FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE PART 142 Marvin Minsky Part G (Featured artist is Red Grooms)

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Marvin Minsky

Image result for marvin minsky

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I was sorry recently  to learn of the passing of one of the great scholars of our generation. I have written about Marvin Minsky several times before in this series and today I again look at a letter I wrote to him in the last couple of years. It is my practice in my letters to quote from the works of Adrian Rogers or Francis Schaeffer or both in my letters to these scholars.

 email on 1-16-15 on Patterns of Exodus

Emailed on 1-16-15

To Dr. Marvin Minsky, From Everette Hatcher, There is a movie this Monday night in a theater near you that I thought you might be interested in

Dear Dr. Minsky,

I posted a response on my blog to your comments on the film series RENOWNED ACADEMICS SPEAKING ABOUT GOD (which received over 300,000 hits on You Tube). I thought of you when I heard about this film PATTERNS OF EVIDENCE: THE EXODUS, which is only showing one time this Monday night January 19, 2015 at 7 pm at a theater near you. You have contended don’t believe in the Bible because you don’t have the scientific type evidence that you require. This film contains the findings of over a dozen academics who are experts in archaeology and here it is at a nearby theater to you.

You can get a ticket by going to this website at this link and putting in your zip code to find a theater near you. It stars Israel Finkelstein, Benjamin Netanyahu,  Shimon Peres,  and many more and they will be discussing if the Exodus took place or not with only scientific facts.  I have posted several very good reviews of the major motion picture on my blog.

Here are some theaters near you that are showing the film:

1. REGAL FENWAY STADIUM 13 & RPX201 Brookline Ave, Boston, MA 02215, 2. SHOWCASE CINEMAS DE LUX REVERE565 Squire Rd, Revere, MA 02151, 3. AMC BURLINGTON CINEMA 1020 South Ave., Burlington, MA 01803, 4. SHOWCASE CINEMA DE LUX LEGACY PLACE670 Legacy Place, Dedham, MA 02026, 5. SHOWCASE CINEMAS DE LUX RANDOLPH73 Mazzeo Dr., Randolph, MA 02368.

Everette Hatcher, cell ph 501-920-733, everettehatcher@gmail.com, P.O. Box 23416, Little Rock, AR 72221

PS: I bet some of your Jewish relatives are already going to the film. It would be a good time for discussion afterward with them.

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END OF MY EMAIL TO DR. MINSKY and below is a post I did that was linked in the email above:

What I learned from the film  PATTERNS OF EVIDENCE:THE EXODUS!!!

Computerized rendering of "Joseph" statue, from "Patterns of Evidence: Exodus"

On the sandy shores of the Red Sea, visitors still flock to hear a long-ago legend that inspired at least two of the world’s greatest religions: the tale of Moses and God’s deliverance of the Israelite people from slavery in Egypt.

But on these shores, where all Pharaoh’s horses and chariots were supposedly swallowed by the sea, modern-day archeologists have concluded the biblical legend never even happened, little more than a religious fairy tale.

Until now.

Now, the 12-year-journey of filmmaker Timothy Mahoney and a team of researchers is not only culminating in a new film poised to rewrite the annals of history, but is also unveiling discoveries that may confirm the tale of Exodus – including a fascinating statue that may be that of the Bible’s Joseph, king of dreams.

Mahoney told WND in an exclusive interview how and why he made the film, “Patterns of Evidence: Exodus”, which is being shown at hundreds of theaters around the U.S. in a special, one-night-only appearance through Fathom Events on Monday, Jan. 19.

image: http://www.wnd.com/files/2015/01/150117patternsofevidence.jpg

150117patternsofevidenceVisit the Fathom Events website to see “Patterns of Evidence: Exodus” at a theater near you on Jan. 19!“Twelve years ago, I started an adventure, a search for the route of the Exodus,” Mahoney told WND. “People were talking, ‘Where is Mt. Sinai, or what sea did they cross?’ I wanted to go on that type of adventure. But when I headed off to Egypt to talk to Egyptologists and scholars, one of them said, ‘What’s the point? Don’t you know the Exodus never happened? There’s no evidence for it.’

“That was news to me,” Mahoney said. “So I went to the location in Egypt where the Israelites were supposed to have settled and I talked to an Egyptologist there, and he told me the same thing: There was no evidence to suggest this story had happened. That led me on this crisis of faith.”

