Monthly Archives: October 2013

Ecclesiastes Dr. Larry LeBlanc Summit, MS True Satisfaction

FBC Summit, October 28, 2012 am Service, Ecclesiastes

Published on Oct 30, 2012

Sermon, “The Story” Study in Ecclesiastes. Dr. Larry LeBlanc, Pastor, FBC Summit, Mississippi

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I have written on the Book of Ecclesiastes and the subject of the meaning of our lives on several occasions on this blog. In this series on Ecclesiastes I hope to show how secular humanist man can not hope to find a lasting meaning to his life in a closed system without bringing God back into the picture. This is the same exact case with Solomon in the Book of Ecclesiastes. Three thousand years ago, Solomon took a look at life “under the sun” in his book of Ecclesiastes. Christian scholar Ravi Zacharias has noted, “The key to understanding the Book of Ecclesiastes is the term ‘under the sun.’ What that literally means is you lock God out of a closed system, and you are left with only this world of time plus chance plus matter.”

Let me show you some inescapable conclusions if you choose to live without God in the picture. Solomon came to these same conclusions when he looked at life “under the sun.”

  1. Death is the great equalizer (Eccl 3:20, “All go to the same place; all come from dust, and to dust all return.”)
  2. Chance and time have determined the past, and they will determine the future.  (Ecclesiastes 9:11-13)
  3. Power reigns in this life, and the scales are not balanced(Eccl 4:1)
  4. Nothing in life gives true satisfaction without God including knowledge (1:16-18), ladies and liquor (2:1-3, 8, 10, 11), and great building projects (2:4-6, 18-20).

You can only find a lasting meaning to your life by looking above the sun and bring God back into the picture.

Related posts:

Ecclesiastes: Nothing New Under the Sun

I have written on the Book of Ecclesiastes and the subject of the meaning of our lives on several occasions on this blog. In this series on Ecclesiastes I hope to show how secular humanist man can not hope to find a lasting meaning to his life in a closed system without bringing God back into the picture. This is the same […]

Ecclesiastes Chapter 4: Order in a Fallen World

I have written on the Book of Ecclesiastes and the subject of the meaning of our lives on several occasions on this blog. In this series on Ecclesiastes I hope to show how secular humanist man can not hope to find a lasting meaning to his life in a closed system without bringing God back into the picture. This is the same […]

The Humanist has no hope to find lasting meaning in life apart from God

I have written on the Book of Ecclesiastes and the subject of the meaning of our lives on several occasions on this blog. In this series on Ecclesiastes I hope to show how secular humanist man can not hope to find a lasting meaning to his life in a closed system without bringing God back […]

 

The Humanist takes on Solomon and the Book of Ecclesiastes

This from the American Humanist website: This week we’re pleased to publish a new poem “Ecclesiastes” by Frank S. Robinson. Frank S. Robinson is a retired New York State administrative law judge, a rare coin dealer, and author of five books, most recently The Case for Rational Optimism. He is married to the poet Therese […]

Avril Lavigne commits “the fool’s sin” in front of family crowd in Tampa (Avril and the Book of Ecclesiastes Part 1)

Tampa Bay Rays apologize for Avril Lavigne TMZ reported: According to local reports, Avril’s mic didn’t work at the start of her show … and she responded to the cavalcade of boos by yelling obscenities at crowd. Rays rep Rick Vaughn tells TMZ, “The Rays demand profanity-free performances from all of our concert performers and […]

Taking on Ark Times Bloggers on various issues Part U “Do men have a say in the abortion debate?” (includes the film SLAUGHTER OF THE INNOCENTS and editorial cartoon)

I have gone back and forth and back and forth with many liberals on the Arkansas Times Blog on many issues such as abortion, human rights, welfare, poverty, gun control  and issues dealing with popular culture. Here is another exchange I had with them a while back. My username at the Ark Times Blog is Saline […]

2008 article on Woody Allen on the meaning of life

I have spent alot of time talking about Woody Allen films on this blog and looking at his worldview. He has a hopeless, meaningless, nihilistic worldview that believes we are going to turn to dust and there is no afterlife. Even though he has this view he has taken the opportunity to look at the weaknesses of […]

If I see Chris Martin of Coldplay in person what would I say to him? (Part 3)

Chris Martin revealed in his interview with Howard Stern that he was rasied an evangelical Christian but he has left the church. I believe that many words that he puts in his songs today are generated from the deep seated Christian beliefs from his childhood that find their way out in his songs. His belief in […]

Part 4 Adrian Rogers on Proverbs “How To Be The Father Of A Wise Child” (video too)

Picture of Adrian Rogers above from 1970′s while pastor of Bellevue Baptist of Memphis, and president of Southern Baptist Convention. (Little known fact, Rogers was the starting quarterback his senior year of the Palm Beach High School football team that won the state title and a hero to a 7th grader at the same school named […]

If I see Chris Martin of Coldplay in person what would I say to him? (Part 2)

Chris Martin revealed in his interview with Howard Stern that he was rasied an evangelical Christian but he has left the church. I believe that many words that he puts in his songs today are generated from the deep seated Christian beliefs from his childhood that find their way out in his songs. His belief in […]

Taking on Ark Times Bloggers on various issues Part N “A discussion of the Woody Allen Movie CRIMES AND MISDEMEANORS”(includes film DEATH BY SOMEONE’S CHOICE)

I have gone back and forth and back and forth with many liberals on the Arkansas Times Blog on many issues such as abortion, human rights, welfare, poverty, gun control  and issues dealing with popular culture. Here is another exchange I had with them a while back. My username at the Ark Times Blog is Saline […]

Taking on Ark Times Bloggers on various issues Part L “On what basis do you say murder is wrong?”Part 2 (includes the film THE BASIS FOR HUMAN DIGNITY)

I have gone back and forth and back and forth with many liberals on the Arkansas Times Blog on many issues such as abortion, human rights, welfare, poverty, gun control  and issues dealing with popular culture. Here is another exchange I had with them a while back. My username at the Ark Times Blog is Saline […]

Taking on Ark Times Bloggers on various issues Part K “On what basis do you say murder is wrong?”Part 1 (includes film ABORTION OF THE HUMAN RACE)

I have gone back and forth and back and forth with many liberals on the Arkansas Times Blog on many issues such as abortion, human rights, welfare, poverty, gun control  and issues dealing with popular culture. Here is another exchange I had with them a while back. My username at the Ark Times Blog is Saline […]

“Woody Wednesday” Another look at Woody Allen’s movie Crimes and Misdemeanors

I have spent alot of time talking about Woody Allen films on this blog and looking at his worldview. He has a hopeless, meaningless, nihilistic worldview that believes we are going to turn to dust and there is no afterlife. Even though he has this view he has taken the opportunity to look at the weaknesses of […]

