FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE PART 229 BEATLES, BREAKING DOWN THE SONG “BECAUSE” (Featured artist is Abraham Cruzvillegas)

____ John Lennon sings the lead on BECAUSE

Image result for john lennon

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It is intriguing to me to compare Francis Schaeffer’s comments on Ecclesiastes chapter one to this song “Because,” and the comments in the song about the observations of the earth, sky and the wind. Schaeffer talks a lot about these following words of Solomon from Ecclesiastes:

What does man gain by all the toil
    at which he toils under the sun?
A generation goes, and a generation comes,
    but the earth remains forever.
The sun rises, and the sun goes down,
    and hastens to the place where it rises.
The wind blows to the south
    and goes around to the north;
around and around goes the wind,
    and on its circuits the wind returns.
All streams run to the sea,
    but the sea is not full;
to the place where the streams flow,
    there they flow again.

All things are full of weariness;
    a man cannot utter it;
the eye is not satisfied with seeing,
    nor the ear filled with hearing.
What has been is what will be,
    and what has been done is what will be done,
    and there is nothing new under the sun.

[Verse 1]
Because the world is round it turns me on
Because the world is round

[Verse 2]
Because the wind is high it blows my mind
Because the wind is high

[Bridge]
Love is old, love is new
Love is all, love is you

[Verse 3]
Because the sky is blue, it makes me cry
Because the sky is blue

Image result for king solomon

Francis Schaeffer said concerning Solomon:

Image result for francis schaeffer

Solomon is the author of Ecclesiastes and he is truly an universal man like Leonardo da Vinci.

Two men of the Renaissance stand above all others – Michelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci and it is in them that one can perhaps grasp a view of the ultimate conclusion of humanism for man. Michelangelo was unequaled as a sculptor in the Renaissance and arguably no one has ever matched his talents.

(Leonardo da Vinci below)

Image result for Leonardo da Vinci

(Michelangelo’s David seen below)

Image result for Michelangelo

The other giant of the Renaissance period was Leonardo da Vinci – the perfect Renaissance Man, the man who could do almost anything and does it better than most anyone else. As an inventor, an engineer, an anatomist, an architect, an artist, a chemist, a mathematician, he was almost without equal. It was perhaps his mathematics that lead da Vinci to come to his understanding of the ultimate meaning of Humanism. Leonardo is generally accepted as the first modern mathematician. He not only knew mathematics abstractly but applied it in his Notebooks to all manner of engineering problems. He was one of the unique geniuses of history, and in his brilliance he perceived that beginning humanistically with mathematics one only had particulars. He understood that man beginning from himself would never be able to come to meaning on the basis of mathematics. And he knew that having only individual things, particulars, one never could come to universals or meaning and thus one only ends with mechanics. In this he saw ahead to where our generation has come: everything, including man, is the machine.

Leonardo da Vinci compares well to Solomon and they  both were universal men searching for the meaning in life. Solomon was searching for a meaning in the midst of the details of life. His struggle was to find the meaning of life. Not just plans in life. Anybody can find plans in life. A child can fill up his time with plans of building tomorrow’s sand castle when today’s has been washed away. There is  a difference between finding plans in life and purpose in life. Humanism since the Renaissance and onward has never found it and it has never found it since. Modern man has not found it and it has always got worse and darker in a very real way.

We have here the declaration of Solomon’s universality:

1 Kings 4:30-34

English Standard Version (ESV)

30 so that Solomon’s wisdom surpassed the wisdom of all the people of the east and all the wisdom of Egypt. 31 For he was wiser than all other men, wiser than Ethan the Ezrahite, and Heman, Calcol, and Darda, the sons of Mahol, and his fame was in all the surrounding nations. 32 He also spoke 3,000 proverbs, and his songs were 1,005. 33 He spoke of trees, from the cedar that is in Lebanon to the hyssop that grows out of the wall. He spoke also of beasts, and of birds, and of reptiles, and of fish. 34 And people of all nations came to hear the wisdom of Solomon, and from all the kings of the earth, who had heard of his wisdom.

_________________________

Here is the universal man and his genius. Solomon is the universal man with a empire at his disposal. Solomon had it all.

Ecclesiastes 1:3

English Standard Version (ESV)

What does man gain by all the toil
    at which he toils under the sun?