Mahoney told WND he returned to the U.S. with a “seed of doubt” growing in his mind about the Bible’s stories, until he spoke to yet another Egyptologist who explained modern archaeology has been looking for Moses in all the wrong places – or more accurately, all the wrong times.

“This other Egyptologist said if you dig deeper, below the surface of where people think the Exodus is and you go deeper in time, you will find the story of the Exodus,” Mahoney said. “And that’s what ‘Patterns of Evidence’ has done: It looked for the story and its key events wherever – and whenever – it may be in Egyptian history … and found that there are patterns of evidence, but they’re not showing up where people thought they would be.”

Mahoney explained: “Mainstream archaeologists would say that if the Exodus ever happened, it happened at the time of Rameses, because of the biblical text that said the Israelites were building the city of Rameses. Yet when people understood Rameses lived around 1250 B.C., they didn’t find evidence for this type of story in that time period.

“But other archaeologists said to look deeper,” he continued. “Beneath the city of Rameses, was another city, much older, called Avaris. And that city was filled with Semitic people. It started very small, just as the Bible says, and over time it grew into one of the largest cities of that time. And that is where we find, I think, the early Israelites. That’s the pattern that matches the story of the Bible. It’s not at the time of Rameses, but it’s at the location of Rameses.”

Archaeological dig site at location believed to be home of ancient Israelite slaves in Egypt

Mahoney also told WND about one of the biggest surprises revealed by “Patterns of Evidence: Exodus” – a statue of a Semitic leader in Egypt, a man who may be none other than the Bible’s Joseph.

“The story of Joseph tells of how he was sold as a slave and came into Egypt and then he rose to become this leader, second in command in Egypt,” Mahoney told WND. “Well, in Avaris, the archaeology shows a small group of Semitic-type people came in, and then there’s this house that matches the area where they would have come from. On top of that house a palace was built. They had tombs behind this palace. And this palace had a statue, and it was the tomb of a Semitic leader.

“The interesting thing is this statue found in the remainder of this tomb, a pyramid tomb – which was only given to royalty types – why did a Semitic character have this?” Mahoney asked. “What some people are saying is that this matches the story, maybe that prestige that Joseph would have received.”

The research team also discovered another biblical parallel.

“In the biblical story, Joseph said his bones should be removed when they left Egypt,” Mahoney recalled. “When the archaeologists uncovered this [Semitic leader’s tomb], a very unusual thing was discovered: There were no bones in this tomb. The bones were gone. Grave robbers never take the bones; they just take the goods, the bones have no value.”

Could the missing bones be yet another confirmation the Semitic leader was Joseph?

Watch the trailer for “Patters of Evidence: Exodus” below:

Patterns of Evidence: The Exodus     Trailer Update 121714

Despite Mahoney’s discoveries, however, the filmmaker told WND it’s important to understand “Patterns of Evidence: Exodus” isn’t a Christian or Jewish apologetic, so much as an effort to encourage archaeologists to examine the evidence anew.

“I didn’t go with a preconceived conclusion, but I was willing to give the Bible the benefit of the doubt as we searched for the truth,” Mahoney said. “I went to the top people in the world and said, ‘Tell me what you know about this story and what does the archaeology tell you.’ I talked with both sides – people who can’t see any evidence for Exodus and people who see the evidence. It became a balanced approach.”

The result, he explained, is not only a movie that is winning awards for its quality of filmmaking, but also a project that is impressing the experts.

“I’ve been pleasantly surprised,” Mahoney said of the reaction to his film. “When I showed it to scholars, I’ve had Dr. Walt Keiser, formerly president of Gordon Conwell Theological Seminary, who has endorsed the project and worked on Zondervan’s NIV Archaeological Study Bible, say he thought this film was important and very well done. Norm Geisler and Joseph Holden, who together wrote ‘The Popular Handbook of Archeology and the Bible,’ say this is a game-changer that helps to spell out where these patterns are. These scholars have really embraced it.”

Even secular scholars, Mahoney said, have said the film was “one of the best they’ve seen” on this topic: “They don’t necessarily agree with everything. They won’t like potential conclusions of the film, but I think they’ll appreciate the investigation.”

Mahoney on site in Egypt

For Mahoney, the film is about an honest search for truth and letting believers know that it’s OK to ask the tough questions about their faith.

