May 2012 (retrieved 9 November 2014).
  99. Jump up^ David Fricke, “George Harrison, Early Takes Volume 1”, Rolling Stone, 23 May 2012 (retrieved 21 February 2013).
  100. Jump up^ Andy Gill, “Album: George Harrison, Early Takes Volume 1 (Universal)”, independent.co.uk, 5 May 2012 (retrieved 12 November 2016).
  101. Jump up^ “Albums: Olivia, onlyolivia.com (retrieved 9 October 2012).
  102. Jump up^ “Behind That Locked Door”, wer-singt.de (retrieved 9 October 2012).
  103. Jump up^ Talevski, pp. 107–08.
  104. Jump up^ Mark W.B. Allender, “The Choir Wide-Eyed Wonder, AllMusic (retrieved 21 February 2013).
  105. Jump up^ Andrew Leahey, “Yim Yames Tribute To, AllMusic (retrieved 20 August 2012).
  106. Jump up^ Michael Simmons, “Cry for a Shadow”, Mojo, November 2011, p. 86.
  107. Jump up^ Harrison Covered, Second Hand Songs (retrieved 16 September 2012).
  108. Jump up^ “MOJO Issue 216 / November 2011”, mojo4music.com (retrieved 30 October 2013).
  109. Jump up^ “Norah Jones ‘Behind That Locked Door’ 09/25/14 – CONAN on TBS”, Conan/Team Coco on YouTube, 25 September 2014 (retrieved 26 September 2014).
  110. Jump up^ Erin Strecker, “Paul Simon Performs ‘Here Comes The Sun’ for George Harrison Week on ‘Conan'”, billboard.com, 24 September 2014 (retrieved 25 September 2014).
  111. Jump up^ Ben Kaye, “Beck kicks off Conan’s week-long George Harrison tribute with ‘Wah-Wah’ – Watch”, Consequence of Sound, 23 September 2014 (retrieved 25 September 2014).

Sources[edit]

  • Keith Badman, The Beatles Diary Volume 2: After the Break-Up 1970–2001, Omnibus Press (London, 2001; ISBN 0-7119-8307-0).
  • Harry Castleman & Walter J. Podrazik, All Together Now: The First Complete Beatles Discography 1961–1975, Ballantine Books (New York, NY, 1976; ISBN 0-345-25680-8).
  • Chant and Be Happy: The Power of Mantra Meditation, Bhaktivedanta Book Trust (Los Angeles, CA, 1997; ISBN 978-0-89213-118-1).
  • Alan Clayson, George Harrison, Sanctuary (London, 2003; ISBN 1-86074-489-3).
  • Graham Dwyer & Richard J. Cole (eds), The Hare Krishna Movement: Forty Years of Chant and Change, I.B. Tauris (London, 2007; ISBN 1-84511-407-8).
  • The Editors of Rolling Stone, Harrison, Rolling Stone Press/Simon & Schuster (New York, NY, 2002; ISBN 0-7432-3581-9).
  • Joshua M. Greene, Here Comes the Sun: The Spiritual and Musical Journey of George Harrison, John Wiley & Sons (Hoboken, NJ, 2006; ISBN 978-0-470-12780-3).
  • John Harris, “A Quiet Storm”, Mojo, July 2001, pp. 66–74.
  • George Harrison, I Me Mine, Chronicle Books (San Francisco, CA, 2002; ISBN 0-8118-3793-9).
  • Olivia Harrison, George Harrison: Living in the Material World, Abrams (New York, NY, 2011; ISBN 978-1-4197-0220-4).
  • Levon Helm with Stephen Davis, This Wheel’s on Fire: Levon Helm and the Story of The Band, A Cappella Books (Chicago, IL, 2000; ISBN 978-1-55652-405-9).
  • Clinton Heylin, Bob Dylan: Behind the Shades (20th Anniversary Edition), Faber and Faber (London, 2011; ISBN 978-0-571-27240-2).
  • Elliot J. Huntley, Mystical One: George Harrison – After the Break-up of the Beatles, Guernica Editions (Toronto, ON, 2006; ISBN 1-55071-197-0).
  • Ian Inglis, The Words and Music of George Harrison, Praeger (Santa Barbara, CA, 2010; ISBN 978-0-313-37532-3).
  • Peter Lavezzoli, The Dawn of Indian Music in the West, Continuum (New York, NY, 2006; ISBN 0-8264-2819-3).
  • Simon Leng, While My Guitar Gently Weeps: The Music of George Harrison, Hal Leonard (Milwaukee, WI, 2006; ISBN 1-4234-0609-5).
  • Chip Madinger & Mark Easter, Eight Arms to Hold You: The Solo Beatles Compendium, 44.1 Productions (Chesterfield, MO, 2000; ISBN 0-615-11724-4).
  • Barry Miles, The Beatles Diary Volume 1: The Beatles Years, Omnibus Press (London, 2001; ISBN 0-7119-8308-9).
  • Chris O’Dell with Katherine Ketcham, Miss O’Dell: My Hard Days and Long Nights with The Beatles, The Stones, Bob Dylan, Eric Clapton, and the Women They Loved, Touchstone (New York, NY, 2009; ISBN 978-1-4165-9093-4).
  • Nicholas Schaffner, The Beatles Forever, McGraw-Hill (New York, NY, 1978; ISBN 0-07-055087-5).
  • Howard Sounes, Down the Highway: The Life of Bob Dylan, Doubleday (London, 2001; ISBN 0-385-60125-5).
  • Bruce Spizer, The Beatles Solo on Apple Records, 498 Productions (New Orleans, LA, 2005; ISBN 0-9662649-5-9).
  • Nick Talevski, The Encyclopedia of Rock Obituaries, Omnibus Press (London, 1999; ISBN 0-7119-7548-5).
  • Gary Tillery, Working Class Mystic: A Spiritual Biography of George Harrison, Quest Books (Wheaton, IL, 2011; ISBN 978-0-8356-0900-5).
  • Richard Williams, Phil Spector: Out of His Head, Omnibus Press (London, 2003; ISBN 978-0-7119-9864-3).
  • Bill Wyman, Rolling with the Stones, Dorling Kindersley (London, 2002; ISBN 0-7513-4646-2).

External links[edit]

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Open Letter to President Trump (Part 1) Take down the Welfare State before it takes USA down with it!!

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Image result for trump inauguration

(Emailed to White House on 1-20-17)

President Donald J. Trump c/o The White House 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW Washington, DC 20500

Dear Mr. President,

I started writing President Obama several years ago, and I would post my letter on my blog http://www.thedailyhatch.org. The last letter I wrote to him was posted on my blog on 11-28-14 and it was entitled, Open letter to President Obama (Part 724) FEMA’s Top-Down Approach to Disaster Relief Is Fundamentally Flawed

I hope it doesn’t rain on you today although the forecast looks like it will. I am hoping that you will return the duty of taking care of the poor back to the churches where it belongs. The FOUNDERS never intended the government to get into the welfare business!!!!

The federal government debt is growing so much that it is endangering us because if things keep going like they are now we will not have any money left for the national defense because we are so far in debt as a nation. We have been spending so much on our welfare state through food stamps and other programs that I am worrying that many of our citizens are becoming more dependent on government and in many cases they are losing their incentive to work hard because of the welfare trap the government has put in place. Other nations in Europe have gone down this road and we see what mess this has gotten them in. People really are losing their faith in big government and they want more liberty back. It seems to me we have to get back to the founding  principles that made our country great.  We also need to realize that a big government will encourage waste and corruptionThe recent scandals in our government have proved my point. In fact, the jokes you made at Ohio State about possibly auditing them are not so funny now that reality shows how the IRS was acting more like a monster out of control. Also raising taxes on the job creators is a very bad idea too. The Laffer Curve clearly demonstrates that when the tax rates are raised many individuals will move their investments to places where they will not get taxed as much.

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The time is here now. Last night I watched you at the Lincoln Memorial and I was getting excited. There is some pressing matters in our country and I wanted to mention several to you. One is the growing welfare state. I have posted an article below about what the welfare state is doing to England because we need to learn from their mistakes.

Welfare state may drag England down the tubes!!!!

I’ve shared this bit of political incorrect terrorism humor from England, as well asthis somewhat un-PC bit of tax humor.

But perhaps motivated by the scandal of giving welfare to terrorists, this new video is the most amusing thing I’ve seen from across the ocean.

I almost didn’t post this because it singles out immigrants from the developing world, but since I’ve shared horror stories from home-grown moochers in the U.K., as well as examples of scroungers from Europe who are robbing British taxpayers, I think I’ve covered all the bases.

But in the spirit of inclusiveness, here are other satirical videos worth sharing.

My all-time favorite video satire is from Iowahawk, featuring the Pelosimobile.

And I’ve always thought this left-wing attack against libertarianism is very funny.

And this Tim Hawkins video on the government Candyman is great, as isanother version of the song.

Speaking of Tim Hawkins, his home-schooling video is superb.

This spoof of the Chevy Volt also is extremely well done.

Last but not least, here are two brutal Obama teleprompter videos.

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Real Time with Bill Maher March 16 2012 – Alexandra Pelosi Interviews Welfare Recipients in NYC Published on Mar 18, 2012 by vclubscenedotcom Real Time with Bill Maher March 16 2012 – Alexandra Pelosi Interviews Welfare Recipients __________ President Obama c/o The White House 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW Washington, DC 20500 Dear Mr. President, I […]

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FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE PART 147, John Hospers Part C, this post includes portion of 6-2-94 letter from Hospers to me blasting Christian Evangelicalism,(Featured artist is Ron Gorchov )

I sent a cassette tape of Adrian Rogers on Evolution to John Hospers in May of 1994 which was the 10th anniversary of Francis Schaeffer’s passing and I promptly received a typed two page response from Dr. John Hospers. Dr. Hospers had both read my letter and all the inserts plus listened to the whole sermon and had some very angry responses. If you would like to hear the sermon from Adrian Rogers and read the transcript then refer to my earlier post at this link.  Over the last few weeks I have posted  portions of Dr. Hospers’ letter and portions of the cassette tape that he listened to back in 1994, but today I want  to look at some other comments made on that cassette tape that John Hospers listened to and I will also post a few comments that Dr. Hospers made in that 2 page letter.

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John Hospers: From 1776 to 1984

Interview with
John Hospers
by Karen Minto

Q: Where did you grow up?

Hospers: I was born and raised in a small Dutch town near Des Moines, Iowa, settled by the Dutch in 1847. The first language I learned was Dutch, and almost everyone in the town spoke it, as well as English. The Dutch Reformed Church dominated the life of the town, though there was no religious training in the public schools. People were very industrious and hard-working. I don’t think anyone in the town was on welfare, and the average income of families was the highest in the state. There were tulip gardens all over the place, and every year in May they’d have an annual tulip festival—everyone in Dutch costume, scrubbing the streets, singing Dutch songs—the whole bit. More important to me were the dogs and cats I always had, and finding homes for stray animals.

Q: What early influences affected your intellectual development?

Hospers: The religious influence was very strong, and at first I absorbed it like everyone else. It was a long time before I knew of anyone who did not share the prevailing Calvinism. Later, I got to thinking about it critically more and more, and that is undoubtedly what started my interest in philosophy, though at that time I was unaware that there was a subject by that name.

In sixth grade I read every article on astronomy in the school’s World Book Encyclopedia, and then I borrowed every book on astronomy that the city library had. I would figure out when different stars and planets would rise, and stay up at night waiting for it to happen. The laws of physics and astronomy never let me down.

The Central College campus was just a block from our house, and I would go to the college observatory and show the college students the rings of Saturn and various double stars. When I got to college myself, the dean, who taught astronomy, delegated the job of teaching it to me. It was my first and best teaching experience—I prepared the tests, taught the class, preparing the lectures and discussions with care. Here I was, a 17-year-old, teaching astronomy to college seniors. Sometimes the dean would drop in and smile, telling the class “I’ll leave you to John—he knows more about astronomy than I do.” Whatever compliments I have ever received, this was the one that meant the most to me.

