Tag Archives: Bob Dylan

FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE Part 62 THE BEATLES (Part N The last 4 people alive from cover of Stg. Pepper’s and the reason Bob Dylan was put on the cover!) (Feature on artist Larry Bell)

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Today we are going to look at the four men on the cover of Sgt. Pepper’s that are still alive today:   Bob Dylan, Dion, Larry Bell and  Bobby Breen.

Great article on Dylan and Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band Cover:

A famous album by the fab four – The Beatles – is “Sergeant peppers lonely hearts club band“. The album itself is one of the must influential albums of all time. New recording techniques and experiments with different styles of music made this album more of a piece of art than just an LP. The cover of the album was a work of art on its own.
The cover won a Grammy Award. It featured lots of famous people like Edgar Allan Poe, Karl Marx, T.E. Lawrence, Laurel & Hardy and Albert Einstein. The Beatles themselves are represented by wax statues of the young beatles at Madame Tussauds. But offcourse, i’m referencing this album because one of the celebrities featured on the album is Bob Dylan himself.
Dylan’s portrait is shown in the top right corner, overlooking the rest of the pack.

[sgt-pepper_bob_dylan.jpg]

In the very fine article, The Sgt. Pepper’s Album Cover: Faces in the Crowd,” by  on  March 29, 2015, she made this observation concerning the picking of  BOB DYLAN to be on the cover:

Although his debut album had been released only five years previous, Dylan was already a giant figure in the minds of his fans—including the Beatles. Everything they had written since the Rubber Soul era carried a touch of Dylan’s influence, if only in the way he opened up the possibilities of rock lyrics to subjects other than boy-meets-girl.

 

sgt-pepper

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 is correct that the Beatles were heavily influenced by Dylan and I wanted to make a further observation down those same lines. Dylan’s songs pointed out over and over that the previous generation was bankrupt in their values of PERSONAL PEACE and AFFLUENCE and this new generation was not interested in just “keeping up with the Joneses.”  Dylan was consistently bringing up the big questions in life and those were the questions the Beatles wanted answered!!! Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band Album really did look at every potential answer to meaning in life and to as many people as the Beatles could imagine had the answers to life’s big questions. One of the persons on the cover did have access to those answers and I am saving that person for last in this series on the Beatles. 

Dylan and Lennon pictured below:

DYLAN AND LENNON IN CAR IN LONDON PT1

johnny-cash-and-bob-dylan

I have dedicated several posts to this series on the Beatles and I don’t know whenthis series will end because Francis Schaeffer spent a lot of time listening to the Beatles and talking and writing about them and their impact on the culture of the 1960’s. In this series we have looked at several areas in life where the Beatles looked for meaning and hope but also we have examined some of the lives of those  writers, artists, poets, painters, scientists, athletes, models, actors,  religious leaders, musicians, comedians, and philosophers  that were put on the cover of Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band album. We have discovered that many of these individuals on the cover have even taken a Kierkegaardian leap into the area of nonreason in order to find meaning for their lives and that is the reason I have included the 27 minute  episode THE AGE OF NONREASON by Francis Schaeffer. In that video Schaeffer noted,  ” Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band…for a time it became the rallying cry for young people throughout the world. It expressed the essence of their lives, thoughts and their feelings.”

How Should We then Live Episode 7 small (Age of Nonreason)

Four people still alive that appeared on the cover:  Bob Dylan: The man who introduced the Beatles to marijuana.  Dion: Besides Dylan, the onetime heartthrob was the only pop music figure in the gallery. Larry Bell: American sculptor who worked as a bouncer at the Unicorn in LA. Bobby Breen: Child star of the 1930s. I am going to take a look at four of their lives below.

In the book HOW SHOULD WE THEN LIVE? Francis Schaeffer wrote:

In this flow there was also the period of psychedelic rock, an attempt to find this experience without drugs, by the use of a certain type of music. This was the period of the Beatles’ Revolver (1966) and Strawberry Fields Forever (1967). In the same period and in the same direction was Blonde on Blonde (1966) by Bob Dylan. 

Actually Schaeffer spent a lot of time talking about Bob Dylan.

 

BOB DYLAN AND JOHN LENNON IN LONDON PT2

Ballad Of A Thin Man

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Bob Dylan: Ballad Of A Thin Man

Bob Dylan looked into the modern thought  of the 1960’s and he saw that the educated class did not have the answers and he was looking for the answers to the big questions of life in his writings. Over and over again back then reporters were asking him what his songs meant. Actually his songs were an effort to bring up the big questions but he did not have the answers. In the song “A Ballad of a Thin Man” Dylan ridicules the reporter “Mr. Jones” throughout the song for his lack of understanding of this new generation.  “Oh my God, am I here all alone?” is the feeling that Mr. Jones has after following around Dylan because he doesn’t even to begin to understand the deep seated dissatisfaction of this new generation with the status quo. Every person that ever lived has had this feeling at one time or another and Romans chapter one discusses the inner conscience that everyone has that points them to the God of the Bible that created the world and put them on this earth for a purpose. 

Francis Schaeffer in his film series THE AGE OF PERSONAL PEACE AND AFFLUENCE  made the following points concerning the young people of the 1960’s:

I. By the Early 1960s People Were Bombarded From Every Side by Modern Man’s Humanistic Thought

II. Modern Form of Humanistic Thought Leads to Pessimism

Regarding a Meaning for Life and for Fixed Values

A. General acceptance of selfish values (personal peace and affluence) accompanied rejection of Christian consensus.

1. Personal peace means: I want to be left alone, and I don’t care what happens to the man across the street or across the world. I want my own life-style to be undisturbed regardless of what it will mean — even to my own children and grandchildren.

2. Affluence means things, things, things, always more things — and success is seen as an abundance of things.

B. Students wish to escape meaninglessness of much of adult society.

1. Watershed was Berkeley in 1964.

Bob Dylan also was writing in his music about the disconnect between the young generation of the 1960’s and their parents’ generation. Francis Schaeffer noted:

It is called “A Ballad of a a Thin Man” and it apparently was written by Bob Dylan himself. Last time I read you the back cover of the album and I pointed out that when you go to the museums and also in the Theater and  in the pop records you see this same message. This is far from nothing. The very music is tremendous. It is great communication. It is like pop art. It is very destructive and just like the Theatre of the absurd although it destroys everything and leaves you with nonsense seemingly yet when you listen to the words with great care it has made a very selective destruction. Let me read the words.

You walk into the room
With your pencil in your hand
You see somebody naked
And you say who is that man?
You try so hard
But you don’t understand
Just what you would’ve said
When you get home

Something is happening
But you don’t know what it is
Do you Mister Jones?

You sneak into the window
And you say, “Is this where it is?”
Somebody points his finger at you
And says, “It’s his”
And you say, “What’s mine?”
Someone else says, “Where what is?”
And you say, “Oh my God, am I here all alone?”

Something is happening
But you don’t know what it is
Do you Mister Jones?

You hand in your ticket
And you go see the geek
Who walks up to you
When he hears you speak
And says, “How does it feel
To be such a freak?”
And you say, “Impossible”
As he hands you a bone

Something is happening
And you don’t know what it is
Do you Mister Jones?

You have many contacts
Out there among the lumberjacks
To get you facts
When someone attacks your imagination
But no one has any respect
Anyway they just expect
You to hand over your check
To tax deductible charity organizations

The sword swallower walks up to you
And he kneels
He crosses himself
And then he clicks his high heels
And without further notice
Asks you how it feels
And says, “Here’s your throat back
Thanks for the loan”

Something is happening
And you don’t know what it is
Do you Mister Jones?

You crawl into the room
Like a camel and you frown
You put your eyes in your pocket
And you put your nose into the ground
There ought to be a law
Against you comin’ around
You got to be made
To be wearing a telephone

But something is happening
And you don’t know what it is
Do you Mister Jones?

Something is happening here
And you don’t know what it is
Do you Mister Jones?

Songwriters
Bob Dylan

Francis Schaeffer pictured below:

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Francis Schaeffer observed:

In the June 28, 1966 issue of Look Magazine in the article on California the writer concludes, “It may seem ironical that a highly technical society demands a means for mystically exploration and this is LSD.” All of these may sound different. LSD and Bob Dylan may sounds miles apart. A tremendous art work in one of our great museums and the kids in a concert listening to Bob Dylan but in reality the message is the same. The tension is that according to all logic and rationality ALL IS ABSURD, yet man at the same time can not live with this and he is in this tremendous tension. He just can’t get away from being human. This is exactly what Paul was talking about in the Book of Romans and that man really knows about God and he knows about God in his conscience and from God’s external [creative] works.

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At one point in his life Bob Dylan did come to the same final conclusion that Solomon did so long ago in the Book of Ecclesiastes  when he observed the world around him and Dylan expressed this same conclusion in his song “Gotta Serve Somebody” back in the early 1980’s.

Ecclesiastes 12:13-14:
13 Now all has been heard;
here is the conclusion of the matter:
Fear God and keep his commandments,
for this is the whole duty of man.

14 For God will bring every deed into judgment,
including every hidden thing,
whether it is good or evil.

Bob Dylan – Gotta Serve Somebody (Live)

Published on Feb 15, 2014

1998-10-29 Toronto, Canada

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In fact, at this same time, Dylan joined my favorite Christian musician Keith Green and played the harmonica for this song below:

I pledge my head to heaven

NOTICE BELOW THAT JOHN LENNON REFERENCES DYLAN’S SONG “A Ballad of a a Thin Man” IN THE THIRD STANZA.

John Lennon, Eric Clapton, Keith Richards, Mitch Mitchell, Jimi Hendrix

Uploaded on Jul 1, 2010

John Lennon (Beatles), Eric Clapton (Cream), Keith Richards (Rolling Stones), Mitch Mitchell (Jimi Hendrix Experience) – Yer Blues

“Yer Blues”

2,3Yes I’m lonely wanna die
Yes I’m lonely wanna die
If I ain’t dead already
Ooh girl you know the reason whyIn the morning wanna die
In the evening wanna die
If I ain’t dead already
Ooh girl you know the reason whyMy mother was of the sky
My father was of the earth
But I am of the universe
And you know what it’s worth
I’m lonely wanna die
If I ain’t dead already
Ooh girl you know the reason whyThe eagle picks my eye
The worm he licks my bone
I feel so suicidal
Just like Dylan’s Mr. Jones
Lonely wanna die
If I ain’t dead already
Ooh girl you know the reason whyBlack cloud crossed my mind
Blue mist round my soul
Feel so suicidal
Even hate my rock ‘n’ roll
Wanna die yeah wanna die
If I ain’t dead already
Ooh girl you know the reason why
By Tom Breihan / November 7, 2014 – 11:19 am

The producer Glyn Johns worked with people like the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, and the Who on some of their peak-era classics. And according to Johns, he almost worked on something that could’ve been a bigger deal than any of the real albums on his résumé. In his new memoir, Sound Man, Johns claims that Bob Dylan enlisted his help in making an album with both the Beatles and the Stones. Together. Honestly, it’s probably best that the album never happened; the entire baby boom generation might’ve immediately immolated.

According to Rolling Stone, Johns writes that he encountered Dylan at a New York airport and said nice things about his work with the Beatles and Stones. And then, Johns writes, this happened:

He said he had this idea to make a record with the Beatles and the Stones. And he asked me if I would find out whether the others would be interested. I was completely bowled over. Can you imagine the three greatest influences on popular music in the previous decade making an album together?

Johns contacted all the relevant parties and tried to make it happen, but a few key parties were just not down with the idea:

Keith and George thought it was fantastic. But they would since they were both huge Dylan fans. Ringo, Charlie and Bill were amicable to the idea as long as everyone else was interested. John didn’t say a flat no, but he wasn’t that interested. Paul and Mick both said absolutely not…. I had it all figured out. We would pool the best material from Mick and Keith, Paul and John, Bob and George, and then select the best rhythm section from the two bands to suit whichever songs we were cutting. Paul and Mick were probably, right, however I would have given anything to have given it a go.

Sound Man is out 11/13, via Blue Rider Press.

Great Album

How Should We then Live Episode 7 small (Age of Nonreason)

Beatles Comments about Bob Dylan

Traveling Wilburys – End Of The Line

TARNISHED WILBURY’S:

Friday, May 3rd, 2013

I’D HAVE YOU ANY TIME:

Friday, June 8th, 2012

PALOMINO JAM?:

Monday, May 21st, 2012

GEORGE AND BOB:

Sunday, October 9th, 2011

HARI AND ZIMMY PLAYING TENNIS ON THE ISLE OF WIGHT 1969:

Wednesday, September 7th, 2011

THE WILVER SILBURIES:

Tuesday, November 16th, 2010

CAMPEST MAN BOOTS EVER:

Tuesday, September 14th, 2010

ZIMMY AND RINGY:

Thursday, July 29th, 2010

WORDS FROM A MASTER:

Thursday, June 24th, 2010

“They were fantastic singers. Lennon, to this day, it’s hard to find a better singer than Lennon was, or than McCartney was and still is.

“I’m in awe of McCartney. He’s about the only one that I am in awe of. He can do it all. And he’s never let up… He’s just so effortless.”

Bob Dylan 2007.

BOB AND GEORGE:

Tuesday, June 15th, 2010

Traveling Wilburys – Handle With Care

Traveling Wilburys-Runaway (Del Shannon`s song)

The True History Of The Traveling Wilbury’s

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When I think about the group THE TRAVELING WILBURY’S and the close friendships that Bob Dylan had with many of the Beatles it makes me think of the song A LITTLE HELP FROM MY FRIENDS and that song is discussed below:

September 19, 2011

By Elvis Costello

My absolute favorite albums are Rubber Soul and Revolver. On both records you can hear references to other music — R&B, Dylan, psychedelia — but it’s not done in a way that is obvious or dates the records. When you picked up Revolver, you knew it was something different. Heck, they are wearing sunglasses indoors in the picture on the back of the cover and not even looking at the camera . . . and the music was so strange and yet so vivid. If I had to pick a favorite song from those albums, it would be “And Your Bird Can Sing” . . . no, “Girl” . . . no, “For No One” . . . and so on, and so on. . . .

Their breakup album, Let It Be, contains songs both gorgeous and jagged. I suppose ambition and human frailty creeps into every group, but they delivered some incredible performances. I remember going to Leicester Square and seeing the film of Let It Be in 1970. I left with a melancholy feeling.

The Beatles – Girl

62

‘Girl’

the beatles 100 greatest songs
Gunter Zint/K & K Ulf Kruger OHG/Redferns

Main Writer: Lennon
Recorded: November 11, 1965
Released: December 6, 1965
Not released as a single

Like so many of the love songs the Beatles were writing on Rubber Soul, this deceptively simple ballad sounds like the confession of a man who’s vulnerable and confused in the presence of a woman who’s tougher and more independent than he is (“The kind of girl you want so much/It makes you sorry”). Yet even as she keeps making a fool out of him, his voice is full of admiration and affection for her as he sings, “She promises the Earth to me/And I believe her/After all this time, I don’t know why.” “When I heard this, as a young teenager, it hit the nail on the head,” Jackson Browne told Rolling Stone. “It embodied the feelings I was living with every day — completely burning with sexual desire, with almost a regret at being so overpowered.” The obvious inspiration is Bob Dylan, but Lennon surpasses him here — “Girl” makes “Just Like a Woman” sound like kid stuff. Years later, Lennon said that the fantasy girl in the song’s lyric was an archetype he had been searching for his entire life (“There is no such thing as the girl — she was a dream”) and finally found in Yoko Ono.

Appears On: Rubber Soul

61

‘With a Little Help From My Friends’

the beatles 100 greatest songs
Ron Case/Getty Images

Writers: McCartney-Lennon
Recorded: March 29 and 30, 1967
Released: June 2, 1967
Not released as a single

The Beatles cut this in an all-night session after the photo shoot for the Sgt. Pepper cover. At dawn, Starr trudged up the stairs to head home — but the other Beatles cajoled him into doing his lead vocal then and there, standing around the microphone for moral support. Though nervous and exhausted, Starr delivered a magnificently soulful vocal, right up to that final high note.

The lyrics about loneliness and vulnerability were in some ways more revealing than Lennon and McCartney might have written for themselves. But there’s also a typical Beatle joke. As McCartney admitted, “I remember giggling with John when we wrote the lines ‘What do you see when you turn out the light? I can’t tell you, but I know it’s mine.’ It could have been him playing with his willy under the covers, or it could have been taken on a deeper level.”

Appears On:Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band

JUST LIKE DYLAN DION ALSO HAD A CONVERSION TO CHRISTIANITY AT A LATER POINT IN HIS LIFE.

Dion – The Wanderer (HD)

Dion — Abraham, Martin and John — Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour.

Published on Dec 16, 2014

Remembering heroes of the past, wondering about today’s role models.

Dion DiMucci

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Dion DiMucci
DionDiMucci.jpg
Background information
Birth name Dion Francis DiMucci
Also known as Dion
Born July 18, 1939 (age 75)
The Bronx, New York, United States
Origin Italian-American
Genres Rock, pop, doo-wop, R&B,blues
Occupation(s) Singer, songwriter
Instruments Vocals, guitar
Years active 1957–present
Labels Laurie, Arista, Mohawk, Columbia, ABC, Warner Brothers, Dayspring, Blue Horizon
Associated acts Dion and the Belmonts, Dion and the Del-Satins, The Timberlanes, The Wanderers
Website http://www.diondimucci.com/
Notable instruments
Martin Guitars (acoustic)

Dion Francis DiMucci (born July 18, 1939), better known mononymously as Dion, is an American singer-songwriter whose work has incorporated elements of doo-wop, rock and R&B styles—and, most recently, straight blues. He was one of the most popular American rock and roll performers of the pre-British Invasion era. He had more than a dozen Top 40 hits in the late 1950s and early 60s. He is best remembered for the 1961 singles, “Runaround Sue” and “The Wanderer“, written with Ernie Maresca.