“It’s important that [Exodus] has a historical grounding to it,” Mahoney told WND. “If this history isn’t true, if it’s just an allegory, it’s a house of cards. The rest of the stories in Bible are built on these stories. Even Jesus talks about Moses, the apostle Paul, they reference it. If you don’t have a historical Exodus, then what happens to a historical Jesus? It’s all connected.

“What we’re having right now is people who are aggressively saying these are fairy tales,” Mahoney said. “The question I raise is, ‘Are they really? How do we know? Why are you saying that?’ When I went and investigated for the last 12 years with my team, we found, wait a minute – there is evidence for this story. So don’t just say this little narrow window of time is all we can look at. There are patterns of archaeological evidence that fit this story of Exodus like a hand in a glove.”

Visit the Fathom Events website to see “Patterns of Evidence: Exodus” at a theater near you on Jan. 19!

Immediately following the film on Jan. 19, Gretchen Carlson, host of Fox News Channel’s “The Real Story with Gretchen Carlson,” will moderate an expert panel Q&A, which includes author and AnGeL Ministries founder Anne Graham Lotz, best-selling author and TV host Eric Metaxas, New York Archdiocese Father Jonathan Morris and speaker and radio show host Dennis Prager.

Featured artist today is Red Grooms

Red Grooms & Stephen Hannock- 9/28/13 at BMAC

Published on Jun 24, 2016

Red Grooms & Stephen Hannock- 9/28/13 at BMAC

Red Grooms

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
For the 1986 film, see Red Grooms: Sunflower in a Hothouse.
Red Grooms
Born Charles Rogers Grooms
June 7, 1937 (age 79)
Nashville, Tennessee
Nationality American
Education Art Institute of Chicago, Nashville’sPeabody College
Known for Multimedia art, Printmaking

Looking Along Broadway Towards Grace Church, mixed media construction by Red Grooms, 1981, Cleveland Museum of Art

Red Grooms (born Charles Rogers Grooms on June 7, 1937) is an American multimedia artist best known for his colorful pop-art constructions depicting frenetic scenes of modern urban life. Grooms was given the nickname “Red” by Dominic Falcone (of Provincetown’s Sun Gallery) when he was starting out as a dishwasher at a restaurant in Provincetown and was studying with Hans Hofmann.

Background and education

Grooms was born in Nashville, Tennessee during the middle of the Great Depression. He studied at the Art Institute of Chicago, then at Nashville’s Peabody College. In 1956, Grooms moved to New York City, to enroll at the New School for Social Research. A year later, Grooms attended a summer session at the Hans Hofmann School of Fine Arts in Provincetown, Massachusetts. There he met experimental animation pioneer Yvonne Andersen, with whom he collaborated on several short films.[1]

Red Grooms belongs to a generation of artists who, in G. R. Swenson’s words, “took the world too seriously not to be amused by it.” As Judith Stein notes, “At times Grooms’s humor has an absurdist streak, full of the impetuous energy and preposterous puns of the Marx Brothers. He shares a comic sense with Bob and Ray whose straight-man/funny-man teamwork plays off against the mundane conventions of daily life. As an empiricist with a keen political sense and a retentive memory for visual facts, Grooms follows in the tradition of William Hogarth and Honoré Daumier, who were canny commentators on the human condition.”[2]

In 1969, Peter Schjeldahl compared Grooms to Marcel Duchamp, because both embodied “a movement of one man that is open to everybody.”[3]

Career

Early work

In the spring of 1958, Grooms, Yvonne Andersen and Lester Johnson each painted twelve-foot by twelve-foot panels, which they erected with telephone poles on a parking lot adjacent an amusement park in Salisbury, MA..”[4]

Inspired by artist-run spaces such as New York’s Hansa Gallery and Phoenix, and Provincetown’s Sun Gallery, Grooms and painter Jay Milder opened the City Gallery in Grooms’ second-floor loft in the Flatiron District. When Phoenix refused to show Claes Oldenburg, Grooms and Milder dropped out of Phoenix and City Gallery presented Oldenberg’s first New York exhibition, as well as that of Jim Dine. Other artists who showed at City Gallery include Stephen Durkee, Mimi Gross, Bob Thompson, Lester Johnson, and Alex Katz.[4] Grooms recalls, “We were reacting to Tenth Street. In ’58 and ’59, Tenth Street was sort of like SoHo is now, and it was getting all the lively attention of everyone downtown….We were just kids in our twenties..and had a flair for attracting people to our openings.” [4]

During the late 1950s and early 1960s, Grooms made a number of “Happenings“. The best known was The Burning Building, staged at his studio (dubbed “The Delancey Street Museum” for the occasion) at 148 Delancey Street in New York’s Lower East Sidebetween December 4 and 11, 1959.