A cousin who planned to go on to Harvard to study English influenced me to major in that subject. There wasn’t a lot of philosophy being taught at the college, so in addition to taking the few philosophy courses, I took a major in English. I might have stuck with astronomy, except that no one thought that such a subject would lead to any professional future. Meanwhile, even prior to courses in philosophy, I was having more doubts about religion: the usual ones about how one could know that this religion possessed the truth rather than another, how one could get knowledge of God, and so on. What saved me was the reading of David Hume’s Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion—which I still think is the greatest book ever written on the subject. It reflected so many of my own thoughts that I knew I was not alone. I remember thinking, for example, that if God is both all-good and all-powerful, he would not let people and animals suffer. If he couldn’t prevent their suffering, he is not omnipotent, and if he doesn’t want to prevent it he is not all-good. We excuse a surgeon for inflicting suffering if he can’t cure the patient any other way, but an omnipotent benevolent deity would not have that excuse. That source of doubt was more important to me than the usual ones about where did God come from. I concluded with Hume that no attempt to get round this dilemma was successful.

I went on to get a Master’s degree in English at the State University of Iowa. I was all set to teach Shakespeare and Shelley, but I never got to do it: when I was offered a scholarship at Columbia University, I asked whether I could change my major to philosophy. That was okay with them, so it was in philosophy that I finally got my Ph.D., though I skated on pretty thin ice because of my comparative lack of background in philosophy. But the literature background prepared me well for a dissertation in aesthetics, which became my major field of study in philosophy.

Q: What philosophers did you most respect in graduate school?

Hospers: Hume and Mill. Also Plato and Aristotle, and to some extent Descartes and Locke. But Hume most of all—both his historical and epistemological works—which I admired as much for the beauty and clarity of his style as for what he said. It wasn’t until later that I got into contemporary philosophers such as William James, Blanshard, and most of all G. E. Moore, who was for a year my teacher at Columbia.

Q: What is your best philosophical work?

Hospers: Probably the aesthetics book, Understanding the Arts. The most famous section I ever wrote was the 100-page first chapter of Introduction to Philosophical Analysis, entitled “Words and the World,” which introduced a whole generation of students to philosophy via the study of language, and for which I am still best known. I also picked up some notoriety with my long piece in the Encyclopedia of Philosophy, “Aesthetics, Problems of,” and even more with my 40,000-word article in the Encyclopedia Britannica, “Art, Philosophy of.”

[…]

Q: You used to be a determinist. Are you still?

Hospers: This depends on what the word “determinism” (like so many words ending in -ism) is taken to mean. Some people say that all events are predetermined by God; I see no reason to accept that view. Or that “it’s all determined by laws of nature”—if you knew all the laws and all the initial conditions, you could predict everything (as Newton did with regard to the planetary orbits). The problem is (one of many) that if you made the prediction and the predicted event didn’t occur, we would say, without any further evidence, that we hadn’t considered all the conditions—we’d take the very fact of the prediction going wrong as evidence that there was an error in our statement of the conditions. Thus the statement becomes what philosophers call a “functional tautology.” Sure, all our actions have causes. Do we really want to say that some of our actions have no causes at all? Freedom says “I cause my actions.” Determinism (in the unobjectionable sense) says “My actions are caused by me.” They are two sides of the same coin.

Q: How well did David Kelley defend direct realism in The Evidence of the Senses?

Hospers: I confess that I’ve never read it all the way through. Some years ago I was much more involved with problems of perception than I am now; his book came too late on the scene for me. But he writes with admirable clarity and doesn’t confuse one sub-problem with another, as so many writers do.

Many writers have defended direct realism, e.g. John Laird’s A Theory of Direct Realism. I must say I was never totally convinced by this view. It still seems to me that smells and tastes, and even colors, vary enormously from one percipient to another because of the differences in our sense-organs. Not only in our sense-organs, but in our state of mind: the dessert no longer tastes sweet after we have eaten something that tasted sweet just before. What does exist out there are certain chemical properties of the dish, and also of the human nose. But you can’t say that something has a property A and also doesn’t have it–only that it seems to one person that it has A, and doesn’t seem so to another. However, it may be that David doesn’t want to deny any of this. I’m afraid I’d have to go and spend some time with the book again.

Q: What did you think of Sciabarra’s view that Rand was a dialectical thinker, and absorbed her method of doing philosophy from Russian culture?

Hospers: Amen! That’s what I thought all along, and reading his book provided a confirmation I had greatly sought. “Dialectical” characterizes her method throughout, and helps to explain why Ayn and I came from different starting points, and conceived the issues differently. In view of this it’s amazing that we got on as well as we did. Her method was quite immune to the subtleties of language. Naturally, I believe that the method of philosophical analysis as done largely in Anglo-American philosophy is preferable; at least it gets the questions straight. I wish she had been exposed early on to the clarifying light of contemporary Anglo-American philosophy. There is one book I would like to have gone through with her step by step: Alexander B. Johnson’s A Treatise on Language, published in 1836. He was never attached to any college or university, but figured out the fundamentals all by himself—truly one of the great figures of American philosophy. Very few people know about him, even today.

Q: What is the most profound thing that Rand got right in basic philosophy?

Hospers: Several things (I couldn’t pick out just one). That reality is there independently of us. That it cannot both be X and not-X at the same time in the same respect; that ideas can change the world, for better or for worse. That within limits, our destiny lies in our own hands.

She was right about value—though (she was probably unaware of it) the American philosopher Ralph Barton Barry had carved out much of the same domain in his Realms of Value. The deathless robot example had been used by Richard Taylor in his Good and Evil, to similarly powerful effect. Unlike Perry, Taylor drew from his working out of the concept of value a social-political ethics very similar to Rand’s, in his marvelous little book Freedom, Anarchy, and the Law, which I have occasionally used as a text in my political philosophy course. “All great minds run in the same channel,” it has been said—and while this isn’t true, more Randians should realize that other minds than Ayn Rand’s have had some of her most important ideas. The whole structure—the integrated system—is unique to her, but many of the ingredients have been created by others, often in unexpectedly subtle ways, and devotees of Rand should really appreciate this—they have often spoken as if hers was the only great mind that ever existed, and as if her ideas were spun directly from the head of Zeus.

Q: What is your vision of the future of Rand’s philosophy, say in a hundred years?

Hospers: I’m not in the prediction business. I’d say here what I always say in response to questions in ethics: “It all depends.” If free-market ideas and limited government really are the wave of the future, Rand will surely be seen as its Moses, leading the people into the promised land. But if the U.S. continues on the path to government-by-bureaucracy, Randian political ideas will remain what they are today, a discussion piece for a small but articulate minority. And in any future international crisis, the government will expand further and individualist ideas will tend to be drowned out.

Of course, her social-political philosophy is only a small part of her total philosophy, but it’s the part for which she is most famous. I doubt that her metaphysical views will take hold in the absence of her social and political ideas. They are the tail that wags the dog.

Q: What about the universities? Is getting Objectivism into the universities a valid strategic goal for the Objectivist movement?

Hospers: Universities have always been centers of statism, because professors believe they can do better when subsidized by the state than they could do in the free market. I don’t see this changing very much. Also, there are many technical issues discussed in philosophy departments on which Rand either has nothing to say or says something ill-informed because she had only a glancing acquaintance with what was going on in philosophy and other departments in the universities. Her review of John Rawls’ A Theory of Justice without having taken the trouble to read the book, is a case in point. She didn’t do enough careful work in relation to views that she opposed.

Q: Do you have any advice to graduate students in philosophy?

Hospers: Be careful and be prepared for the worst. Most heads of departments don’t like Objectivist views (if they know anything about them at all), and one is less likely to be hired—and there are many more Ph.D.s being graduated in philosophy than the present market can place. So you might have to end up teaching something else. Or not teaching at all. Don’t go into teaching unless you are really dedicated. Most students would do better to go into something that pays, and study philosophy in their spare time.

Q: What is your assessment of the quality of liberal education in America? Has it got much worse?

Hospers: Yes, it has. Science departments are still tops, but the humanities have deteriorated. Much of philosophy is still pretty solid, though there is an emphasis on courses with popular titles that teach one very little about philosophical concepts. Much of it is just junk—instead of clarifying the student’s mind, it throws more words out, which the student takes down in notes, and the student may even fancy that she has learned something in philosophy. A lecture, it’s said, is something that goes from the notes of the teacher to the notes of the student without having gone through the minds of either. Philosophy has to be done slowly and carefully, from the ground up, Oxford-tutorial style, with the teacher correcting the student at every step of the way. The large lecture-hall courses in philosophy don’t begin to do that; they may give the student the delusion that something has been learned, and meanwhile a wonderful source of wisdom and guidance to living one’s life is out there and the student never gets a hint that it’s there. It’s a tragic situation—a waste of the student’s time. Literature courses have become corrupted in different ways: instead of a systematic study of Shakespeare or Milton, one just gets “impressions” and “interpretations” (the one supposedly as good as the other). When I studied Shakespeare you couldn’t get by with such drivel—indeed you had to know the material thoroughly, and every student had powerful responses to Shakespeare’s poetry, so that it would make a difference their lives. I used to commit passages of Shakespeare to memory, repeating them out loud while driving to school—I don’t think much of this goes on any more.

Most important of all perhaps is that this is the “first illiterate generation,” brought up on television and not trained to do anything with words—to write them, to combine them creatively in essays, and to read, read, and read. Some students still read a lot—though they’d rather look up a topic on the computer and pretend they know about it than actually look at a book themselves. But even graduate students I know don’t read just for the love of it. They will read on a topic if their graduate program requires it, but just to immerse themselves in books for the sheer joy of acquainting themselves with other minds—it seems to me that’s quite rare these days.

Last year I asked my ethics class to write a few pages on justice, before we discussed the topic in the course. Most of the papers were ill-organized and inarticulate, and the kids wrote as if “anything goes” in using language (do we believe “anything goes” when we’re trying to repair a car?). They thought they had done well—just putting down impressions—and thought I was “much too opinionated” in correcting them, though if I’d been conscientious I would have had to write more words in commenting on their papers than they had written in the papers. Then I saw a paper that was so clear, and had such elegant simplicity, that I could barely believe it—nothing complicated, nothing even taken from books, just the working out of a few fairly simple ideas. The girl who wrote it was from Korea and had learned English only six years before, in Korea. She had learned it “the correct way,” as a foreign language, paying attention to grammar and construction. How had this girl, who had had no philosophy course before, come to do better than any of the American-born students? I remembered that until after World War II, Korea had been controlled by Japan, and no Korean was permitted to embark on higher education. There it was—in a few years the Koreans have got way ahead of us (this girl wasn’t the only example), though we may still think we’re tops. The thought that scared me was, if they can rise so fast, we can fall pretty fast too. American students are near the bottom of the list in language, mathematics, and other subjects. How can we survive if we continue in the direction we are going?

Q: Why does Borders stock so much Continental philosophy and post-modern junk? Who buys that stuff?

Hospers: Instructors like to assign it, to mystify students and show them how much more learned they (the instructors) are. But I doubt that that’s the main reason. It’s the magic of words again. There are certain words in titles, such as “the meaning of life,” which turn students on, and they think they are getting philosophy just because the book is stocked on a shelf labeled “philosophy.” They are fascinated by the occult, and often identify metaphysics with occultism of some kind—with the mysterious or the mystical, with E.S.P. and “inner revelation” as the key to knowledge. What they actually learn from all this is: nothing. But bookstores stock it because the untutored and the unwary buy it.

Q: Did you see the Sense of Life documentary? What did you think of it?

Hospers: I was moved by some parts of it, especially those parts in which Rand in her inimitable voice speaks with conviction about the topics at hand—especially in the interviews in the New Orleans gold conference, which I hadn’t heard before. I was again bowled over by her ability to say something with simple elegance, and to trace so relentlessly the consequences of her opponents’ ideas. I wanted to tell her how much she meant to all of us.

The parts dealing with the early years were revealing and moving. One disadvantage was that the film was told solely from the point of view of her followers. It would have had a richer texture if it had described some of the ideas being discussed by those who honored her and cared for her but didn’t necessarily believe that every word was sacred scripture.

Q: What is your favorite scene in Atlas Shrugged?

Hospers: There are so many—how can I choose? I guess I’d have to say the scene between Dagny and the tramp in the train, on what happened to Twentieth Century Motors, and why. It’s such a great literary piece—and it presents, as she does so well, the consequences of acting on certain ideas—in this case “To each according to his ability, to each according to his need.” When I finish reading those ten pages aloud to the class, half of them don’t understand it or don’t care, and the other half is thunderstruck—they have been hit over the head with new ideas, which they have never heard before, and they don’t quite know how to handle it or what to do about it. Many a future Objectivist has taken root from that reading in my class—and I’ve done it annually for about thirty years.

[…]

A Full Context exclusive – John Hospers’ “Memories of Ayn Rand”

from Full Context, Vol. 10, No. 9
(May 1998)
Issues of Full Context containing the full transcripts of our interviews are available here.

