FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE PART 108 A look at the BEATLES as featured in 7th episode of Francis Schaeffer film HOW SHOULD WE THEN LIVE? Part F The Chance worldview of A DAY IN THE LIFE and the solution it suggests (Artist featured today is Patrick Caulfield )

According to Elvis Costello and many others A DAY IN THE LIFE was the greatest song from the greatest album. It was drug induced song about a drug induced crash that included the solution of escaping into drug trips

(Francis Schaeffer pictured below)

Francis Schaeffer noted that King Solomon took a long look at life UNDER THE SUN without God in the picture and Solomon notes that death can arrive unexpectedly at anytime in Ecclesiastes 9:11-13: 

11 Again I saw that under the sun the race is not to the swift, nor the battle to the strong, nor bread to the wise, nor riches to the intelligent, nor favor to those with knowledge, but time and chance happen to them all. 12 For man does not know his time. Like fish that are taken in an evil net, and like birds that are caught in a snare, so the children of man are snared at an evil time, when it suddenly falls upon them. 13 I have also seen this example of wisdom under the sun, and it seemed great to me.

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Death can come at anytime. Albert Camus in a speeding car with a pretty girl, then Camus dead. Lawrence of Arabia coming over the crest of a hill at 100 mph on his motorcycle and some boy stands in the road and Lawrence turns aside and dies.  

Lawrence of Arabia on a Brough Superior he called George V. Lawrence owned eight Broughs: 1922: Boa (short for Boanerges)

The driver of the Facel-Vega FV3B car, Michel Gallimard, who was Camus’ publisher and close friend, also died in the accident.

September 19, 2011

By Elvis Costello

My absolute favorite albums are Rubber Soul and Revolver. On both records you can hear references to other music — R&B, Dylan, psychedelia — but it’s not done in a way that is obvious or dates the records. When you picked up Revolver, you knew it was something different. Heck, they are wearing sunglasses indoors in the picture on the back of the cover and not even looking at the camera . . . and the music was so strange and yet so vivid. If I had to pick a favorite song from those albums, it would be “And Your Bird Can Sing” . . . no, “Girl” . . . no, “For No One” . . . and so on, and so on. . . .

Their breakup album, Let It Be, contains songs both gorgeous and jagged. I suppose ambition and human frailty creeps into every group, but they delivered some incredible performances. I remember going to Leicester Square and seeing the film of Let It Be in 1970. I left with a melancholy feeling.

The Beatles- A Day in the Life

1

‘A Day in the Life’

the beatles 100 greatest songs
Keystone-France/Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images

Writers: Lennon-McCartney
Recorded: January 19 and 20, February 3, 10 and 22, 1967
Released: June 2, 1967
Not released as a single

“A Day in the Life” is the sound of the Beatles on a historic roll. “It was a peak,” John Lennon told Rolling Stone in 1970, recalling the Sgt. Pepper period. It’s also the ultimate Lennon-McCartney collaboration: “Paul and I were definitely working together, especially on ‘A Day in the Life,'” said Lennon.

After their August 29th, 1966, concert in San Francisco, the Beatles left live performing for good. Rumors of tension within the group spread as the Beatles released no new music for months. “People in the media sensed that there was too much of a lull,” Paul McCartney said later, “which created a vacuum, so they could bitch about us now. They’d say, ‘Oh, they’ve dried up,’ but we knew we hadn’t.”

With Sgt. Pepper, the Beatles created an album of psychedelic visions; coming at the end, “A Day in the Life” sounds like the whole world falling apart. Lennon sings about death and dread in his most spectral vocal, treated with what he called his “Elvis echo” — a voice, as producer George Martin said in 1992, “which sends shivers down the spine.”

Lennon took his lyrical inspiration from the newspapers and his own life: The “lucky man who made the grade” was supposedly Tara Browne, a 21-year-old London aristocrat killed in a December 1966 car wreck, and the film in which “the English army had just won the war” probably referred to Lennon’s own recent acting role in How I Won the War. Lennon really did find a Daily Mail story about 4,000 potholes in the roads of Blackburn, Lancashire.