 

Schaeffer noted that Solomon took a look at the meaning of life on the basis of human life standing alone between birth and death “under the sun.” This phrase UNDER THE SUN appears over and over in Ecclesiastes. The Christian Scholar Ravi Zacharias noted, “The key to understanding the Book of Ecclesiastes is the term UNDER THE SUN — What that literally means is you lock God out of a closed system and you are left with only this world of Time plus Chance plus matter.” 

Man is caught in the cycle XXXXXXXXX

Ecclesiastes 1:1-7

English Standard Version (ESV)

All Is Vanity

The words of the Preacher, the son of David, king in Jerusalem.

Vanity of vanities, says the Preacher,
    vanity of vanities! All is vanity.
What does man gain by all the toil
    at which he toils under the sun?
A generation goes, and a generation comes,
    but the earth remains forever.
The sun rises, and the sun goes down,
    and hastens to the place where it rises.
The wind blows to the south
    and goes around to the north;
around and around goes the wind,
    and on its circuits the wind returns.
All streams run to the sea,
    but the sea is not full;
to the place where the streams flow,
    there they flow again.

All things are full of weariness;
    a man cannot utter it;
the eye is not satisfied with seeing,
    nor the ear filled with hearing.
What has been is what will be,
    and what has been done is what will be done,
    and there is nothing new under the sun.
10 Is there a thing of which it is said,
    “See, this is new”?
It has been already
    in the ages before us.

_____________

Solomon is showing a high degree of comprehension of evaporation and the results of it. Seeing also in reality nothing changes. There is change but always in a set framework and that is cycle. You can relate this to the concepts of modern man. Ecclesiastes is the only pessimistic book in the Bible and that is because of the place where Solomon limits himself. He limits himself to the question of human life, life under the sun between birth and death and the answers this would give.

Ecclesiastes 1:4

English Standard Version (ESV)

A generation goes, and a generation comes,
    but the earth remains forever.

___________________

Ecclesiastes 4:16

English Standard Version (ESV)

16 There was no end of all the people, all of whom he led. Yet those who come later will not rejoice in him. Surely this also is vanity and a striving after wind.

__________________________

In verses 1:4 and 4:16 Solomon places man in the cycle. He doesn’t place man outside of the cycle. Man doesn’t escape the cycle. Man is only cycle. Birth and death and youth and old age. With this in mind Solomon makes this statement.

Ecclesiastes 6:12

12 For who knows what is good for a man during his lifetime, during the few years of his futile life? He will spend them like a shadow. For who can tell a man what will be after him under the sun?

____________________

There is no doubt in my mind that Solomon had the same experience in his life that I had as a younger man. I remember standing by the sea and the moon arose and it was copper and beauty. Then the moon did not look like a flat dish but a globe or a sphere since it was close to the horizon. One could feel the global shape of the earth too. Then it occurred to me that I could contemplate the interplay of the spheres and I was exalted because I thought I can look upon them with all their power, might, and size, but they could contempt nothing and I felt as man as God. Then came upon me a horror of great darkness because it suddenly occurred to me that although I could contemplate them and they could contemplate nothing yet they would continue to turn in ongoing cycles when I saw no more forever and I was crushed.

THIS IS SOLOMON’S FEELING TOO. The universal man, Solomon, beyond our intelligence with an empire at his disposal with the opportunity of observation so he could recite these words here in Ecclesiastes 6:12, “For who knows what is good for a man during his lifetime, during the few years of his futile life? He will spend them like a shadow. For who can tell a man what will be after him under the sun?”

Because (Beatles song)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
“Because”
Song by the Beatles from the album Abbey Road
Released 26 September 1969
Recorded 1–5 August 1969,
EMI Studios, London
Genre Psychedelic rock, progressive rock
Length 2:45
Label Apple Records
Writer Lennon–McCartney
Producer George Martin
Music sample
0:00

Because” is a song written by John Lennon[1] (credited to Lennon–McCartney) and recorded by the Beatles in 1969. It features a prominent three-part vocal harmony by Lennon, Paul McCartney, and George Harrison, overdubbed twice to make nine voices in all. It first appeared on Abbey Road (1969), immediately preceding the extended medley on side two of the record.

Composition[edit]

An electric harpsichord similar to the one used for “Because”

The song begins with a distinctive electric harpsichord intro played by producer George Martin. The harpsichord is joined by Lennon’s guitar (mimicking the harpsichord line) played through aLeslie speaker. Then vocals and bass guitar enter.

“Because” was one of few Beatles recordings to feature a Moog synthesiser, played by George Harrison. It appears in what Alan Pollack refers to as the “mini-bridge”,[2] and then again at the end of the song.