Image result for john hospers ayn rand

Here is another quote from Dr. John Hospers’ June 2, 1994 letter that commented on Adrian Rogers message on Evolution:

I find it [GRADUAL EVOLUTION] much more compatible with the way reality works in other areas to believe that it came gradually over millions of years. (No, the dinosaurs did not “on the 6th day” — but long before man. The evidence of the rocks is pretty convincing on this, unless you want to say that God planted false evidence in the rocks in order to try man’s faith (as some said 10 years ago). (And the sun had to be there before the third day, since without the sun’s light there would be no day and night on the earth!)

During the 1990′s I actually made it a practice to write famous atheists and scientists that were mentioned by Adrian Rogers and Francis Schaeffer and challenge them with the evidence for the Bible’s historicity and the claims of the gospel. Usually I would send them a cassette tape of Adrian Rogers’ messages “6 reasons I know the Bible is True,” “The Final Judgement,” “Who is Jesus?” and the message by Bill Elliff, “How to get a pure heart.”  I would also send them printed material from the works of Francis Schaeffer and a personal apologetic letter from me addressing some of the issues in their work. My second cassette tape that I sent to both Antony Flew and George Wald was Adrian Rogers’ sermon on evolution and here below you can watch that very sermon on You Tube.   Carl Sagan also took time to correspond with me about a year before he died. 

(Francis Schaeffer pictured below)

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Adrian Rogers pictured below

I have posted on Adrian Rogers’ messages on Evolution before but here is a complete message on it.

Evolution: Fact of Fiction? By Adrian Rogers

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(This next paragraph is my comment and not Adrian Rogers) This might interest you that good friend in Little Rock Craig Carney had an uncle named  Warren Carney and Warren was born in 1917 and he was the last living witness of the Scopes Monkey trial but he died in June of 2015. His father took him to the trial every day since they lived in Dayton and it was the biggest happening in the town’s history. Also I attended the funeral of Dr. Robert G. Lee (1886-1978) at Bellevue Baptist in Memphis and he is the minister who presided over William Jennings Bryan’s funeral in 1925.

(William Jennings Bryan)

(Dr. Robert G. Lee )

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b. The Fixity of the Species
The second bridge the evolutionist cannot cross is the steadfastness, the fixity, of the species—that is, “the basic categories of life.”

Now, what does the Bible say about the species? Well, Genesis 1, verses 11–12: “And God said, Let the earth bring forth grass, the herb yielding seed, and the fruit tree yielding fruit”—now, listen to this phrase—“after his kind, whose seed is in itself, upon the earth: and it was so. And the earth brought forth grass, and herb yielding seed after his kind, and the tree yielding fruit, whose seed was in itself, after his kind: and God saw that it was good” (Genesis 1:11–12). You continue this passage. Ten times God uses this phrase, “after his kind”—“after his kind,” “after his kind”—because like produces like.

Now, the evolutionist must believe that reproduction does not always come kind after kind. There has to be a mutation—or a transmutation, rather—between species—that you can become a protozoa; and then you can become an un-segmented worm; and then you may become a fish; and then you may become a reptile, and move from one species to another. Now, all of us know there is such a thing as mutation. If you have roses, you can get various varieties of roses. If you have dogs—canines—you can have everything from a poodle to a Great Dane, but they’re still canines; they’re still dogs. The scientists have bombarded fruit flies with gamma rays or some kind of rays to cause mutations, and they get all kinds of strange fruit flies. But, they never get June bugs; they’re still fruit flies. You see, there are variations and adaptations that God has built, but you never have one species turning to another species. You never have a cat turn into a dog that turns to a cow that turns to a horse. You just don’t have that.

Now, men have tried to do that. I heard, one time, about a marine biologist who tried to take one of these beautiful shell creatures called an abalone and cross it with a crocodile. What he got was a crock of baloney. And, anytime anybody tries this, that’s exactly what they come up with.
Now, you say, “Pastor Rogers, why are you so certain about the fixity of the species, the steadfastness of the species?” Number one: because the Bible teaches it, and that’s enough for me. But, let’s move beyond that. We’re not talking about theological reasons now; we’re talking about logical reasons. Friend, if this is true, you would expect to find transitional forms in the fossils. There are billions of fossils; there are trillions of fossils— multiplied fossils. In not one instance—are you listening?—in not one instance do we find a transitional form. None—there are none.

Now, there are some people who will attempt to show you a proof of these, but I can tell you that eminent scientists have proven that these are not true. You would think that if man has evolved for millions and billions of years, and that life has evolved from one-celled life, some amoeba, to what we have today, that, in the fossils in the earth, we would find these transitional forms. But, they’re not there. The people talking about finding the missing link… Friend, the whole chain is missing—the whole chain is missing. Now, you ask them to prove it—that that is not true; and, they cannot come up with evidence. Well, you say, “But Pastor, they seem to have the proof. What about these ape-men? What about these people who lived in caves—these cave dwellers?” We have cave dwellers today. People have lived in caves through the years. “But, what about these things that we see in the museum? What about these creatures in this Time-Life advertisement?” Those are the products of imagination, and artistry, and plaster of Paris.

Adrian Rogers pastor of Bellevue Baptist in Memphis visiting with Ronald Reagan in White House pictured above.

Below Bellevue Baptist pictured in 1975:

Some years ago—in 1925, I believe it was—in Tennessee—Dayton, Tennessee— we had something called The Monkey Trial. Clarence Darrow and William Jennings Bryan were in a court case. A teacher had taught evolution in school, and there were people who sued that evolution should not be taught in school. Now it is reversed— you’re sued if you don’t teach evolution in school. But, there was a great debate, and Clarence Darrow, who was a very brilliant lawyer, was presenting evidence for evolution. Part of the evidence that Clarence Darrow presented was Nebraska Man, and he had all of these pictures.

Now, what had happened is there was a man named Harold Cook. And, Harold Cook had found a piece of evidence, and out of that piece of evidence the artist had created this half-man, half-ape—this Nebraska Man. Well, what was it that Clarence Darrow used as evidence that Harold Cook had discovered? It was a tooth. I didn’t say, “teeth”; I said, “tooth.” He had a tooth; and, with that tooth, he had devised a race—male and female.

I was interested in reading, in my research for this message, where a creationist went to the University of Nebraska, where they have the campus museum. And, since he’s named Nebraska Man, they have the replica of Nebraska Man there, in the museum. So, this creationist went in there and said, “I want to see Nebraska Man.” So, they took him in there, and in a case were the skull and the skeleton of Nebraska Man. And, the creationist said, “Are these the actual bones of Nebraska Man?” “Oh,” he said, “no, they’re not the actual bones.” “Well,” the man said, “where could I see the actual bones?” “Oh,” he said, “well, we don’t have the bones. These are plaster of Paris casts of Nebraska Man.” “Well, you must have had the bones to make the cast.” The man in charge seemed embarrassed. “We don’t have any bones. All we have is a tooth.” That’s Nebraska Man. And, what they had done was to take a tooth, take some imagination, take an artist, take plaster of Paris, take some paste and some hair, and glue it on him—make a male, make a female, make a civilization called Nebraska Man out of one—one—tooth.

When I was in school, I studied about the Java ape-man. If you go back as far as I do, you studied about the Java ape-man. Where’d he come from? Well, in 1891, Sir Eugene Dubois found, in Java, the top of a skull, the fragment of a left thighbone, and three molar teeth. He announced the missing link had been found—750,000 years old. These bones that he found—these sparse bones—were not found together, and they were found scattered, over the space of one year. Twenty-four eminent scientists got together to investigate these bones; they were from Europe. There was no agreement. Ten said that they were the bones of an ape; seven said that they were the bones of a man; seven said that it was the missing link. Later, Dubois himself had to confess that it was the remains of an ape. But, in the museum, he is called Pithecanthropus Erectus— “the ape-man who stands up.” But, he’s just an ape.

What about the Piltdown man? I, in college, was introduced to the Piltdown man. Where’d we get his name? Well, Charles Dawson, in Piltdown, England, found in a gravel pit a piece of a jaw, two molar teeth, and a piece of a skull. For 50 years, this was known as “the Piltdown man,” but it was later shown to be a hoax. And, The Reader’s Digest, in 1958, said this—and I quote: “The great Piltdown hoax was an ape only 50 years old. Its teeth had been filed down and artificially colored.” Well, we laugh at that, and we say anybody could have a joke pulled on him. Yes, but friend, the scientists took this and put it in the museum for 50 years. Do you see how anxious man is to make a monkey of himself? I mean, it was a hoax.

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Image result for painting A Discussion on the Piltdown Skull

The painting, entitled “A Discussion on the Piltdown Skull,” is based on a meeting at the Royal College of Surgeons on the afternoon of August 11, 1913, during which the participants presented their views on the anatomy of Piltdown man. One or more of these men may have been involved in committing the fraud, while others were the unwitting victims. The anthropologist Arthur Keith (wearing the white laboratory coat) is seated at the table examining the Piltdown skull. Seated to Keith’s left are the osteologist William Pycraft and the zoologist Ray Lankester. The dentist Arthur Underwood stands in front, to Keith’s right. Standing in the back (from Keith’s far left) are the geologist Arthur Smith Woodward, the amateur paleontologist Charles Dawson, the anatomist Grafton Elliot Smith, and Frank Barlow, an assistant to Woodward. Other notables in the Piltdown affair, such as Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, Lewis Abbot and Martin Hinton, were not present at the discussion. On the back wall, a portrait of Charles Darwin presides over the meeting. (Photograph courtesy of the Geological Society of London.)

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And, Dr. Austin H. Clark, noted biologist of the Smithsonian Institute,  said this—listen to this, this is Smithsonian: “There is no evidence which would show man developing step-by-step from lower forms of life. There is nothing to show that man was in any way connected with monkeys. He appeared suddenly and in substantially the same form as he is today. There are no such things as missing links. So far as concerns the major groups of animals, the creationists appear to have the best argument. There is not the slightest evidence that any one of the major groups arose from any other.” Folks, again—not that I’m embarrassed at being a Baptist preacher—but that’s not a Baptist preacher speaking; that’s a biologist at the Smithsonian.

There’s a man today who’s going about speaking on college campuses. His name is Dr. Philip E. Johnson. He’s a Harvard gradate and also a graduate of the University of Chicago. He’s an attorney—and no mean attorney. He has served as a law clerk for the Chief Justice of the United State Supreme Court. I want you… And, by the way, Mr. Johnson, whose books are in our library and in our bookstore, I believe, is a true believer and does not believe in evolution. He’s brilliant. And, he tells the following story of a lecture given by Colin Patterson at the American Museum of Natural History in 1981. Let me tell you who Patterson is. Patterson is a senior paleontologist—that means, just simply, “someone who studies ancient events, and creatures, and so forth”—he is a senior paleontologist at the British Natural History Museum. And, I’ve been to that museum. As you walk in, the first thing you see is the head of Darwin there—the bust of Darwin. He is—Colin Patterson is—the senior paleontologist at the British Natural History Museum, and he is the author of that museum’s general text on evolution. So, this guy’s no “6” or “7.” When it comes to science, he’s a “9” or “10.”

(Phillip Johnson)

(Colin Patterson)

Now, Philip Johnson, who is this lawyer from Harvard, quotes Colin Patterson, and he says this happened: He says—Patterson is lecturing now, and Philip Johnson is talking about it; and, here’s what Philip Johnson says: “First, Patterson asked his audience of experts a question which reflected his own doubts about much of what has been thought to be secured knowledge about evolution.” Now, here’s this man; he’s asking his colleagues this question: “Can you tell me anything you know about evolution—any one thing—that is true?” A good question: “Can you tell me…”—now listen; it’s kind of funny—“Can you tell me anything—any one thing—you know is true?” Now, here are these learned men sitting out there. And, let me tell you what happened: He said, “I tried that question on the geology staff at the Field Museum of Natural History, and the only answer I got was silence. I tried it on the members of the Evolutionary Morphology Seminar in the University of Chicago”—morphology means, “to change from one form to another”—I tried it on the members of the Evolutionary Morphology Seminar in the University of Chicago, a very prestigious body of evolutionists, and all I got there was silence for a long time. Eventually, one person said, ‘I do know one thing: It ought not to be taught in high school.’”
Now, get the setting: Here is a man, a brilliant scientist from the British Museum, who has written a book on the thing. And, he gets these high muckety-mucks out there—these intellectual top waters—and he said, “

Can you tell me one thing that you know to be true—that you know to be true?” Silence. Only thing one of them said: “I know that it ought not to be taught in high school.”