“Woody Wednesday” A 2010 review of Woody Allen’s Annie Hall

I have spent alot of time talking about Woody Allen films on this blog and looking at his worldview. He has a hopeless, meaningless, nihilistic worldview that believes we are going to turn to dust and there is no afterlife. Even though he has this view he has taken the opportunity to look at the weaknesses of […]

Robert Dick Wilson’s talk “Is the Higher Criticism Scholarly?” (part 6 of transcript)

The Bible and Archaeology (3/5) For many more archaeological evidences in support of the Bible, see Archaeology and the Bible . (There are some great posts on this too at the bottom of this post.) Robert Dick Wilson at the Grove City Bible Conference in 1909. IS THE HIGHER CRITICISM SCHOLARLY?Clearly attested facts showing that thedestructive […]

“Woody Wednesday” In 2009 interview Woody Allen talks about the lack of meaning of life and the allure of younger women

I have spent alot of time talking about Woody Allen films on this blog and looking at his worldview. He has a hopeless, meaningless, nihilistic worldview that believes we are going to turn to dust and there is no afterlife. Even though he has this view he has taken the opportunity to look at the weaknesses of […]

“Woody Wednesday” Woody Allen on the Emptiness of Life by Toby Simmons

I have spent alot of time talking about Woody Allen films on this blog and looking at his worldview. He has a hopeless, meaningless, nihilistic worldview that believes we are going to turn to dust and there is no afterlife. Even though he has this view he has taken the opportunity to look at the weaknesses of […]

12 Questions for Woody Allen (Woody Wednesday)

Above is a clip of 12 questions for Woody Allen. Below is a list of some of his movies. WOODY’S FINEST: Philip French’s favourite five Annie Hall (1977) In his first fully achieved masterwork, a semi-autobiographical comedy in which his ex-lover Diane Keaton and best friend Tony Roberts play versions of themselves, Allen created a […]

“Woody Wednesday” Allen on the meaning of life (part 2)

September 3, 2011 · 5:16 PM ↓ Jump to Comments Woody Allen on the Emptiness of Life In the final scene of Manhattan, Woody Allen’s character, Isaac, is lying on the sofa with a microphone and a tape-recorder, dictating to himself an idea for a short story. It will be about “people in Manhattan,” he says, […]

Video interviews of Gwyneth Paltrow and Chris Martin (Part 4)

As far as I know they have never done an interview together. Therefore, I have included separate interviews that they have done below and I have some links to past posts I have done on them too. Shane Warne – Chris Martin Interview (Part 1) Uploaded by HandyAndy136 on Nov 24, 2010 Originally broadcast on […]

“Woody Wednesday” Allen realizes if God doesn’t exist then all is meaningless

The Bible and Archaeology (1/5) The Bible maintains several characteristics that prove it is from God. One of those is the fact that the Bible is accurate in every one of its details. The field of archaeology brings to light this amazing accuracy. _________________________- I want to make two points today. 1. There is no […]

Milton Friedman’s religious views

John Lofton noted: “DR. FRIEDMAN an evolutionist with ‘values’ of unknown origin but he said they were not ‘accidental.’ “   If anyone takes time to read my blog for any length of time they can not question my respect for the life long work of Milton Friedman. He has advanced the cause of freedom […]

By Everette Hatcher III | Posted in Atheists ConfrontedMilton Friedman | Edit | Comments (0)

Open letter to President Obama (Part 442) Michael Cannon of Cato Institute speaks to Arkansas Senators (Part 1, includes editorial cartoon)

 

(Emailed to White House on 3-20-13.)

President Obama c/o The White House
1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW
Washington, DC 20500

Dear Mr. President,

I know that you receive 20,000 letters a day and that you actually read 10 of them every day. I really do respect you for trying to get a pulse on what is going on out here.

According to Michael Cannon we can avoid Obamacare if we don’t set up an exchange. Is that true?

An ObamaCare Debate Challenge (Michael F. Cannon)

CATO Institute Michael Cannon at the Arkansas Conservative Caucus

Published on Mar 19, 2013

The CATO Institute’s Michael Cannon spoke at the Arkansas Conservative Caucus on Tuesday March 19th. Several conservatives were present. Cannon talked about how to defeat Obamacare in Arkansas & how the states can stop Obamacare on a national level.

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UALR Radio did a great job on the Michael Cannon visit below:
Health Insurance Exchanges
10:13 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Cato Health Expert Tells Arkansas To Abandon Insurance Exchange Plans

Credit Nathan Vandiver / KUAR
Michael Cannon of the Cato Institute told lawmakers Tuesday that abandoning plans to partner with the federal government on a health insurance exchange would both benefit the state and reduce the power of the Affordable Care Act.

Michael Cannon of the Cato Institute says Arkansas lawmakers should avoid as much state responsibility involved with the federal Affordable Care Act as possible.

The health policy expert from the Cato Institute, a public policy think tank dedicated to promoting free market principles, spoke with lawmakers Tuesday in the Senate Insurance and Commerce Committee to discuss the state’s options regarding what to do with its health insurance exchange.

Cannon says the state should leave the exchange up to the federal government.

“Rather than create a health insurance exchange or even try to help the Obama administration implement an exchange through the partnership model, I think that the state’s much better off trying to protect it’s employers and those 130,000 Arkansas residents from these illegal taxes,” Cannon said.

Cannon also says an Oklahoma lawsuit calling part of the Affordable Care Act an illegal tax could force lawmakers to take another look at the entire law.

Annabelle Imber Tuck, chair of the Arkansas Access to Justice Commission provided another view to reporters following the meeting. She’s on an advisory committee for the health insurance exchange which the state is already working on and says the state will be more responsive than the federal government when dealing with individual consumer’s issues.

“Our insurance department will be there for the complaints, have you ever tried to call Washington to complain about something? You can complain here under this partnership and under a state exchange and get some action,” Imber Tuck said.

In response to a question from Democratic Senator Joyce Elliott of Little Rock, Cannon said he was there to both advise legislators on the state’s health insurance exchange and to push stopping the Affordable Care Act altogether.

President Obama wants it all now it seems but he can’t pay for it.

 

obamacare cartoons, obamacare cartoon, obamacare picture, obamacare pictures, obamacare image, obamacare images, obamacare illustration, obamacare illustrations

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Thank you so much for your time. I know how valuable it is. I also appreciate the fine family that you have and your commitment as a father and a husband.

Sincerely,

Everette Hatcher III, 13900 Cottontail Lane, Alexander, AR 72002, ph 501-920-5733, lowcostsqueegees@yahoo.com

Relatedd posts:

 

 

Max Brantley of the Ark Times takes on Michael Cannon of the Cato Institute today concerning Obamacare

Max Brantley of the Ark Times takes on Michael Cannon of the Cato Institute today concerning Obamacare. I have posted many links to Cannon’s articles in the past on my blog and on the Arkansas Times liberal blog. The finest article written in my estimation was written on Nov 20, 2012 and here is a […]

Is Michael Cannon of the Cato Institute right about states blocking Obamacare, factchecker says he is wrong.