Inspired by George Méliès’s 1902 film A Trip to the Moon, Grooms’ early film Shoot the Moon (1962) features celebrants played by Edwin Denby, Alex Katz and Grooms seen shredding library books to make confetti.” [2] Other Grooms films include:The Big Sneeze(1962), a hand-drawn comic filmed by Rudy Burckhardt; Before an’ After (1964), a sadomastic comedy that casts Mimi Gross as part dominatrix/part healthclub operator; Fat Feet (1966), a collaboration with Mimi Gross, Yvonne Andersen and Dominic Falcone that begins where Shoot the Moon ends; Tapping Toes (1968-70), which uses his first sculpto-pictorama City of Chicago (1967) as its set; Conquest of Libya by Italy (1912-13) (1972-3), a black and white animation that spoofs that era’s newsreels; Hippodrome Hardware(1973), based on Grooms’ 1972 live performance of the same name, whose main character Mr. Ruckus is played by Grooms; Grow Great (1974), a live-action short that features Mimi Gross as the household consumer; Little Red Riding Hood (1978), which features his daughter Saskia; and Man Walking Up (1984).[5]

Today Grooms is recognized as a pioneer of site-specific sculpture and installation art. City of Chicago (1967), a room-sized, walk-through “sculpto-pictorama,” features sky-scraper-proportioned sculptures of Mayor Daley and Hugh Hefner “joined by such historical figures as Abraham Lincoln, Al Capone, and fan-dancer Sally Rand, accompanied by a sound track featuring gunfire and burlesque music. Grooms’s genius for rendering the intricacies of architectural ornament is vividly apparent in several three-dimensional vistas of Chicago’s famous buildings. Evident here and in the numerous other cityscapes Grooms has created is his extraordinary ability to capture a sense of place with a great sensitivity to detail.”[2]

Another sculpto-pictorama, Ruckus Manhattan (1975) exemplifies the mixed-media installations that would become his signature craft. These vibrant three-dimensional constructions melded painting and sculpture, to create immersive works of art that invited interaction from the viewer. The pieces were often populated with colorful, cartoon-like characters, from varied walks of life. His satirical environmental installation The Discount Store was shown at VCU’s Anderson Gallery in 1979.[6] One of his biggest themes is the use of painting people, often using other artists or their styles to show his appreciation for their works.

Mature work

Regarding his large wall relief, William Penn Shaking Hands with the Indians (1967), based on a similarly titled painting by Benjamin West, Grooms remarked, “To tell the truth I did [the work] more because of Mr Benjamin West than Mr. Penn. Benjamin West is a hero for American Art. … As I understand he set up the whole tableau for The Treaty on his estate using actors from a touring Shakespeare company Then he had an easel installed in the basket of a hot air balloon tethered at 60 feet, and with the help of sandwiches and birch beer hauled up to him by his wife, painted this great masterpiece in six days. To me, this is exemplary American behavior.”[2]

Grooms’s two most notable installations—The City of Chicago (1967) and Ruckus Manhattan (1975)—were enormously popular with the public. These works were executed in collaboration with then-wife, the artist Mimi Gross. Along with Gross, he starred in Mike Kuchar‘s Secret of Wendel Samson (1966), which tells the story of a closeted gay artist torn between two relationships. In the 1990s Grooms returned to his Tennessee roots, creating likenesses of 36 figures from Nashville history for the Tennessee Foxtrot Carousel (1998).

Grooms’ sculpture The Shootout, which depicts a cowboy and an Indian shooting at one another, drew protests by Native American activists when it was unveiled in Denver in 1982. The sculpture was evicted from two locations in downtown Denver after protesters threatened to deface it. In 1983 the sculpture was moved to the grounds of the Denver Art Museum, and now sits on the roof of the museum restaurant.[7] Grooms commented “Denver is beginning to rival Grumpsville, Tennessee, as one of the great sourpuss towns.”[8]

Other media

Besides painting and sculpture, Grooms is also known for his prolific printmaking. He has experimented with numerous techniques, creating woodblock prints, spray-painted stencils, soft-ground etchings, and elaborate three-dimensional lithograph constructions.