You see, folks, there are some bridges that they cannot cross. One bridge is the origin of life. George Wald said, “That’s impossible, but I believe it—spontaneous generation—because I don’t want to believe in God.” The other is the fixity of the species. We don’t have any evolutionary fossilized remains, missing links.

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12/09/2013

Featured Artist Today is Ron Gorchov

Ron Gorchov Looks to The Greeks

It is often said that artists never retire, and American abstract painter Ron Gorchov is no exception. Now in his early 80s, Gorchov nevertheless continues to quietly push his work in strange new directions. His latest exhibit, a low-key affair at the Lesley Heller Workspace at 54 Orchard Street, offers up an collection of minimal watercolor compositions influenced primarily by Greek Mythology.

The ameba-like watercolor paintings represent something of a departure for Gorchov, who is best-known for his curved paintings — large canvases bound to custom-bowed stretchers — that resemble the shapes of shields, saddles, and primitive masks. “My paintings are mostly made from reverie, and luck,” he once told The Brooklyn Rail. “I think painting, per se, is an ideal way to criticize the work you already admire because that way you can take the best things in it and try to make your work to be the next consequential step. I mean, to me, that’s a given tradition in creative thought: to build on what you’re seeing that you love and try to bring it to new and unknown terrain.”

Born in Chicago in 1930, Gorchov began painting at the age of 14 when he began taking classes at the Art Institute of Chicago. He has been working in New York since the early 1950s, when he arrived with his wife, newborn son, and all but $80 to his name. Since arriving he has made paintings that are now in permanent collections at The Met, MoMA, and Guggenheim, to name a few. His contemporaries include Willem de Kooning, Mark Rothko, and Joel Shapiro.

Gorchov’s watercolor paintings will be on display at the Lesley Heller Workspace through October 13th.

Lane Koivu 

Ron Gorchov at CHEIM & READ

Published on Apr 7, 2012

James Kalm has the distinct pleasure of bringing viewers this brief tour of recent paintings by one of New York’s most enigmatic artists, Ron Gorchov. Though a member of the New York art world since the early fifties, it was in the late sixties that Gorchov devised his unique painting support, often referred to as a “saddle shape”. The use of this convex surface was a refutation of Clement Greenberg’s dogmatic idea that the picture plane must be flat, and rectangular. Along with his “saddle shape” canvases Gorchov has developed a “stack” format, a series of curved planes overlaying each other, that he paints sophisticated color studies on. This exhibition presents recent examples of Gorchov’s works that display his innovative comingling of painting and sculpture and the mastery of his means. Includes an appreciation by Jonathan Lasker.

Featured artist is Ron Gorchov

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ron Gorchov (born 1930) is an American artist who has been working with curved surface paintings and shaped canvases since 1967.[1] Gorchov’s primary invention consists of finely fitted, curved wooden frames resembling shields or saddles, across which is stretched linen or canvas. He uses simple paired strokes to create images that play with asymmetry within a basically symmetrical design, creating his emblematic doubled or mirrored image.[2]

Gorchov’s paintings are included in many prominent collections, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Detroit Institute of Art, and the Guggenheim.

Biography[edit]

Gorchov’s career as an artist began in 1944, at the age of fourteen, when he began taking classes at the Art Institute of Chicago. Many of his fellow students were servicemen returning from World War II who used G.I. Billbenefits to pay for art materials. “A veteran… gave me a paper bag with all his half-squeezed oil paint tubes and a whole bunch of old brushes and he said they’d be good luck.”.[3]

Gorchov attended the University of Mississippi in 1947 and called it “the most unlikely place I could go. The deep south was exotic. I went fishing with William Faulkner…but because of the horrific racial problem I was mentally not at all able to think about art.”[4] Gorchov returned to Chicago and took both academic and art classes at Roosevelt College and the Art Institute. In 1953, Gorchov came to New York with his wife and newborn son and eighty dollars. The family moved into the Marlton Hotel, across the street from where the Whitney Museum used to be and what is now the New York Studio School.

Gorchov’s career has included impressive showings at Susan Caldwell and Pat Hamilton galleries in the 1970s, followed by Hamilton, Marlborough, and Jack Tilton galleries in New York and galerie m in Germany in the 1980s. In 1972, Gorchov installed two of his “experiments in neocontructivism: multipaneled stacks of heraldic monochromes” [5] at the Everson Museum of Art in Syracuse, New York. One of these stacked works, titled Set, was later included in Rooms, the inaugural exhibition at P.S. 1 Contemporary Art Center in New York in 1976, while the other, titled Entrance, was also exhibited at P.S. 1 in 1979. In 2006 Gorchov’s work was again shown at P.S. 1 in a solo show titled Ron Gorchov: Double Trouble.

Tradition[edit]

Gorchov is sometimes known as a “perennially emerging artist.”.[6] His first appearance on the scene was in 1960, when he was included in the Whitney Museum’s Young America 1960: Thirty American Painters Under Thirty-Sixexhibition. Some years later Gorchov was rediscovered by Dorothy Miller, then a curator at MoMA, who chose him for Art in America’s “New Talent U.S.A.: Painting.”

Gorchov was part of a group of artists working in Manhattan in the 1960s and 70s that was responding to the concept of “Action Painting” as defined by Harold Rosenberg, a concept that purported to demolish pictorial conventions and held as suspect the notions of facility and harmonious composition.[7] His work shows an affinity with that of Arshile Gorky (Gorchov was at one point affiliated with Gorky’s mentor John D. Graham), Joel Shapiroand Richard Tuttle.[8] He was a mentor to Willem de Kooning and friendly with Mark Rothko.[9]

References[edit]

  1. Jump up^ Ron Gorchov, Answers to Gavin Spanierman Questionnaire, 2007
  2. Jump up^ Robert Storr, catalog essay, 1990
  3. Jump up^ Ron Gorchov with Robert Storr and Phong Bui, The Brooklyn Rail, September 2006
  4. Jump up^ Ron Gorchov with Robert Storr and Phong Bui, The Brooklyn Rail, September 2006
  5. Jump up^ Robert Storr, ArtForum, September 2005
  6. Jump up^ Robert Storr, catalog essay, 1990
  7. Jump up^ Robert Storr, catalog essay, 1990
  8. Jump up^ Missing in action: Robert Storr on Ron Gorchov, ArtForum, September 2005
  9. Jump up^ Robert Storr, catalog essay, 1990

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Chuck Colson on SAVING PRIVATE RYAN’s lessons!!!

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Saving Private Ryan D-Day Scene

Saving Private Ryan opening cemetery scene

HD – Saving Private Ryan – Death of Captain John H. Miller and Final Speech

The Good Life

by Chuck Colson

Learn More | Meet Chuck Colson

An old man walks down a wide path through a colonnade of evergreens. He has a full head of gray hair, combed from a wavy peak to one side. His eyebrows spike with a grandfatherly flourish toward his temples. He wears a light blue Windbreaker over a golf shirt with a horizontal stripe, Sansabelt slacks, and the crepe-soled shoes his doctor recommended. His gait is quick but stiff – stiff like someone who has just gotten himself up. He marches forward with great intent and purpose, as if he’s hunting out something or someone.Behind him trail his family. His wife is closest, his son and daughter-in- law a step or two farther behind, bracketing their children.

The man’s eyes show that for the moment he’s not thinking of his family, although he seems to be dragging them in his wake. His eyes are at once wide-open yet fixed, poached by what can only be dread. His mouth works in a way that shows his stomach is in his throat. Off to the left his family can see the curve of a long shore, hear the soughing of the waves, and nearly breathe in the scent of the brine. But the man looks neither to his right nor to his left. He keeps stumbling forward, his body tense yet determined.

When he finally turns to his right, he steps onto a vast lawn striped with thousands of white crosses that extend toward the horizon. Here and there a Jewish star adds to the procession of markers that contrast starkly against the green sward. The old man’s pace speeds as he makes his way through this vast cemetery. His family struggles to keep up.

James Ryan’s determined march finally halts in front of a particular cross. The rims of his eyes show red. He wipes at them with a shaking hand, sniffs hard, tries again to breathe. Here it is, his captain’s cross, the name, the date: Captain John W. Miller, June 13, 1944.

He takes another sniff against his watering eyes, bites his lip. He’s almost choking as he struggles to breathe in the heavy air. His knees give way, and he kneels before the cross, his shoulders heaving. His wife is suddenly at one shoulder, his son at the other. He’s glad they are there, but they cannot help with what needs to be done.

He mumbles that he’s all right, and they retreat several steps, leaving him to the thoughts that press so hard he can’t bear the weight.

Not until this moment does he realize that what he has been looking forward to yet dreading is a transaction. An exchange of some kind. For him this visit to the Normandy American Cemetery is no sightseeing tour. It’s a profound action. Even now he cannot say why he believes this to be the case. The emotion that’s seized him declares it to be so, however.

Whatever must happen involves the question that’s dogged him his whole life. The unspoken question that’s brought him here. He feels its presence in every memory, and not only the good ones.

Now that he’s looking at his captain’s grave, Ryan has to ask the question.

Decades earlier, on June 6, 1944, Captain Miller and his men had landed at Omaha Beach, a horror James Ryan had been spared as part of the 101st Airborne. His unit had been dropped into Normandy the night before the sea assault. He later learned from the tales of his buddies and from seeing newsreel footage what D-day had been like. Although Germany had not been expecting the assault at the place Eisenhower chose, the air assault hadn’t softened their positions one whit, and when the armored front of the Higgins boats opened onto the beach, the men were ducks on a pond to the enemy’s machine guns. Many of those sitting forward in the landing craft never had a chance to move from their seats as the Germans opened fire. Those who jumped over the craft’s sides to swim and crawl ashore could only cling to the Belgian gates and iron hedgehogs – the jack-shaped defensive works strewn in rows all along the shingle that prevented tanks from making the initial assault.

The army rangers humped forward in waves, men falling to the right and left every few feet. They were getting hit not only by machinegun fire but by artillery as well. Bodies flew with the explosions. The wounded picked up their severed arms and stumbled a few more feet to their deaths. The waves washing onto the beaches ran red with blood, lapping at the dead, who lay scattered and senseless.

Captain Miller and a few of his company made it to the seawall. Although 50 percent of the men in the first waves to hit Omaha Beach were killed in action, the others broke the first line of German defenses.

Soon after the hell of D-Day, Captain Miller and a squad of seven men were assigned to find paratrooper James Ryan and bring him home – alive. The army’s chief of staff, General George C. Marshall, had personally issued the order for Private James Ryan to be taken out of the war. Ryan’s two older brothers had died in the great assault, and a third brother had been killed in action in New Guinea. Marshall thought that three sons were enough for any mother to contribute to the war.

Captain Miller and his squad found Ryan with remnants of the 506, Baker Company, which had orders to secure a bridge on the far side of a river. The company had been ordered to hold the bridge at all costs – or, as a final defense, to blow it up. When Captain Miller and his squad arrived to take Ryan home, Ryan refused to leave. Miller asked him what he was supposed to say to Ryan’s mother when she got another folded American flag. Ryan replied, “You can tell her that when you found me, I was with the only brothers I had left. And that there was no way I was deserting them. I think she’d understand that.”

Captain Miller and his squad told Ryan angrily that they had already lost two men in the search to find him. Miller finally decided that they’d make Ryan’s battle their own as well and save him in the process.

The Germans soon came at them – nearly a full company of men, two Panzer tanks, two Tigers. The Americans lured the Panzers down the village’s main street, where they staged an effective ambush. The only thing Ryan had been allowed to do was pitch mortar shells like hand grenades. Captain Miller never let Ryan leave his side, protecting the private every step of the way.

Still, one tank blew their sharpshooter to eternity. Another soldier died in hand-to-hand combat with a knife to his heart. No matter their ingenuity, the squad couldn’t hold off such an overpowering force, and the men made a strategic retreat to the other side of the bridge. In the retreat one of the sergeants was hit and collapsed.

Captain Miller took a shot beneath his ribs as he struggled to fix the wiring on a detonation device. Then an artillery blast knocked him nearly unconscious. All hope lost, Captain Miller began shooting at a tank coming straight at him.

Suddenly, Tankbuster aircraft shrieked down on them, blowing the enemy’s tanks to smithereens and routing their foot soldiers. The Allies’ own armored reinforcements rolled up minutes later.

Of the squad that had come to save Ryan, only two men escaped relatively unscathed. The others were dead or dying.