Cato’s Michael F. Cannon Discusses ObamaCare’s Individual Mandate Is Michael Cannon of the Cato Institute right about states blocking Obamacare, factchecker says he is wrong. I Have Been False* Posted by Michael F. Cannon *According to PolitiFact. In an unconscious parody of everything that’s wrong with the “fact-checker” movement in journalism, PolitiFact Georgia (a project of […]

An ObamaCare Debate Challenge by Michael F. Cannon (editorial cartoon)

Obamacare is a poorly written and because of that the majority of states may never have to put into practice.   February 28, 2013 2:13PM ObamaCare Debate Challenge: Lawrence Wasden Edition By Michael F. Cannon Share Tweet Like Google+1 Congress empowered states to block major provisions of ObamaCare, including its subsidies and employer mandate. All […]

Open letter to President Obama (Part 249)

Is Washington Bankrupting America? Uploaded by BankruptingAmerica on Apr 20, 2010 Be first to receive our videos and other timely info about economic policy. Subscribe at http://www.bankruptingamerica.org ————————- According to a recent poll, 74 percent of likely voters are extremely or very concerned about the current level of government spending. And 58 percent think the […]

The real truth about Obamacare can be seen on the www.thedailyhatch.org

Michael Cannon on Medicare and Healthcare You want to know the real truth about Obamacare then check out these videos and articles linked below: American people do not want Obamacare and the regulations that go with it March 7, 2012 – 8:02 am In this article below you will see that the American people do not […]

The primary cause of higher hospital care and education costs in the USA is?

Is Washington Bankrupting America? Uploaded by BankruptingAmerica on Apr 20, 2010 Be first to receive our videos and other timely info about economic policy. Subscribe at http://www.bankruptingamerica.org ————————- According to a recent poll, 74 percent of likely voters are extremely or very concerned about the current level of government spending. And 58 percent think the […]

 

Pro-life Atheist Nat Hentoff: “Without exception, Physicians emphasize that human life is a continuum–from the implantation of a fertilized egg in the uterine lining to birth to death”

Nat Hentoff is an atheist, but he became a pro-life activist because of the scientific evidence that shows that the unborn child is a distinct and separate human being and even has a separate DNA. His perspective is a very intriguing one that I thought you would be interested in. I have shared before many   cases (Bernard Nathanson, Donald Trump, Paul Greenberg, Kathy Ireland)    when other high profile pro-choice leaders have changed their views and this is just another case like those. I have contacted the White House over and over concerning this issue and have even received responses. I am hopeful that people will stop and look even in a secular way (if they are not believers) at this abortion debate and see that the unborn child is deserving of our protection.That is why the writings of Nat Hentoff of the Cato Institute are so crucial.

Beyond the ‘rehearsed response’

by Nat Hentoff
The Village Voice, January 30, 1996

I read my fellow columnist Adolph Reed Jr. with interest and sometimes find him illuminating. But when he writes with what W.H. Auden used to call a ”rehearsed response”–rather than independent research–he is disappointingly ordinary.

In a recent Voice column, Professor Reed–he is a tenured savant at Northwestern University–elegantly described me as having a ”fetus fetish.” The professor went on to declare unequivocally that ”a fetus is not a human being, it’s an organism growing inside the body, albeit an organism with the potential to become a human being.”

Since he or she (even fetuses have genders) has not yet been admitted into our protected circle, it’s okay to kill him or her.

I am familiar with the argument, being confronted with this rationale for abortion when I speak on the subject at colleges–including Princeton, Brown, the Columbia University Law School, Harvard, and other campuses.

Invariably, I am invited to address these largely hostile audiences by a small, hardy group of prolifers who present me as an oddity for their side–somewhat like the two-headed boy in the carnival.

They have spread the word beforehand that I am an atheist civil libertarian who writes for that prochoice bastion, The Village Voice. They add that my writings make clear that my views have far more in common with the teachings of justices William Brennan and Thurgood Marshall than with those of the Christian Coalition’s Ralph Reed, whom I consider an enemy of the Bill of Rights.

So what the hell am I doing with a fetus fetish–particularly since Margot, my wife of many years, is unswervingly prochoice?

I begin my talks to students and faculty eager to dissect my heresy with a quote from the second edition of a standard medical textbook, The Unborn Patient: Prenatal Diagnosis and Treatment, published by W.B. Saunders Company, a division of Harcourt Brace, in 1991. The editors–all medical school professors at the University of California at San Francisco and experts in fetal treatment–are Michael Harrison, Mitchell Golbus, and Roy Filly.

God is nowhere mentioned in the textbook. The first chapter begins: ”The concept that the fetus is a patient, an individual whose maladies are a proper subject for medical treatment as well as scientific observation, is alarmingly modern. Only now are we beginning to consider the fetus seriously–medically, legally, and ethically.”

In recent years I’ve interviewed a number of physicians engaged in research on prenatal development. Without exception, they emphasize that human life is a continuum–from the implantation of a fertilized egg in the uterine lining to birth to death. Setting up divisions of this process to justify abortion –as in Roe v. Wade–is artificial. It’s a denial of biology. Whether in the fourth or 14th week, it is the life of a developing human being that is being killed. The American Medical News (June 20, 1994)–a weekly publication of the American Medical Association–has reported an analysis of the beginnings of human life by Dr. C. Ward Kischer, a professor in the department of anatomy at the University of Arizona College of Medicine. I commend it to Professor Reed:

”Every point in time is part of a continuum. Therefore, every point in development derives its significance from the previous point. Scientific ‘spin doctors’ have invented and promoted such bogus biology as ‘pre-embryo’ and ‘stages of individuality,’ and have duped many physicians who know little about human embryology. Many of them are now using this pseudo-science to justify human embryo experimentation. The Nuremberg trials settled this question conclusively.”

The Nuremberg trials were concerned solely with human beings, as I am.

In the February 18, 1990, Journal of the American Medical Association, Dr. Joel Hylton, a physician in Thomasville, North Carolina, who had people like Adolph Reed Jr. in mind, wrote:

”Who can say that the fetus is not alive and is not a separate genetic entity? Its humanity…also cannot be questioned scientifically. It is certainly of no other species. That it is dependent on another makes it qualitatively no different from countless other humans outside the womb.” (Emphasis added.)

Dr. Hylton added: ”It strikes me that to argue that one may take an innocent life to preserve the quality of life of another is cold and carries utilitarianism to an obscene extreme. Nowhere else in our society is this permitted or even thinkable–although abortion sets a frightening prospect.”