His 1973 purchase of a hot-glue gun facilitated several masterpieces of paper sculpture; for example, Sam, a portrait of Sam Reily who appeared in Fat Feet; and Gretchen’s Fruit, a tour-de-force still life. In 1979, Grooms spent a week teaching at the University of New Mexico, in Albuquerque, where he first started working in bronze. Regarding the several western and football themes made in metal, Grooms told Grace Glueck: “It looks just like my regular stuff, but it’s for the ages. . . It turns out to be easier to work with than less durable materials.” The monumental Lumberjack (1977–1984), cast from a whimsical woodsman Red made as a gift for artist Neil Welliver, demonstrates his facility with the lost-wax method of casting.[2]

Collections and honors

Grooms’ work has been exhibited in galleries across the United States, as well as Europe, and Japan. His art is included in the collections of thirty-nine museums, including the Art Institute of Chicago, the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Cheekwood Botanical Garden and Museum of Art in Nashville, the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, the Cleveland Museum of Art, the Carnegie Museum of Art, and the Knoxville Museum of Art.

In 2003, Grooms was awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award by the National Academy of Design.

Personal

Grooms currently lives and works in New York City in a studio in lower Manhattan at the intersection of Tribeca and Chinatown, where he has lived for around 40 years. He has one daughter, Saskia Grooms.

References

  1. Jump up^ Biography of Grooms on PBS website. Accessed June 13, 2007.
  2. ^ Jump up to:a b c d e Judith Stein, “All Around the Cobbler’s Bench”, Red Grooms: A Retrospective (Philadelphia: Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, 1985)
  3. Jump up^ Peter Schjeldahl, “Red Grooms: He Dares to Make Art That Is Fun”, New York Times, June 15, 1969, sec. 2, p. 25.
  4. ^ Jump up to:a b c Judith Stein, “The Early Years: 1937-1960,” Red Grooms: A Retrospective (Philadelphia: Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, 1985)
  5. Jump up^ Janet Cutler, “The Films of Red Grooms,” Red Grooms: A Retrospective (Philadelphia: Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, 1985)
  6. Jump up^ Kistler, Ashley (2016). Anderson Gallery:45 Years of Art on the Edge. Richmond, Virginia: School of the Arts, Virginia Commonwealth University. p. 42.
  7. Jump up^ Irene Clurman, “Orphan sculpture to find home at art museum,” Rocky Mountain News, October 12, 1983, p.6.
  8. Jump up^ Berny Morson, “Artists crash protest,” Rocky Mountain News, September 29, 1983, p.7.

External links

Red Grooms & Stephen Hannock- 9/28/13 at BMAC

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Red Grooms: Sculptopictoramatist on DVD

Uploaded on Mar 17, 2009

http://LAndSVideo.com presents Red Grooms: Sculptopictoramatist

Red Grooms has made a ruckus in the arts for almost half a century. An artist best known for his pop art constructions and for whom the unique terms “sculptopicturamatist” has been coined. Painter, sculptor, printmaker, filmmaker, and theatrical showman—take a walk through Grooms’ cheerfully satirical, cartoon-like style, and witness him creating exuberant works swarming with boisterous life.

To learn more or order, please visit:
http://landsvideo.com/vf-grooms.shtml

Red Grooms Intro: 2D to 3D Production Assignment

Published on Apr 4, 2016

— Created using PowToon — Free sign up at http://www.powtoon.com/youtube/ — Create animated videos and animated presentations for free. PowToon is a free tool that allows you to develop cool animated clips and animated presentations for your website, office meeting, sales pitch, nonprofit fundraiser, product launch, video resume, or anything else you could use an animated explainer video. PowToon’s animation templates help you create animated presentations and animated explainer videos from scratch. Anyone can produce awesome animations quickly with PowToon, without the cost or hassle other professional animation services require.

Red Grooms

Published on Nov 28, 2015

Red Grooms was born in Nashville, Tennessee in 1937. He studied at the Art Institute of Chicago and the New School for Social Research, New York. In the 1950s Grooms moved to New York City to immerse himself in the art scene. For nearly fifty years Grooms has combined color, vibrancy, and a generous dose of self-deprecating humor to produce art in all media that provokes and delights. He pokes fun at the icons of American politics, entertainment, the art world, while paying homage to his subjects at the same time. No artist since Honoré Daumier has had a greater understanding of humor or a more direct connection to his audience. In return, Grooms has earned the public’s unqualified admiration and appreciation.