Solo stardom: 1960–1964[edit]

By the end of 1960, Dion had released his first solo album on Laurie, Alone with Dion, and the single “Lonely Teenager“, which rose to No. 12 in the US charts. The name on his solo releases was simply “Dion”. Follow-ups “Havin’ Fun” and “Kissin’ Game” had less success, and the signs were that Dion would drift onto the cabaret circuit. However, he then recorded, with a new vocal group, the Del-Satins, an up-tempo number co-written with Ernie Maresca. The record, “Runaround Sue“, stormed up the U.S. charts, reaching No. 1 in October 1961, and No. 11 in the UK,[7] where he also toured. “Runaround Sue” sold over a million copies, achieving gold disc status.[8]

For the next single, Laurie promoted the A-side, “The Majestic”, but it was the B-side, Maresca’s “The Wanderer“, which received more radio play and climbed swiftly up the charts to reach No. 2 in the U.S. in February 1962 and No. 10 in the UK (the 1976 re-release made the UK Top 20).[7]

By the end of 1961, Dion had become a major star, touring worldwide and making an appearance in the Columbia Pictures musical film Twist Around the Clock. He followed with a string of singles – “Lovers Who Wander” (No. 3), “Little Diane” (No. 8), “Love Came to Me” (No. 10) – in 1962, several of which he wrote or co-wrote. He also had successful albums with Runaround Sue and Lovers Who Wander.

At the end of 1962, Dion moved from Laurie to Columbia Records. The first Columbia single, Leiber and Stoller‘s “Ruby Baby” (originally a hit for the Drifters) reached No. 2, while “Donna the Prima Donna” and “Drip Drop” (another cover of a Drifters hit) both reached No. 6 in late 1963. (Dion also recorded an Italian version of “Donna the Prima Donna” using the identical backup vocals.) His other Columbia releases were less successful, and problems with his addiction and changing public tastes saw a period of commercial decline.

While Dion’s career appeared to be nearing an end, he still retained enough credibility to be, along with Bob Dylan, one of only two rock artists featured on the album cover of the BeatlesSgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band in 1967.

In April 1968, Dion experienced what he identified as a powerful religious experience. After getting clean once again from heroin addiction, an experience he documented in his 1970 song “Your Own Backyard”, he approached Laurie Records for a new contract. They agreed on condition that he record the song “Abraham, Martin & John“, written by Dick Holler (also the writer of the Royal Guardsmen‘s “Snoopy Vs. The Red Baron”) in response to the assassination of John F. Kennedy and those of Martin Luther King and Robert F. Kennedy during the summer of 1968. The success of this song – later recorded by many others including Marvin Gaye – which reached No. 4 in the US charts and No. 1 in Canada, resuscitated Dion’s career. It sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc.[8]

Mature and Christian period: 1969–1986[edit]

For the next few years, Dion’s music became radically different, moving to more contemplative and mature material. He released several albums essentially as a singer-songwriter, to moderate sales, moving to the Warner Brothers label in 1969.

There followed a live reunion show with the Belmonts at Madison Square Garden on June 2, 1972, which was recorded and released as a live album by Warner. A year later, in 1973, Dion and the original Belmonts performed once more, doing a sold out concert at the Nassau Coliseum on Long Island, New York. However, no recording of the 1973 reunion was ever released. This was followed in 1975 by the album Born To Be With You, produced by Phil Spector. The album was a commercial failure, but has been subsequently praised by such artists as Jason Pierce of Spiritualized and Pete Townshend of the Who.[citation needed]

In 1978, Dion released an album drawing on many of his teenage influences, Return of the Wanderer, another commercial failure.

In December 1979, there was a radical spiritual change in Dion, who had become a born-again Christian.[9] Thereafter, his recordings for several years were in a contemporary Christian vein, in which he released five albums on the DaySpring Recordslabel, a division of Word Records in Waco, Texas. These albums reflecting his evangelical Christian convictions were Inside Job (1980), Only Jesus (1981), I Put Away My Idols (1983) which charted at #37, Seasons (1984), Kingdom in the Streets (1985) and Velvet & Steel (1986). Several singles were successfully released to Christian radio, notably “Still in the Spirit” from Kingdom in the Streets.

In 1984, Dion won the GMA Dove Award (Christian Music Award) for the album I Put Away My Idols. He was also nominated for Grammy Award for Best Gospel Vocal Performance, Male for the same album.

On September 24, 1985, Dion was a guest on 100 Huntley Street.

It Was 20 Years Ago Today Documentary

Published on Jun 8, 2012

The beginning of the 1987 documentary that examines the Beatles, Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, released in 1967. This beginning is not included on the YouTube version that is already posted, so here it is.

Good map of people on cover below:

  1. Sri Yukteswar Giri: Indian guru, one of four chosen for the cover by George Harrison.
  2. Aleister Crowley: Notorious mystic, polymath, and drug user chosen, designer Jann Haworth says, by John Lennon.
  3. Mae West: “What would I be doing in a lonely hearts club?” she reportedly joked. Ringo Starr appeared in her 1978 film “Sextette.”
  4. Lenny Bruce: By 1967, the Beatles shared some of the late comic’s persecution complex.
  5. Karlheinz Stockhausen: Avant-garde composer who (though chosen by McCartney) once credited Lennon as the crucial link between pop and “serious” music.
  6. W.C. Fields: Wisecracking actor, apparently chosen by Peter Blake.
  7. Carl Jung: Psychoanalyst who famously dreamed of “dirty, sooty” Liverpool (the Beatles’ hometown), where he discovers Self in the form of a blooming magnolia.
  8. Edgar Allan Poe: Chosen by Lennon, who would soon write the line “Man you should have seen them kicking Edgar Allan Poe” (”I Am the Walrus”).
  9. Fred Astaire: McCartney, a big fan, has said “Here, There and Everywhere” was inspired by “Cheek to Cheek.”
  10. Richard Merkin: Self-proclaimed “literary painter” chosen by Haworth and/or Blake.
  11. Vargas girl: Iconic pinup. Haworth now finds the cover’s preponderance of blond bombshells (and lack of other influential women) “scathing, terrible.”
  12. Leo Gorcey (missing): Actor who starred in 1930s-’40s comedy-drama serials “Dead End Kids” and “Bowery Boys” asked for $400 for permission to use his image and was painted out.
  13. Huntz Hall: Gorcey’s fellow actor in “Dead End Kids” and “Bowery Boys” series.
  14. Simon Rodia: Immigrant construction worker who created the Watts Towers in Los Angeles.
  15. Bob Dylan: The man who introduced the Beatles to marijuana.
  16. Aubrey Beardsley: Influential Victorian-era illustrator whose work enjoyed a ’60s revival.
  17. Sir Robert Peel: UK prime minister of 1830s and ’40s who reformed the police force.
  18. Aldous Huxley: Author of “Brave New World,” advocated psychedelic drug use.
  19. Dylan Thomas: The Welsh poet, who died in 1953. As a child, Lennon took comfort in stories about artists such as Thomas and van Gogh, who “seemed to see things other people didn’t see.”
  20. Terry Southern: Novelist and satirist. Ringo starred in 1969 feature film of his novel “The Magic Christian.”
  21. Dion: Besides Dylan, the onetime heartthrob was the only pop music figure in the gallery.
  22. Tony Curtis: The actor, a family friend of the Haworths, inspired a generation of hairstyles in late ’50s England.
  23. Wallace Berman: West Coast collage/assemblage artist chosen by designers Haworth and Blake.
  24. Tommy Handley: BBC comedian of the Beatles’ childhood eulogized by the bishop of London for his “satire without malice.”
  25. Marilyn Monroe: Famously sang “Happy Birthday” for JFK; contrary to popular belief, McCartney does not own the rights to the song.
  26. William S. Burroughs: Experimental writer, influenced McCartney with his cut-up tape recordings.
  27. Sri Mahavatara Babaji: Indian guru.
  28. Stan Laurel: British-born comic actor, one half of the duo Laurel and Hardy.
  29. Richard Lindner: “Mechanistic Cubist” painter chosen by the designers.
  30. Oliver Hardy: Laurel’s comic partner.
  31. Karl Marx: Though an avid reader of his work, Lennon was an uncertain revolutionary (”Don’t you know that you can count me out”).
  32. H.G. Wells: Science fiction pioneer (”War of the Worlds,” “The Time Machine”) and utopian thinker.
  33. Sri Paramahansa Yogananda: Harrison liked to give away copies of his “Autobiography of a Yogi.”
  34. (Window dummy)
  35. Stuart Sutcliffe: Ex-Beatle whose premature death haunted Lennon.
  36. (Window dummy)
  37. Max Miller: Risque comedian of McCartney’s beloved music hall era.
  38. Petty girl: Like Vargas’s, George Petty’s pinup girls were World War II icons.
  39. Marlon Brando: In “The Wild One,” the rival biker gang is called the Beetles.
  40. Tom Mix: Early Western film star.
  41. Oscar Wilde: Another of the artists who “suffered because of their visions,” as Lennon once told Playboy.
  42. Tyrone Power: Hollywood star of the Beatles’ formative years.
  43. Larry Bell: American sculptor who worked as a bouncer at the Unicorn in LA.
  44. Dr. David Livingstone: Scottish explorer and African missionary.
  45. Johnny Weissmuller: Movie Tarzan whose famous whoop preceded McCartney’s.
  46. Stephen Crane: “Red Badge of Courage” author who died at 28 after living the last years of his life in England.
  47. Issy Bonn: British comic and singer whose raised right hand just behind Paul’s head — an Eastern death symbol? — was seen as a clue to the rampant “Paul is dead” rumors.
  48. George Bernard Shaw: Playwright, critic, socialist, vegetarian.
  49. H.C. Westermann: American sculptor and printmaker, chosen by the designers.
  50. Albert Stubbins: Midcentury English footballer whose best years were with Liverpool.
  51. Sri Lahiri Mahasaya: Indian guru.
  52. Lewis Carroll: Lennon, a big fan of the “Alice” author, took Carroll’s verse “The Walrus and the Carpenter” as inspiration for “I Am the Walrus.”
  53. T.E. Lawrence: “Lawrence of Arabia” famously portrayed by Swinging Londoner Peter O’Toole.
  54. Sonny Liston: Wax image of the former heavyweight champ, whose nemesis, the future Muhammad Ali, posed for photos with the Beatles.
  55. George Petty girl
  56. George Harrison (wax): Wax images of the youthful Beatles were provided by Madame Tussauds, which threw in Liston and Diana Dors for good measure.
  57. John Lennon (wax)
  58. Shirley Temple (hidden behind wax Lennon’s left shoulder): First of three images of the child star (including the doll wearing the Rolling Stones jersey), a bit of overkill for which Haworth blames herself.
  59. Ringo Starr (wax)
  60. Paul McCartney (wax)
  61. Albert Einstein (hidden behind real-life Lennon’s right shoulder): Scientific genius who said, “I live my daydreams in music.”
  62. John Lennon: “Sgt. Pepper” outfits designed by Manuel Cuevas, who still sews flashy costumes in Nashville. He hardly remembers it: “I made a bunch of funny outfits for them,” he says.
  63. Ringo Starr: Declined to make any suggestions and doesn’t recall the photo shoot — “I suppose I must have been there because I’m in the photograph,” he has said.
  64. Paul McCartney: Originated the “Sgt. Pepper” concept; chose most of the showbiz celebrities.
  65. George Harrison: “Within You Without You,” his sole contribution to “Sgt. Pepper,” reconfirmed his interest in Eastern philosophy.
  66. Bobby Breen: Child star of the 1930s.
  67. Marlene Dietrich: Once shared the stage at the Prince of Wales Theatre with young Beatles.
  68. Mohandas Gandhi (blacked out).
  69. Order of the Buffalos Legionnaire
  70. Diana Dors: British Marilyn whose second husband was Richard Dawson.
  71. Shirley Temple

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How Should We then Live Episode 7 small (Age of Nonreason)

The Beatles Dont Let Me Down Rooftop Concert 1969

The Beatles Get Back Rooftop Concert, 1969 360p

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Bobby Breen in “Rainbow on the River”

Bobby Breen

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Bobby Breen
Bobby Breen.jpg

Bobby Breen
Born November 4, 1927 (age 87)
Montréal, Quebec, Canada
Occupation Actor, singer
Years active 1936–1964

Bobby Breen (born November 4, 1927) is a former Canadian-born actor and singer who reached major popularity as a child star in the 1930s.

Life and Career[edit]

He made his professional debut at age four in a night club in Toronto and was an immediate sensation. He made his radio debut soon after. He played in vaudeville and his sister paid for his musical education. Breen went to Hollywood in 1935. His first major appearance was on Eddie Cantor‘s weekly radio show in 1936, and he soon became the leading child star at RKO Radio Pictures. He is best remembered today for his films, and for the fact that he was a boy soprano. His first film was Let’s Sing Again (1936), followed by eight more, including Rainbow on the River (1936), Make a Wish (1937), Hawaii Calls (1938), Way Down South (1939), and his last film, Johnny Doughboy (1942). He was RKO’s biggest child star at this time and, while he played the leading part, his co-stars included famous actors like Basil Rathbone, Alan Mowbray, Charlie Ruggles, May Robson and Dolores Costello.

He continued working as a singer in nightclubs and a musical performer in stock theatre, later serving as a guest pianist for the NBC Symphony Orchestra on radio, and hosting a local TV show in New York. He also recorded briefly for the Motown label, singing on two singles and an unreleased album in 1964.[1][2] In 1953, Breen appeared on ABC‘s reality show, The Comeback Story, to explain how his career nose-dived as he entered his teen years and how he fought to recover.

As of 2002, Breen was living with his family in Tamarac, Florida and worked as the owner/operator of Bobby Breen Enterprises, a local talent agency, and even appeared sometimes as a singer at smaller concerts.[3]

Filmography[edit]

Bobby Breen with Louise Beavers in his second film Rainbow on the River

In popular culture[edit]

Featured artist today is Larry Bell:

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(Look at the 9:45 mark to 16:00 mark and he used a glass piece that had broken because of chance creation of it, “Serendipity” of it and mentions Marcel Duchamp )   (at 34:25 mark “Some people trust Jesus but I don’t) (at 39:30 tells the Peter Blake story)

Quickfire: Larry Bell

(In the video below I learned that Peter Blake saw a show of his at Robert Frazier Gallery in London and liked his work and Peter was also a friend of Dennis Hopper who had taken the picture of Larry and put him in)

Meet Larry Bell, Artist – Artistic Evolution

Uploaded on Oct 31, 2011

Meet Larry Bell, Artist
We caught up with Larry Bell during the Artist Panel on October 6, 2011. To ask him a few questions about the Artistic Evolutions show, his first memories of the Museum, and The Beatles.

Larry Bell: Seeing Through Glass

Published on May 24, 2013

Filmed in his Taos studio, Larry Bell demonstrates how he uses glass and an industrial process called vacuum deposition of thin films to create his stunning sculptures. He also shares his thoughts about the conservation of his work.

More about the GCI’s Modern and Contemporary Art Research Initiative at http://www.getty.edu/conservation//mo…

Meet the Artist: Larry Bell

In a career that spans over 50 years, artist Larry Bell has had his work featured all over the world, including at the Langham Place in Mong Kok. This autumn, he is showcasing some of his recent works in Hong Kong. He speaks to Laura Chan about his work and his impressions of the city.

By Laura Chan | Sep 11, 2014

Over the years, Larry Bell has taken on all kinds of creative endeavors, from abstract paintings to sculptures to experimentation with thin film deposition. You may have seen his “Happy Man” sculpture outside Langham Place in Mong Kok—or maybe you’ve seen his likeness on the album cover of The Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. He has been hard at work in his US studio in New Mexico, and is coming to Hong Kong this fall to exhibit his more recent creations as part of White Cube’s “Light and Red” exhibit, through November 15.

HK: Last time you were in Hong Kong, in 2004, you unveiled your sculpture outside Langham Place. How did that feel?
Larry Bell: I was thrilled. When I came, a year or so before to look at the site, it was so hard to tell what kind of a space it was to sit in; it was all big building equipment, cranes and half-built foundations. But all around, the place was so full of people. I thought [that] it was a great high-visibility site. The big pieces I’ve done have are mostly in sheltered places, like businesses and schools, but this was in front of everybody.

HK: Do you think Hong Kong has changed since then?
LB:
Last time I came, I spent all my time in Kowloon. Over there, it has really changed. There are so many big buildings that have popped up over the last 10 years.

HK: Do you prefer sticking around the studio, or traveling for exhibits?
LB: Making is the most fun. It’s great fun to come to a place like [Hong Kong], with great people, and such incredible food. But in the studio, I’m not a tourist: it’s my scene and it’s what I do. The studio is a special place to be, whether I am working on something, or waiting for a muse to kick me out of the chair to work.

HK: Your career spans over 50 years. What has changed about the art world since the 60s and 70s?
LB:
When I started, contemporary art had no audience. There was a giant argument going on [as to] whether anyone had the right to paint abstractly without knowing how to paint the figure. Somehow non-objective or abstract work was less credible than figurative work. But then, if there’s an audience who wants stuff, and there’s some suggestion that it has some value—financial value—the audience grows. It’s not the history of art that establishes the value of work, it’s the perversity of merchandising. It has nothing to do with art. Art is probably something that only artists experience in their studio when they’re working.

HK: What are you most proud of?
LB:
That I made it 54 years; I’m celebrating my 54th year of unemployment. There have been good times and rough times, but I’m still hanging on. If the whole thing falls apart tomorrow—I still did all of that.

HK: How did you get on the cover of the Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band album?
LB: I don’t really know… but I know this much: I had a show in London around 1964 or ’65, in a gallery of a guy named Robert Fraser. He was really close with a lot of music people, who would go to all his art shows. So I think one of the Beatles saw my show, because, as I understand, the people on the cover were chosen by the musicians; one of them must have said to put me on it. One day I got a letter from the music publisher asking to use my picture, which was actually taken by Dennis Hopper on Venice Beach. But I had no idea it would become an icon like that. That’s all I know about it; I virtually had nothing to do with it.

HK: Any thoughts on their music?
LB: Well, I wasn’t that nuts over the Beatles. I always liked the Stones better.

Works featured in Light and Red:

Light Knot made with polyester coated with aluminium and silicon monoxide.
Photo: Jack Hems; © Larry Bell; courtesy White Cube

Part of Bell’s new series of collages on red Hiromi paper
Photo: Alan Shaffer; © Larry Bell; courtesy White Cube

Through Nov 15, Larry Bell’s Light Knots and Collages will feature in “Light and Red” at White Cube (50 Connaught Rd. Central).

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Larry Bell

Larry Bell has had a long and varied career, and also influential enough to land himself on the cover of The Beatles’ 1967 albumSgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.

Born in 1939 in Chicago, Illinois, and now based in Toas, New Mexico and Venice, California, his earliest work were, like Donald Judd, Abstract-expressionist paintings.