According to Lennon, the song’s close musical resemblance to the first movement of Ludwig van Beethoven‘s Moonlight Sonata was no coincidence: “Yoko was playing Beethoven’s ‘Moonlight Sonata’ on the piano … I said, ‘Can you play those chords backwards?’, and wrote ‘Because’ around them. The lyrics speak for themselves … No imagery, no obscure references.”[1][3]

Musical structure[edit]

With regard to the controversy Lennon initiated by citing Beethoven’s “Moonlight Sonata” as an inspiration, musicologist Walter Everett notes that “both arpeggiate triads and seventh chords inC♯ minor in the baritone range of a keyboard instrument at a slow tempo, move through the submediant to ♭II and approach vii dim7/IV via a common tone.”[4] But while acknowledging the unusual shared harmonies, Dominic Pedler notes that the relationship is not the result of reversing the order of the chords as Lennon suggested.[5]

“Because” concludes with a vocal fade-out on D dim, which keeps listeners in suspense as they wait for the return to the home key of C♯ minor. Mellers states that: “causality is released and there is no before and no after: becausethat flat supertonic is a moment of revelation, it needs no resolution.”[6] The D dim chord (and its accompanying melodic F♮) lingers until they resolve into the opening Am7 chord of “You Never Give Me Your Money“.

Recording[edit]

George Martin on “Because”:[7]

Between us, we also created a backing track with John playing a riff on guitar, me duplicating every note on an electronic harpsichord, and Paul playing bass. Each note between the guitar and harpsichord had to be exactly together, and as I’m not the world’s greatest player in terms of timing, I would make more mistakes than John did, so we had Ringo playing a regular beat on hi-hat to us through our headphones.

The main recording session for “Because” was on 1 August 1969, with vocal overdubs on 4 August, and a double-tracked Moog synthesiser overdub by Harrison on 5 August.[8] As a result, this was the last song on the album to be committed to tape, although there were still overdubs for other incomplete songs. This approach took extensive rehearsal, and more than five hours of extremely focused recording, to capture correctly. McCartney and Harrison both said it was their favourite track on Abbey Road. “They knew they were doing something special,” said engineer Geoff Emerick, “and they were determined to get it right.” [9] Versions of the song without instrumentation can be found on 1996’s Anthology 3 and 2006’s Love. Both versions highlight the three-part harmony by Lennon, McCartney and Harrison, though the Love version is lengthened and includes overdubbed birdsong from “Across the Universe“.

Personnel[edit]

Personnel per Ian MacDonald[10]

Cover versions[edit]

Year Artist Release Notes
1969 Gary McFarland Today
1971 John Williams Changes
1976 Lynsey De Paul All This and World War II
1977 Devo The Truth About De-Evolution (soundtrack) The song is performed (and distorted highly) during the film’s closing credits.
1978 Alice Cooper & The Bee Gees Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (soundtrack)
1981 Shampoo In Naples 1980–81 Lyrics rewritten in Neapolitan.
1982 Pedro Aznar Pedro Aznar
1987 Mike Marshall Gator Strut
1994 The Nylons The Nylons
1998 Vanessa-Mae George Martin‘s In My Life She performed the song on a solo violin with a background choir singing the lyrics.
1999 Elliott Smith American Beauty (soundtrack)
2004 Alejandro Dolina Tangos del Bar del Infierno Also used as the opening theme for his radio show La Venganza Será Terrible.
2005 George Clinton How Late Do U Have 2BB4UR Absent?
2005 Negativland No Business A complete deconstruction of the song on “Old is New” and “New is Old”, adding voice effects and additional track overlaying
2005 Ná Ozzetti & André Mehmari Piano e Voz
2007 Solveig Slettahjell Domestic Songs
2007 Various artists Across the Universe The six main characters and three minor characters in the film combined to perform the nine vocal parts.
2009 Nyoy Volante
2009 Martin John Henry Abbey Road Now!
2009 Gerry Rafferty Life Goes On
2013 Al Di Meola All Your Life
2013 Rachel Zeffira

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Jump up to:a b Sheff 2000, p. 191.
  2. Jump up^ Pollack.
  3. Jump up^ Snopes.com 2009, pp. 1.
  4. Jump up^ Walter Everett. The Beatles as Musicians: Revolver Through the Anthology Oxford University Press, Oxford 1999. pp. 259–260
  5. Jump up^ Dominic Pedler. The Songwriting Secrets of the Beatles. Music Sales Limited. Omnibus Press. NY. 2003. pp. 428–433
  6. Jump up^ Wilfred Mellers. Twilight of the Gods: The Music of the Beatles. Schirmer/Macmillan 1973. p. 118
  7. Jump up^ Buskin, Richard, insidetracks, p. 64-65
  8. Jump up^ Lewisohn 1988, pp. 184–185.
  9. Jump up^ “77 – ‘Because'”. 100 Greatest Beatles Songs. Rolling Stone. Retrieved 17 June 2012.
  10. Jump up^ MacDonald 2005, p. 365.