In 1975, Margot Hentoff wrote a piece on abortion in the Voice that created a great deal of comment, most of it savagely critical. Then, as now, she was for abortion rights. Then, as now, she was an admirer of George Orwell and shunned euphemisms. In any context, she does not turn away from–in William Burroughs’s phrase–”the naked lunch at the end of the fork.” To say the least, she is a challenge to live with and has made me more honest than I would have been otherwise.

In the Voice, Margot wrote:

”Here we have one of the problems created by the liberal community’s obfuscation of language in refusing to speak plainly about what abortion is.

”They have held on to the illogical concept that the fetus is not a human being, that no killing is involved, and that an abortion is merely an operative procedure on a woman who has the right to decide what she wants to do with her body and the products thereof.”

In the October 16, 1995, New Republic, Naomi Wolf, also strongly prochoice, wrote: ”Many pro-choice advocates developed a language to assert that the fetus isn’t a person, and this, over the years, has developed into a lexicon of dehumanization….

”How can we charge that it is vile and repulsive for pro-lifers to brandish vile and repulsive images if the images are real?”

Copyright 1996 VV Publishing Company

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In the past I have spent most of my time looking at this issue from the spiritual side. In the film series “WHATEVER HAPPENED TO THE HUMAN RACE?” the arguments are presented  against abortion (Episode 1),  infanticide (Episode 2),   euthanasia (Episode 3), and then there is a discussion of the Christian versus Humanist worldview concerning the issue of “the basis for human dignity” in Episode 4 and then in the last episode a close look at the truth claims of the Bible.

Francis Schaeffer

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I truly believe that many of the problems we have today in the USA are due to the advancement of humanism in the last few decades in our society. Ronald Reagan appointed the evangelical Dr. C. Everett Koop to the position of Surgeon General in his administration. He partnered with Dr. Francis Schaeffer in making the video below. It is very valuable information for Christians to have.  Actually I have included a video below that includes comments from him on this subject.

In the film series “WHATEVER HAPPENED TO THE HUMAN RACE?” the arguments are presented  against abortion (Episode 1),  infanticide (Episode 2),   euthanasia (Episode 3), and then there is a discussion of the Christian versus Humanist worldview concerning the issue of “the basis for human dignity” in Episode 4 and then in the last episode a close look at the truth claims of the Bible.

Francis Schaeffer: How Should We Then Live? (Full-Length Documentary)

Francis Schaeffer Whatever Happened to the Human Race (Episode 1) ABORTION

Francis Schaeffer: What Ever Happened to the Human Race? (Full-Length Documentary)

Part 1 on abortion runs from 00:00 to 39:50, Part 2 on Infanticide runs from 39:50 to 1:21:30, Part 3 on Youth Euthanasia runs from 1:21:30 to 1:45:40, Part 4 on the basis of human dignity runs from 1:45:40 to 2:24:45 and Part 5 on the basis of truth runs from 2:24:45 to 3:00:04

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Related posts:

Al Mohler on Kermit Gosnell’s abortion practice

Francis Schaeffer: “Whatever Happened to the Human Race” (Episode 1) ABORTION OF THE HUMAN RACE Published on Oct 6, 2012 by AdamMetropolis ________________ Picture of Francis Schaeffer and his wife Edith from the 1930′s above. I was sad to read about Edith passing away on Easter weekend in 2013. I wanted to pass along this fine […]

A man of pro-life convictions: Bernard Nathanson (part4)

ABORTION – THE SILENT SCREAM 1 / Extended, High-Resolution Version (with permission from APF). Republished with Permission from Roy Tidwell of American Portrait Films as long as the following credits are shown: VHS/DVDs Available American Portrait Films Call 1-800-736-4567 http://www.amport.com The Hand of God-Selected Quotes from Bernard N. Nathanson, M.D., Unjust laws exist. Shall we […]

Abortionist Bernard Nathanson turned pro-life activist (part 11)

ABORTION – THE SILENT SCREAM 1 / Extended, High-Resolution Version (with permission from APF). Republished with Permission from Roy Tidwell of American Portrait Films as long as the following credits are shown: VHS/DVDs Available American Portrait Films Call 1-800-736-4567 http://www.amport.com The Hand of God-Selected Quotes from Bernard N. Nathanson, M.D., Unjust laws exist. Shall we […]

Abortionist Bernard Nathanson turned pro-life activist (part 9)(Donald Trump changes to pro-life view)

When I think of the things that make me sad concerning this country, the first thing that pops into my mind is our treatment of unborn children. Donald Trump is probably going to run for president of the United States. Tony Perkins of the Family Research Council recently had a conversation with him concerning the […]

Taking on Ark Times Bloggers on various issues Part U “Do men have a say in the abortion debate?” (includes the film SLAUGHTER OF THE INNOCENTS and editorial cartoon)

I have gone back and forth and back and forth with many liberals on the Arkansas Times Blog on many issues such as abortion, human rights, welfare, poverty, gun control  and issues dealing with popular culture. Here is another exchange I had with them a while back. My username at the Ark Times Blog is Saline […]

Taking on Ark Times Bloggers on various issues Part T “Abortion is a dirty business” (includes video “Truth and History” and editorial cartoon)

I have gone back and forth and back and forth with many liberals on the Arkansas Times Blog on many issues such as abortion, human rights, welfare, poverty, gun control  and issues dealing with popular culture. Here is another exchange I had with them a while back. My username at the Ark Times Blog is Saline […]

“Sanctity of Life Saturday” Abortion supporters lying in order to further their clause? Window to the Womb (includes video ABORTION OF THE HUMAN RACE)

It is truly sad to me that liberals will lie in order to attack good Christian people like state senator Jason Rapert of Conway, Arkansas because he headed a group of pro-life senators that got a pro-life bill through the Arkansas State Senate the last week of January in 2013. I have gone back and […]

Taking on Ark Times Bloggers on various issues Part D “If you can’t afford a child can you abort?”Francis Schaeffer Quotes part 4 includes the film ABORTION OF THE HUMAN RACE) (editorial cartoon)

I have gone back and forth and back and forth with many liberals on the Arkansas Times Blog on many issues such as abortion, human rights, welfare, poverty, gun control  and issues dealing with popular culture. Here is another exchange I had with them a while back. My username at the Ark Times Blog is Saline […]

Taking on Ark Times Bloggers on various issues Part C “Abortion” (Francis Schaeffer Quotes part 3 includes the film SLAUGHTER OF THE INNOCENTS) (editorial cartoon)

I have gone back and forth and back and forth with many liberals on the Arkansas Times Blog on many issues such as abortion, human rights, welfare, poverty, gun control  and issues dealing with popular culture. Here is another exchange I had with them a while back. My username at the Ark Times Blog is Saline […]

Taking on Ark Times Bloggers on various issues Part B “Gendercide” (Francis Schaeffer Quotes Part 2 includes the film ABORTION OF THE HUMAN RACE) (editorial cartoon)