In the 1960s, Bell began making some of his most recognisable works: Cube structures that sit on transparent plinths. Three of these works were featured in the influential 1966 minimalist exhibition Primary Structures, which also featured the work of Donald Judd, Dan Flavin, Ellsworth Kelly, Carl Andre and Sol LeWitt (amongst others).

I often see people disregard the relationship between the plinth and a sculpture, and furthermore the plinth’s sculptural presence. It’s always refreshing to look at Bell’s work, because he brings an awareness to the plinth by making it part of the work itself.

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Born in Chicago in 1939

Larry Bell’s work emerged in the mid-1960s, and is often included in major exhibitions of Minimal art. His work was shown in the first exhibit to focus on Minimal art, Primary Structures, at the Jewish Museum in 1966. Bells work was also included in the seminal Museum of Modern Art exhibit, The Responsive Eye in 1965. More recently, Bells work was prominently presented in the Museum of Contemporary Arts show, A Minimal Future? Art as Object 1958-1968, and discussed at length in the catalogue essays.

Bell is one of the most prominent and influential artists to have come out of the Los Angeles art scene of the 1960s, first showing at the Huysman Gallery, and then at Ferus. He became associated with the most important movements at the time, such as Light and Space art and what was described as Finish Fetish (a term coined by the late critic John Coplans). Bell has continued to investigate the complexities of highly refined surface treatments of glass, as well as large-scale sculptural installations.

Larry Bell was born in Chicago, and currently resides in Taos, New Mexico. The artist now maintains studios in Taos, New Mexico and Venice, California. Having grown up in the San Fernando Valley, Bell attended Chouinard Art School in Los Angeles from 1957 through 1959, where he was a student of Robert Irwin. He was extraordinarily successful as a young artist, and showed regularly at Pace Gallery in New York between 1965 and 1973. In September of 2005, Pace Wildenstein presented a show of works titled Larry Bell: The Sixties.

His work is in public collections throughout the world, including The Museum of Modern Art, New York; The Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo; Art Institute of Chicago; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; Los Angeles County Museum; Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge; Museum Ludwig, Cologne; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; Tate Gallery, London; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; and the Whitney Museum of American Art.

Larry Bell (artist)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Larry Bell
Born 1939 (age 75–76)
Chicago, Illinois
Nationality American
Known for Sculpture
Movement Minimal Art, Geometric abstraction

Larry Bell (born in 1939) is a contemporary American artist and sculptor. He lives and works in Taos, New Mexico, and maintains a studio in Venice, California. From 1957 to 1959 he studied at the Chouinard Art Institute in Los Angeles as a student of Robert Irwin, Richards Ruben, Robert Chuey, and Emerson Woelffer.[1] He is a grant recipient from, among others, the National Endowment for the Arts and theGuggenheim Foundation, and his artworks are found in the collections of many major cultural institutions. Bell’s work has been shown at museums and in public spaces in the United States and abroad over the course of his 40-year career. Larry Bell is one of the Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band cutouts.

Critical analysis of work[edit]

Larry Bell’s art addresses the relationship between the art object and its environment through the sculptural and reflective properties of his work. Bell is often associated with Light and Space, a group of mostly West Coast artists whose work is primarily concerned with perceptual experience stemming from the viewer’s interaction with their work. This group also includes, among others, artists James Turrell, John McCracken, Peter Alexander, Robert Irwin and Craig Kauffman On the occasion of the Tate Gallery’s exhibit Three Artists from Los Angeles: Larry Bell, Robert Irwin, Doug Wheeler, Michael Compton wrote the following to describe the effect of Bell’s artwork:

At various times and particularly in the 1960s some artists have worked near what could be called the upper limits of perceptions, that is, where the eye is on the point of being overwhelmed by a superabundance of stimulation and is in danger of losing its power to control it… These artists sometimes produce the effect that the threat to our power to resolve what is seen heightens our awareness of the process of seeing…However, the three artists in this show… operate in various ways near the lowest thresholds of visual discrimination. The effect of this is again to cause one to make a considerable effort to discern and so to become conscious of the process of seeing.[2]

1960s[edit]

Untitled (1964), bismuth, chromium, gold, and rhodium on gold-plated brass;Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

Bell’s earliest pieces are paintings in the Abstract Expressionist tradition. He began incorporating fragments and shards of clear and mirrored glass into his compositions. At the same time, he began in his painting to produce angular geometric compositions that alluded to or represented three-dimensional forms. These works frequently depicted rectilinear forms with truncated corners. Next there came a series of shadow boxesor “ghost boxes”, three-dimensional cases whose surfaces often featured shapes reminiscent of those in the preceding paintings. Of this transition, critic Peter Frank has observed:

The earliest boxes contained within them, coated onto the glass or even defining their parameters, the angled contours and beveled edges with which the paintings had inferred three-dimensionality; the illusion of volume was thus conflated with actual volume.[3]

As happy as Larry
The American artist behind the ‘Light and Red’ exhibition now showing in Central speaks to Fionnuala McHugh about rage, age and hallucinations.
Bell in White Cube.

Larry Bell – painter, sculptor, long-distance driver, dog lover and 1960s icon – was in Hong Kong recently. Usually he divides his time between his studios in Venice, California, and Taos, in New Mexico, but he’d come here for the opening of his exhibition titled “Light and Red”. His work is being shown at White Cube, which seems appropriate because if there’s any shape with which Bell is associated, it’s a cube.

For years, he created boxes out of glass. If you look at them now, you eventually reach a point where you can’t quite decide if he’s trying to express the beauty of containment or if he’s signalling a desperate urge to escape. In 2011, as part of the 54th Venice Biennale, six of his 1960s cubes were set on six pedestals in one of the gilded rooms of the Palazzo Contarini Degli Scrigni. The photographs of the installation capture a wonderfully translucent zoo of caged light.

I’m unfit for employment of any kind – if I went into the army, everyone should sell their defence bonds
That exhibition was titled “Venice in Venice: Glow & Reflection – Venice California Art from 1960 to the Present”, and showed the work of a group of young, experimental Californian artists who hung out together in Los Angeles under a sky so perfect it had, 50 years earlier, attracted what used to be called the moving-picture industry.

The Light and Space artists, as they were collectively termed, aren’t internationally renowned – the most famous is probably James Turrell – but even if you’ve never heard of Bell, you’ll almost certainly have glimpsed him. He’s featured on the cover of “Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band”, the 1967 Beatles album that became a defining moment of 60s iconography.
Larry Bell with pieces from his “Light and Red” exhibition at White Cube, in Central.

And the bronze stick-man outside Langham Place, in Mong Kok, which weighs an un-spindly 2,700kg, that’s by Bell. It’s No26 in a group of 27 works from his “Sumer” series.

The figures grew out of some electronic doodling on his Mac in 1993, which he initially sent to long-time friend, architect Frank Gehry, who wanted ideas for a client’s house. The series takes its name from the Sumerians, who lived about 7,000 years ago in Mesopotamia, the cradle of human civilisation, and it has been interpreted as a commentary on “the post-human condition”. There may be those who wonder if this cultural reference in Mong Kok on a busy Saturday afternoon is, rather like the glass boxes, sending out a mixed message.

At any rate, it was the architect of Langham Place who called the figure Happy Man. Bell’s namecard has a whole row of them stick-dancing, stick-bending, stick-arms-akimbo.

IN A BACKROOM IN White Cube, in Central, early on the evening of the Mid-Autumn Festival, as the city prepares itself to focus on (moon) light, Bell – rather heavier than he was when a pal, the actor Dennis Hopper, took photos of him nattily dressed in striped trousers and corresponding shoes half a century ago – is craggily handsome in a red gingham shirt.

He’s now 74. Is he a Happy Man?

“I can’t tell sh** without these,” he says, holding out the two hearing-aids, like a pair of pink broad beans, he’s just removed from his ears to be admired. “Sometimes they work, sometimes they get plugged up with wax.”
The cover of the 1967 Beatles album “Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” was a defining piece of 1960s iconography and features a picture of Bell. Can you find him?

Bell bears an ironic name. When he was 46, he was told by a consultant that he’d had profound hearing loss his entire life. He’d only made the appointment because someone in Los Angeles, who collected his work, had slammed her cutlery on the table at a smart dinner-party and shouted, in frustration, “Larry, get your damn ears checked!”

…In 1962, he had his first show at Los Angeles’ influential Ferus Gallery. Shortly afterwards, three men in suits knocked on his door. Bell – in a response which may be familiar to some of Hong Kong’s creative residents – was convinced they were building inspectors and, as he wasn’t supposed to be living in his studio, hid. Eventually, after peering through a crack in the window, he invited the trio in, misheard the introductions, and only when the visit was well-established did he realise he was hosting artist Marcel Duchamp.
The cover of the 1967 Beatles album “Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” features a picture of Bell.
The episode sounds appropriately surreal, although perhaps more Magritte than Duchamp – you imagine the men in bowler hats, the interior artist with his eye at a keyhole, the over-arching blue sky. When asked, Bell obligingly begins to paint a verbal picture of the return visit he made to Duchamp in New York a few years later.

First of all, what was he wearing? “Oh, I was pretty well turned-out,” Bell says, comfortably. “Duchamp was a pretty slick guy himself, a very conservative dresser. Formal. He was sitting in his parlour, smoking a cigar. He did it very eloquently. Very elegantly. He smoked it like this.”

Bell borrows a pen, places it between the little finger and ring finger of his left hand, makes puffing gestures.

“I was 25, he was 73, 74. [Actually, Duchamp was 78.] It wasn’t a big room, about the size of this one” – a glance around White Cube’s back office – “but there was a Brancusi, a de Chirico, a Magritte. I couldn’t take my eyes off the Brancusi and he paid no attention to it. I thought, ‘I’m in a room with a guy who thinks being with a Brancusi is nothing.’ Brancusi was my great hero, everything he did was so simple.”

Teeny, Duchamp’s second wife (who was American and had been married to Matisse’s son, Pierre), brought in some food. The dazzled Bell, on the launching pad of his career, sat while Duchamp – who would die three years later – talked about a show he was planning of his early work. “I said, ‘Really, how early?’ And he said, ‘Oh, I was four or six.'”

Now the slim-hipped, fashion-plate dude he was is almost as old as Duchamp on that afternoon in 1965. As if reading my mind, Bell says, unprompted, “I’m not jealous of my age then. I like myself more now than I did when I was younger.” Why? He pauses. “I’m celebrating my 54th year of employment. I’ve managed to do my thing all of this time. I don’t feel any value in my trip other than working … I’m nothing but what I do.”

The reason he was in New York that year was to exhibit his work at Pace gallery. The show was a success: a West Coast statement of artistic arrival intended to be heard along the East Coast. At the time, Bell was paying to have his glass-coating process done in Los Angeles by a company he’d found in the phone book, but someone suggested that he start doing it himself; so he bought the necessary equipment second-hand in New York (it was huge enough to be nicknamed The Tank), plus an instruction manual titled Vacuum Deposition of Thin Films, and based himself in the city for the next few years.

In an interview in Hunter Drohojowska-Philp’s book Rebels in Paradise: The Los Angeles Art Scene and the 1960s, Bell is quoted as saying, “I made more money when I was 25 than my dad made in his whole life. I was totally unprepared … It gave me a nervous breakdown by the time I was 30 and turned me into an alcoholic.”

“There were hard times financially,” he admits now.

He was married (he’d met his wife, Gloria, at a Duchamp opening at the Pasadena Art Museum) but the money was flowing through his fingers and he was adrift. Success made him feel simultaneously guilty about those artists left behind in Los Angeles and baffled by those artists he met in New York. He returned to California and then, in 1972, to New Mexico. In deliberately-enforced isolation, the work – the muse, he calls it – kept him going.

His son, Oliver, is a videographer, and nowadays, of course, the whole world can watch short films of his studio on Vimeo. “I don’t believe in intellect,” Bell says firmly. “It has to be hands-on.”

In the clips, Bell and his assistants (he has five) move around wearing white face-masks: the vacuum process requires that the glass be spotlessly clean. There’s an iconic note to that, too. Hopper told him that the masked look he wore, to devastating effect, in his role as Frank Booth in the film Blue Velvet was partly inspired by Bell.

Time for Bell’s close-up.

“Squish your hair, Larry,” says Herskovic Ponder before he goes off to be photographed, adding, fondly, “These artists are such hippies.” (Bell’s sign-off to his emails is, indeed, Peace and Love.) Decades ago, Bell had been a customer at her parents’ photography store in Los Angeles, which had a stellar clientele; other customers bringing in their snaps for printing, in those pre-digital, pre-selfie days, had included Elvis Presley, Marlon Brando and Tony Curtis.

They met again several years ago, by which time Bell was divorced, had re-rented his former studio in Venice – “After 30 years, I needed a scene where there was some action”, he says – and was commuting there from Taos.

This is his third show with White Cube. At the London opening, last October, Sir Peter Blake – the British artist who co-designed the “Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” cover with his now-ex-wife – came to say hello, and to show him photographs of how the image was created. In an early montage, Adolf Hitler (one of John Lennon’s choices) was standing to the right of Bell until wiser counsels prevailed. In the end, Bell was placed between Tyrone Power, the actor, and David Livingstone, the missionary explorer to whom Henry Stanley addressed his famously presumptive remark.

On the gallery’s walls are a series of scarlet-bordered collages he created on paper he had made in Japan. The red is the loudest red he could find. He was, he says, playing with the idea of strength. He points out the design of the glass boxes: they’re a little deeper at the top than the bottom to make them less reflective so what you see isn’t just surface light but the texture within. Downstairs, his “Light Knot” sculptures, made from polyester film, float calmly in space, as if they carry no weight at all. Those glass boxes have been specially designed, too; they’re wider at the top than the bottom, “to change the feeling of the container”. It is, he says contentedly, “a very good show”.

He always does the 1,000-mile journey between his Venice and Taos studios by car; he’s clocked up 400,000 miles in his Chevrolet Suburban. Until a month ago, when the coughing got too bad, Bell – like Duchamp – was a cigar-smoker and the only constant companion who would tolerate the auto-fug was Pinky, his bulldog. That’s when he does his meditating, when Pinky and he are on a road trip. He switches off the radio, takes out his hearing-aids and drives with his thoughts through the happy, silent night.

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Related posts:

Francis Schaeffer’s “How should we then live?” Video and outline of episode 6 “The Scientific Age” (Schaeffer Sundays)

Francis Schaeffer’s “How should we then live?” Video and outline of episode 5 “The Revolutionary Age” (Schaeffer Sundays)

Francis Schaeffer’s “How should we then live?” Video and outline of episode 4 “The Reformation” (Schaeffer Sundays)

“Schaeffer Sundays” Francis Schaeffer’s “How should we then live?” Video and outline of episode 3 “The Renaissance”

Francis Schaeffer’s “How should we then live?” Video and outline of episode 2 “The Middle Ages” (Schaeffer Sundays)

Francis Schaeffer’s “How should we then live?” Video and outline of episode 1 “The Roman Age” (Schaeffer Sundays)

FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE Part 25 BOB DYLAN (Part C) Francis Schaeffer comments on Bob Dylan’s song “Ballad of a Thin Man” and the disconnect between the young generation of the 60’s and their parents’ generation (Feature on artist Fred Wilson)

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Francis Schaeffer pictured below:

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Francis Schaeffer has written extensively on art and culture spanning the last 2000 years and here are some posts I have done on this subject before : Francis Schaeffer’s “How should we then live?” Video and outline of episode 10 “Final Choices” episode 9 “The Age of Personal Peace and Affluence”episode 8 “The Age of Fragmentation”episode 7 “The Age of Non-Reason” episode 6 “The Scientific Age” , episode 5 “The Revolutionary Age” episode 4 “The Reformation” episode 3 “The Renaissance”episode 2 “The Middle Ages,”, and  episode 1 “The Roman Age,” . My favorite episodes are number 7 and 8 since they deal with modern art and culture primarily.(Joe Carter rightly noted,Schaefferwho always claimed to be an evangelist and not a philosopher—was often criticized for the way his work oversimplified intellectual history and philosophy.” To those critics I say take a chill pill because Schaeffer was introducing millions into the fields of art and culture!!!! !!! More people need to read his works and blog about them because they show how people’s worldviews affect their lives!

J.I.PACKER WROTE OF SCHAEFFER, “His communicative style was not that of a cautious academic who labors for exhaustive coverage and dispassionate objectivity. It was rather that of an impassioned thinker who paints his vision of eternal truth in bold strokes and stark contrasts.Yet it is a fact that MANY YOUNG THINKERS AND ARTISTS…HAVE FOUND SCHAEFFER’S ANALYSES A LIFELINE TO SANITY WITHOUT WHICH THEY COULD NOT HAVE GONE ON LIVING.”

Francis Schaeffer’s works  are the basis for a large portion of my blog posts and they have stood the test of time. In fact, many people would say that many of the things he wrote in the 1960’s  were right on  in the sense he saw where our western society was heading and he knew that abortion, infanticide and youth enthansia were  moral boundaries we would be crossing  in the coming decades because of humanism and these are the discussions we are having now!)

There is evidence that points to the fact that the Bible is historically true as Schaeffer pointed out in episode 5 of WHATEVER HAPPENED TO THE HUMAN RACE? There is a basis then for faith in Christ alone for our eternal hope. This link shows how to do that.

Francis Schaeffer in Art and the Bible noted, “Many modern artists, it seems to me, have forgotten the value that art has in itself. Much modern art is far too intellectual to be great art. Many modern artists seem not to see the distinction between man and non-man, and it is a part of the lostness of modern man that they no longer see value in the work of art as a work of art.” 

Many modern artists are left in this point of desperation that Schaeffer points out and it reminds me of the despair that Solomon speaks of in Ecclesiastes.  Christian scholar Ravi Zacharias has noted, “The key to understanding the Book of Ecclesiastes is the term ‘under the sun.’ What that literally means is you lock God out of a closed system, and you are left with only this world of time plus chance plus matter.” THIS IS EXACT POINT SCHAEFFER SAYS SECULAR ARTISTS ARE PAINTING FROM TODAY BECAUSE THEY BELIEVED ARE A RESULT OF MINDLESS CHANCE.

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Francis Schaeffer with his son Franky pictured below. Francis and Edith (who passed away in 2013) opened L’ Abri in 1955 in Switzerland.