Captain Miller lay close by where he had been hit, his back slumped against the bridge’s wall. Ryan, in anguish, was alone with his rescuer in the final moments before Miller died. Ryan watched as the captain struggled in his last moments, shot clean through one lung. The captain wouldn’t take another breath, except to grunt, “James. Earn this . . . earn it.”

Were these dying words a final order or charge?

These memories rivet the aged James Ryan, who now finds himself staring at the grave marker and mumbling to his dead commander. He tells Captain Miller that his family is with him. He confesses that he wasn’t sure how he would feel about coming to the cemetery today. He wants Captain Miller to know that every day of his life he’s thought of their conversation at the bridge, of Miller’s dying words. Ryan has tried to live a good life, and he hopes he has. At least in the captain’s eyes, he hopes he’s “earned it,” that his life has been worthy of the sacrifice Captain Miller and the other men made of giving their lives for his.

As Ryan mutters these thoughts, he cannot help wondering how any life, however well lived, could be worthy of his friends’ sacrifice. The old man stands up, but he doesn’t feel released. The question remains unanswered.

His wife comes to his side again. He looks at her and pleads, “Tell me I’ve led a good life.”

Confused by his request, she responds with a question: “What?”

He has to know the answer. He tries to articulate it again: “Tell me I’m a good man.”

The request flusters her, but his earnestness makes her think better of putting it off. With great dignity, she says, “You are.”

His wife turns back to the other family members, whose stirring says they are ready to leave.

Before James Ryan joins them, he comes to attention and salutes his fallen comrade. What a gallant old soldier he is.

Who of us can see this scene from Steven Spielberg’s magnificent film Saving Private Ryan and not ask ourselves the same question: Have I lived a good life?

Does there exist an exact way of calculating the answer to this question? How do we define living a good life? What makes the good we do good enough? Is our life worthy of the sacrifice of others? The unavoidable question of whether we have lived a good life searches our hearts.

Not everyone experiences what Ryan did in such a dramatic way. Yet this question of the good life – and others like it – haunts every human being from the earliest years of our consciousness. Something stirs us at the very core of our being, demanding answers to so many questions: Is there some purpose in life? Are we alone in this universe, or does some force – call it fate, destiny, or providence – guide our lives?

These questions don’t often occur to us so neatly of course. Usually the hardest questions hit us at the hardest times. In the midst of tragedy or serious illness, when confronting violence and injustice, or after seeing our personal hopes shattered, we cry out, “Why is the world such a mess? Is there anything I can do about it?”

There’s a mystery at work in these perennial questions of human existence. I doubt anyone who has ever seen Saving Private Ryan or read great works of literature like Dostoyevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov or Camus’s The Plague has ever doubted the relevance of such questions. Neither does anyone who has ever marveled at the beauty of the Milky Way or sat weeping at the bedside of a dying loved one.

What distinguishes humans from all other creatures is our selfconsciousness: We know we are alive and that we will die, and we cannot keep from asking ourselves questions about why life is the way it is and what it all means.

And isn’t it odd that we all understand immediately why Private Ryan would feel compelled to live an honorable life? Does he believe that in doing so he can make his comrades’ sacrifice worthwhile? Evidently, he does, and we sense the rightness of this. But why does he feel in their debt? Why does he feel that their actions have to be recompensed by his own, as if blind justice with a sword in one hand and balancing scales in the other really existed? And why should goodness be the means of repaying this debt? Why not revenge? Why should he not set about killing as many former Nazis as possible? Somehow that does not satisfy, though. If sacrifice can be repaid at all, it can be done only by sacrifice, not by slaughter. We know this. But why do we know this?

A broad answer lies in our humanity. Because we are human, we ask questions about meaning and purpose. We have an innate sense of justice and our own need to meet the demands of justice. Moral attitudes differ from culture to culture, but take people from a Stone Age culture in a remote village in Papua New Guinea, sit them down in front of Saving Private Ryan, and they will immediately understand the issues involved. They will understand Ryan’s questions and his sense of gratitude.

The word should in the questions that arise from Private Ryan’s life immediately grounds us in ethical considerations. It implies there must be a variety of answers to these questions. It suggests that some answers are better than others – some are right while others are wrong. So, where does this should come from? What does it mean that we possess an innate sense of these things?

At the very least it points to the notion that we all live in a moral universe, which is one of the reasons human beings, regardless of background or economics or place of birth, are irresistibly religious. If nothing else, we know there is someone or something to which we owe a debt for our existence.

Our questions also presume that we can choose our answers to these questions and act on these choices. The freedom of the human will, even if circumscribed, is built into the way the human mind works.

Commenting on life’s questions, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, in the case Planned Parenthood v. Casey, said, “At the heart of liberty is the right to define one’s own concept of existence, of meaning, of the universe, and of the mystery of human life.” Kennedy asserted that beliefs about these matters define the attributes of personhood. We are who we are, we are the type of creatures we are, because we are obliged to come to our own conclusions about the great questions. Although I disagree profoundly with the legal conclusion Justice Kennedy drew from this observation, I must admit his summary captures what makes us human.3

I can remember when I first began asking questions early in life. I have particularly vivid memories of the Sunday morning in December 1941 when our family was riveted to the radio, listening with growing anxiety to the reports of the Japanese attacks on Pearl Harbor. I was certain we’d be fighting Japanese soldiers or German SS officers in the streets of our sleepy Boston suburb. I remember asking my father, “Why does there have to be war and bloodshed and death?” He replied – mistakenly, as I now think – that it was all part of the natural process, like famines and plagues that prevented overpopulation.

During the war, I organized fund-raising campaigns in my school, even auctioned off my treasured model airplane collection to raise funds for the war effort. Instinctively I knew I was meant to do my part to protect our freedoms. I wanted my life – even at age twelve – to matter.

I also remember standing in our yard many nights, the world around me in darkness, blackout shades covering every window in the neighborhood, protecting us against the expected air raids. I would stare into the dazzling array of stars above me and wonder where the universe began, where it ended, and what I was doing here. As a student, I struggled to grasp the concept of infinity – what was beyond those stars.

I’ve continued to ask these kinds of questions, especially during times of stress. I’ve asked them in my life as a government official, as a husband and father, as a convicted felon, and then as a Christian leader. Many times in the inner recesses of my conscience I’ve asked Ryan’s questions: Have I been a good man? Have I lived a good life? Sometimes I’ve been unsure; other times I’ve been sure that I have failed. But where do we go to answer these questions? Whom do we ask? Who can tell us the truth about the value of our lives?

While the quest to find answers to such questions can be arduous at times, even heartbreaking, the search for the truth about life is the one thing that makes life worthwhile, exhilarating. The ability to pursue such a search makes us human. Emmanuel Mounier, the founder of the French “personalist” philosophical movement, writes that human life is characterized by a “divine restlessness.” The lack of peace within our hearts spurs us on a quest for the meaning of life – a command imprinted on “unextinguished souls.”4 Pope John Paul II sums up the matter elegantly: “One may define the human being, therefore, as the one who seeks the truth.”5

What will be the truth of our lives and our destinies? Most people want to arrive at Captain Miller’s cemetery cross – or whatever judgment seat they envision – with some confidence that they have lived a good life.

But what is a good life? How does such a life incorporate answers to the great questions? How can such a life be lived?

Have I lived one?

Have you?

(This scene includes violence and bad language) Saving Private Ryan Omaha Beach

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WOODY WEDNESDAY At 79, Woody Allen Says There’s Still Time To Do His Best Work JULY 29, 2015 5:03 PM ET

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Woody Allen – The Atheist

JULY 29, 2015 5:03 PM ET
When asked about his major shortcomings, filmmaker Woody Allen says, "I'm lazy and an imperfectionist."

When asked about his major shortcomings, filmmaker Woody Allen says, “I’m lazy and an imperfectionist.”

Thibault Camus/AP

Woody Allen is a prolific filmmaker — he’s been releasing films pretty much every year since the mid-1960s. (His latest, Irrational Man, is now in theaters.) But Allen isn’t exactly prolific as an interview subject. When film critic Sam Fragoso sat down with Allen in Chicago, the filmmaker revealed his insecurities (well, not so much revealed as reiterated), and discussed why actors like to work with him and what he regrets.

Allen also discussed his relationship with his wife, Soon-Yi Previn, whom he met when he was in a relationship with actress Mia Farrow. Previn is Farrow’s adopted daughter and is 35 years younger than Allen.


Sam Fragoso: You’re more prolific than most people.

Woody Allen: But prolific is a thing that’s not a big deal. It’s not the quantity of the stuff you do; it’s the quality. A guy like James Joyce will do just a couple of things, but they resonate way beyond anything I’ve ever done or ever could dream of doing.

Would you say your quality, in spots, dipped because of the quantity?

It always [has]. When you start out to make a film, you have very big expectations and sometimes you come close. When I did Match Point, I felt I came very close. But you never get that thing that you want. You always set out to make Citizen Kane or to makeThe Bicycle Thief and it doesn’t happen. You can’t set out to make something great head-on; you just have to make films and hope you get lucky.

Have you considered scaling back, making a film every few years?

It wouldn’t help. It’s not that I feel, “Oh, if I had more time or more money, I could make this better.” It’s coming to terms with the shortcomings in one’s own gift and one’s own personality.

What are your major shortcomings?

I’m lazy and an imperfectionist. Steven Spielberg and Martin Scorsese will work on the details until midnight and sweat it out, whereas for me, come 6 o’clock, I want to go home, I want to have dinner, I want to watch the ballgame. Filmmaking is not [the] end-all be-all of my existence. Another shortcoming is that I don’t have the intellect or the depth or the natural gift. The greatness is not in me. When you see scenes in [Akira] Kurosawa films … you know he’s a madman on the set. There would be 100 horses and everything had to be perfect. He was crazy. I don’t have any of that.

You wouldn’t consider yourself crazy?

No, no. My problem is that I’m middle-class. If I was crazy I might be better. That probably accounts for my output. I lead a very sensible life: I get up in the morning, I work, I get the kids off to school, do the treadmill, play the clarinet, take a walk with my wife. It’s usually the same walk every day. If I were crazy, it would help. If I shrieked on the set and demanded, it may be better, but I don’t. I say, “Good enough!” It’s a middle-class quality, which does make for productivity.

You’re never bored.

Look, we all have to make a living in life and do something. Making films, by the general standard of jobs, is a very good one. You work with very gifted people. I work with beautiful women and good men.

Most performers want to work with you.

There are two factors:

1) I give them good parts to play and they are artists and they don’t want to keep doing blockbuster movies. They want to act in something.

2) But they want to work with me when the blockbuster movie hasn’t offered them anything. If I offer them something and then Jurassic Park offers them something, they take Jurassic Park because of the money.

The way you describe filmmaking, it comes across as a job first, passion second, so where do you find happiness?

It’s not a tedious chore; it’s a pleasant way to make a living. I like playing music, I like being with the family, but I don’t have any ecstatic highs. I’m not like Samuel Taylor Coleridge. I enjoy working. If it’s 7 in the morning and you’re on the set and there’s Scarlett Johansson or Emma Stone, and you’re dealing for a year with costumes and music … it’s like arts and crafts, you’re making a collage. But I’m not someone who does heroin.

Have you experimented with drugs recreationally or for creative purposes?

I’ve never done any drugs whatsoever. I’ve never taken a puff of marijuana. I’ve never taken a recreational pill of any sort. I can barely bring myself to take two Extra Strength Excedrin.

Not once?

No, and I don’t even have the curiosity. People say all the time, “Aren’t you curious?” But I’m not a curious person. I’m not curious to travel, but I do because my wife likes it. I’m not curious to see other places, I’m not curious to try new things. I go to the same restaurants all the time, and my wife is always saying, “Let’s try something new!” I don’t enjoy that. When Elaine’s was open in New York, I ate every dinner, seven nights a week, for 10 [to] 12 years.

I’m still surprised you’ve never taken a hit from a joint.

And I was right in the thick of it. I would play [the Chicago nightclub] Mr. Kelly’s and the [San Francisco nightclub] Hungry I and college concerts in the ’60s, and afterwards everyone would be doing it. All the folk acts, the rock acts. The subject of drugs never interests me. There are a lot of subjects that don’t hold my attention. I’m not interested in technology. I don’t have a computer. I’m not interested in traveling, popular music. I can’t bring myself to get motivated.

And yet you’re making a series for an online audience with Amazon.

Right, I’ve never seen one. I think they’re going to be embarrassed. They’re going to regret that they started up with me. I’m doing my best. I’m working a six-episode series.

They’re no good?