I have gone back and forth and back and forth with many liberals on the Arkansas Times Blog on many issues such as abortion, human rights, welfare, poverty, gun control  and issues dealing with popular culture. Here is another exchange I had with them a while back. My username at the Ark Times Blog is Saline […]

SANCTITY OF LIFE SATURDAY “AngryOldWoman” blogger argues that she has no regrets about past abortion

Sometimes you can see evidences in someone’s life of how content they really are. I saw  something like that on 2-8-13 when I confronted a blogger that goes by the name “AngryOldWoman” on the Arkansas Times Blog. See below. Leadership Crisis in America Published on Jul 11, 2012 Picture of Adrian Rogers above from 1970′s […]

“Sanctity of Life Saturday” The Church Awakens: Whatever Happened to the Human Race? (includes the video ABORTION OF THE HUMAN RACE)

In the film series “WHATEVER HAPPENED TO THE HUMAN RACE?” the arguments are presented  against abortion (Episode 1),  infanticide (Episode 2),   euthenasia (Episode 3), and then there is a discussion of the Christian versus Humanist worldview concerning the issue of “the basis for human dignity” in Episode 4 and then in the last episode a close […]

Taking on Ark Times Bloggers on various issues Part H “Are humans special?” includes film ABORTION OF THE HUMAN RACE) Reagan: ” To diminish the value of one category of human life is to diminish us all”

I have gone back and forth and back and forth with many liberals on the Arkansas Times Blog on many issues such as abortion, human rights, welfare, poverty, gun control  and issues dealing with popular culture. Here is another exchange I had with them a while back. My username at the Ark Times Blog is Saline […]

Taking on Ark Times Bloggers on various issues Part G “How do moral nonabsolutists come up with what is right?” includes the film “ABORTION OF THE HUMAN RACE”)

I have gone back and forth and back and forth with many liberals on the Arkansas Times Blog on many issues such as abortion, human rights, welfare, poverty, gun control  and issues dealing with popular culture. Here is another exchange I had with them a while back. My username at the Ark Times Blog is Saline […]

Taking on Ark Times Bloggers on various issues Part E “Moral absolutes and abortion” Francis Schaeffer Quotes part 5(includes the film SLAUGHTER OF THE INNOCENTS) (editorial cartoon)

I have gone back and forth and back and forth with many liberals on the Arkansas Times Blog on many issues such as abortion, human rights, welfare, poverty, gun control  and issues dealing with popular culture. Here is another exchange I had with them a while back. My username at the Ark Times Blog is Saline […]

Francis Schaeffer’s “How should we then live?” Video and outline of episode 10 “Final Choices” (Schaeffer Sundays)

E P I S O D E 1 0   Dr. Francis Schaeffer – Episode X – Final Choices 27 min FINAL CHOICES I. Authoritarianism the Only Humanistic Social Option One man or an elite giving authoritative arbitrary absolutes. A. Society is sole absolute in absence of other absolutes. B. But society has to be […]

Francis Schaeffer’s “How should we then live?” Video and outline of episode 9 “The Age of Personal Peace and Affluence” (Schaeffer Sundays)

E P I S O D E 9 Dr. Francis Schaeffer – Episode IX – The Age of Personal Peace and Affluence 27 min T h e Age of Personal Peace and Afflunce I. By the Early 1960s People Were Bombarded From Every Side by Modern Man’s Humanistic Thought II. Modern Form of Humanistic Thought Leads […]

Francis Schaeffer’s “How should we then live?” Video and outline of episode 8 “The Age of Fragmentation” (Schaeffer Sundays)

E P I S O D E 8 Dr. Francis Schaeffer – Episode VIII – The Age of Fragmentation 27 min I saw this film series in 1979 and it had a major impact on me. T h e Age of FRAGMENTATION I. Art As a Vehicle Of Modern Thought A. Impressionism (Monet, Renoir, Pissarro, Sisley, […]

Francis Schaeffer’s “How should we then live?” Video and outline of episode 7 “The Age of Non-Reason” (Schaeffer Sundays)

E P I S O D E 7 Dr. Francis Schaeffer – Episode VII – The Age of Non Reason I am thrilled to get this film series with you. I saw it first in 1979 and it had such a big impact on me. Today’s episode is where we see modern humanist man act […]

Francis Schaeffer’s “How should we then live?” Video and outline of episode 6 “The Scientific Age” (Schaeffer Sundays)

E P I S O D E 6 How Should We Then Live 6#1 Uploaded by NoMirrorHDDHrorriMoN on Oct 3, 2011 How Should We Then Live? Episode 6 of 12 ________ I am sharing with you a film series that I saw in 1979. In this film Francis Schaeffer asserted that was a shift in […]

Francis Schaeffer’s “How should we then live?” Video and outline of episode 5 “The Revolutionary Age” (Schaeffer Sundays)

E P I S O D E 5 How Should We Then Live? Episode 5: The Revolutionary Age I was impacted by this film series by Francis Schaeffer back in the 1970′s and I wanted to share it with you. Francis Schaeffer noted, “Reformation Did Not Bring Perfection. But gradually on basis of biblical teaching there […]

Francis Schaeffer’s “How should we then live?” Video and outline of episode 4 “The Reformation” (Schaeffer Sundays)

Dr. Francis Schaeffer – Episode IV – The Reformation 27 min I was impacted by this film series by Francis Schaeffer back in the 1970′s and I wanted to share it with you. Schaeffer makes three key points concerning the Reformation: “1. Erasmian Christian humanism rejected by Farel. 2. Bible gives needed answers not only as to […]

“Schaeffer Sundays” Francis Schaeffer’s “How should we then live?” Video and outline of episode 3 “The Renaissance”

Francis Schaeffer’s “How should we then live?” Video and outline of episode 3 “The Renaissance” Francis Schaeffer: “How Should We Then Live?” (Episode 3) THE RENAISSANCE I was impacted by this film series by Francis Schaeffer back in the 1970′s and I wanted to share it with you. Schaeffer really shows why we have so […]

Francis Schaeffer’s “How should we then live?” Video and outline of episode 2 “The Middle Ages” (Schaeffer Sundays)

  Francis Schaeffer: “How Should We Then Live?” (Episode 2) THE MIDDLE AGES I was impacted by this film series by Francis Schaeffer back in the 1970′s and I wanted to share it with you. Schaeffer points out that during this time period unfortunately we have the “Church’s deviation from early church’s teaching in regard […]

Francis Schaeffer’s “How should we then live?” Video and outline of episode 1 “The Roman Age” (Schaeffer Sundays)

Francis Schaeffer: “How Should We Then Live?” (Episode 1) THE ROMAN AGE   Today I am starting a series that really had a big impact on my life back in the 1970′s when I first saw it. There are ten parts and today is the first. Francis Schaeffer takes a look at Rome and why […]

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“Woody Wednesday” Melinda and Melinda

I enjoyed the movie “Melinda and Melinda” and Woody Allen did a great job of bringing up big issues.