Ballad Of A Thin Man

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Bob Dylan looked into the modern thought  of the 1960’s and he saw that the educated class did not have the answers and he was looking for the answers to the big questions of life in his writings. Over and over again back then reporters were asking him what his songs meant. Actually his songs were an effort to bring up the big questions but he did not have the answers. In the song “A Ballad of a Thin Man” Dylan ridicules the reporter “Mr. Jones” throughout the song for his lack of understanding of this new generation.  “Oh my God, am I here all alone?” is the feeling that Mr. Jones has after following around Dylan because he doesn’t even to begin to understand the deep seated dissatisfaction of this new generation with the status quo. Every person that ever lived has had this feeling at one time or another and Romans chapter one discusses the inner conscience that everyone has that points them to the God of the Bible that created the world and put them on this earth for a purpose. 

Francis Schaeffer in his film series THE AGE OF PERSONAL PEACE AND AFFLUENCE  made the following points concerning the young people of the 1960’s:

I. By the Early 1960s People Were Bombarded From Every Side by Modern Man’s Humanistic Thought

II. Modern Form of Humanistic Thought Leads to Pessimism

Regarding a Meaning for Life and for Fixed Values

A. General acceptance of selfish values (personal peace and affluence) accompanied rejection of Christian consensus.

1. Personal peace means: I want to be left alone, and I don’t care what happens to the man across the street or across the world. I want my own life-style to be undisturbed regardless of what it will mean — even to my own children and grandchildren.

2. Affluence means things, things, things, always more things — and success is seen as an abundance of things.

B. Students wish to escape meaninglessness of much of adult society.

1. Watershed was Berkeley in 1964.

Bob Dylan also was writing in his music about the disconnect between the young generation of the 1960’s and their parents’ generation. Francis Schaeffer noted: It is called “A Ballad of a a Thin Man” and it apparently was written by Bob Dylan himself. Last time I read you the back cover of the album and I pointed out that when you go to the museums and also in the Theater and  in the pop records you see this same message. This is far from nothing. The very music is tremendous. It is great communication. It is like pop art. It is very destructive and just like the Theatre of the absurd although it destroys everything and leaves you with nonsense seemingly yet when you listen to the words with great care it has made a very selective destruction. Let me read the words.

You walk into the room
With your pencil in your hand
You see somebody naked
And you say who is that man?
You try so hard
But you don’t understand
Just what you would’ve said
When you get home

Something is happening
But you don’t know what it is
Do you Mister Jones?

You sneak into the window
And you say, “Is this where it is?”
Somebody points his finger at you
And says, “It’s his”
And you say, “What’s mine?”
Someone else says, “Where what is?”
And you say, “Oh my God, am I here all alone?”

Something is happening
But you don’t know what it is
Do you Mister Jones?

You hand in your ticket
And you go see the geek
Who walks up to you
When he hears you speak
And says, “How does it feel
To be such a freak?”
And you say, “Impossible”
As he hands you a bone

Something is happening
And you don’t know what it is
Do you Mister Jones?

You have many contacts
Out there among the lumberjacks
To get you facts
When someone attacks your imagination
But no one has any respect
Anyway they just expect
You to hand over your check
To tax deductible charity organizations

The sword swallower walks up to you
And he kneels
He crosses himself
And then he clicks his high heels
And without further notice
Asks you how it feels
And says, “Here’s your throat back
Thanks for the loan”

Something is happening
And you don’t know what it is
Do you Mister Jones?

You crawl into the room
Like a camel and you frown
You put your eyes in your pocket
And you put your nose into the ground
There ought to be a law
Against you comin’ around
You got to be made
To be wearing a telephone

But something is happening
And you don’t know what it is
Do you Mister Jones?

Something is happening here
And you don’t know what it is
Do you Mister Jones?

Songwriters
Bob Dylan

Francis Schaeffer observed:

In the June 28, 1966 issue of Look Magazine in the article on California the writer concludes, “It may seem ironical that a highly technical society demands a means for mystically exploration and this is LSD.” All of these may sound different. LSD and Bob Dylan may sounds miles apart. A tremendous art work in one of our great museums and the kids in a concert listening to Bob Dylan but in reality the message is the same. The tension is that according to all logic and rationality ALL IS ABSURD, yet man at the same time can not live with this and he is in this tremendous tension. He just can’t get away from being human. This is exactly what Paul was talking about in the Book of Romans and that man really knows about God and he knows about God in his conscience and from God’s external [creative] works.

_____________

At one point in his life Bob Dylan did come to the same final conclusion that Solomon did so long ago in the Book of Ecclesiastes  when he observed the world around him and Dylan expressed this same conclusion in his song “Gotta Serve Somebody” back in the early 1980’s.

Ecclesiastes 12:13-14:
13 Now all has been heard;
here is the conclusion of the matter:
Fear God and keep his commandments,
for this is the whole duty of man.

14 For God will bring every deed into judgment,
including every hidden thing,
whether it is good or evil.

Bob Dylan – Gotta Serve Somebody (Live)

Published on Feb 15, 2014

1998-10-29 Toronto, Canada

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In fact, at this same time, Dylan joined my favorite Christian musician Keith Green and played the harmonica for this song below:

I pledge my head to heaven

Egypt.jpg (22417 bytes)

R-0153 Pledge My Head To Heaven (Keith Green) – Bob plays harmonica for Keith Green on this track from his gospel album So You Wanna Go Back To Egypt, Pretty Good Records, 1980

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Was Schaeffer right to point at that all people have to deal with the world that God has made around them and they must struggle with their own agnostic views because the conscience that God has given them and the evidence from the creation around them tells them that God exists? (Schaeffer’s terms are the universe and its form and the mannishness of man.)

I have a good friend who is a street preacher who preaches on the Santa Monica Promenade in California and during the Q/A sessions he does have lots of atheists that enjoy their time at the mic. When this happens he  always quotes Romans 1:18-19 (Amplified Bible) ” For God’s wrath and indignation are revealed from heaven against all ungodliness and unrighteousness of men, who in their wickedness REPRESS and HINDER the truth and make it inoperative. For that which is KNOWN about God is EVIDENT to them and MADE PLAIN IN THEIR INNER CONSCIOUSNESS, because God  has SHOWN IT TO THEM,”(emphasis mine). Then he  tells the atheist that the atheist already knows that God exists but he has been suppressing that knowledge in unrighteousness. This usually infuriates the atheist.

My friend draws some large crowds at times and was thinking about setting up a lie detector test and see if atheists actually secretly believe in God. He discussed this project with me since he knew that I had done a lot of research on the idea about 20 years ago.

Nelson Price in THE EMMANUEL FACTOR (1987) tells the story about Brown Trucking Company in Georgia who used to give polygraph tests to their job applicants. However, in part of the test the operator asked, “Do you believe in God?” In every instance when a professing atheist answered “No,” the test showed the person to be lying. My pastor Adrian Rogers used to tell this same story to illustrate Romans 1:19 and it was his conclusion that “there is no such thing anywhere on earth as a true atheist. If a man says he doesn’t believe in God, then he is lying. God has put his moral consciousness into every man’s heart, and a man has to try to kick his conscience to death to say he doesn’t believe in God.”

It is true that polygraph tests for use in hiring were banned by Congress in 1988.  Mr and Mrs Claude Brown on Aug 25, 1994  wrote me a letter confirming that over 15,000 applicants previous to 1988 had taken the polygraph test and EVERY TIME SOMEONE SAID THEY DID NOT BELIEVE IN GOD, THE MACHINE SAID THEY WERE LYING.

It had been difficult to catch up to the Browns. I had heard about them from Dr. Rogers’ sermon but I did not have enough information to locate them. Dr. Rogers referred me to Dr. Nelson Price and Dr. Price’s office told me that Claude Brown lived in Atlanta. After writing letters to all 9 of the entries for Claude Brown in the Atlanta telephone book, I finally got in touch with the Browns.

Adrian Rogers also pointed out that the Bible does not recognize the theoretical atheist.  Psalms 14:1: The fool has said in his heart, “There is no God.”  Dr Rogers notes, “The fool is treating God like he would treat food he did not desire in a cafeteria line. ‘No broccoli for me!’ ” In other words, the fool just doesn’t want God in his life and is a practical atheist, but not a theoretical atheist. Charles Ryrie in the The Ryrie Study Bible came to the same conclusion on this verse.

Francis Schaeffer in his book HOW SHOULD WE THEN LIVE? noted:

In about A.D. 60, a Jew who was a Christian and who also knew the Greek and Roman thinking of his day wrote a letter to those who lived in Rome. Previously, he had said the same things to Greek thinkers while speaking on Mars Hill in Athens. He had spoken with the Acropolis above him and the ancient marketplace below him, in the place where the thinkers of Athens met for discussion. A plaque marks that spot today and gives his talk in the common Greek spoken in his day. He was interrupted in his talk in Athens, but his Letter to the Romans gives us without interruption what he had to say to the thinking people of that period.

He said that the integration points of the Greek and Roman world view were not enough to answer the questions posed either by the existence of the universe and its form, or by the uniqueness of man. He said that they deserved judgment because they knew that they did not have an adequate answer to the questions raised by the universe or by the existence of man, and yet they refused, they suppressed, that which is the answer. To quote his letter:

The retribution of God is revealed from heaven against all ungodliness and unrighteousness of men, who suppress the truth in unrighteousness. Because that which is known of God is evident within them [that is, the uniqueness of man in contrast to non-man], for God made it evident to them. For the invisible things of him since the creation of the world are clearly seen, being perceived by the things that are made [that is, the existence of the universe and its form], even his eternal power and divinity; so that they are without excuse. [Roman 1:18ff.]

Here he is saying that the universe and its form and the mannishness of man speak the same truth that the Bible gives in greater detail. That this God exists and that he has not been silent but has spoken to people in the Bible and through Christ was the basis for the return to a more fully biblical Christianity in the days of the Reformers. It was a message of the possibility that people could return to God on the basis of the death of Christ alone. But with it came many other realities, including form and freedom in the culture and society built on that more biblical Christianity. The freedom brought forth was titanic, and yet, with the forms given in the Scripture, the freedoms did not lead to chaos. And it is this which can give us hope for the future. It is either this or an imposed order.

As I have said in the first chapter, people function on the basis of their world view more consistently than even they themselves may realize. The problem is not outward things. The problem is having, and then acting upon, the right world view — the world view which gives men and women the truth of what is.

How Should We then Live Episode 7 small (Age of Nonreason)

#02 How Should We Then Live? (Promo Clip) Dr. Francis Schaeffer

10 Worldview and Truth

Two Minute Warning: How Then Should We Live?: Francis Schaeffer at 100

Francis Schaeffer Whatever Happened to the Human Race (Episode 1) ABORTION

Francis Schaeffer “BASIS FOR HUMAN DIGNITY” Whatever…HTTHR

Ballad of a Thin Man

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“Ballad of a Thin Man”
Song by Bob Dylan from the album Highway 61 Revisited
Released August 30, 1965
Recorded Columbia Studios, New York, August 2, 1965
Genre Blues rock
Length 5:58
Label Columbia
Writer Bob Dylan
Producer Bob Johnston
Highway 61 Revisited track listing

Ballad of a Thin Man” is a song written and recorded by Bob Dylan, and released as the final track on Side One of his sixth album, Highway 61 Revisited in 1965.

Recording

Dylan recorded “Ballad of a Thin Man” in Studio A of Columbia Records in New York City, located at 799 Seventh Avenue, just north of West 52nd Street.[1] on August 2, 1965.[2] Record producer Bob Johnston was in charge of the session, and the backing musicians were Mike Bloomfield on lead guitar, Bobby Gregg on drums, Harvey Goldstein on bass, Al Kooper on organ,[3] and Dylan himself playing piano.[4] Driven by Dylan’s sombre piano chords, which contrast with a horror movie organ part played by Al Kooper, this track was described by Kooper as “musically more sophisticated than anything else on the [Highway 61 Revisited] album.”[5]

Kooper has recalled that at the end of the session, when the musicians listened to the playback of the song, drummer Bobby Gregg said, “That is a nasty song, Bob.” Kooper adds, “Dylan was the King of the Nasty Song at that time.”[6]

Meaning

Dylan’s song revolves around the mishaps of a Mr. Jones, who keeps blundering into strange situations, and the more questions he asks, the less the world makes sense to him. Critic Andy Gill called the song “one of Dylan’s most unrelenting inquisitions, a furious, sneering, dressing-down of a hapless bourgeois intruder into the hipster world of freaks and weirdoes which Dylan now inhabited.[6]

In August 1965, soon after recording the song, when questioned by Nora Ephron and Susan Edmiston about the identity of Mr. Jones, Dylan was deadpan: “He’s a real person. You know him, but not by that name… I saw him come into the room one night and he looked like a camel. He proceeded to put his eyes in his pocket. I asked this guy who he was and he said, ‘That’s Mr. Jones.’ Then I asked this cat, ‘Doesn’t he do anything but put his eyes in his pocket?’ And he told me, ‘He puts his nose on the ground.’ It’s all there, it’s a true story.”[7] At a press conference in San Francisco in December 1965, Dylan supplied more information about Mr. Jones: “He’s a pinboy. He also wears suspenders.”[8]

In March 1986, Dylan told his audience in Japan: “This is a song I wrote a while back in response to people who ask me questions all the time. You just get tired of that every once in a while. You just don’t want to answer no more questions. I figure a person’s life speaks for itself, right? So, every once in a while you got to do this kind of thing, you got to put somebody in their place… So this is my response to something that happened over in England. I think it was about ’63, ’64. [sic] Anyway the song still holds up. Seems to be people around still like that. So I still sing it. It’s called ‘Ballad Of A Thin Man’.”[9]

There has been speculation whether Mr. Jones was based on a specific journalist.[6] In 1975, reporter Jeffrey Jones “outed” himself in a Rolling Stone article, describing how he had attempted to interview Dylan at the 1965 Newport Folk Festival. When Dylan and his entourage later chanced on the hapless reporter in the hotel dining room, Dylan shouted mockingly, “Mr. Jones! Gettin’ it all down, Mr. Jones?”[10] When Bill Flanagan asked Dylan, in 1990, whether one reporter could claim all the credit for Mr. Jones, Dylan replied: “There were a lot of Mister Joneses at that time. Obviously there must have been a tremendous amount of them for me to write that particular song. It was like, ‘Oh man, here’s the thousandth Mister Jones’.”[11]

Interpretation

Dylan critic Mike Marqusee writes that “Ballad of a Thin Man” can be read as “one of the purest songs of protest ever sung”, with its scathing take on “the media, its interest in and inability to comprehend [Dylan] and his music.” For Marqusee, the song became the anthem of an in-group, “disgusted by the old, excited by the new… elated by their discovery of others who shared their feelings”, with its central refrain “Something is happening here/ But you don’t know what it is/ Do you, Mr. Jones?” epitomizing the hip exclusivity of the burgeoning counterculture.[12] Dylan biographer Robert Shelton describes the song’s central character, Mr. Jones, as “one of Dylan’s greatest archetypes”, characterizing him as “a Philistine, a person who does not see… superficially educated and well bred but not very smart about the things that count.”[13]

Releases

The song was originally released in 1965 on the album Highway 61 Revisited. Dylan released live recordings of the song on Before the Flood (1974), Bob Dylan at Budokan (1979), Real Live (1984), Hard to Handle (video, 1986), Live 1966, The “Royal Albert Hall” Concert (1998) and on The Bootleg Series Vol. 7: No Direction Home: The Soundtrack (2005).

Covers

Notes

  1. Jump up ^ Polizzotti 2006, p. 45
  2. Jump up ^ Polizzotti 2006, p. 145
  3. Jump up ^ Bjorner 2010
  4. Jump up ^ Polizotti 2006, p. 106
  5. Jump up ^ Egan 2010, pp. 64–66
  6. ^ Jump up to: a b c d Gill 1998, pp. 86–87
  7. Jump up ^ Interview with Nora Ephron and Susan Edmiston, August 1965, reprinted in Cott 2006, p. 48
  8. Jump up ^ KQES Press conference, December 3, 1965, reprinted in Cott 2006, p. 66
  9. Jump up ^ Bjorner 2004
  10. Jump up ^ Jones 1975, p. 12
  11. Jump up ^ Flanagan 1990, p. 106
  12. Jump up ^ Marqusee 2005, pp. 169–171
  13. Jump up ^ Shelton 1986, p. 280
  14. Jump up ^ US Embassy, Ljubljana & Slovenia, U.S. Department of State. “Projekt Bob Dylan: Postani prostovoljec”
  15. Jump up ^ “Laibach has contributed to a project, dedicated to American music icon Bob Dylan”, laibach.org

References

External links

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Artist featured today is Fred Wilson

Fred Wilson: Objects and Installations 1979–2000
EXHIBITIONS
Fred Wilson:
Objects and Installations 1979–2000
October 11, 2001–January 12, 2002

Venues: Tang Teaching Museum, Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, NY; Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Berkeley, CA; Blaffer Gallery, University of Houston, Houston, TX; Addison Gallery of American Art, Andover, MA; Anta Monica Museum, Santa Monica, CA; The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York, NY; Chicago Cultural Center, Chicago, IL

Curator: Maurice Berger, Curator of the Center for Art and Visual Culture, UMBC

Organized by the Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture, UMBC

Fred Wilson: Objects and Installations, 1979–2000 is the first major retrospective of the African-American artist and explores his sustained aesthetic inquiry into the relationship between art and the museum. Wilson’s “mock” museum installations, into which he places provocative and beautifully rendered objects, explore the question of how the museum consciously or unconsciously perpetuates prejudice. The exhibition Fred Wilson: Objects and Installations, 1979–2000 consists of more than 100 objects, each configured to recreate sections of Wilson’s original installations.

Supported by the Norton Family Foundation; Elizabeth Firestone Graham Foundation; Andy Warhol Foundation for Visual Arts; Maryland State Arts Council.

Saturday, May 26, 2012

Grey Area (Brown Version) by Fred Wilson on View at the Brooklyn Museum

Fred Wilson’s “Grey Area (Brown Version)” is part of the Contemporary Art Collection of the Brooklyn Museum. This piece is comprised of five busts of the Egyptian queen Nefertiti, each bust measuring 8 3/4 x 9 x 13 in. (47.6 x 22.9 x 33 cm) made of plaster. The artist purchased and painted the busts, illustrating a value scale ranging in color from oatmeal to dark chocolate, raising controversial questions about the racial identity of ancient Egyptians. He has said of his practice, “I use beauty as a way of helping people to receive difficult or upsetting ideas. The topical issues are merely a vehicle for making one aware of one’s own perceptual shift—which is the real thrill.” Wilson is an American artist born in 1954. This artwork is on view in the Contemporary Art Galleries, 4th Floor of the museum.