(Is it a world of time and chance? Tara Browne is killed and his girlfriend walks away with minor bruises)

Brian Jones, Suki Poitier (centre) and Tara Browne (right), 1966

Mick Jagger and Paul McCartney

Lennon wrote the basic song, but he felt it needed something different for the middle section. McCartney had a brief song fragment handy, the part that begins “Woke up, fell out of bed.” “He was a bit shy about it because I think he thought, ‘It’s already a good song,'” Lennon said. But McCartney also came up with the idea to have classical musicians deliver what Martin called an “orchestral orgasm.” The February 10th session became a festive occasion, with guests like Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Marianne Faithfull and Donovan. The studio was full of balloons; the formally attired orchestra members were given party hats, rubber noses and gorilla paws to wear. Martin and McCartney both conducted the musicians, having them play from the lowest note on their instruments to the highest.

Two weeks later, the Beatles added the last touch: the piano crash that hangs in the air for 53 seconds. Martin had every spare piano in the building hauled down to the Beatles’ studio, where Lennon, McCartney, Ringo Starr, Martin and roadie Mal Evans played the same E-major chord, as engineer Geoff Emerick turned up the faders to catch every last trace. By the end, the levels were up so high that you can hear Starr’s shoe squeak.

In April, two months before Sgt. Pepper came out, McCartney visited San Francisco, carrying a tape with an unfinished version of “A Day in the Life.” He gave it to members of the Jefferson Airplane, and the tape ended up at a local free-form rock station, KMPX, which put it into rotation, blowing minds all over the Haight-Ashbury community. The BBC banned the song for the druggy line “I’d love to turn you on.” They weren’t so far off base: “When [Martin] was doing his TV program on Pepper,” McCartney recalled later, “he asked me, ‘Do you know what caused Pepper?’ I said, ‘In one word, George, drugs. Pot.’ And George said, ‘No, no. But you weren’t on it all the time.’ ‘Yes, we were.’ Sgt. Pepper was a drug album.”

In truth, the song was far too intense musically and emotionally for regular radio play. It wasn’t really until the Eighties, after Lennon’s murder, that “A Day in the Life” became recognized as the band’s masterwork. In this song, as in so many other ways, the Beatles were way ahead of everyone else.

Appears On: Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band

How Should We then Live Episode 7 small

The drug culture and the mentality that went with it had it’s own vehicle that crossed the frontiers of the world which were otherwise almost impassible by other means of communication. This record,  Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, became the rallying cry for young people throughout the world. It expressed the essence of their lives, thoughts and their feelings. Later came psychedelic rock an attempt to find this experience without drugs. The younger people and the older ones tried drug taking but then turned to the eastern religions. Both drugs and the eastern religions seek truth inside one’s own head, a negation of reason. The central reason of the popularity of eastern religions in the west is a hope for a non-rational meaning to life and values. 

Francis Schaeffer below is holding the album Beatles’ album SGT PEP in the film series HOW SHOULD WE THEN LIVE? episode 7 “The Age of Non-Reason” in which he discusses the Beatles’ 1960’s generation and their search for meanings and values!

John Lennon who wrote the major part of A DAY IN THE LIFE believed that we live in materialistic universe of time and chance and in this song he tells the sad story of his friend Tara Browne. “I read the news today, oh boy, About a lucky man who made the grade, And though the news was rather sad, Well I just had to laugh, I saw the photograph. He blew his mind out in a car, He didn’t notice that the red lights had changed.”

How do people cope if there is no purpose for our lives in this secular world of time and chance? They do it by trying to by escaping into the area of NON-REASON. Francis Schaeffer wrote about this in his 1968 book ESCAPE FROM REASON and Schaeffer pointed out that one of the way that is done is through drugs. Look at the drug references below in A DAY IN THE LIFE.

 

I read the news today, oh boy
About a lucky man who made the grade
And though the news was rather sad
Well I just had to laugh
I saw the photograph.

He blew his mind out in a car
He didn’t notice that the red lights had changed
A crowd of people stood and stared
They’d seen his face before
Nobody was really sure
If he was from the House of Lords.

I saw a film today, oh boy
The English army had just won the war
A crowd of people turned away
But I just had to look
Having read the book
I’d love to turn you on.

Woke up, fell out of bed,
Dragged a comb across my head
Found my way downstairs and drank a cup,
And looking up I noticed I was late.

Found my coat and grabbed my hat
Made the bus in seconds flat
Found my way upstairs and had a smoke,
Somebody spoke and I went into a dream.

I read the news today oh boy
Four thousand holes in Blackburn, Lancashire
And though the holes were rather small
They had to count them all
Now they know how many holes it takes to fill the Albert Hall.
I’d love to turn you on.