I have grave doubts about them. I thought it was going to be an easy score. Movies are not easy, but it’s not a cinch. I don’t want to disappoint them.

After all these years of making movies about death (the fear of it, how to beat it, etc.), do you feel, at 79, any better about it all?

You don’t beat that anxiety. You don’t mellow when you get older and gain a Buddhist acceptance.

Is it worse now?

It’s not worse; it’s the same. If you wake up in the middle of the night, at 20, contemplating your extinction, you have the same feeling at 60 and 80. You’re hardwired to fight to live. You can’t give logical reasons why, but you’re hardwired to survive. You would prefer not to. You would prefer that the life story was a different scenario, but it’s not.

How long have you been seeing an analyst?

Well, not continually. I was in analysis when I was 20 and then stopped for a while, then saw a shrink when I was a little older. I’ve been in and out. Now I check in once a week just to charge the batteries.

Has it helped?

It’s funny, it’s helped, but not as much as I’ve wanted. Years ago, I remember, I brought my clarinet into the repair shop, and the guy took two weeks and put new pads on and everything. When I went in, I said, “Thank you, but am I going to sound better?” And he said, “Yes, you will sound better, but not as much as you’d like to.” The truth is you can’t get what you want.

Are you suggesting people can’t get better?

I do think you get better to a certain degree. Every case is different. It depends how close you are to getting better by yourself. If someone is close to it, the shrink can give you that little push and they make it.

Where/when have you experienced that push?

When I first started to be a comedian, I used to have the fantasy all the time that they’d hate me. I’m going to get on stage and they’re not going to like me. The problem was — psychologically, but unbeknownst to me — I was worried I was not going to like them. And that was causing me anxiety, which I transferred to, “They’re not going to like me.” That was a significant contribution of relieving the anxiety of going on stage.

Also, when I was 19 I was married.

What was that?

It was fine! It got me out of my parent’s house and got me into New York City and reality. My wife was a nice, smart person, but I would sometimes become nauseated during the night and I kept thinking it was the food. “Oh, I shouldn’t have eaten at the Chinese restaurant, the Italian food.” It was anxiety, and when someone finally pointed it out to me that it wasn’t the food causing me those stomach problems, it was a big help.

You didn’t like the people.

I never liked people.

What’s your problem with people?

I think some of them are wonderful, but they are so many of them that are not. I was one of the few guys rooting for the comet to hit the Earth. Statistically, more people that deserved to go would go.

Would you consider yourself a good person?

I would consider myself … decent as I got older. When I was younger I was less sensitive, in my 20s. But as I got older and began to see how difficult life was for everybody, I had more compassion for other people. I tried to act nicer, more decent, more honorable. I couldn’t always do it. When I was in my 20s, even in my early 30s, I didn’t care about other people that much. I was selfish and I was ambitious and insensitive to the women that I dated. Not cruel or nasty, but not sufficiently sensitive.

You viewed women as temporary fixtures?

Yes, temporary, but as I got older and they were humans suffering like I was … I changed. I learned empathy over the years.

Do you have any major regrets?

Oh! My biggest regret — I have so many, trivial ones and big ones — is that I didn’t finish college. I allowed myself to get thrown out. I couldn’t care less about it at the time. I regret that I didn’t have a more serious life; that my films were too entertaining when I started. I wanted to be [Ingmar] Bergman.

But you contributed joy to the world through laughter.

Yes, that’s what got me by. It saved me. But it was the easy road when I started, and I did it. If I had it to do over again, I would be a more dedicated artist. I would’ve been more serious right from the start. People could look at that and say, “You’re nuts. Those are the only movies of yours that we enjoyed. Whenever you’ve tried to be serious or tried to be meaningful, we walk out.”

That’s dialogue from [your film] Stardust Memories.

You’re right, and it may just be that the amount of depth I have, and the talent to amuse that I have, goes up to three, and that’s where it is and I did very nicely with it.

You make it sound like your life is over.

Well, I am 80 in a few months. Who knows what I can count on? My parents lived long, but that’s not guarantee of anything. It’s too late to really reinvent oneself. All I can do is try to do good work so that people can say, “In his later years, in his last years, he did some of his best work.” Great.

Since you are nearing 80, I’m curious: Do you still believe “love fades,” as Annie Hall claims?

It fades almost all the time. Once in a while you get lucky and get into a relationship that lasts a very long time. Even a lifetime. But it does fade. Relationships are the most difficult thing people deal with. They deal with loneliness, meeting people, sustaining relationships. You always hear from people, “Well, if you want to have a good relationship you have to work at it.” But there’s nothing else in your life that you really love and enjoy that you have to work at. I love music, but I don’t have to work at it. A guy likes to go out boating on the weekends, he doesn’t think, “Oh, I have to work at it.” He can’t wait to leave work to get to it. That’s the way you have to feel about your relationship. If you feel that you have to work at it — a constant business of looking the other way, sweeping stuff under the rug, compromising — it’s not working.

Do you feel that way now with [your wife] Soon-Yi Previn?

I lucked out in my last relationship. I’ve been married now for 20 years, and it’s been good. I think that was probably the odd factor that I’m so much older than the girl I married. I’m 35 years older, and somehow, through no fault of mine or hers, the dynamic worked. I was paternal. She responded to someone paternal. I liked her youth and energy. She deferred to me, and I was happy to give her an enormous amount of decision-making just as a gift and let her take charge of so many things. She flourished. It was just a good-luck thing.

Luck is something you play with in your movies often.

Yes, I’m a big believer in that.

But when you found Soon-Yi, when did you know that this relationship worked? I must say from afar — to the general public — it’s a bit harder to understand.

I thought it was ridiculous.

So run me through your thought process back in late ’80s.

I started the relationship with her and I thought it would just be a fling, it wouldn’t be serious. But it had a life of its own. And I never thought it would be anything more. Then we started going together, then we started living together, and we were enjoying it. And the age difference didn’t seem to matter. It seemed to work in our favor, actually.

She enjoyed being introduced to many, many things that I knew from experience, and I enjoyed showing her those things. She took them, and outstripped me in certain areas that I showed her. That’s why I’m a big believer in luck. I feel that you can’t orchestrate those things. Two people come along, and they have a trillion exquisite needs and neuroses and nuances, and they have to mesh. And if one of them doesn’t mesh, it causes a lot of trouble. It’s like the trace vitamin not being in your body. It’s a tiny little thing, but if you don’t have it, you die.

The separation between church and state, artists and their personal lives — do you think the allegations [that you sexually abused your adopted daughter, Dylan Farrow] have affected how people approach your movies?

I would say no. I always had a small audience. People did not come in great abundance, and they still don’t, and I’ve maintained the same audience over the years. If the reviews are bad, they don’t come. If the reviews are good, they probably come.

You really don’t believe they carry that external baggage into the theater?

Not for a second. It has no meaning in the way I make movies, too. I never see any evidence of anything in my private life resonating in film. If I come out with a film people want to see, they flock to see it, which means they see it to the degree of Manhattan or Annie Hall or Midnight in Paris. That’s my outer limits. If I come out with a film they don’t want to see, they don’t come.

At the end of it all, what do you want to be remembered for?

People always ask me this now that I’m turning 80, but I don’t really care. It wouldn’t matter to me, aside from the royalties to my kids, if they took all my films and dumped them. You and I could be standing over [William] Shakespeare’s grave, singing his praises, and it doesn’t mean a thing. You’re extinct.

Sam Fragoso is a writer and editor whose work has appeared in The Atlantic, Vanity Fair, Playboy and elsewhere. A book of his interviews with emerging filmmakers, titled Talk Easy, will be published by The Critical Press in 2016.

Woody Allen & Parker Posey Red-Carpet Interviews for ‘Irrational Man’

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George Harrison – All Things Must Pass (SONG)

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The Beatles – All Things Must Pass (Full Band Demo – 1969)

Uploaded on Jun 16, 2011

The Beatles performing “All Things Must Pass”, the George Harrison classic in 1968 during the Get Back / Let It Be sessions, 1969.

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George Harrison – All Things Must Pass (Live – 1997 on VH1 – HQ Audio)

Uploaded on Nov 2, 2011

George Harrison’s legendary impromptu performance of “All Things Must Pass” on VH1 in 1997, George’s last live performance before his death. The audio has been cleaned up and is high quality.

Paul McCartney – All things must pass (Concert For George)(HQ)

George Harrison – All Things Must Pass

 

All Things Must Pass (song)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
“All Things Must Pass”
ATMP juke.jpg

2001 jukebox single, “My Sweet Lord (2000)“/”All Things Must Pass”
Song by George Harrison from the album All Things Must Pass
Published Harrisongs
Released 27 November 1970
Genre Folk rock
Length 3:47
Label Apple
Writer(s) George Harrison
Producer(s) George Harrison, Phil Spector
All Things Must Pass track listing

All Things Must Pass” is a song by English musician George Harrison, issued in November 1970 as the title track to his triple album of the same name. Billy Preston released the song originally – as “All Things (Must) Pass” – on his Apple Records album Encouraging Words (1970), after the Beatles had rejected it for inclusion on their Let It Be album in January 1969. The composition reflects the influence of the Band‘s sound and communal music-making on Harrison, after he had spent time with the group in Woodstock, New York, in late 1968, while Timothy Leary‘s poem “All Things Pass”, a psychedelic adaptation of the Tao Te Ching, provided inspiration for his song lyrics.

The subject matter deals with the transient nature of human existence, and in Harrison’s All Things Must Pass reading, words and music combine to reflect impressions of optimism against fatalism. On release, together with Barry Feinstein‘s album cover image, commentators viewed the song as a statement on the Beatles’ break-up. Widely regarded as one of Harrison’s finest compositions, its rejection by his former band has provoked comment from biographers and reviewers. Music critic Ian MacDonald described “All Things Must Pass” as “the wisest song never recorded by The Beatles”,[1] while author Simon Leng considers it “perhaps the greatest solo Beatle composition”.[2] The recording was co-produced by Phil Spector in London; it features an orchestral arrangement by John Barham and contributions from musicians such as Ringo Starr, Pete Drake, Bobby Whitlock, Eric Clapton and Klaus Voormann.

Although the Beatles failed to formally record the song, a 1969 solo demo by Harrison appears on their compilation Anthology 3 (1996). An early version from the All Things Must Pass sessions was released on Harrison’s posthumous compilation Early Takes: Volume 1 in 2012. Paul McCartney performed “All Things Must Pass” at the Concert for George tribute in November 2002, a year after Harrison’s death. Jim James, the Waterboys, Klaus Voormann and Yusuf Islam, and Sloan Wainwright are among the other artists who have covered the song.

Background[edit]

The Band in Woodstock in 1969, with Levon Helm (centre) and Robbie Robertson (second from right)

Like his friend Eric Clapton, George Harrison was inspired by Music from Big Pink, the seminal debut album[3] from the Band, the former backing group for Bob Dylan.[4][5] Released in July 1968, Music from Big Pink was partly responsible for Harrison’s return to the guitar, his first instrument,[6] after he had spent two years attempting to master the more complex Indian sitar.[7][8] Harrison duly shared his enthusiasm with the British music press, declaring Big Pinkthe new sound to come from America”, drummer Levon Helm later recalled, thus helping to establish the Band internationally.[9] In appreciation, Robbie Robertson, the Band’s guitarist, extended an invitation to Harrison to stop by in Woodstock, New York, when the opportunity arose.[10]

I respected the Band enormously. All the different guys in the group sang, and Robbie Robertson used to say he was lucky, because he could write songs for a voice like Levon [Helm]’s. What a wise and generous attitude.[11]

– George Harrison to Musician magazine, 1987

Late in 1968, after producing sessions in Los Angeles for a solo album by Apple Records signing Jackie Lomax,[12] Harrison spent Thanksgiving and much of December in upstate New York,[13] where he renewed his friendship with a now semi-retired Dylan and took part in informal jam sessions with the Band.[1][14]According to Helm, they discussed making a possible “fireside jam” album with Clapton and an Apple Films “rock western” called Zachariah, but neither project progressed beyond the planning stage.[9] The bucolic surroundings proved fruitful for Harrison as a songwriter, producing his first collaboration with Dylan, “I’d Have You Anytime“,[15] and leading him to write “All Things Must Pass”.[16][17] He later described the latter song as a “Robbie Robertson–Band type of tune”,[18]and said that he always imagined it being sung by Helm.[19]

Composition[edit]

While discussing “All Things Must Pass” with music journalist Timothy White in 1987, Harrison recalled that his “starting point” for the composition was Robertson’s “The Weight” – a song that had “a religious and a country feeling to it”.[11] Musically, the verses of “All Things Must Pass” are set to a logical climb within the key of E;[20] the brief choruses form a departure from this, with their inclusion of a B minor chord rather than the more expected major voicing. Author Ian Inglis notes that the composition incorporates the same “modes, cadences and suspensions” found in Band songs such as “The Weight” and “The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down“.[21]

For his lyrics, Harrison drew inspiration from “All Things Pass”, a poem published in Timothy Leary‘s 1966 book Psychedelic Prayers after the Tao Te Ching.[16][22][nb 1] In his 1980 autobiography, I Me Mine, Harrison refers to the idea for the song originating from “all kinds of mystics and ex-mystics”, including Leary.[18] Like later Harrison compositions such as “Here Comes the Sun“, “So Sad” and “Blow Away“, the lyrical and emotional content is based around metaphors involving the weather and the cycle of nature.[25] Harrison states in the opening lines of verse one: “Sunrise doesn’t last all morning / A cloudburst doesn’t last all day“.[26]

The Catskill Mountains in upstate New York, surroundings that inspired the music of the Band, and Harrison’s song “All Things Must Pass”

According to Harrison biographer Simon Leng, the lyrics reflect “life’s ephemeral character” and the “transitory” nature of love.[27] Inglis suggests that the song is “[o]stensibly” about “the end of a love affair”.[21] He and theologian Dale Allison note the optimism offered in Harrison’s words,[21][28] since, as Leng puts it, “a new day always dawns.”[27] Although “All Things Must Pass” avoids religiosity, Allison writes that its statement on the “all-inclusive” transience of things in the material world explains why so much of its 1970 parent album, All Things Must Pass, “finds hope and meaning only in God, who does not pass away”.[29] The song’s main message is offered in its middle eight:[30][31]

All things must pass
None of life’s strings can last
So I must be on my way
And face another day.