Fred Wilson | Art21 | Preview from Season 3 of “Art in the Twenty-First Century” (2005)

Uploaded on May 7, 2008

Appropriating curatorial methods and strategies, Fred Wilson creates new contexts for the display of art and artifacts found in museum collections, along with wall labels, sound, lighting, and non-traditional pairings of objects. His sculptures and installations lead viewers to recognize that changes in context create changes in meaning, and thereby shape interpretations of historical truth and artistic value.

Fred Wilson is featured in the Season 3 episode “Structures” of the Art21 series “Art in the Twenty-First Century”.

Learn more about Fred Wilson: http://www.art21.org/artists/fred-wilson

© 2005-2007 Art21, Inc. All Rights Reserved

_____________________________

A Conversation with Fred Wilson

Uploaded on Jun 7, 2010

A 1999 recipient of a MacArthur Foundation “Genius” Grant as well as the 2003 American representative at the Venice Biennale, Fred Wilson is internationally known for his museum installations, in which he re-installs and re-labels objects owned by a museum for the purpose of creating new meanings and non-conventional narratives. Beyond bringing home the point that the way we view and “read” objects is conditioned by context and juxtaposition, Wilson’s installations subvert, criticize, or poke fun at the unspoken assumptions that museums make about the social order, including such issues as class, gender, and ethnicity. He has created such projects across the US and around the world in such diverse venues as the Seattle Art Museum, Museums of History and Ethnography and the National Gallery of Jamaica, the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, Dartmouth College, and the Museum of World Culture in Gothenborg, Sweden.

Born in 1954, Wilson has a BFA from SUNY Purchase. Wilson serves on the Board of Trustees of the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. He lives and works in New York City.

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Amos Interviews Fred Wilson pt1

Uploaded on Oct 20, 2010

Amos Interviews the man that has brought a great amount of speculation and conversation with his artistic expresssing Mr. Fred Wilson, here is part 1

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Amos Interviews Fred Wilson pt2

Amos Interviews the man that has brought a great amount of speculation and conversation with his artistic expresssing Mr. Fred Wilson, here is part 2

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The Backlash of the Fred Wilson Project

Published on Jul 1, 2013

Fred Wilson was commissioned to create a piece of public art for the Cultural Trail in Indianapolis. When he chose to re-purpose an image of a freed slave, the public was outraged.

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From PBS:

Fred Wilson

Home » Artists » Fred Wilson

About Fred Wilson

Fred Wilson was born in the Bronx, New York, in 1954, and lives and works in New York. He received a BFA from Purchase College, State University of New York. Commenting on his unorthodox artistic practice, Wilson has said that, although he studied art, he no longer has a strong desire to make things with his hands: “I get everything that satisfies my soul from bringing together objects that are in the world, manipulating them, working with spatial arrangements, and having things presented in the way I want to see them.” Thus, Wilson creates new exhibition contexts for the display of art and artifacts found in museum collections—including wall labels, sound, lighting, and non-traditional pairings of objects. His installations lead viewers to recognize that changes in context create changes in meaning. While appropriating curatorial methods and strategies, Wilson maintains his subjective view of the museum environment and the works he presents. He questions (and forces the viewer to question) how curators shape interpretations of historical truth, artistic value, and the language of display—and what kinds of biases our cultural institutions express. In his groundbreaking intervention, “Mining the Museum” (1992), Wilson transformed the Maryland Historical Society’s collection to highlight the history of slavery in America. For the 2003 Venice Biennale, Wilson created a mixed-media installation of many parts—focusing on Africans in Venice and issues and representations of blacks and whites—which included a suite of black glass sculptures; a black-and-white tiled room, with wall graffiti culled from texts of African-American slave narratives; and a video installation of “Othello,” screened backwards. Wilson received a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Achievement Award (1999) and the Larry Aldrich Foundation Award (2003). He is the Distinguished Visiting Fellow in Object, Exhibition, and Knowledge at Skidmore College. Fred Wilson represented the United States at the Cairo Bienniale (1992) and Venice Biennale.

Links
The Pace Gallery, New York
Rena Bransten Gallery, San Francisco
Fred Wilson on the Art21 Blog

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Just like tom thumb´s blues (no direction home)

Francis Schaeffer has written extensively on art and culture spanning the last 2000 years and here are some posts I have done on this subject before : Francis Schaeffer’s “How should we then live?” Video and outline of episode 10 “Final Choices” episode 9 “The Age of Personal Peace and Affluence”episode 8 “The Age of Fragmentation”episode 7 “The Age of Non-Reason” episode 6 “The Scientific Age” , episode 5 “The Revolutionary Age” episode 4 “The Reformation” episode 3 “The Renaissance”episode 2 “The Middle Ages,”, and  episode 1 “The Roman Age,” . My favorite episodes are number 7 and 8 since they deal with modern art and culture primarily.(Joe Carter rightly noted,Schaefferwho always claimed to be an evangelist and not a philosopher—was often criticized for the way his work oversimplified intellectual history and philosophy.” To those critics I say take a chill pill because Schaeffer was introducing millions into the fields of art and culture!!!! !!! More people need to read his works and blog about them because they show how people’s worldviews affect their lives!

J.I.PACKER WROTE OF SCHAEFFER, “His communicative style was not that of a cautious academic who labors for exhaustive coverage and dispassionate objectivity. It was rather that of an impassioned thinker who paints his vision of eternal truth in bold strokes and stark contrasts.Yet it is a fact that MANY YOUNG THINKERS AND ARTISTS…HAVE FOUND SCHAEFFER’S ANALYSES A LIFELINE TO SANITY WITHOUT WHICH THEY COULD NOT HAVE GONE ON LIVING.”

Francis Schaeffer’s works  are the basis for a large portion of my blog posts and they have stood the test of time. In fact, many people would say that many of the things he wrote in the 1960’s  were right on  in the sense he saw where our western society was heading and he knew that abortion, infanticide and youth enthansia were  moral boundaries we would be crossing  in the coming decades because of humanism and these are the discussions we are having now!)

There is evidence that points to the fact that the Bible is historically true as Schaeffer pointed out in episode 5 of WHATEVER HAPPENED TO THE HUMAN RACE? There is a basis then for faith in Christ alone for our eternal hope. This link shows how to do that.

Francis Schaeffer in Art and the Bible noted, “Many modern artists, it seems to me, have forgotten the value that art has in itself. Much modern art is far too intellectual to be great art. Many modern artists seem not to see the distinction between man and non-man, and it is a part of the lostness of modern man that they no longer see value in the work of art as a work of art.” 

Many modern artists are left in this point of desperation that Schaeffer points out and it reminds me of the despair that Solomon speaks of in Ecclesiastes.  Christian scholar Ravi Zacharias has noted, “The key to understanding the Book of Ecclesiastes is the term ‘under the sun.’ What that literally means is you lock God out of a closed system, and you are left with only this world of time plus chance plus matter.” THIS IS EXACT POINT SCHAEFFER SAYS SECULAR ARTISTS ARE PAINTING FROM TODAY BECAUSE THEY BELIEVED ARE A RESULT OF MINDLESS CHANCE.

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Francis Schaeffer with his son Franky pictured below. Francis and Edith (who passed away in 2013) opened L’ Abri in 1955 in Switzerland.

How Should We then Live Episode 7 small (Age of Nonreason)

#02 How Should We Then Live? (Promo Clip) Dr. Francis Schaeffer

The clip above is from episode 9 THE AGE OF PERSONAL PEACE AND AFFLUENCE

10 Worldview and Truth

In above clip Schaeffer quotes Paul’s speech in Greece from Romans 1 (from Episode FINAL CHOICES)

Two Minute Warning: How Then Should We Live?: Francis Schaeffer at 100

A Christian Manifesto Francis Schaeffer

Published on Dec 18, 2012

A video important to today. The man was very wise in the ways of God. And of government. Hope you enjoy a good solis teaching from the past. The truth never gets old.

Francis Schaeffer “BASIS FOR HUMAN DIGNITY” Whatever…HTTHR

Ballad Of A Thin Man

_________

Francis Schaeffer noted:

I want to give you an illustration of the Theatre of the Absurd from the back of Bob Dylan’s record Highway 61 revisited. Language becomes junk but once you have finished you have had a communication. It is really the same as a drug experience. Let me read this:

Liner Notes

On the slow train time does not interfere & at the Arabian crossing waits White Heap, the man from the newspaper & behind him the hundred Inevitables made of solid rock & stone — the Cream Judge & the Clown — the doll house where Savage Rose & Fixable live simply in their wild animal luxury . . . . Autumn, with two zeros above her nose arguing over the sun being dark or Bach is as famous as its commotion & that she herself — not Orpheus — is the logical poet “I am the logical poet” she screams “Spring? Spring is only the beginning!” she attempts to make Cream Judge jealous by telling him of down-to-earth people & while the universe is erupting, she points to the slow train & prays for rain and for time to interfere — she is not extremely fat but rather progressively unhappy . . . . the hundred Inevitables hide their predictions & go to bars & drink & get drunk in their very special conscious way & when tom dooley, the kind of person you think you’ve seen before, comes strolling in with White Heap, the hundred Inevitables all say “who’s that man who looks so white?” & the bartender, a good boy & one who keeps the buffalo in his mind, says, “I don’t know, but I’m sure I’ve seen the other fellow someplace” & when Paul Sargent, a plainclothes man from 4th street, comes in at three in the morning & busts everybody for being incredible, nobody really gets angry — just a little illiterate most people get & Rome, one of the hundred Inevitables whispers “I told you so” to Madam John . . . Savage Rose & Fixable are bravely blowing kisses to the Jade Hexagram Carnaby Street & to all the mysterious juveniles & the Cream Judge is writing a book on the true meaning of a pear — last year. he wrote one on famous dogs of the civil war & now he has false teeth & no children . . . . when the Cream met Savage Rose & Fixable, he was introduced to them by none other than Lifelessness — Lifelessness is the Great Enemy & always wears a hip guard — he is very hipguard . . . . Lifelessness said when introducing everybody “go save the world” & “involvement! that’s the issue” & things like that & Savage Rose winked at Fixable & the Cream went off with his arm in a sling singing “summertime & the livin is easy” . . . . the Clown appears — puts a gag over Autumn’s mouth and says “there are two kinds of people — simple people & normal people” this usually gets a big laugh from the sandpit & White Heap sneezes — passes out & rips open Autumn’s gag & says “What do you mean you’re Autumn and without you there’d be no spring! you fool! without spring, there’d be no you! what do you think of that???.” then Savage Rose & Fixable come by & kick him in the brains & color him pink for being a phony philosopher — then the Clown comes by and screams “You phony philosopher!” & jumps on his head — Paul Sargent comes by again in an umpire’s suit & some college kid who’s read all about Nietzsche comes by & says “Neitzsche never wore an umpire’s suit” & Paul says “You wanna buy some cloths, kid?” & then Rome & John come out of the bar & they’re going up to Harlem . . . . we are singing today of the WIPE-OUT GANG — the WIPE-OUT GANG buys, owns & operates the Insanity Factory — if you do not know where the Insanity Factory is located, you should hereby take two steps to the right, paint your teeth & go to sleep . . . . the songs on this specific record are not so much songs but rather exercises in tonal breath control. . . . the subject matter — though meaningless as it is — has something to do with the beautiful strangers . . . . the beautiful strangers, Vivaldi’s green jacket & the holy slow train

you are right john cohen — quazimodo was right — mozart was right. . . . I cannot say the word eye any more . . . . when I speak this word eye, it is as if I am speaking of somebody’s eye that I faintly remember . . . . there is no eye — there is only a series of mouths — long live the mouths — your rooftop — if you don’t already know — has been demolished . . . . eye is plasma & you are right about that too — you are lucky — you don’t have to think about such things as eye & rooftops & quazimodo.

Notes By Bob Dylan

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Francis Schaeffer comments:

If you don’t feel dead there is something wrong with you. You really are dead. This isn’t the Theartre of the Absurd, but it is the same exact technique. Everything is killed, but don’t think for a moment that communication is dead. It isn’t. It is a tremendous tool for a communication after all the rational logical controls are down and out of the way. And all I can say is that the kids that listen to this stuff and have nothing to anchor to you can’t for a moment think that they aren’t infiltrated by this. So I would not tie this very closely to the Theartre of the Absurd.

The Theartre of the Absurd does smash normal communication, but it doesn’t smash communication. It throws wide open a first order experience to speak of destruction to give this vague idea of hope in other forms. Then it leads to pantheism.

Jean Arp (Hans Arp)
Jean Arp is associated with the DADA movement. His collages were of torn pieces of paper dropped and affixed where they would land. His use of chance is intended to create free of human intervention. “Dada,” wrote Arp, “wished to destroy the hoaxes of reason and to discover an unreasoned order.”


Collage with Squares Arranged According to the Laws of Chance


Random Collage


Torn Paper and Gouache

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Highway 61 Revisited

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Highway 61 Revisited
A photograph of Dylan seated in a blue jacket with a person standing behind him holding a camera
Studio album by Bob Dylan
Released August 30, 1965
Recorded Columbia Studio A, 799 Seventh Avenue, New York, June 15 – August 4, 1965
Genre Rock, folk rock, blues rock, rock and roll
Length 51:26
Label Columbia
Producer Bob Johnston
Tom Wilson on “Like a Rolling Stone”
Bob Dylan chronology
Bringing It All Back Home
(1965)
Highway 61 Revisited
(1965)
Blonde on Blonde
(1966)
Singles from Highway 61 Revisited
  1. Like a Rolling Stone
    Released: July 1965

Highway 61 Revisited is the sixth studio album by the American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan, released by Columbia Records in August 1965. Having until then recorded mostly acoustic music, Dylan used rock musicians as his backing band on every track of the album, except for the closing 11-minute ballad, “Desolation Row.” Critics have focused on the innovative way in which Dylan combined driving, blues-based music with the subtlety of poetry to create songs that captured the political and cultural chaos of contemporary America. Author Michael Gray has argued that in an important sense the 1960s “started” with this album.[1]

Leading with the hit single “Like a Rolling Stone,” the album features songs that Dylan has continued to perform live over his long career, including “Ballad of a Thin Man” and “Highway 61 Revisited.” He named the album after the major American highway which connected his birthplace, Duluth, Minnesota, to southern cities famed for their musical heritage, including St. Louis, Memphis, New Orleans, and the Delta blues area of Mississippi.

Highway 61 Revisited peaked at number three in the United States charts and number four in the United Kingdom. The album was ranked number four on Rolling Stones “500 Greatest Albums of All Time“. “Like a Rolling Stone” was a top-10 hit in several countries, and was listed at number one on Rolling Stones 500 Greatest Songs of All Time list. Two other songs, “Desolation Row” and “Highway 61 Revisited,” were listed at number 187 and number 373 respectively.

Dylan and Highway 61

In his memoir Chronicles: Volume One, Dylan described the kinship he felt with the route that supplied the title of his sixth album: “Highway 61, the main thoroughfare of the country blues, begins about where I began. I always felt like I’d started on it, always had been on it and could go anywhere, even down in to the deep Delta country. It was the same road, full of the same contradictions, the same one-horse towns, the same spiritual ancestors … It was my place in the universe, always felt like it was in my blood.”[2]

While he was growing up in the 1950s, Highway 61 stretched from Duluth, where Dylan was born, through St. Paul, and down to the Mississippi delta. Along the way, the route passed near the birthplaces and homes of influential musicians such as Muddy Waters, Son House, Elvis Presley, and Charley Patton. The “empress of the blues”, Bessie Smith, died after sustaining serious injuries in an automobile accident on Highway 61. Critic Mark Polizzotti points out that blues legend Robert Johnson is alleged to have sold his soul to the devil at the highway’s crossroads with Route 49.[3] The highway had also been the subject of several blues recordings, notably Roosevelt Sykes‘ “Highway 61 Blues” (1932) and Mississippi Fred McDowell‘s “61 Highway” (1964).[4]

Dylan has stated that he had to overcome considerable resistance at Columbia Records to give the album its title. He told biographer Robert Shelton: “I wanted to call that album Highway 61 Revisited. Nobody understood it. I had to go up the fucking ladder until finally the word came down and said: ‘Let him call it what he wants to call it’.”[5] Michael Gray has suggested that the very title of the album represents Dylan’s insistence that his songs are rooted in the traditions of the blues: “Indeed the album title Highway 61 Revisited announces that we are in for a long revisit, since it is such a long, blues-travelled highway. Many bluesmen had been there before [Dylan], all recording versions of a blues called ‘Highway 61’.”[6]

Recording sessions

Background

In May 1965, Dylan returned from his tour of England feeling tired and dissatisfied with his material. He told journalist Nat Hentoff: “I was going to quit singing. I was very drained.” The singer added, “It’s very tiring having other people tell you how much they dig you if you yourself don’t dig you.”[7]

As a consequence of his dissatisfaction, Dylan wrote 20 pages of verse he later described as a “long piece of vomit”.[8] He reduced this to a song with four verses and a chorus—”Like a Rolling Stone”.[9] He told Hentoff that writing and recording the song washed away his dissatisfaction, and restored his enthusiasm for creating music.[7] Describing the experience to Robert Hilburn in 2004, nearly 40 years later, Dylan said: “It’s like a ghost is writing a song like that … You don’t know what it means except the ghost picked me to write the song.”[10]

Highway 61 Revisited was recorded in two blocks of recording sessions that took place in Studio A of Columbia Records, located in Midtown Manhattan.[11] The first block, June 15 and June 16, was produced by Tom Wilson and resulted in the single “Like a Rolling Stone”.[12] On July 25, Dylan performed his controversial electric set at the Newport Folk Festival, where some of the crowd booed his performance.[13] Four days after Newport, Dylan returned to the recording studio. From July 29 to August 4, he and his band completed recording Highway 61 Revisited, but under the supervision of a new producer, Bob Johnston.[14]

Recording sessions, June 15–16

Al Kooper seated

Al Kooper’s improvised organ riff on “Like a Rolling Stone” has been described as “one of the great moments of pop music serendipity”.[15]

Tom Wilson produced the initial recording sessions for Highway 61 Revisited on June 15–16, 1965. Dylan was backed by Bobby Gregg on drums, Joe Macho, Jr. on bass, Paul Griffin on piano, and Frank Owens on guitar.[16] For lead guitar, the singer recruited Michael Bloomfield of the Paul Butterfield Blues Band.[17] The musicians began the June 15 session by recording a fast version of “It Takes a Lot to Laugh, It Takes a Train to Cry” and the song “Sitting on a Barbed Wire Fence”, which was omitted from the Highway 61 album.[18] Dylan and his band next attempted to record “Like a Rolling Stone”;[19] at this early stage, Dylan’s piano dominated the backing, which was in 3/4 time.[20] “Barbed Wire Fence”, the fast version of “It Takes a Lot to Laugh”, and an early take of “Like a Rolling Stone” were eventually released on The Bootleg Series Volumes 1–3 (Rare & Unreleased) 1961–1991.[21]