Melinda and Melinda

Movies | Woody Allen may not have all the answers, but he does ask some of the right questions

No one is going to accuse Woody Allen of having the answers to life’s important questions. At least no one who doesn’t share the prolific director’s pronounced set of neuroses, obsessions, and eccentricities. But at his best, Mr. Allen at least asks some of the right questions-and often in a way that few other filmmakers are willing to do (e.g., 1989’s Crimes and Misdemeanors).

Besides that, Mr. Allen can be pretty funny, at least according to some tastes. But lately, Mr. Allen hasn’t been much of either-thoughtful or funny. His latest film, Melinda and Melinda (rated PG-13 for adult situations involving sexuality, and some substance material), offers some of the rewards of Mr. Allen’s earlier films but isn’t anywhere near as profound or as entertaining as the best of them.

The basic setup involves a dinner discussion between two playwrights, one who writes comedies, the other tragedies. The discussion turns to whether “life” is basically comic or tragic, with each playwright taking the side opposite to his craft. A third dinner guest introduces a true story he’s heard, and each playwright begins to fill in the details of the tale, demonstrating that it can be taken in a direction either amusing or heartbreaking.

Thus Melinda and Melinda. Both “Melindas” are played by Australian actress Radha Mitchell, who begins each story by bursting into a dinner party unexpectedly. In the tragic tale, it’s a party hosted by “Park Avenue Princess” Chloë Sevigny and her out-of-work-actor husband Johnny Lee Miller; Ms. Mitchell’s Melinda is a wayward old college friend. In the comic tale, the party is in the home of feminist filmmaker Amanda Peet and her also out-of-work-actor husband Will Ferrell; Melinda is a depressed neighbor who’s taken too many sleeping pills.

Mr. Ferrell plays, essentially, Woody Allen-and does quite well as Mr. Allen’s onscreen proxy. Unfortunately, most everyone else in the film also plays some variation of Woody Allen too, and as a result they’re all pretty much insufferable and rarely come across as real people.

The value in Mr. Allen’s films was once found in a willingness both to take seriously and ridicule varying philosophies and belief systems. Fully understood or not, ideas had consequences. But from the weakly deconstructed setup to an even weaker eat-drink-and-be-merry finale, not much about Melinda communicates a similar intellectual rigor.

Related posts:

“Woody Wednesday” Emma Stone Considering Lead Role In Woody Allen’s Next Movie

I have spent alot of time talking about Woody Allen films on this blog and looking at his worldview. He has a hopeless, meaningless, nihilistic worldview that believes we are going to turn to dust and there is no afterlife. Even though he has this view he has taken the opportunity to look at the weaknesses of his own secular view. I […]

2008 article on Woody Allen on the meaning of life

I have spent alot of time talking about Woody Allen films on this blog and looking at his worldview. He has a hopeless, meaningless, nihilistic worldview that believes we are going to turn to dust and there is no afterlife. Even though he has this view he has taken the opportunity to look at the weaknesses of […]

“Woody Wednesday” First Look Image: Louis C.K. in Woody Allen’s Blue Jasmine

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“Woody Wednesday” Trivia about Woody Allen Part 5

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“Woody Wednesday” Trivia about Woody Allen Part 4

Woody Allen interview 1971 PART 1/4 I have spent alot of time talking about Woody Allen films on this blog and looking at his worldview. He has a hopeless, meaningless, nihilistic worldview that believes we are going to turn to dust and there is no afterlife. Even though he has this view he has taken the opportunity […]

Taking on Ark Times Bloggers on various issues Part N “A discussion of the Woody Allen Movie CRIMES AND MISDEMEANORS”(includes film DEATH BY SOMEONE’S CHOICE)

I have gone back and forth and back and forth with many liberals on the Arkansas Times Blog on many issues such as abortion, human rights, welfare, poverty, gun control  and issues dealing with popular culture. Here is another exchange I had with them a while back. My username at the Ark Times Blog is Saline […]

“Woody Wednesday” Trivia about Woody Allen Part 3

Woody Allen interview 1971 PART 2/4 I have spent alot of time talking about Woody Allen films on this blog and looking at his worldview. He has a hopeless, meaningless, nihilistic worldview that believes we are going to turn to dust and there is no afterlife. Even though he has this view he has taken the opportunity […]

“Woody Wednesday” Trivia about Woody Allen Part 2

Dick & Woody get semi-metaphysical I have spent alot of time talking about Woody Allen films on this blog and looking at his worldview. He has a hopeless, meaningless, nihilistic worldview that believes we are going to turn to dust and there is no afterlife. Even though he has this view he has taken the opportunity to […]

“Woody Wednesday” Trivia about Woody Allen Part 1

Woody Allen about meaning and truth of life on Earth I have spent alot of time talking about Woody Allen films on this blog and looking at his worldview. He has a hopeless, meaningless, nihilistic worldview that believes we are going to turn to dust and there is no afterlife. Even though he has this view he […]

“Woody Wednesday” Woody Allen video interview in France talk about making movies in Paris vs NY and other subjects like God, etc

Woody Allen video interview in France Related posts: “Woody Wednesdays” Woody Allen on God and Death June 6, 2012 – 6:00 am Good website on Woody Allen How can I believe in God when just last week I got my tongue caught in the roller of an electric typewriter? If Jesus Christ came back today and […]

Nico’s sad story of drugs and her interaction with Jim Morrison

Nico’s sad story of drugs and her interaction with Jim Morrison

Nico – These Days

The Doors (1991) – Movie Trailer / Best Parts

The Doors Movie – Back Door Man/When The Music’s Over/Arrest of Jim Morrison

Uploaded on Jul 30, 2009

A clip from “The Doors” movie with “Back Door Man”, “When The Music’s Over” and arrest of Jim Morrison in New Haven, Connecticut.

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When You’re Strange (Parte 2)(Shows Andy Warhol)

Jim Morrison’s Last Interview

Published on Sep 3, 2012

Recording Date: February xx – 1971
Interview Location: Diane Gardiner’s Apartment – Los Angeles, CA
Publication: Rolling Stone #77 – March 4th – 1971
Length: 73:43

Info:
Jim Morrison’s last known recorded interview is conducted by Rolling Stone journalist Ben Fong-Torres and features Pamela Courson. This tape was made unintentionally after a chance meeting at Diane Gardiner’s apartment in Los Angeles. The interview is later used in the March 4th, 1971 issue of Rolling Stone

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The Warehouse – New Orleans

Uploaded on Dec 1, 2011

On January 30th 1970 The Warehouse opened it’s doors to thousands of fans to see The Flock, Fleetwood Mac and The Grateful Dead. In the ensuing twelve years some of the best musicians in the world would grace the stage. Including – The Allman Brothers, Bob Dylan, The Doors, Pink Floyd, The Who, Bob Marley, David Bowie, Foghat, Jethro Tull, The Clash, The Talking Heads, Rush, Dr. John and many many more. We are filming this documentary in an attempt to capture some of the magic that so many of us missed out on.