Ultimately, the cycle of nature offers “consolation”, Leng writes,[30] as further evidenced in the verse-three lines “Now the darkness only stays at night time” and “Daylight is good at arriving at the right time“.[21]

The lyrics underwent some minor changes after Harrison presented the song to the Beatles in January 1969, when they began working at London’s Twickenham Film Studios for the so-called Get Back project (released as the Let It Be album and film).[32] He had initially written the second line of verse two as the more literal “A wind can blow those clouds away“,[33] but bootlegs from the sessions reveal John Lennon suggesting the word “mind” to introduce a bit of “psychedelia” into the song.[34] Similarly, the repeated line “it’s not always gonna be this grey” was originally “It’s not always been this grey” in verses one and two.[35]

Pre-All Things Must Pass recording history[edit]

The Beatles’ Get Back rehearsals[edit]

“All Things Must Pass”
Song by the Beatles from the album Anthology 3
Published Harrisongs
Released 28 October 1996
Recorded 25 February 1969
Abbey Road Studios, London
Genre Folk rock
Length 3:05
Label Apple
Writer(s) George Harrison
Producer(s) George Harrison

In contrast with the creative equality he enjoyed with Dylan and the Band in Woodstock,[36][37] Harrison returned to the Beatles fold and found the same discordant atmosphere that had blighted the White Album sessions in 1968.[5][38] Early on during the Get Back rehearsals – and tellingly, music journalist John Harris notes, before the arrival that day of Lennon and his partner Yoko Ono – Harrison enthused with fellow Beatles Ringo Starr and Paul McCartney about the Band’s camaraderie and group ethos, saying: “They’re just living, and they happen to be a band as well.”[39]

I got back to England for Christmas and then … we were to start on the thing which turned into Let It Be. And straight away, again, it was just weird vibes. You know, I found I was starting to be able to enjoy being a musician, but the moment I got back with the Beatles it was just too difficult.[13]

– Harrison to Crawdaddy, 1977

On 2 January, day one of the Twickenham film shoot,[40] Harrison introduced “All Things Must Pass”, and the band worked on the song intermittently over the next four days of filming.[41][42] In the search for a suitable musical arrangement, Harrison stressed his preference for a “feel” akin to the Band, a suggestion that resulted in Lennon switching from guitar to Lowrey organ, a keyboard favoured by the Band’s Garth Hudson.[43] During the Twickenham rehearsals, the Beatles also discussed the idea of Harrison performing “All Things Must Pass” solo for inclusion in the proposed film.[44]

They returned to the song briefly towards the end of January, by which time the project had moved location to their own Apple Studio, in central London[32] – one of Harrison’s conditions for rejoining the Beatles after his temporary walkout on 10 January.[3][45] Although the band gave a fair amount of time to “All Things Must Pass”, it was ultimately pushed aside,[46] just as other Harrison compositions including “Old Brown Shoe“, “Isn’t It a Pity“, “Let It Down” and “I Me Mine” received a lukewarm reception,[47][48] particularly from Lennon.[49][50] David Fricke of Rolling Stone has referred to this period as a “struggle” for Harrison “against the patronizing restrictions of writing within and for the Beatles”.[51] Doug Sulpy and Ray Schweighardt, authors of Get Back: The Unauthorized Chronicle of The Beatles’ Let It Be Disaster, observe that Lennon and McCartney routinely rejected Harrison’s songs, “even though some were far better than their own”.[52]

The Beatles never formally recorded “All Things Must Pass”,[32] and only rehearsal takes circulate on bootleg compilations from the sessions.[53] The Fly on the Wall bonus disc accompanying the McCartney-instigated Let It Be… Naked album (2003) includes a snippet of the Beatles indulging in some Band-like chorusing on the song.[54]

Harrison’s solo demo[edit]

During the Beatles’ Apple Studio session on 28 January,[55] Harrison talked with Lennon and Ono about possibly doing a solo album of his unused songs, in order to “preserve this, the Beatle bit, more”.[56] Lennon offered his support for the idea.[56] While author Bruce Spizer has suggested that Lennon was keen to “spare” the band from having to work on Harrison’s songs,[57] Sulpy and Schweighardt consider that Lennon’s enthusiasm was because such a solo project would allow him and Ono to continue their own recording activities “without causing friction within The Beatles”.[55][nb 2]

On 25 February 1969, his 26th birthday, Harrison entered Abbey Road Studios alone and recorded a demo of the song, along with other recent compositions “Old Brown Shoe” and “Something“.[59][60] With Ken Scott serving as engineer,[1] he recorded two takes of “All Things Must Pass”, adding extra electric guitar onto the second.[32][61] This version was eventually released in 1996 on the Beatles’ outtake collection Anthology 3.[32]

Billy Preston’s version[edit]

“All Things (Must) Pass”
Song by Billy Preston from the album Encouraging Words
Published Harrisongs
Released 11 September 1970 (UK)
9 November 1970 (US)
Genre Soul
Length 3:38
Label Apple
Writer(s) George Harrison
Producer(s) George Harrison, Billy Preston

Soon after Harrison had begun talking publicly about making a solo album, during the final months of 1969,[62][63] he offered “All Things Must Pass”, along with the more recent “My Sweet Lord“, to Billy Preston for the latter’s album Encouraging Words.[64][65] Through Harrison’s invitation,[66] Preston had played keyboards for the Beatles once the Get Back/Let It Be sessions resumed at Apple Studio,[32][67] where the 22-year-old Texan had impressed with his superior musicianship and convivial presence.[68][69] Preston was soon offered a recording deal with Apple Records,[70] Encouraging Words being the second album under the contract.[71][72]

Co-produced by Harrison, Preston’s reading of “All Things Must Pass” betrays an obvious debt to his former mentor, Ray Charles.[73] While Harrison’s later recording is generally viewed as the definitive version,[74] Bruce Eder of AllMusic considers this treatment of the song the superior of the two.[75] Preston’s version appeared in September 1970,[76] five months after the Beatles’ break-up.[77]

All Things Must Pass recording[edit]

While completing his production on Preston’s release,[78] Harrison chose to record the song himself for what became the title track of his post-Beatles solo debut, the triple album All Things Must Pass.[79] In describing “All Things Must Pass” as a “haunting hymn about the mortality of everything”, author Elliot Huntley notes the added poignance in Harrison’s version, due to the death of his mother in July 1970 after a long period of illness.[80]

With Phil Spector as his co-producer, Harrison taped the basic track at Abbey Road Studios between 26 May and early in June.[81] Other participants included Clapton, German bassist Klaus Voormann and Starr, the latter another avowed Band fan.[82] Leng credits the song’s piano part to Bobby Whitlock, who also sang backing vocals with Clapton,[27] his future bandmate in Derek and the Dominos.[83] In his 2010 autobiography, Whitlock states that it was Preston who played the piano on “All Things Must Pass”, while his own contribution was pump organ, or harmonium.[84][nb 3] Although Leng lists both Harrison and Clapton as having played acoustic guitar and Starr and Jim Gordon on drums,[27]according to the personnel that Whitlock offers, neither Clapton nor Gordon played on the song.[87] Among the overdubs on the track, Nashville session musician Pete Drake recorded a pedal-steel guitar part during a brief visit to London,[88] to participate in sessions for Harrison songs such as “Behind That Locked Door” and “I Live for You“.[89][nb 4]

I’d play it to them and they’d say, “Wow, yeah! Great song!” And I’d say, “Really? Do you really like it?” I realised that it was okay …[91]

– Harrison discussing the reception his compositions received during the album sessions

Spector’s erratic behaviour[92] during the All Things Must Pass sessions left Harrison to handle most of the project alone,[93][94] but in August 1970, after receiving a tape of Harrison’s early mixes of the songs, Spector provided him with written feedback and guidance.[27] Spector wrote of “All Things Must Pass”, “This particular song is so good that any honest [vocal] performance by you is acceptable as far as I’m concerned”,[27] but he expressed his disapproval of the horns at the start of the track.[74] In the words of authors Chip Madinger and Mark Easter, “clearer heads prevailed” and Jim Price and Bobby Keys‘ horn parts were retained.[74]

The recording opens with “unvaryingly steady” piano chords, Inglis writes,[21] and what Leng terms “sensitive” string orchestration from John Barham,[27] soon joined by the horns and Drake’s pedal steel.[32] Leng highlights this combination as providing the song with its rising and falling musical moods, implying variously light and darkness;[27] Inglis writes of the musical arrangement mirroring the “competing impressions” of hope and melancholy found in Harrison’s lyrics.[21] True to its Catskill roots, the recording evokes the Band’s “The Weight”[74][95] and their eponymous second album,[96] the tracks on which were similarly inspired by “the beauty of that autumn in Woodstock”, according to Helm.[97][nb 5]

Release and album artwork[edit]

The song’s title and message provided inspiration for Barry Feinstein‘s cover photo for All Things Must Pass

Almost two years after Harrison wrote the song, “All Things Must Pass” was released in November 1970,[48] closing side three of the triple album in its original LP format.[99] Despite its high retail price, All Things Must Pass was a major commercial success,[100][101] comfortably outselling concurrent solo releases by Lennon and McCartney.[94][102][nb 6]

The song’s title was invariably seen as a statement on the demise of the Beatles,[21][104] as commentators viewed the album as Harrison’s liberation from the artistic constraints imposed on him within the band.[105][106] The album’s cover image, showing Harrison seated on his Friar Park lawn surrounded by four reclining garden gnomes – thought to represent the Beatles – was also viewed as reflecting this theme.[107] While commenting that “All Things Must Pass” had “accrue[d] new layers of relevance” during the album’s creation, particularly with the death of Harrison’s mother, former Mojo editor Paul Du Noyer writes: “Nobody in November 1970 could have mistaken the title’s significance … As if to cement the association of ideas, the wry cover picture has George in solitary splendour, surrounded by a quartet of gnomes.”[108] In a 2001 interview, photographer Barry Feinstein admitted that the words “All Things Must Pass” had helped inspire his set-up for the photo, saying: “What else could it be? … [It] was over with The Beatles, right? And that title … Very symbolic.”[104]

Reception and legacy[edit]

On release, Ben Gerson of Rolling Stone described “All Things Must Pass” as “eloquently hopeful and resigned” while labelling the album “the music of mountain tops and vast horizons”.[109] Beatles Forever author Nicholas Schaffner noted in 1977, with reference to Harrison’s commercial and critical dominance over his former bandmates following the break-up: “The very fact that the Beatles had kept George’s flowering talents so under wraps proved to be his secret weapon.”[110] Schaffner named “All Things Must Pass” and “Beware of Darkness” as the two “most eloquent” songs on All Things Must Pass, “musically as well as lyrically”, with “mysterious, seductive melodies, over which faded strings and horns hover like Blue Jay Way fog”.[111]