The musicians returned to Studio A the following day, when they devoted almost the entire session to recording “Like a Rolling Stone”. Present on this occasion was Al Kooper, a young musician invited by Wilson to observe, but who wanted to play on the session.[22] Kooper managed to sit in on the session, and he improvised an organ riff that, critics Greil Marcus and Mark Polizzotti argue, became a crucial element of the recording.[23][24] The fourth take was ultimately selected as the master, but Dylan and the band recorded eleven more takes.[25] After “Like a Rolling Stone” had been completed, he improvised a short unreleased song,[26] bootlegged under the title “Lunatic Princess Revisited”,[25] but copyrighted as “Why Do You Have to Be So Frantic?”.[27] Critic Clinton Heylin calls the song a “weird little one-verse fragment”, but claims that the riff is the blueprint of the singer’s 1979 evangelical composition, “Slow Train”.[26]

Recording sessions, July 29 – August 4

To create the material for Highway 61 Revisited, Dylan spent a month writing in his new home in the Byrdcliffe artists’ colony of Woodstock in upstate New York.[28] When he returned to Studio A on July 29, he was backed by the same musicians as the previous session, but his producer had changed from Wilson to Johnston.[29][a 1]

McCoy holding a microphone onstage

Nashville sessions musician Charlie McCoy’s chance visit to New York resulted in the guitar flourishes accompanying “Desolation Row”, the last track on the album.[30]

Their first session together was devoted to three songs. After recording several takes each of “Tombstone Blues“, “It Takes a Lot to Laugh” and “Positively 4th Street“, masters were successfully recorded.[31] “Tombstone Blues” and “It Takes a Lot to Laugh” were included in the final album, but “Positively 4th Street” was issued as a single-only release. At the close of the July 29 session, Dylan attempted to record “Desolation Row”, accompanied by Al Kooper on electric guitar and Harvey Brooks on bass. There was no drummer, as the drummer had gone home.[32] This electric version was eventually released in 2005, on The Bootleg Series Vol. 7.[33]

On July 30, Dylan and his band returned to Studio A and recorded three songs. A master take of “From a Buick 6” was recorded and later included on the final album, but most of the session was devoted to “Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window?” Dylan was unsatisfied with the results and set the song aside for a later date; it was eventually re-recorded with the Hawks in October.[34]

After Dylan and Kooper spent the weekend in Woodstock writing chord charts for the songs,[35] sessions resumed at Studio A on August 2.[36][37] “Highway 61 Revisited”, “Just Like Tom Thumb’s Blues“, “Queen Jane Approximately“, and “Ballad of a Thin Man” were recorded successfully and masters were selected for the album.[38][39][40]

One final session was held on August 4, again at Studio A. Most of the session was devoted to completing “Desolation Row”. Johnston has related that Nashville musician Charlie McCoy was visiting New York, and he invited McCoy to play guitar at the session.[30] According to some sources, seven takes of “Desolation Row” were recorded, and takes six and seven were spliced together for the master recording.[41]

The resulting album, Highway 61 Revisited, has been described as “Dylan’s first purely ‘rock’ album”,[42] a realization of his wish to leave his old music format behind and move on from his all-acoustic first four albums and half-acoustic, half-electric fifth album, Bringing It All Back Home. Documentary director D. A. Pennebaker, who filmed Dylan on his acoustic UK tour in May 1965, has said: “I didn’t know that he was going to leave acoustic. I did know that he was getting a little dragged by it.”[43]

___________________

My favorite performance by Bob Dylan was when he played on this song below:

I pledge my head to heaven

Egypt.jpg (22417 bytes)

R-0153 Pledge My Head To Heaven (Keith Green) – Bob plays harmonica for Keith Green on this track from his gospel album So You Wanna Go Back To Egypt, Pretty Good Records, 1980

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________

Bob Dylan – Gotta Serve Somebody (Live)

Published on Feb 15, 2014

1998-10-29 Toronto, Canada

Songs

Side one

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In 2004, Rolling Stone magazine declared “Like a Rolling Stone” to be “the greatest song of all time”, and noted “the impressionist voltage of Dylan’s language, the intensely personal accusation in his voice (‘Ho-o-o-ow does it fe-e-e-el?’)” and “the apocalyptic charge of Kooper’s garage-gospel organ”.[44]

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Highway 61 Revisited opens with “Like a Rolling Stone”, which has been described as revolutionary in its combination of electric guitar licks, organ chords, and Dylan’s voice, “at once so young and so snarling … and so cynical”.[45] Michael Gray characterized “Like a Rolling Stone” as “a chaotic amalgam of blues, impressionism, allegory, and an intense directness: ‘How does it feel?'”[45] Polizzotti writes that the composition is notable for avoiding traditional themes of popular music, such as romance, and instead expresses resentment and a yearning for revenge.[46][47] It has been suggested that Miss Lonely, the song’s central character, is based on Edie Sedgwick, a socialite and actress in the Factory scene of pop artist Andy Warhol.[48] Critic Mike Marqusee has written that this composition is “surely a Dylan cameo”, and that its full poignancy becomes apparent upon the realization that “it is sung, at least in part, to the singer himself: he’s the one ‘with no direction home’.”[49] “Like A Rolling Stone” reached number two in the Billboard Hot 100 in the summer of 1965,[50] and was a top-10 hit in Australia, Canada, the Netherlands, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom.[51][52]

The fast-paced blues song “Tombstone Blues”, driven by Michael Bloomfield’s lead guitar, uses a parade of historical characters—outlaw Belle Starr, biblical temptress Delilah, Jack the Ripper (represented in this song as a successful businessman), John the Baptist (described here as a torturer), and blues singer Ma Rainey whom Dylan humorously suggests shared a sleeping bag with composer Beethoven—to sketch an absurdist account of contemporary America.[53] For critics Mark Polizzotti and Andy Gill, the reality behind the song is the then-escalating Vietnam War; both writers hear the “king of the Philistines” who sends his slaves “out to the jungle” as a reference to President Lyndon B. Johnson.[53][54]

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According to critic Andy Gill, “It Takes A Lot To Laugh” illustrates Dylan’s creativity, both in the way it adapts an old blues song, and in the way Dylan recorded two radically different versions of the song: the first, fast and guitar-driven; in his second version, released on Highway 61, Dylan transformed the song into a “slow, loping, piano-based blues”.[55]

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On July 29, 1965, Dylan and his band resumed recording “It Takes a Lot to Laugh, It Takes a Train to Cry”.[56] Tony Glover, who observed the recording session, has recalled that Dylan re-worked on the song at the piano while the other musicians took a lunch break.[57] Critic Sean Egan writes that by slowing down the tempo, Dylan transformed the song from an “insufferably smart-alec number into a slow, tender, sensual anthem”.[58] Gill points out that the lyrics reveal the singer’s talent for borrowing from old blues numbers, adapting the lines “Don’t the clouds look lonesome shining across the sea/ Don’t my gal look good when she’s coming after me” from “Solid Road” by bluesmen Brownie McGhee and Leroy Carr.[55]

Allmusic critic Bill Janovitz describes “From a Buick 6” as a “raucous, up-tempo blues”, which is played “almost recklessly”.[59] The song opens with a snare shot similar to the beginning of “Like a Rolling Stone”.[60] Partially based on Sleepy John Estes‘ 1930 song “Milk Cow Blues“,[59] the guitar part is patterned after older blues riffs by Robert Johnson, Charlie Patton and Big Joe Williams.[61] Robert Shelton hears the song as “an earthy tribute to another funky earth-mother”,[61] while for Heylin it is close to filler material; he argues that only through the musicians’ performance is Dylan able to “convince us he is doing more than just listing the number of ways in which this ‘graveyard woman’ is both a lifesaver and a death-giver”.[62]

“Ballad of a Thin Man” is driven by Dylan’s piano, which contrasts with “the spooky organ riffs” played by Al Kooper.[63] Marqusee describes the song as one of “the purest songs of protest ever sung”, as it looks at the media and its inability to understand both the singer and his work. He writes that the song became the anthem of an in-group, “disgusted by the old, excited by the new … elated by their discovery of others who shared their feelings”, with its refrain “Something is happening here/ But you don’t know what it is/ Do you, Mr Jones?” epitomizing the “hip exclusivity” of the burgeoning counterculture.[63] Robert Shelton describes the song’s central character, Mr Jones, as “one of Dylan’s greatest archetypes”, characterizing him as “a Philistine … superficially educated and well bred but not very smart about the things that count”.[61]

Side two

Polizzotti, in his study of Highway 61 Revisited, writes that the opening track of Side Two, “Queen Jane Approximately” is in a similar vein to “Like a Rolling Stone”, but the song offers “a touch of sympathy and even comfort in place of relentless mockery”.[64] The song is structured as a series of ABAB quatrain verses, with each verse followed by a chorus that is simply a repeat of the last line of each verse: “Won’t you come see me Queen Jane?”.[65] Gill calls this song “the least interesting track” on Highway 61, but praises the piano ascending the scale during the harmonica break as an evocation of “the stifling nature of an upper class existence”.[66] “Queen Jane Approximately” was released as the B-side of Dylan’s “One of Us Must Know (Sooner or Later)” single in early 1966.[67]

Dylan commences the title song of his album, “Highway 61 Revisited”, with the words “Oh God said to Abraham, ‘Kill me a son’/Abe says, ‘Man, you must be puttin’ me on'”.[68] As Gill has pointed out, Abraham was the name of Dylan’s father, which makes the singer the son whom God wants killed.[69] Gill comments that it is befitting that this song, celebrating a highway central to the history of the blues, is a “raucous blues boogie”.[69] He notes that the scope of the song broadens to make the highway a road of endless possibilities, peopled by dubious characters and culminating in a promoter who “seriously considers staging World War III out on Highway 61”.[69] The song is punctuated by the sound of a police siren. (On the album cover, Dylan is credited with playing “Police Car”.)[70] Highway 61 Revisited” was released as the B-side of his “Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window?” single on November 30, 1965.[71]

“Just Like Tom Thumb’s Blues” has six verses and no chorus.[72] The lyrics describe a nightmarish experience in Juarez, Mexico, where, in Shelton’s words, “our anti-hero stumbles amid sickness, despair, whores and saints.”[73] He battles with corrupt authorities, alcohol and drugs before resolving to return to New York City.[73][74][75] In this song, critics have heard literary references to Malcolm Lowry‘s Under the Volcano, Edgar Allan Poe‘s “The Murders in the Rue Morgue” and Jack Kerouac‘s Desolation Angels.[73][76][77] The backing musicians, Bobby Gregg on drums, Mike Bloomfield on electric guitar, and two pianists, Paul Griffin on tack piano and Al Kooper on Hohner Pianet, produce a mood that, for Gill, perfectly complements the “enervated tone” of the lyrics.[38][78] Heylin notes that Dylan took great care—sixteen takes—to get the effect he was after, with lyrics that subtly “[skirt] the edge of reason”.[36]

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Featuring a “courtly, flamenco-tinged guitar backing”,[79] it has been suggested that in “Desolation Row”, Dylan combined the cultural chaos of mid-1960s America with sepia-tinged TV westerns he remembered from his youth, such as Rawhide and Gunsmoke.[80]

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Dylan concludes Highway 61 Revisited with the sole acoustic exception to his rock album. Gill has characterized “Desolation Row” as “an 11-minute epic of entropy, which takes the form of a Fellini-esque parade of grotesques and oddities featuring a huge cast of iconic characters”. These include historical celebrities such as Einstein and Nero, the biblical characters Noah and Cain and Abel, the Shakespearian figures of Ophelia and Romeo, ending with literary titans T.S. Eliot and Ezra Pound.[79] The song opens with a report that “they’re selling postcards of the hanging”, and adds “the circus is in town”.[81] Polizzotti connects this song with the lynching of three black circus workers in Duluth, Minnesota, which was Dylan’s birthplace, and describes “Desolation Row” as a cowboy song, “the ‘Home On The Range’ of the frightening territory that was mid-sixties America”.[80] In the penultimate verse, the passengers on the Titanic are shouting “Which side are you on?”.[82] Shelton suggests Dylan is asking, “What difference which side you’re on if you’re sailing on the Titanic?” and is thus satirizing “simpleminded political commitment”.[82]

Outtakes

Eleven outtakes from the Highway 61 Revisited sessions have subsequently been released on the Columbia and Legacy record labels. The first proper non-album release from the sessions was the single “Positively 4th Street”,[83] although on an early pressing of the single Columbia used another Highway 61 outtake, “Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window?”, by mistake.[84] “Crawl Out Your Window” was subsequently re-recorded with the Hawks in October, and released as a single in November 1965.[34] Columbia accidentally released an alternate take of “From a Buick 6” on an early pressing of Highway 61 Revisited, and this version continued to appear on the Japanese release for several years.[62] Other officially released outtakes include alternate takes of “Like a Rolling Stone” and “It Takes a Lot to Laugh, It Takes a Train to Cry”, and a previously unreleased song, “Sitting on a Barbed Wire Fence”, on The Bootleg Series Volumes 1–3 (Rare & Unreleased) 1961–1991.[21] Alternate takes of “Desolation Row”, “Highway 61 Revisited”, “Just Like Tom Thumb’s Blues”, “Tombstone Blues” and a still different take of “It Takes a Lot to Laugh, It Takes a Train to Cry” were released on The Bootleg Series Volume 7.[33] Excerpts from several different takes of “Like a Rolling Stone” appeared on the Highway 61 Interactive CD-ROM,[85] released in February 1995.[86] Several other alternate takes of various songs were recorded during the Highway 61 sessions but remain unreleased,[87] as does the composition “Why Do You Have to Be So Frantic?”.[26]

Packaging

The cover artwork was photographed by Daniel Kramer several weeks before the recording sessions. Kramer captured Dylan sitting on the stoop of the apartment of his manager, Albert Grossman, located in Gramercy Park, New York, placing Dylan’s friend Bob Neuwirth behind Dylan “to give it extra color”.[88] Dylan wears a Triumph motorcycle T-shirt under a blue and purple silk shirt, holding his Ray-Ban sunglasses in his right hand.[88] Photographer Kramer commented in 2010 on the singer’s expression: “He’s hostile, or it’s a hostile moodiness. He’s almost challenging me or you or whoever’s looking at it: ‘What are you gonna do about it, buster?[89]

As he had on his previous three albums, Dylan contributed his own writing to the back cover of Highway 61 Revisited, in the shape of freeform, surrealist prose: “On the slow train time does not interfere & at the Arabian crossing waits White Heap, the man from the newspaper & behind him the hundred inevitable made of solid rock & stone.”[70] One critic has pointed out the close similarity of these notes to the stream of consciousness, experimental novel Tarantula, which Dylan was writing during 1965 and 1966.[58]

Reception and legacy

Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
AllMusic 5/5 stars[90]
BBC (Favorable)[91]
Entertainment Weekly A+[92]
PopMatters (Favorable)[93]
Rolling Stone 5/5 stars[94]
Piero Scaruffi (8/10)[95]
Sputnikmusic 5/5[96]

In the British music press, initial reviews of Highway 61 expressed both bafflement and admiration for the record. New Musical Express critic Allen Evans wrote: “Another set of message songs and story songs sung in that monotonous and tuneless way by Dylan which becomes quite arresting as you listen.”[97] The Melody Maker LP review section, by an anonymous critic, commented: “Bob Dylan’s sixth LP, like all others, is fairly incomprehensible but nevertheless an absolute knock-out.”[98] The English poet Philip Larkin, reviewing the album for The Daily Telegraph, wrote that he found himself “well rewarded” by the record: “Dylan’s cawing, derisive voice is probably well suited to his material … and his guitar adapts itself to rock (‘Highway 61’) and ballad (‘Queen Jane’). There is a marathon ‘Desolation Row’ which has an enchanting tune and mysterious, possibly half-baked words.”[99]

In September 1965, the US trade journal Billboard also praised the album, and predicted big sales for it: “Based upon his singles hit ‘Like a Rolling Stone’, Dylan has a top-of-the-chart-winner in this package of his off-beat, commercial material.”[100] The album peaked at number three on the US Billboard 200 chart of top albums,[50] and number four on the UK albums charts.[101] In the US, Highway 61 was certificated as a gold record in August 1967,[102] and platinum in August 1997.[103]

Highway 61 Revisited has remained among the most highly acclaimed of Dylan’s works. Biographer Anthony Scaduto praises its rich imagery, and describes it as “one of the most brilliant pop records ever made. As rock, it cuts through to the core of the music—a hard driving beat without frills, without self-consciousness.”[104] Michael Gray calls Highway 61 “revolutionary and stunning, not just for its energy and panache but in its vision: fusing radical, electrical music … with lyrics that were light years ahead of anyone else’s; Dylan here unites the force of blues-based rock’n’roll with the power of poetry. The whole rock culture, the whole post-Beatle pop-rock world, and so in an important sense the 1960s started here.”[1]

Among Dylan’s contemporaries, Phil Ochs was impressed by Highway 61, explaining: “It’s the kind of music that plants a seed in your mind and then you have to hear it several times. And as you go over it you start to hear more and more things. He’s done something that’s left the whole field ridiculously in the back of him.”[105] In 2003, Rolling Stone magazine described Highway 61 as “one of those albums that changed everything”, and placed it at number four in its list of “The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time“.[106] The Rolling Stone list of “The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time” ranked “Highway 61 Revisited”, “Desolation Row” and “Like a Rolling Stone” at number 373,[107] number 187,[108] and number one, respectively.[44] In 2012, The Best 100 Albums of All Time book ranked Highway 61 Revisited as the greatest album of all time.[109]

Dylan playing guitar onstage

Having toured continuously since the inception of his Never Ending Tour in June 1988,[110] Dylan has performed “Like a Rolling Stone” more than 2,000 times in concert.[111]

Most of the songs on Highway 61 Revisited have remained important, in varying degrees, to Dylan’s live performances since 1965. According to his website, he has played “Like a Rolling Stone” over 2,000 times, “Highway 61 Revisited” more than 1,700 times, “Ballad of a Thin Man” over 1,000 times, and most of the other songs between 150 and 500 times.[111]

The influence of the songs on Highway 61 Revisited can be heard in many cover versions. “Like a Rolling Stone” has been recorded by artists including the Rolling Stones, on their live album Stripped,[112] David Bowie and Mick Ronson on Heaven and Hull,[113] Johnny Winter on Raisin’ Cane,[114] and Jimi Hendrix at the Monterey Pop Festival.[115] My Chemical Romance‘s version of “Desolation Row” was featured in the film Watchmen in 2009.[116] The song has also been covered by the Grateful Dead on their album Postcards of the Hanging.[117] “Just Like Tom Thumb’s Blues” has been recorded by Linda Ronstadt, Nina Simone and Neil Young.[75]

Track listing

The track listing of Highway 61 Revisited is as follows:[90]

All songs written and composed by Bob Dylan.