Supposed drug references

The song became controversial for its supposed references to drugs. The BBC announced that it would not broadcast “A Day in the Life” due to the line “I’d love to turn you on”, which, according to the corporation, advocated drug use.[7] Other lyrics allegedly referring to drugs include “found my way upstairs and had a smoke / somebody spoke and I went into a dream”. A spokesman for the BBC stated, “We have listened to this song over and over again. And we have decided that it appears to go just a little too far, and could encourage a permissive attitude to drug-taking.”[46] The ban was eventually lifted on 13 March 1972.[47]

Lennon and McCartney denied that there were drug references and publicly complained about the ban at a dinner party at the home of their manager, Brian Epstein, celebrating their album. Lennon said that the song was simply about “a crash and its victim”, and called the line in question “the most innocent of phrases.”[46] McCartney later said “This was the only one in the album written as a deliberate provocation. A stick-that-in-your-pipe … But what we want is to turn you on to the truth rather than pot.”[48] However, George Martin later commented that he had always suspected that the line “found my way upstairs and had a smoke” was a drug reference, recalling how the Beatles would “disappear and have a little puff”, presumably of cannabis, but not in front of him.[49] “When [Martin] was doing his TV programme on Pepper”, McCartney recalled later, “he asked me, ‘Do you know what caused Pepper?’ I said, ‘In one word, George, drugs. Pot.’ And George said, ‘No, no. But you weren’t on it all the time.’ ‘Yes, we were.’ Sgt. Pepper was a drug album.”[6]

When Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band was released in South Asia, Malaysia and Hong Kong, “A Day in the Life” “With a Little Help from My Friends” and “Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds” were excluded because of supposed drug references.[50]

 

 

 

WHY IS SOLOMON CAUGHT IN DESPAIR IN THE BOOK OF ECCLESIASTES?  Christian scholar Ravi Zacharias has noted, “The key to understanding the Book of Ecclesiastes is the term ‘UNDER THE SUN.’ What that literally means is you lock God out of a closed system, and you are left with only this world of time plus chance plus matter.” THIS IS EXACT POINT SCHAEFFER SAYS SECULAR ARTISTS ARE PAINTING FROM TODAY BECAUSE THEY BELIEVED ARE A RESULT OF MINDLESS CHANCE.

By the way, the final chapter of Ecclesiastes finishes with Solomon emphasizing that serving God is the only proper response of man. Solomon LOOKS ABOVE THE SUN AND BRINGS GOD BACK INTO THE PICTURE in the final chapter of the book in Ecclesiastes 12:13-14, “ Now all has been heard; here is the conclusion of the matter: Fear God and keep his commandments, for this is the whole duty of man.  For God will bring every deed into judgment, including every hidden thing, whether it is good or evil.”

 

(Francis Schaeffer pictured below)

______

Patrick Caulfield is artist featured today

TateShots: Mavis Cheek & Antonio Carluccio on Patrick Caulfield

Patrick Caulfield

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Patrick Caulfield
Caulfield, After Lunch.jpg

After Lunch, 1975, Tate Gallery
Born Patrick Joseph Caulfield
29 January 1936
Acton, Middlesex, England
Died 29 September 2005 (aged 69)
London, England
Nationality British
Education Chelsea School of Art, 1956–1959

Royal College of Art, 1960–1963

Known for Painting, Printmaking
Notable work After Lunch, 1975

Still Life with Dagger, 1963

Les Demoiselles d’Avignon vues de derrière, 1999

Awards Prix des Jeunes Artistes, 1965Royal Academician, 1993Jerwood Painting Prize, 1995London Institute Honorary Fellowship, 1996

Commander of the Order of the British Empire, 1996

Still Life with Dagger, 1963, Tate Gallery.

Patrick Joseph Caulfield, CBE, RA (29 January 1936 – 29 September 2005), was an English painter and printmaker known for his bold canvases, which often incorporated elements of photorealismwithin a pared-down scene. Examples of his work are Pottery and Still Life Ingredients.