Music: “The Loudest Of Them”
Artist: Sound Machine

Red Grooms Art Video

Uploaded on Apr 23, 2008

This is the final project for our art project on our artist- Red Grooms for Immaculata High School’s 3D Design class. Its pretty random but its kinda due to the fact that Grooms’ art can sometimes be random too. So anyway, enjoy! Made by Thaddeus John Wislinski-(and completley edited by), John Paul Mahoney, and Brendan Patrick O’Connell.

Red Grooms: Larger Than Life

Published on Feb 28, 2014

Red Grooms: Larger Than Life

Marina’s 88.5 Interview about Red Grooms

Published on Oct 7, 2016

Listen to Brooks Museum’s chief curator Marina Pacini’s interview with Paul Gubala from 88.5, The Voice of SCS, and learn more about our upcoming exhibition, “Red Grooms: Traveling Correspondent.” On view at the Brooks, Saturday, October 15, 2015 – January 8, 2017 http://buff.ly/2dsCGMc

Red Grooms’ Target Discount Store (1970)

Published on Oct 8, 2014

This documentary on the creation of Red Grooms’ sculpture “The Discount Store” was commissioned by the Walker Art Center for the exhibition “Figures and Environments” which ran from May 15 to June 13, 1970 in Dayton’s Auditorium. Read more here: http://blogs.walkerart.org/visualarts…

Filmed by Alan Kraning. Piano by Tommy Ray. Ruckus Films with special cooperation from Target Corporation.

Red Grooms talks about Dali Salad

Uploaded on Jun 20, 2007

As a Pop artist, Red Grooms has always been fascinated with the ordinary and the everyday. In the artwork Dali Salad, he used paper, vinyl, aluminum, wood, steel, plastic, and even Ping-Pong balls to create a lively and humorous portrait of Salvador Dali, a Surrealist painter whom Grooms describes as having “both exploited and been exploited in the print field. “A behind-the-scenes look at the production process shows how Grooms’s three-dimensional print was made –from the conception of the salad motif to the actual printing and assemblage of the work at the Minneapolis-based printmaking studio Vermillion Editions, Ltd.

This video was produced in 1987 as part of a Documentaries on Art series.

Red Grooms | Tennessee Crossroads

Uploaded on Feb 7, 2011

Joe Elmore spends the day at the Cumberland mountain art studio of a famous Native Tennessean who has taken an interest in the Civil War.
Visit http://www.tennesseecrossroads.org for more information about this story and how your contributions to Nashville Public Television will keep this show on the air.

Red Grooms talks about his Marlins home run sculpture

Red Grooms | Tennessee Crossroads

Uploaded on Feb 7, 2011

Joe Elmore spends the day at the Cumberland mountain art studio of a famous Native Tennessean who has taken an interest in the Civil War.
Visit http://www.tennesseecrossroads.org for more information about this story and how your contributions to Nashville Public Television will keep this show on the air.

TUESDAY, 23 DECEMBER 2008

NYC ART – RED GROOMS

Red Grooms with his painting “Joseph’s Bridge” named in honour of Joseph Stella’s paintings of Brooklyn Bridge
Red Grooms (born Charles Rogers Grooms on June 7th., 1937) is an American multimedia artist best known for his colourful pop-art constructions depicting frenetic scenes of modern urban life. After studying at the Art Institute of Chicago, then at Nashville’s Peabody College, in 1956, Grooms moved to New York City, to enrol at the New School for Social Research.
‘Subway’ an excerpt from ‘Ruckus Manhattan’ 1975
In the early 1960’s Grooms invented “sculpto-pictoramas” (such as his work, Ruckus Manhattan) – the mixed-media installations that would become his signature craft. These vibrant three-dimensional constructions melded painting and sculpture, to create immersive works of art that invited interaction from the viewer. The pieces were often populated with colourful, cartoon-like characters, from varied walks of life.

The Nervous City Street Scene 1973

Grooms’ work has been exhibited extensively in galleries across the United States, as well as Europe, ans Japan and his art hangs in the collections of thirty-nine galleries, including the Art Institute of Chicago, the Museum of Modern Art in NYC, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. In 2003, he was awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award by the National Academy of Design.

Red Grooms currently lives and works in a studio on Walker Street, in Lower Manhattan at the intersection of Tribeca and Chinatown.

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