Side one
No. Title Length
1. Like a Rolling Stone 6:13
2. Tombstone Blues 6:00
3. It Takes a Lot to Laugh, It Takes a Train to Cry 4:09
4. From a Buick 6 3:19
5. Ballad of a Thin Man 5:58
Side two
No. Title Length
6. Queen Jane Approximately 5:31
7. Highway 61 Revisited 3:30
8. Just Like Tom Thumb’s Blues 5:32
9. Desolation Row 11:21

Personnel

The musical personnel on Highway 61 Revisited were as follows:[70][85][a 2]

  • Bob Dylan – guitar, harmonica, piano, vocals, police car noises
Additional musicians
___________________________________________________________

Featured artist Susan Rothenberg:

Susan Rothenberg: Emotions | Art21 “Exclusive”

Uploaded on Mar 26, 2010

Episode #099: Filmed at her home and studio in New Mexico, artist Susan Rothenberg explains how she transforms personal experiences and feelings into works that can become an “emotional moment” for the viewer. While discussing the loss of her dog, Rothenberg describes the process of recovering a memory of her pet through the act of painting.

Susan Rothenberg’s early work—large acrylic, figurative paintings—came to prominence in the 1970s New York art world, a time and place almost completely dominated and defined by Minimalist aesthetics and theories. The first body of work for which she became known centered on life-sized images of horses. Glyph-like and iconic, these images are not so much abstracted as pared down to their most essential elements. The horses, along with fragmented body parts (heads, eyes, and hands) are almost totemic, like primitive symbols, and serve as formal elements through which Rothenberg investigated the meaning, mechanics, and essence of painting. Rothenbergs paintings since the 1990s reflect her move from New York to New Mexico, her adoption of oil painting, and her new-found interest in using the memory of observed and experienced events (a riding accident, a near-fatal bee sting, walking the dog, a game of poker or dominoes) as an armature for creating a painting. These scenes excerpted from daily life, whether highlighting an untoward event or a moment of remembrance, come to life through Rothenbergs thickly layered and nervous brushwork. A distinctive characteristic of these paintings is a tilted perspective in which the vantage point is located high above the ground. A common experience in the New Mexico landscape, this unexpected perspective invests the work with an eerily objective psychological edge.

Learn more about Susan Rothenberg at: http://www.art21.org/artists/susan-ro…

VIDEO | Producer: Wesley Miller & Nick Ravich. Interview: Susan Sollins. Camera: Dyanna Taylor. Sound: Jim Gallup. Editor: Paulo Padilha. Artwork Courtesy: Susan Rothenberg.

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Susan Rothenberg: Bruce & the Studio | Art21 “Exclusive”

Uploaded on May 7, 2010

Episode #105: Susan Rothenberg describes the blend of studio time and ranch work that she shares with her husband, the artist Bruce Nauman, at their New Mexico home.

Susan Rothenberg’s early work—large acrylic, figurative paintings—came to prominence in the 1970s New York art world, a time and place almost completely dominated and defined by Minimalist aesthetics and theories. The first body of work for which she became known centered on life-sized images of horses. Glyph-like and iconic, these images are not so much abstracted as pared down to their most essential elements. The horses, along with fragmented body parts (heads, eyes, and hands) are almost totemic, like primitive symbols, and serve as formal elements through which Rothenberg investigated the meaning, mechanics, and essence of painting. Rothenbergs paintings since the 1990s reflect her move from New York to New Mexico, her adoption of oil painting, and her new-found interest in using the memory of observed and experienced events (a riding accident, a near-fatal bee sting, walking the dog, a game of poker or dominoes) as an armature for creating a painting. These scenes excerpted from daily life, whether highlighting an untoward event or a moment of remembrance, come to life through Rothenbergs thickly layered and nervous brushwork. A distinctive characteristic of these paintings is a tilted perspective in which the vantage point is located high above the ground. A common experience in the New Mexico landscape, this unexpected perspective invests the work with an eerily objective psychological edge.

Learn more about Susan Rothenberg at: http://www.art21.org/artists/susan-ro…

VIDEO | Producer: Wesley Miller & Nick Ravich. Interview: Susan Sollins. Camera: Robert Elfstrom & Dyanna Taylor. Sound: Jim Gallup & Ray Day. Editor: Paulo Padilha. Artwork Courtesy: Bruce Nauman & Susan Rothenberg. Special Thanks: Bruce Nauman.

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Susan Rothenberg

19 February – 11 April 2009

Susan_Rothenberg.JPG
© Susan Rothenberg
Red
oil on canvas
55 x 57 ½ inches / 140 x 146,1 cm

SUSAN ROTHENBERG

19 February 2009 through 11 April 2009

Sperone Westwater is pleased to announce an exhibition of ten new paintings by Susan Rothenberg.
In these new works on canvas, Rothenberg has created compositions with fragmented images of the body. Acting as surrogates for the human form, Rothenberg uses these disembodied puppet legs, heads and arms to demonstrate how the representation of the figure can be transformed into a study of space and form. Unlike other recent paintings in which much of the imagery was drawn from Rothenberg’s physical surroundings in the New Mexico desert, this new group of work uses the body as its primary subject. This series is the latest example of Rothenberg’s longtime ability to challenge and extend painterly conventions in her distinctive way of organizing pictorial space and her exploration of light, color, form and movement.
In these paintings, boldly colored shapes are juxtaposed against a textured and heavily worked white/grey/putty background – a technique that can be traced back to Rothenberg’s radical Horse Paintings of the 1970s. Although the shapes of body parts represented in these new paintings are familiar, all sense of narrative is lost by their dispersion across the picture plane and the composition as a whole becomes abstract.
Rothenberg’s first solo exhibition in New York in 1975, consisting of three large-scale painting of horses, was heralded for introducing imagery into minimalist abstraction and bringing a new sensitivity to figuration. Peter Schjeldahl called the show “a eureka,” stating that “the large format of the pictures was a gesture of ambition” and that “the mere reference to something really existing was astonishing.” Since then, Rothenberg has had numerous solo exhibitions and her work has been exhibited extensively throughout the United States and abroad. Her work is in the collections of over forty major public institutions worldwide. Recent important exhibitions include a retrospective at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, New York that traveled to Washington, D.C., St. Louis, Chicago, and Seattle (1992); a retrospective at the Museo de Arte Contemporáneo in Monterrey, Mexico (1996); a show of paintings from the nineties at The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (1999), and an exhibition of drawings and prints at the Museum of Art at Cornell University that traveled to The Contemporary Museum in Honolulu, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Santa Fe (1998-99). Forthcoming important exhibitions for Rothenberg include a group show titled “Paint Made Flesh” at the Frist Art Center in Nashville, Tennessee from 23 January – 10 May 2009, and a solo survey of twenty-five paintings presented by the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth and the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum in Santa Fe, New Mexico. “Susan Rothenberg: Moving in Place” will open at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth (15 October 2009 – 4 January 2010), and travel to the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum in Santa Fe, New Mexico (22 January – 16 May 2010), The Phillips Collection in Washington D.C. (15 June – 30 September 2010), and the Miami Art Museum (15 October 2010 – 9 January 2011).
A catalogue with full-page color reproductions accompanies the exhibition. For more information as well as photographic images, please contact Maryse Brand at Sperone Westwater at (212) 999-7337, ormaryse@speronewestwater.com.

Susan Rothenberg

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Susan Rothenberg
Rothhorse2.jpg

Untitled (Horse) 1979
Susan Rothenberg’s painting
Born 1945
Buffalo, New York, U.S.
Nationality American
Field Contemporary art
Training Cornell University

Susan Rothenberg (born 1945) is a contemporary painter who lives and works in New Mexico, USA.

Background

Rothenberg was born in Buffalo, New York, in 1945. After graduating from Cornell University, she had her first solo exhibition: three large horse paintings, at 112 Greene Street Gallery, in 1975.

Style

Since the mid-1970s, Rothenberg has been recognized as one of the most innovative and independent artists of the contemporary period; in 2010, New York Times art critic David Belcher wrote that comparisons between Rothenberg and Georgia O’Keeffe had “become hard to avoid.”[1] From her early years in SoHo through her move to New Mexico’s desert landscape, Rothenberg has remained as influenced and challenged by her physical surroundings as she is by artistic issues and personal experiences. In addition to her earliest horse paintings, Rothenberg has taken on numerous forms as subject matter, such as dancing figures, heads and bodies, animals, and atmospheric landscapes. Rothenberg’s visceral canvases have continued to evolve, as she explores the boundary between figural representation and abstraction; her work also examines the role of color and light, and the translation of her personal experience to a painterly surface.

Rothenberg’s first solo exhibition in New York in 1975, consisting of three large-scale paintings of horses, was heralded for introducing imagery into minimalist abstraction, while bringing a new sensitivity to figuration. Critic Peter Schjeldahl called the show “a eureka,” stating that “the large format of the pictures was a gesture of ambition,” and that “the mere reference to something really existing was astonishing.”

Later career

Although best-knownt as a painter, Rothenberg has also made crucial contributions to the medium of drawing. On the occasion of her 2004 exhibition of drawings at Sperone Westwater, Robert Storr wrote, “…fundamentally, drawing is as much a matter of evocation as it is of depiction, of identifying the primary qualities of things in the world and transposing them without a loss of quiddity. This at any rate is what drawing has been for Rothenberg.”

Exhibitions

Rothenberg has had numerous solo exhibitions throughout the United States and abroad. Her first major survey, initiated by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, traveled to the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Carnegie Institute, and the Tate Gallery, London, among other institutions (1983–1985). Recent exhibitions include a retrospective organized by Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo (1992–1994), which traveled to Washington, D.C., St. Louis, Chicago, and Seattle (1992); a retrospective at the Museo de Arte Contemporáneo in Monterrey, Mexico (1996); a survey of prints and drawings presented by the Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University (1998); and Susan Rothenberg: Paintings from the Nineties at The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (1999). Rothenberg has been the recipient of the National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship Grant (1979), the Cornell University Alumni Award (1998), the Skowhegan Medal for Painting (1998), and Sweden’s Rolf Schock Prize (2003).

Personal life

Rothenberg married the artist Bruce Nauman in 1989.

Museum exhibitions

  • 1978 “Susan Rothenberg, Recent Work,” Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota, 20 May – 2 July (catalogue)
  • 1981–1982 “Susan Rothenberg,” Kunsthalle Basel, Switzerland, 3 October – 15 November; Frankfurter Kunstverein, Frankfurt, 7 December – 31 January; Louisiana Museum, Humlebaek, Denmark, 13 March – 2 May (catalogue); “Susan Rothenberg,” Akron Art Museum, Ohio, 21 November – 10 January
  • 1982 “Susan Rothenberg: Recent Paintings,” Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, 14 October – 29 November (catalogue)
  • 1983–1985 “Susan Rothenberg,” Los Angeles County Museum of Art, California, 1 September – 16 October; San Francisco Museum of Art, California, 10 November – 25 December; Museum of Art, Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, 18 January – 18 March 1984; Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, 10 April – 3 June; Aspen Center for the Visual Arts, Colorado, 1 July – 19 August; Detroit Institute of Arts, Michigan, 9 September – 21 October; Tate Gallery, London, 21 November – 20 January 1985; Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, 26 February – 27 March (catalogue); “Currents,” ICA, Boston, April.
  • 1985 “Centric 13: Susan Rothenberg—Works on Paper,” University Art Museum, California State Center, Long Beach, 12 March – 21 April; Des Moines Art Center, Iowa, 21 June – 28 July (catalogue); “Susan Rothenberg, Prints,” Des Moines Art Center, Iowa, September – October
  • 1988 “Drawing Now: Susan Rothenberg,” Baltimore Museum of Art, Maryland, 23 February – 4 April
  • 1990 “Susan Rothenberg,” Rooseum Center for Contemporary Art, Malmo, Sweden, 30 June – 17 August 1990 (catalogue)
  • 1992–94 “Susan Rothenberg, Paintings and Drawings, 1974–1992,” Albright Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, 14 November 1992 – 3 January *1993; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C., 10 February – 9 May 1993: The Saint Louis Art Museum, Saint Louis, MO., 27 May – 25 July 1993; Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, 20 August – 24 October 1993; Seattle Art Museum, Seattle, WA., 17 November – 9 January 1994; The Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas, TX, 30 January – 27 March 1994 (catalogue)
  • 1995 “Focus Series,” Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, VA, 18 February – 2 July
  • 1996–97 “Susan Rothenberg,” MARCO, Museo de Arte Contemporaneo de Monterrey, Monterrey, Mexico, 4 October 1996 – 19 January 1997 (catalogue)
  • 1998–99 “Susan Rothenberg: Drawings and Prints,” Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 22 August – 25 October; The Contemporary Museum, Honolulu, HI, 15 January–14 March; Museum of Fine Arts, Santa Fe, NM, 21 March – 24 May (catalogue)
  • 1999–2000 “Susan Rothenberg: Paintings from the 90’s,” Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MFA, 18 November 1999 – 17 January 2000 (Catalogue)
  • 2009–2010 “Susan Rothenberg: Moving In Place,” Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, TX, 18 October 2009 – 3 January 2010

References

  1. Jump up ^ David Belcher, “Another Painter in O’Keefe Territory,” The New York Times, 8 April 2010.

Sources

  • Harry N. Abrams, Inc., published a major monograph on Rothenberg written by Joan Simon (Simon, Joan, Susan Rothenberg, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 1991).

External links

_______________

Susan Rothenberg

About Susan Rothenberg

Susan Rothenberg was born in Buffalo, New York, in 1945. She received a BFA from Cornell University. Her early work—large acrylic, figurative paintings—came to prominence in the 1970s New York art world, a time and place almost completely dominated and defined by Minimalist aesthetics and theories. The first body of work for which Rothenberg became known centered on life-size images of horses. Glyph-like and iconic, these images are not so much abstracted as pared down to their most essential elements. The horses, along with fragmented body parts (heads, eyes, and hands) are almost totemic, like primitive symbols, and serve as formal elements through which Rothenberg investigated the meaning, mechanics, and essence of painting. Rothenberg’s paintings since the 1990s reflect her move from New York to New Mexico, her adoption of oil painting, and her new-found interest in using the memory of observed and experienced events (a riding accident, a near-fatal bee sting, walking the dog, a game of poker or dominoes) as an armature for creating a painting. These scenes excerpted from daily life, whether highlighting an untoward event or a moment of remembrance, come to life through Rothenberg’s thickly layered and nervous brushwork. A distinctive characteristic of these paintings is a tilted perspective, in which the vantage point is located high above the ground. A common experience in the New Mexico landscape, this unexpected perspective invests the work with an eerily objective psychological edge. Susan Rothenberg received a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Skowhegan Medal for Painting. She has had one-person exhibitions at Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Dallas Museum of Art; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; and Tate Gallery, London; among others.

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FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE Part 23 BOB DYLAN (Part A) (Feature on artist Josiah McElheny)Francis Schaeffer on the proper place of rebellion with comments by Bob Dylan and Samuel Rutherford (Josiah McElheny is featured artist)

Why am I doing this series FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE? John Fischer probably expressed it best when he noted:

Schaeffer was the closest thing to a “man of sorrows” I have seen. He could not allow himself to be happy when most of the world was desperately lost and he knew why. He was the first Christian I found who could embrace faith and the despair of a lost humanity all at the same time. Though he had been found, he still knew what it was to be lost.

Schaeffer was the first Christian leader who taught me to weep over the world instead of judging it. Schaeffer modeled a caring and thoughtful engagement in the history of philosophy and its influence through movies, novels, plays, music, and art. Here was Schaeffer, teaching at Wheaton College about the existential dilemma expressed in Michelangelo Antonioni’s 1966 film, Blowup, when movies were still forbidden to students. He didn’t bat an eye. He ignored our legalism and went on teaching because he had been personally gripped by the desperation of such cultural statements.

Schaeffer taught his followers not to sneer at or dismiss the dissonance in modern art. He showed how these artists were merely expressing the outcome of the presuppositions of the modern era that did away with God and put all conclusions on a strictly human, rational level. Instead of shaking our heads at a depressing, dark, abstract work of art, the true Christian reaction should be to weep for the lost person who created it. Schaeffer was a rare Christian leader who advocated understanding and empathizing with non-Christians instead of taking issue with them.

Bob Dylan – When You Gonna Wake Up Sermon – Tempe 1979

Published on Apr 28, 2012

Probably the most contentious show in Dylan’s long history of live performance. The between-song “raps” were a fixture of Dylan’s performances during his “Christian” period, but early during the Slow Train Coming tour, Dylan and his band encountered the most hostile, skeptical audience of the tour in Tempe, Arizona on November 26th, 1979. An unique audio document of a fascinating period that people rarely discuss today.

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Quotes from A Christian Manifesto (Written by Francis Schaeffer)

1. Rutherford argued that Romans 13 indicates that all power is from God and that government is ordained and instituted by God. The state, however, is to be administered according to the principles of God’s Law. Acts of the state which contradicted God’s Law were illegitimate and acts of tyranny. Tyranny was defined as ruling without the sanction of God.

2. Rutherford held that a tyrannical government is always immoral. He said that “a power ethical, politic, or moral, to oppress, is not from God, and is not a power, but a licentious deviation of a power; and is no more from God, but from sinful nature and the old serpent, than a license to sin.”

3. Rutherford presents several arguments to establish the right and duty of resistance to unlawful government. First, since tyranny is satanic, not to resist it is to resist God—to resist tyranny is to honor God. Second, since the ruler is granted power conditionally, it follows that the people have the power to withdraw their sanction if the proper conditions are not fulfilled. The civil magistrate is a “fiduciary figure”—that is, he holds his authority in trust for the people. Violation of the trust gives the people a legitimate base for resistance.