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Turn out the Lights – Jim Morrison’s last night on stage

Uploaded on Feb 14, 2012

74 minute documentary on The Warehouse available – http://www.ebay.com/itm/321226531309?…

Jim Morrison’s last night on stage with The Doors was at The Warehouse in New Orleans Louisiana on December 12, 1970. This short film uses interviews with The Warehouse owners, employees and a fan to tell the story of what really happened that night. This is a small portion of my larger documentary “A Warehouse on Tchoupitoulas” which delves into all the goings on at New Orleans’ most infamous music venue.

 

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Morrison & Nico, The End*

I’ll be your Mirror NICO 1966 Warhol video

Uploaded on Jan 25, 2011

Andy Warhol s NICO the IT Girl of 1966 in the Kitchen 1967 Velvet Underground rare original Chelsea Girl Lou Reed Song christa Päffgen

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Nico Icon (Documentary) part7

 

NICO interview

Uploaded on Jul 24, 2007

somewhere in England Manchester university with ‘Blue Orchids’

Lou Reed on the Charlie Rose Show (April 21st 1998)

Uploaded on Apr 17, 2011

Charlie Rose talks to musician and writer Lou Reed about his career and various projects.

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Nico

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Nico
Nico at Lampeter University - November 1985 (1).jpg

Nico, 1985.
Background information
Birth name Christa Päffgen
Born 16 October 1938
Cologne, Germany
Died 18 July 1988 (aged 49)
Ibiza, Spain
Genres Art rock, folk rock, protopunk, experimental, avant-garde
Occupations Composer, singer, musician, fashion model, actress
Instruments Vocals, keyboards, harmonium, tambourine
Years active 1954–1988
Labels Verve, Elektra, Reprise, Island, Beggars Banquet
Associated acts The Velvet Underground, John Cale, Lou Reed, Brian Jones, Kevin Ayers, John Cooper Clarke, The Invisible Girls, Blue Orchids, Bob Dylan, Brian Eno

Nico (born Christa Päffgen; 16 October 1938 – 18 July 1988)[1][2] was a German singer-songwriter, lyricist, composer, musician, fashion model, and actress, who initially rose to fame as a Warhol Superstar in the 1960s. She is known for both her vocal collaboration on The Velvet Underground‘s debut album, The Velvet Underground & Nico (1967), and her work as a solo artist from the late 1960s through the 1980s. She also had roles in several films, including Federico Fellini‘s La Dolce Vita (1960) and Andy Warhol‘s Chelsea Girls (1966), as herself. Nico died in July 1988, as a result of injuries sustained in a cycling accident while vacationing in Ibiza with her son.[1]

Early life

Nico was born Christa Päffgen in Cologne, five years after the Nazis came to power in Germany. When she was two years old, she moved with her mother and grandfather to the Spreewald forest outside of Berlin. Her father was enlisted as a soldier during World War II, and sustained head injuries that caused severe brain damage; he was variously said to have died in a concentration camp,[3][4] or to have faded away as a result of the shellshock he suffered.[5]

In 1946, Nico and her mother relocated to downtown Berlin, where Nico worked as a seamstress. She attended school until the age 13, and then began selling lingerie in the exclusive department store KaDeWe, eventually getting modeling jobs in Berlin.[4] Standing at five feet, ten inches tall and with chiseled features and porcelain skin, Nico rose to prominence as a fashion model as a teenager.

At 15 years of age, according to various conflicting accounts, Nico was said to have been raped by a member of the U.S. Air Force who was sentenced to death.[6] Her song “Secret Side” from the album The End, made oblique references to this. A review of the album The End examines the poetry of “Secret Side” and questions the validity of the rape legend.[7]

Career

Acting and modeling (1954-1964)

Discovered at 16 by photographer Herbert Tobias while both were working at a KaDeWe fashion show in Berlin, Tobias christened ‘Nico’ with her adopted name, which she used for most of her life.[8] Tobias named her this after his friend, filmmaker Nikos Papatakis. She soon moved to Paris and began working for Vogue, Tempo, Vie Nuove, Mascotte Spettacolo, Camera, Elle, and other fashion magazines. At age 17, she was contracted by Coco Chanel to promote their products, but she fled to New York City and abandoned the job.[3] Through her travels, she learned to speak English, Spanish, and French.

After appearing in several television advertisements, Nico got a small role in Alberto Lattuada‘s film La Tempesta (1958). She also appeared in Rudolph Maté‘s For the First Time, with Mario Lanza, later that year.

In 1959, she was invited to the set of Federico Fellini‘s La Dolce Vita, where she attracted the attention of the acclaimed director, who gave her a minor role in the film as herself. By this time, she was living in New York and taking acting classes with Lee Strasberg.[4]

She appears as the cover model on jazz pianist Bill Evans‘ 1962 album, Moon Beams.[9] After splitting her time between New York and Paris, she got the lead role in Jacques Poitrenaud‘s Strip-Tease (1963). She recorded the title track, which was written by Serge Gainsbourg but not released until 2001, when it was included in the compilation Le Cinéma de Serge Gainsbourg.

In 1962, Nico gave birth to her son, Christian Aaron “Ari” Päffgen, commonly held to have been fathered by French actor Alain Delon.[10] Delon always denied his paternity. The child was raised mostly by Delon’s mother and her husband and eventually was adopted by them, taking their surname, Boulogne.[11]

Nico’s first performances as a singer took place in December 1963 at New York’s Blue Angel nightclub, where she sang standards such as “My Funny Valentine”.

The Velvet Underground (1965-1967)

Nico performing the Exploding Plastic Inevitable in Ann Arbor, Michigan, 1966.

In 1965, Nico met Rolling Stones guitarist Brian Jones and recorded her first single, “I’m Not Sayin’” with the b-side “The Last Mile“, produced by Jimmy Page for Andrew Loog Oldham‘s Immediate label. Actor Ben Carruthers introduced her to Bob Dylan in Paris that summer. In 1967 Nico recorded his song “I’ll Keep It with Mine” for her first album, Chelsea Girl.[1] Dylan had written the tune for Judy Collins in 1964, according to her own liner notes from the Geffen Records’ album “Judy Collins Sings Dylan” album (she was the first artist to release the song, in 1965).

After being introduced by Brian Jones, she began working in New York with Andy Warhol and Paul Morrissey on their experimental films, including Chelsea Girls, The Closet, Sunset and Imitation of Christ.