References[edit]

External links[edit]

The Beatles are featured in this episode below and Schaeffer noted,  ” Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band…for a time it became the rallying cry for young people throughout the world.”

How Should We then Live Episode 7 

 

The Beatles:

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Abraham Cruzvillegas: Autoconstrucción | ART21 “Exclusive”

Published on Mar 4, 2016

SUBSCRIBE 65K
Episode #232: Abraham Cruzvillegas discusses his personal and artistic relationship to the concept of autoconstrucción from his childhood home in Mexico City. “Autoconstucción is about self-constructing or constructing your own house,” the artist explains, adding, “I like the term because it leads me to think about the construction of identity.” Cruzvillegas, who is shown assembling his large-scale installation “The Autoconstrucción Suites” at the Walker Art Center, is not illustrating autoconstrucción houses through his work, but instead is activating the method’s dynamic improvisation through the use of found materials. Inspired by the harsh landscape and living conditions of his childhood neighborhood, Abraham Cruzvillegas assembles sculptures and installations from found objects and disparate materials. Expanding on the intellectual investigation of his own paradoxical aesthetic concepts of “autoconstrucción” and “autodestrucción,” he likens his works to self-portraits of contradictory elements, exploring the effects of improvisation, transformation, and decay on his materials and work. In his experiments with video and performance, through the use of academic research and personal and family archives, he reveals the deep connection between his identity—born of the realities of his family’s life in Mexico—and his artistic practice. Learn more about the artist at: http://www.art21.org/artists/abraham-… ART21 “Exclusive” is supported, in part, by 21c Museum Hotel, and by individual contributors. CREDITS: Producer: Ian Forster. Interview: Susan Sollins. Editor: Morgan Riles. Camera: Mark Falstad, Kevin Galligan, David Howe & Joel Shapiro. Sound: Heidi Hesse & Mauricio Rodríguez. Artwork Courtesy: Abraham Cruzvillegas. Special Thanks: Walker Art Center

Featured artist is Abraham Cruzvillegas

Abraham Cruzvillegas

Abraham Cruzvillegas was born in Mexico City in 1968. Inspired by the harsh landscape and living conditions of Colonia Ajusco, his childhood neighborhood in Mexico City where houses were built on inhospitable land in ad hoc improvisations according to personal needs and economic resources, Cruzvillegas assembles sculptures and installations from found objects and disparate materials.

Expanding on the intellectual investigation of his own paradoxical aesthetic concepts of autoconstrucción and autodestrucción*, he likens his works to self-portraits of contradictory elements and explores the effects of improvisation, transformation, and decay on his materials and work. In his experiments with video, performance, personal and family archives, and academic research, he reveals the deep connection between his identity—born of the realities of his family’s life in Mexico—and his artistic practice.

Abraham Cruzvillegas studied at Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM). He has been awarded residencies at DAAD (2010); Capp Street (2009); the Smithsonian Institution (2008); Cove Park (2008); Civitella Ranieri Foundation (2007); and Atelier Calder (2005). Other honors include the Yanghyun Prize (2012) and the Prix Altadis d’arts plastiques (2006). His work has appeared in major exhibitions at Haus der Kunst, Munich (2014); Walker Art Center (2013); Tate Modern (2012); Documenta (2012); Modern Art Oxford (2011); Istanbul Biennial (2011); Seoul Biennial (2010); CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts (2009); Havana Biennial (2009); the Centre for Contemporary Arts, Glasgow (2008); New Museum (2007); Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Monterrey (2004); Contemporary Arts Museum Houston (2003); Venice Biennale (2003); Bienal de São Paulo (2002); and Museo Universitario de Ciencias y Artes (MUCA), Mexico (2001). Abraham Cruzvillegas lives and works in Mexico City, Mexico.

*The terms autoconstrucción and autodestrucción (translated literally as self-construction and self-destruction) refer to methods of building and eventual destruction that arise from the constraints of poverty, which require scavenging, recycling, and adaptation of materials.

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