It follows from Rutherford’s thesis that citizens have a moral obligation to resist unjust and tyrannical government. While we must always be subject to the office of the magistrate, we are not to be subject to the man in that office who commands that which is contrary the Bible.

Rutherford offered suggestions concerning illegitimate acts of the state. A ruler, he wrote, should not be deposed merely because he commits a single breach of the compact he has with the people. Only when the magistrate acts in such a way that the governing structure of the country is being destroyed—that is, when he is attacking the fundamental structure of society—is he to be relieved of his power and authority. A Christian Manifesto, F. Schaeffer, p. 100-101

In Lex Rex he (Rutherford) does not propose armed revolution as an automatic solution. Instead, he sets forth the appropriate response to interference by the state in the liberties of the citizenry. Specifically, he stated that if the state deliberately is committed to destroying its ethical commitment to God then resistance is appropriate.

In such an instance, for the private person, the individual, Rutherford suggested that there are three appropriate levels of resistance: First, he must defend himself by protest (in contemporary society this would most often be by legal action); second, he must flee if at all possible; and third, he may use force, if necessary, to defend himself. One should not employ force if he may save himself by flight; nor should one employ flight if he can save himself and defend himself by protest and the employment of constitutional means of redress.

On the other hand, when the state commits illegitimate acts against a corporate body—such as a duly constituted state or local body, or even a church—then flight is often an impractical and unrealistic means of resistance. Therefore, with respect to a corporate group or community, there are two levels of resistance: remonstration (or protest) and then, if necessary, force employed in self-defense.

For a corporate body (a civil entity), when illegitimate state acts are perpetrated upon it, resistance should be under the protection of the duly constituted authorities: if possible, it should be under the rule of the lesser magistrates (local officials). Rutherford urged that the office of the local official is just as much from God as is the office of the highest state official. Rutherford said, “When the supreme magistrate will not execute the judgment of the Lord, those who made him supreme magistrate, under God, who have under God, sovereighn liberty to dispose of crowns and kingdoms, are to execute the judgment of the Lord, when wicked men make the law of God of none effect.”

Samuel Rutherford and Bob Dylan would have understood each other. In “When You Gonna Wake Up” from the album SLOW TRAIN COMING, Dylan has the lines: “Adulterers in churches and pornography in the schools, You got gangsters in power and lawbreakers making rules, When you gonna wake up, When you gonna wake up, When you gonna wake up, And strengthen the things that remain?”

The difference in the centuries, and the difference in the language used, changes nothing. pp. 103-4

Force, as used in this book, means compulsion or constraint exerted upon a person (or persons) or on an entity such as the state. When discussing force it is important to keep an axiom in mind: always before protest or force is used, we must work for reconstruction. In other words, we should attempt to correct and rebuild society before we advocate tearing it down or disrupting it.

If there is a legitimate reason for the use of force, and if there is a vigilant precaution against its overreaction in practice, then at a certain point a use of force is justifiable. We should recognize, however, that overreaction can too easily become the ugly horror of sheer violence. Therefore a distinction between force and violence is crucial. p. 106

This defense (of human life) should be carried out on at least four fronts:

First, we should aggressively support a human life bill or a constitutional amendment protecting unborn children.

Second, we must enter the courts seeking to overturn the Supreme Court’s abortion decision.

Third, legal and political action should be taken against hospitals and abortion clinics that perform abortions (perhaps including picketing).

Fourth, the State must be made to feel the presence of the Christian community. This may include doing such things as sit-ins in legislatures and courts, including the Supreme Court, when other constitutional means fail…The bottom line is that at a certain point there is not only the right, but the duty, to disobey the state.

This is scary. There are at least four reasons why.

First, we must make definite that we are in no way talking about any kind of a theocracy.

Second, it is frightening when we realize that our consideration of these things, and this work, will certainly get behind the Iron Curtain and into other tyrannical countries where Christians face these questions in practice every day of their lives, in prison or out of prison. p. 120

A matter of individual decision’

In our day an illustration for the need of protest is tax money being used for abortion. After all the normal constitutional means of protest had been exhausted, then what could be done? At some point protest could lead some Christians to refuse to pay some portion of their tax money. Of course,, this would mean a trial. Such a move would have to be the individual’s choice under God. No one should decide for another. (p. 108)

After recognizing man’s God-given absolute rights, the Declaration [of Independence] goes on to declare that whenever civil government becomes destructive of these rights, “it is the right of the people to alter and abolish it, and institute new government, laying its foundation on such principles, and organizing its powers in such form as to them shall seem most likely to effect their safely and happiness.” The Founding Fathers, in the spirit of Lex Rex, cautioned in the Declaration of Independence that established governments should not be altered or abolished for “light and transient causes.” But when there is a “long train of abuses and usurpations” designed to produce an oppressive, authoritarian state, “it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such government…”

Simply put, the Declaration of Independence states that the people, if they find that their basic rights are being systematically attacked by the state, have a duty to try to change that government, and if they cannot do so, to abolish it. Christian Manifesto, pp. 127-8

If there is no final place for civil disobedience, then the government has been made autonomous, and as such, it has been put in the place of the Living God. If there is no final place for civil disobedience, then the government has been made autonomous, and as such, it has been put in the place of the Living God, because then you are to obey it even when it tells you in is own way at that time to worship Caesar. And that point is exactly where the early Christians performed their acts of civil disobedience even when it cost them their lives. Christian Manifesto, p. 130

It is time we consciously realize that when any office commands what is contrary to God’s Law it abrogates its authority. And our loyalty to the God who gave this law then requires that we make the appropriate response in that situation to such a tyrannical usurping of power. pp 131-2

A Christian Manifesto, by Francis Schaeffer, Crossway, 1981

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A Christian Manifesto Francis Schaeffer

Published on Dec 18, 2012

A video important to today. The man was very wise in the ways of God. And of government. Hope you enjoy a good solis teaching from the past. The truth never gets old.

Francis Schaeffer “BASIS FOR HUMAN DIGNITY” Whatever…HTTHR

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Andy Warhol’s Screen Test of Bob Dylan (1965) NYC

Published on Sep 29, 2013

Pictures and video from Andy Warhol’s “Screen Tests” of Bob Dylan circa 1965
God don’t make no promises that He don’t keep
You got some big dreams, baby, but in order to dream you gotta still be asleep

“God don’t make no promises that He don’t keep
You got some big dreams, baby, but in order to dream you gotta still be asleep

When you gonna wake up, when you gonna wake up
When you gonna wake up and strengthen the things that remain?

Counterfeit philosophies have polluted all of your thoughts
Karl Marx has got ya by the throat and Henry Kissinger has got you all wrapped up into knots

When you gonna wake up, when you gonna wake up
When you gonna wake up and strengthen the things that remain?

You got innocent men in jail, your insane asylums are filled
You got unrighteous doctors dealing drugs that’ll never cure your ills

When you gonna wake up, when you gonna wake up
When you gonna wake up and strengthen the things that remain?

Adulterers in churches and pornography in the schools
You got gangsters in power and lawbreakers making rules

YES, When you gonna wake up, when you gonna wake up
When you gonna wake up and strengthen the things that remain?

Well you can’t take it with you and you know that it’s too worthless to be sold
They tell you, “Time is money,” as if your life was worth its weight in gold

When you gonna wake up, when YOU gonna wake up
When you gonna wake up and strengthen the things that remain?

Spiritual advisors that make you hold your breath
They’ll give you instant inner peace but every step you take leads right down to death

When you gonna wake up, when you gonna wake up
When you gonna wake up and strengthen the things that remain?

Do you ever wonder just what God requires?
You think He’s just an errand boy to satisfy your wandering desires?

When you gonna wake up, when you gonna wake up
When you gonna wake up and strengthen the things that remain?

There’s a Man up on a cross and He’s been crucified
You know who He is you know why He died?

When you gonna wake up, when you gonna wake up
When you gonna wake up and strengthen the things that remain?”

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Francis Schaeffer has written extensively on art and culture spanning the last 2000 years and here are some posts I have done on this subject before : Francis Schaeffer’s “How should we then live?” Video and outline of episode 10 “Final Choices” episode 9 “The Age of Personal Peace and Affluence”episode 8 “The Age of Fragmentation”episode 7 “The Age of Non-Reason” episode 6 “The Scientific Age” , episode 5 “The Revolutionary Age” episode 4 “The Reformation” episode 3 “The Renaissance”episode 2 “The Middle Ages,”, and  episode 1 “The Roman Age,” . My favorite episodes are number 7 and 8 since they deal with modern art and culture primarily.(Joe Carter rightly noted,Schaefferwho always claimed to be an evangelist and not a philosopher—was often criticized for the way his work oversimplified intellectual history and philosophy.” To those critics I say take a chill pill because Schaeffer was introducing millions into the fields of art and culture!!!! !!! More people need to read his works and blog about them because they show how people’s worldviews affect their lives!

J.I.PACKER WROTE OF SCHAEFFER, “His communicative style was not that of a cautious academic who labors for exhaustive coverage and dispassionate objectivity. It was rather that of an impassioned thinker who paints his vision of eternal truth in bold strokes and stark contrasts.Yet it is a fact that MANY YOUNG THINKERS AND ARTISTS…HAVE FOUND SCHAEFFER’S ANALYSES A LIFELINE TO SANITY WITHOUT WHICH THEY COULD NOT HAVE GONE ON LIVING.”

Francis Schaeffer’s works  are the basis for a large portion of my blog posts and they have stood the test of time. In fact, many people would say that many of the things he wrote in the 1960’s  were right on  in the sense he saw where our western society was heading and he knew that abortion, infanticide and youth enthansia were  moral boundaries we would be crossing  in the coming decades because of humanism and these are the discussions we are having now!)

There is evidence that points to the fact that the Bible is historically true as Schaeffer pointed out in episode 5 of WHATEVER HAPPENED TO THE HUMAN RACE? There is a basis then for faith in Christ alone for our eternal hope. This link shows how to do that.

Francis Schaeffer in Art and the Bible noted, “Many modern artists, it seems to me, have forgotten the value that art has in itself. Much modern art is far too intellectual to be great art. Many modern artists seem not to see the distinction between man and non-man, and it is a part of the lostness of modern man that they no longer see value in the work of art as a work of art.” 

Many modern artists are left in this point of desperation that Schaeffer points out and it reminds me of the despair that Solomon speaks of in Ecclesiastes.  Christian scholar Ravi Zacharias has noted, “The key to understanding the Book of Ecclesiastes is the term ‘under the sun.’ What that literally means is you lock God out of a closed system, and you are left with only this world of time plus chance plus matter.” THIS IS EXACT POINT SCHAEFFER SAYS SECULAR ARTISTS ARE PAINTING FROM TODAY BECAUSE THEY BELIEVED ARE A RESULT OF MINDLESS CHANCE.

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Francis Schaeffer pictured below:

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Francis and Edith Schaeffer

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Francis Schaeffer pictured below

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Francis Schaeffer with his son Franky pictured below. Francis and Edith (who passed away in 2013) opened L’ Abri in 1955 in Switzerland.

Artist featured today is Josiah McElheny

Josiah McElheny: History & Originality | Art21 “Exclusive”

Uploaded on Oct 9, 2009

Episode #077: Artist Josiah McElheny discusses the relationship between artworks and the context in which they were created, highlighting the distinctions between history and the personal and interpretive reinvention of historical facts.

Josiah McElheny creates finely crafted, handmade glass objects that he combines with photographs, text, and museological displays to evoke notions of meaning and memory. McElheny’s work takes as its subject the object, idea, and social nexus of glass. Influenced by the writings of Jorge Luis Borges, McElheny’s work often takes the form of historical fictions. Part of McElheny’s fascination with storytelling is that glassmaking is part of an oral tradition handed down generation to generation, artisan to artisan. Sculptural models of Modernist ideals, these totally reflective environments are both elegant seductions as well as parables of the vices of utopian aspirations.

Learn more about Josiah McElheny: http://www.art21.org/artists/josiah-m…

VIDEO | Producer: Wesley Miller and Nick Ravich. Interview: Susan Sollins. Camera & Sound: Kurt Branstetter, Joel Shapiro, and Tom Bergin. Editor: Jenny Chiurco. Artwork Courtesy: Josiah McElheny. Special Thanks: Donald Young Gallery, Chicago and MoMA QNS, Long Island City.

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Trying to show Big Bang which was discovered in 1965 and was on the cover of every newspaper and proved Einstin wrong!!!!

Josiah McElheny: “Conceptual Drawings…” | Art21 “Exclusive”

Uploaded on May 29, 2008

Episode #013: Josiah McElheny discusses his film Conceptual Drawings for a Chandelier, 1965 (2005), shot at The Metropolitan Opera in New York.

Josiah McElheny creates finely crafted, handmade glass objects that he combines with photographs, text, and museological displays to evoke notions of meaning and memory. McElheny’s work takes as its subject the history of Modernism and the impact it has made on society, aesthetics, and contemporary thought.

Josiah McElheny is featured in the Season 3 (2005) episode “Memory” of the Art:21—Art in the Twenty-First Century television series on PBS.

Learn more about Josiah McElheny: http://www.art21.org/artists/josiah-m…

VIDEO | Producer: Wesley Miller & Nick Ravich. Camera & Sound: Nick Ravich. Editor: Jennifer Chiurco. Artwork courtesy: Josiah McElheny. Thanks: The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

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Talks about Francis Bacon’s paintings being both beautiful and horrible looking too.

Josiah McElheny: Beauty & Seduction | Art21 “Exclusive”

Uploaded on Jun 25, 2009

Episode #062: Artist Josiah McElheny discusses the intentionally problematic nature of beauty and seduction in his “Total Reflective Abstraction” (2004) installation, on view at Donald Young Gallery in Chicago, as well as works by fellow artists and architectural masterpieces such as Renaissance palaces.

Josiah McElheny creates finely crafted, handmade glass objects that he combines with photographs, text, and museological displays to evoke notions of meaning and memory. McElhenys work takes as its subject the object, idea, and social nexus of glass. Influenced by the writings of Jorge Luis Borges, McElhenys work often takes the form of historical fictions. Part of McElhenys fascination with storytelling is that glassmaking is part of an oral tradition handed down generation to generation, artisan to artisan. Sculptural models of Modernist ideals, these totally reflective environments are both elegant seductions as well as parables of the vices of utopian aspirations.

Learn more about Josiah McElheny: http://www.art21.org/artists/josiah-m…

VIDEO | Producer: Wesley Miller and Nick Ravich. Interview: Susan Sollins. Camera & Sound: Kurt Branstetter, Joel Shapiro, and Tom Bergin. Editor: Jenny Chiurco. Artwork Courtesy: Josiah McElheny. Special Thanks: Donald Young Gallery, Chicago.

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Josiah McElheny

07 September 2011 – 19 August 2012

Josiah_McElheny.jpg

The Bloomberg Commission:
JOSIAH MCELHENY:
The Past Was A Mirage I Had Left Far Behind
7 September 2011 – 19 August 2012

Sculptor and writer Josiah McElheny transforms the Gallery into a hall of mirrors.

Seven large-scale, mirrored sculptures are arranged as multiple reflective screens for displaying abstract films, selected by a group of invited collaborators and programmed to change throughout the year. The sculptures reflect and refract the projected film selection, saturating the whole gallery and visitors in images and light. Refracted, distorted and multiplied, the moving images explore how abstraction is used to depict an image of visual enlightenment.

The Bloomberg Commission is displayed in Gallery 2, a dedicated space for site-specific works of art that was previously the reading room of the former Whitechapel Library. Inspired by the history of the Library as a creative haven for early modernist thinkers such as Isaac Rosenberg and Mark Gertler, McElheny’s new work explores the history of abstraction in film and video, reinterpreting them by presenting fractured, constantly morphing versions.

Josiah McElheny (b. 1966) lives and works in New York. His work combines a conceptually rigorous examination of history with an ability to create deeply engaging sensory experiences.

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The artist depicks perfect spiritual worlds that will never be enacted.

Josiah McElheny: “The Alpine Cathedral and the City-Crown” | Art21 “Exclusive”

Uploaded on May 19, 2008

Episode #011: Josiah McElheny discusses his installation The Alpine Cathedral and the City-Crown (2007) at the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

Josiah McElheny creates finely crafted, handmade glass objects that he combines with photographs, text, and museological displays to evoke notions of meaning and memory. McElheny’s work takes as its subject the history of Modernism and the impact it has made on society, aesthetics, and contemporary thought.

Josiah McElheny is featured in the Season 3 (2005) episode Memory of the Art:21—Art in the Twenty-First Century television series on PBS.

Learn more about Josiah McElheny: http://www.art21.org/artists/josiah-m…

VIDEO | Producer: Wesley Miller & Nick Ravich. Camera & Sound: Nick Ravich. Editor: Jennifer Chiurco. Artwork courtesy: Josiah McElheny. Thanks: The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

VIDEO | Producer: Wesley Miller & Nick Ravich. Camera & Sound: Nick Ravich. Editor: Jennifer Chiurco. Artwork courtesy: Josiah McElheny. Thanks: The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

“From an Historical Anecdote about Fashion” (2000)

“From an Historical Anecdote about Fashion,” 2000
Blown glass, wood, metal and glass display case, five framed digital prints
Display case dimensions: 72 x 120 x 28 inches
Digital prints: 18 x 25 1/2 inches each
Collection Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY
Photo by Tom Van
Courtesy Donald Young Gallery, Chicago

“I think of all the aspects of display or style or, quote-unquote, beauty. Not of the word ‘beauty’ per se but of elegance- of its specific visual nature, or humor- so that you want to look at it. It’s a way of bringing people into the work- and then there are ideas or experiences for them to find.”
– Josiah McElheny

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Josiah McElheny | Art21 | Preview from Season 3 of “Art in the Twenty-First Century” (2005)

Uploaded on May 14, 2008

Josiah McElheny creates finely crafted, handmade glass objects that he combines with photographs, text, and museological displays to evoke notions of meaning and memory. McElheny’s work takes as its subject the object, idea, and social nexus of glass. Influenced by the writings of Jorge Luis Borges, McElheny’s work often takes the form of historical fictions.

Josiah McElheny is featured in the Season 3 episode “Memory” of the Art21 series “Art in the Twenty-First Century”.

Learn more about Josiah McElheny: http://www.art21.org/artists/josiah-m…

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Artist Interview: Josiah McElheny

Uploaded on Nov 29, 2011

No description available.

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Josiah Mcelheny

October 28, 2009

Josiah Mcelheny

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