Writing for Rolling Stone in 2000, Anthony DeCurtis praised the song for its musical demonstration of “the sweet satisfactions of faith”.[106] On a triple album where “nearly every song is excellent”, AllMusic picks “All Things Must Pass” as one of five standout tracks (or AMG track picks),[112] with Richie Unterberger writing of its autumnal theme: “It’s the kind of song that fits the mood in November, when the trees are getting stripped bare of their leaves, the days are getting shorter and colder, and you have to resign yourself to knowing it’s going to be tougher and tougher in those regards for months, also knowing that those hardships will pass away come springtime.”[113] In his book on Harrison, subtitled A Spiritual Biography, Gary Tillery refers to the song as “magisterial” and a “majestic title track” that “leaves even the shallowest listener contemplative”.[114] Michael Gallucci of Ultimate Classic Rock places “All Things Must Pass” third on his list of Harrison’s best solo songs (behind the two hit singles from All Things Must Pass, “My Sweet Lord” and “What Is Life“), and comments: “The album’s title track takes on more poignancy after Harrison’s death [in 2001], but it’s always been great.”[115] Writing for Rough Guides, Chris Ingham similarly describes the song as “a heart-rending piece of significant prescience which seems to take on more poignancy with every passing year”.[116]

Among Harrison’s biographers, Simon Leng considers “All Things Must Pass” a “classic of Harrison’s lyrical ambiguity, in essence a hopeful song, without sounding so”, with a lyric that “approaches Bob Dylan standard”.[117] Ian Inglis also praises the lyrics, writing: “The song contains some of Harrison’s most insightful and pensive words. ‘Daylight is good at arriving at the right time’ is a fine example of his … ability to position the profound within the commonplace.”[21] Elliot Huntley rates it as one of Harrison’s “most beautiful” songs, “if not the very best”, and suggests that the sentiments behind “All Things Must Pass” would have made it a “fitting conclusion” to the final album recorded by the Beatles, Abbey Road (1969).[80]

Bruce Spizer similarly rates “All Things Must Pass” a highlight of Harrison’s career,[32] while Leng considers it “perhaps the greatest solo Beatle composition” of all.[2] In his book Revolution in the Head, Ian MacDonald describes “All Things Must Pass” as “the wisest song never recorded by The Beatles”.[1] In 2009, The Guardian included the track in its list of “1000 Songs Everyone Must Hear”.[118]

Performance and later releases[edit]

“All Things Must Pass” was not a track that Harrison ever played in concert,[119] although it appeared on his preliminary setlist for the 1971 Concert for Bangladesh shows.[120] He twice performed the song live in front of TV cameras during the final years of his life,[121] beginning with his appearance with Ravi Shankar on VH1‘s Hard Rock Live, filmed in New York on 14 May 1997.[122][123] The pair were on the show to promote their recent collaboration, Chants of India,[123] but at host John Fugelsang‘s urging, Harrison accepted an acoustic guitar and performed a brief rendition of “All Things Must Pass”.[124][125][nb 7] In late 2000, Harrison sang “All Things Must Pass” while again seated on a stool on Friar Park’s main lawn, a performance that was included in the press kit for All Things Must Passs 30th anniversary reissue early the following year.[127][128][nb 8]

Coinciding with this 2001 reissue, the song appeared on a promotional single as the B-side to “My Sweet Lord (2000)“.[130][131] After being omitted from the “cursory” selection of 1970–75 tracks on The Best of George Harrison (1976), Inglis writes, the song appeared on Harrison’s 2009 career-spanning compilation Let It Roll.[132]

In Martin Scorsese‘s 2011 documentary George Harrison: Living in the Material World, “All Things Must Pass” is the first song featured in the movie, played over footage of German air raids over Britain during World War II.[133][134] In November that year, a 1970-recorded demo of the song (featuring just Harrison, Starr and Voormann) appeared on the deluxe edition CD accompanying the British DVD release of the film;[135][136] this CD was subsequently issued worldwide in May 2012 as Early Takes: Volume 1.[137]

Cover versions[edit]

Steve Wood and Daniel May composed music to the 1998 documentary film Everest incorporating melodies from some of George Harrison’s songs, one of which was “All Things Must Pass”.[138] At the Concert for George tribute to Harrison, held at London’s Royal Albert Hall on 29 November 2002, Paul McCartney sang “All Things Must Pass”,[2] backed by a large band that included Preston, Clapton, Voormann and Starr.[139] Leng notes the irony in McCartney performing the song,[2] while Beatles biographer Peter Doggett comments: “it wasn’t hard to imagine Harrison’s cynicism as McCartney led the band into a soulful rendition of ‘All Things Must Pass’ – one of the songs that the other Beatles had refused to take seriously in January 1969.”[140] According to Clapton, author Robert Rodriguez writes, McCartney “was humbled at having to relearn it”.[141]

Several other artists have recorded “All Things Must Pass” in the years since Harrison’s death. In 2003, Bobby Whitlock and his wife, CoCo Carmel, included the song on their acoustic live album Other Assorted Love Songs, Live from Whitney Chapel.[142] Jazz guitarist Joel Harrison covered “All Things Must Pass” on his album Harrison on Harrison: Jazz Explanations of George Harrison, released in October 2005.[143] In 2007, a live version by the Waterboys appeared on their CD single “Everybody Takes a Tumble”,[144]and the following year Sloan Wainwright included a cover of the song on her album Rediscovery.[145]

“All Things Must Pass” was among the Harrison compositions covered by Jim James on his Tribute To EP, recorded in December 2001 but not released until August 2009.[146] Also in 2009, Klaus Voormann released a version of the song on his solo album A Sideman’s Journey,[147] with Yusuf Islam on vocals and acoustic guitar.[148][149]

Personnel[edit]

The musicians who performed on Harrison’s All Things Must Pass version of the song are believed to be as follows:[27]

Notes[edit]

  1. Jump up^ Harrison had already adapted a passage from the Tao Te Ching, a Chinese classic text, in his 1968 B-side for the Beatles, “The Inner Light“.[23] This had come at the suggestion of Cambridge academic Juan Mascaró, who had been moved by Harrison’s lyrics to another of his Indian-inspired compositions, “Within You, Without You“.[24]
  2. Jump up^ By this point, Harrison had already released the largely instrumental soundtrack album Wonderwall Music, which was soon followed by Lennon and Ono’s experimental work Two Virgins.[58]
  3. Jump up^ Alternatively, Harrison said in 1971 that American musician Gary Wright had “played piano on the whole [All Things Must Pass] album”.[85]Leng concedes the difficulty in ascertaining precise musicians’ credits for each track and names Wright and Whitlock as the two “core” keyboard players on the sessions.[86]
  4. Jump up^ Whitlock recalls that originally he had whistled a melody, which Spector recorded onto the basic track, and that this served as a guide for Drake’s contribution.[90]
  5. Jump up^ Leng identifies the Band’s minimalist tradition as a significant influence on other All Things Must Pass songs, particularly “Run of the Mill” and “Behind That Locked Door”.[98]
  6. Jump up^ As of 2011, it remained the most successful album by any of the former Beatles.[103]
  7. Jump up^ Although 150 minutes of Harrison and Shankar’s appearance was filmed, VH1 originally aired only 22 minutes of footage, on 24 July, as George & Ravi – Yin & Yang.[124] Omitted from the broadcast but also performed by Harrison was the Traveling Wilburys tune “If You Belonged to Me” and “Any Road“, a track subsequently released on his posthumous album Brainwashed (2002).[124][126]
  8. Jump up^ On the day after Harrison’s death was publicly announced, the quirky, Terry Gilliam-inspired graphics on Harrison’s website, allthingsmustpass.com, were changed to show just a single gnome and the lyrics to “All Things Must Pass”.[129]

Sources[edit]

  • Dale C. Allison Jr., The Love There That’s Sleeping: The Art and Spirituality of George Harrison, Continuum (New York, NY, 2006; ISBN 978-0-8264-1917-0).
  • Keith Badman, The Beatles Diary Volume 2: After the Break-Up 1970–2001, Omnibus Press (London, 2001; ISBN 0-7119-8307-0).
  • Harry Castleman & Walter J. Podrazik, All Together Now: The First Complete Beatles Discography 1961–1975, Ballantine Books (New York, NY, 1976; ISBN 0-345-25680-8).
  • Alan Clayson, George Harrison, Sanctuary (London, 2003; ISBN 1-86074-489-3).
  • Peter Doggett, You Never Give Me Your Money: The Beatles After the Breakup, It Books (New York, NY, 2011; ISBN 978-0-06-177418-8).
  • The Editors of Rolling Stone, Harrison, Rolling Stone Press/Simon & Schuster (New York, NY, 2002; ISBN 0-7432-3581-9).
  • Joshua M. Greene, Here Comes the Sun: The Spiritual and Musical Journey of George Harrison, John Wiley & Sons (Hoboken, NJ, 2006; ISBN 978-0-470-12780-3).
  • John Harris, “A Quiet Storm”, Mojo, July 2001, pp. 66–74.
  • George Harrison, I Me Mine, Chronicle Books (San Francisco, CA, 2002; ISBN 0-8118-3793-9).
  • Olivia Harrison, George Harrison: Living in the Material World, Abrams (New York, NY, 2011; ISBN 978-1-4197-0220-4).
  • Levon Helm (with Stephen Davis), This Wheel’s on Fire: Levon Helm and the Story of The Band, A Cappella Books (Chicago, IL, 2000; ISBN 978-1-55652-405-9).
  • Mark Hertsgaard, A Day in the Life: The Music and Artistry of the Beatles, Pan Books (London, 1996; ISBN 0-330-33891-9).
  • Elliot J. Huntley, Mystical One: George Harrison – After the Break-up of the Beatles, Guernica Editions (Toronto, ON, 2006; ISBN 1-55071-197-0).
  • Chris Ingham, The Rough Guide to the Beatles, Rough Guides/Penguin (London, 2006; 2nd edn; ISBN 978-1-84836-525-4).
  • Ian Inglis, The Words and Music of George Harrison, Praeger (Santa Barbara, CA, 2010; ISBN 978-0-313-37532-3).
  • Peter Lavezzoli, The Dawn of Indian Music in the West, Continuum (New York, NY, 2006; ISBN 0-8264-2819-3).
  • Simon Leng, While My Guitar Gently Weeps: The Music of George Harrison, Hal Leonard (Milwaukee, WI, 2006; ISBN 1-4234-0609-5).
  • Ian MacDonald, Revolution in the Head: The Beatles’ Records and the Sixties, Pimlico (London, 1998; ISBN 0-7126-6697-4).
  • Chip Madinger & Mark Easter, Eight Arms to Hold You: The Solo Beatles Compendium, 44.1 Productions (Chesterfield, MO, 2000; ISBN 0-615-11724-4).
  • Barry Miles, The Beatles Diary Volume 1: The Beatles Years, Omnibus Press (London, 2001; ISBN 0-7119-8308-9).
  • Mojo: The Beatles’ Final Years Special Edition, Emap (London, 2003).
  • Robert Rodriguez, Fab Four FAQ 2.0: The Beatles’ Solo Years, 1970–1980, Backbeat Books (Milwaukee, WI, 2010; ISBN 978-1-4165-9093-4).
  • Nicholas Schaffner, The Beatles Forever, McGraw-Hill (New York, NY, 1978; ISBN 0-07-055087-5).
  • Bruce Spizer, The Beatles Solo on Apple Records, 498 Productions (New Orleans, LA, 2005; ISBN 0-9662649-5-9).
  • Doug Sulpy & Ray Schweighardt, Get Back: The Unauthorized Chronicle of The Beatles’ Let It Be Disaster, St. Martin’s Griffin (New York, 1997; ISBN 0-312-19981-3).
  • Gary Tillery, Working Class Mystic: A Spiritual Biography of George Harrison, Quest Books (Wheaton, IL, 2011; ISBN 978-0-8356-0900-5).
  • Bobby Whitlock (with Marc Roberty), Bobby Whitlock: A Rock ‘n’ Roll Autobiography, McFarland (Jefferson, NC, 2010; ISBN 978-0-7864-6190-5).
  • Bob Woffinden, The Beatles Apart, Proteus (London, 1981; ISBN 0-906071-89-5).
  • Kenneth Womack, The Beatles Encyclopedia: Everything Fab Four, ABC-CLIO (Santa Barbara, CA, 2014; ISBN 978-0-313-39171-2).

External links[edit]

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