Early life[edit]

Patrick Joseph Caulfield was born on 29 January 1936 in Acton, west London. During the second world war Caulfield’s family returned to Bolton, where his parents were born, to work at the De Havillandfactory. Leaving Acton Secondary Modern at the age of 15, Caulfield secured a position as a filing clerk at Crosse & Blackwell and later transferred to the design studio, working on food display and carrying out menial tasks. At 17, he joined the Royal Air Force at RAF Northwood, pre-empting requirement for national service. Inspired by the 1952 film Moulin Rouge about the artist Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, he spent his free time attending evening classes at Harrow School of Art (now part of the University of Westminster).[1][2]

Studies and work[edit]

Patrick Caulfield studied at Chelsea School of Art from 1956 to 1960, and during this time he won two prizes which funded a trip he made to Greece and Crete upon graduation. The visit to the island proved important, with Caulfield finding inspiration in the Minoan frescoes and the bright, hard colours on Crete.[3] One of his greatest friends was the abstract painter John Hoyland, whom he first met at the Young Contemporaries exhibition in 1959.[4] Progressing to the Royal College of Art from 1960 to 1963,[5] his contemporaries included David Hockney and Allen Jones.[6] He taught at Chelsea School of Art from 1963–71.[5] In 1964, he exhibited at the New Generation show at London’s Whitechapel Gallery, which resulted in him being associated with the pop art movement. This was a label Caulfield was opposed to throughout his career, seeing himself rather as “a ‘formal’ artist”.[1]

From the mid-1970s he incorporated more detailed, realistic elements into his work, After Lunch (1975) is an early example. Still-life: Autumn Fashion (1978) contains a variety of styles – some objects have heavy black outlines and flat colour, but a bowl of oysters is depicted more realistically and other areas are executed with looser brushwork. Caulfield later returned to his earlier, more stripped-down style of painting.

Caulfield’s paintings are figurative, often portraying a few simple objects in an interior. Typically, he used flat areas of simple colour surrounded by black outlines.[7] Some of his works are dominated by a single hue.

In 1987, Caulfield was nominated for the Turner Prize for his show The Artist’s Eye at the National Gallery in London.[8] In 1996 he was made a CBE.

On 24 May 2004, a fire in a storage warehouse destroyed many works from the Saatchi collection, including three by Caulfield. In September 2010 Caulfield and five other British artists, Howard Hodgkin, John Walker, Ian Stephenson, John Hoyland and R.B. Kitaj were included in an exhibition entitled The Independent Eye: Contemporary British Art From the Collection of Samuel and Gabrielle Lurie, at the Yale Center for British Art.[9][10]

He died in London in 2005 and is buried in Highgate Cemetery. His estate is represented by Alan Cristea Gallery and Waddington Custot Galleries in London. His work is held in the private collections ofCharles Saatchi and David Bowie.[11]

Patrick Caulfield’s grave, Highgate Cemetery

Commissions[edit]

Later in his career, Caulfield worked on several commissions in addition to his painting and printmaking. In 1990 he designed a stained glass window for The Ivy restaurant, it is visible from within the restaurant and on its exterior. In 1992 he designed a 12-metre carpet for the British Council‘s Manchester headquarters and in 1984 and 1995 set designs for Party Game and Rhapsody (respectively) at the Royal Opera House.[12] Caulfield painted the doors of the Great West Organ at Portsmouth Cathedral in 2001.

Selected solo exhibitions[edit]

Selected public collections[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Jump up to:a b Feaver, William (2 October 2005). “Obituary: Patrick Caulfield”. The Guardian (London). Retrieved 21 June 2013.
  2. Jump up^ Patrick Caulfield on Telegraph Obituaries
  3. Jump up^ “Patrick Caulfield”. The Daily Telegraph (London). 30 September 2005.
  4. Jump up^ Lambirth, Andrew (2009). John Hoyland: Scatter the Devils. Norwich: Unicorn Press. p. 88. ISBN 978-1-906509-07-1.
  5. ^ Jump up to:a b Caulfield 1992, p. 81.
  6. Jump up^ Burn 2006.
  7. Jump up^ Caulfield 1992, p. 10.
  8. Jump up^ http://www.artnet.com/artists/patrick-caulfield/
  9. Jump up^ Channeling American Abstraction, Karen Wilkin, Wall Street Journal Retrieved 7 October 2010
  10. Jump up^ NY Times, exhibition review Retrieved 15 December 2010
  11. Jump up^ Gleadell, Colin (27 May 2013). “Patrick Caulfield to be honoured with three exhibitions next week”. The Telegraph (London).
  12. Jump up^ http://www.waddingtoncustot.com/exhibition/caulfield2007/text/

References[edit]

Faces :: Patrick Caulfield

19AUG

SONY DSC

Typically allied with pop art, English painter and print maker Patrick Caulfield’s paintings are graphic, colour popping vibrant and joyous – kinda like London’s surprising string of 30 degree plus summer days! We caught his retrospective  at the Tate Britain and I really loved it.

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