When Warhol began managing The Velvet Underground he proposed that the group take on Nico as a “chanteuse“. They consented reluctantly, for both personal and musical reasons.[12][13] The group became the centerpiece of Warhol’s Exploding Plastic Inevitable, a multimedia performance featuring music, light, film and dance. Nico sang lead vocals on three songs (“Femme Fatale“, “All Tomorrow’s Parties“, “I’ll Be Your Mirror“) and backing vocal on “Sunday Morning”, on the band’s debut album, The Velvet Underground & Nico (1967).[1] Nico’s tenure in the Velvet Underground was marked by personal and musical difficulties. Violist and bassist John Cale has written that Nico’s long preparations in the dressing room and pre-performance good luck ritual (burning a candle) would often hold up a performance, which especially irritated band member Lou Reed. Nico’s partial deafness also would sometimes cause her to veer off key, for which she was ridiculed by other band members.[14] The album went on to become timeless in legend. It scored #13 on Rolling Stones 500 Greatest Albums of All Time,[15] though it was poorly received at the time of its release.

Early solo career (1967-1977)

Immediately following her musical work with The Velvet Underground, Nico began work as a solo artist, performing regularly at The Dom in New York City. At these shows, Nico was accompanied by a revolving cast of guitarists, including members of The Velvet Underground, Tim Hardin, Tim Buckley, Ramblin’ Jack Elliott and Jackson Browne.

For her debut album, 1967’s Chelsea Girl, she recorded songs by Bob Dylan, Tim Hardin and Jackson Browne, among others. Velvet Underground members Lou Reed, John Cale and Sterling Morrison contributed to the album, with Nico, Reed and Cale co-writing one song, “It Was a Pleasure Then.”[16] Chelsea Girl is a traditional chamber-folk album, which influenced artists such as Leonard Cohen, with strings and flute arrangements by producer Tom Wilson. Nico was not satisfied with the album and had little say in production matters. In retrospect, she said in 1981:

“I still cannot listen to it, because everything I wanted for that record, they took it away. I asked for drums, they said no. I asked for more guitars, they said no. And I asked for simplicity, and they covered it in flutes! […] They added strings, and— I didn’t like them, but I could live with them. But the flute! The first time I heard the album, I cried and it was all because of the flute.”[17]

In California, Nico spent time with Jim Morrison of The Doors. Morrison encouraged Nico to write her own songs. She would later refer to him as her “soul brother”.

For The Marble Index, released in 1969, Nico wrote the lyrics and music. Accompaniment mainly centered around Nico’s harmonium, while John Cale added an array of folk and classical instruments, and arranged the album. The harmonium became her signature instrument for the rest of her career. The album has a classical-cum-European folk sound.

A promotional film for the song “Evening of Light” was filmed by Francois de Menil. This video featured the now red-haired Nico and Iggy Pop of The Stooges.

Returning to live performance in the early 1970s, Nico (accompanying herself on harmonium) gave concerts in Amsterdam as well as London, where she and John Cale opened for Pink Floyd. 1972 saw a one-off live reunion of Nico, Cale and Lou Reed at Bataclan in Paris.

Nico released two more solo albums in the 1970s, Desertshore (1970) and The End… (1974). Nico wrote the music, sang, and played the harmonium. Cale produced and played most of the other instruments on both albums. The End… featured Brian Eno on synthesizer and Phil Manzanera on guitar, both from Roxy Music. She appeared at the Rainbow Theatre, in London, with Cale, Eno, and Kevin Ayers. The album June 1, 1974 was the result of this concert. Nico performed a version of the Doors’ “The End”, which was the catalyst for The End… later that year.

Between 1970 and 1979, Nico made about seven films with French director Philippe Garrel. She met Garrel in 1969 and contributed the song “The Falconer” to his film Le Lit de la Vierge. Soon after, she was living with Garrel and became a central figure in his cinematic and personal circles. Nico’s first acting appearance with Garrel occurred in his 1972 film, La Cicatrice Intérieure. Nico also supplied the music for this film and collaborated closely with the director. She also appeared in the Garrel films Anathor (1972); the silent Jean Seberg feature Les Hautes Solitudes, released in 1974; Un ange passe (1975); Le Berceau de cristal (1976), starring Pierre Clémenti, Nico and Anita Pallenberg; and Voyage au jardin des morts (1978). His 1991 film J’entends Plus la Guitare is dedicated to Nico.[citation needed]

On 13 December 1974, Nico opened for Tangerine Dream‘s infamous concert at Reims Cathedral in Reims, France. The promoter had so greatly oversold tickets for the show that members of the audience couldn’t move or reach the outside, eventually resulting in some fans urinating inside the cathedral hall.[18] The Roman Catholic Church denounced these actions, ordered the rededication of the cathedral and banned future performances on church property.

Around this time, Nico became involved with German musician Lutz Ulbrich (Lüül), guitarist for Ash Ra Tempel. Ulbrich would accompany Nico on guitar at many of her subsequent concerts through the rest of the decade. Also in this time period, Nico let her hair return to its natural color of brown and took to dressing mostly in black. This would be Nico’s public image from then on.

Nico and Island Records allegedly had many disputes during this time, and in 1975 the label dropped her from their roster.

Later solo career (1978-1988)

In February 1978, Nico performed at the Canet Roc ’78 festival in Spain. Also performing at this event were Blondie, Kevin Ayers, and Ultravox.

She made a vocal contribution to Neuronium‘s second album, Vuelo Químico as she was at the studio, by chance, while it was being recorded in Barcelona in 1978 by Michel Huygen, Carlos Guirao and Albert Gimenez. She read excerpts from Ulalume by Edgar Allan Poe. She said that was deeply moved by the music, so she couldn’t help to make a contribution.

In 1978, Nico briefly toured as supporting act for Siouxsie & The Banshees, one of many punk bands who admired Nico. In Paris, Patti Smith bought a new harmonium for Nico after her original was stolen. Other fans of Nico included John Lydon (of the Sex Pistols), Dave Vanian (of The Damned), and Tommy Gear (of The Screamers).

Nico returned to New York in 1979 where her comeback concert at CBGB (accompanied by John Cale and Lutz Ulbrich) was reviewed postitively in The New York Times. She began playing regularly at the Squat Theatre and other venues with Jim Tisdall accompanying her on harp and Gittler guitar. They played together on a sold-out tour of twelve cities in the East and Midwest. At some shows, she was accompanied on guitar by Cheetah Chrome (The Dead Boys).

In France, Nico was introduced to photographer Antoine Giacomoni. Giacomoni’s photos of Nico would be used for her next album, and would eventually be featured in a book (Nico: Photographies, Horizon Illimite, Paris, 2002).

Through Antoine Giacomoni, she met Corsican bassist Philippe Quilichini. Nico recorded her next studio album, Drama of Exile, in 1981.[1] produced by Philippe Quilichini. Mahamad Hadi aka Mad Sheer Khan played oriental rock guitar and wrote all the oriental production. It was a departure from her earlier work with John Cale, featuring a mixture of rock and Middle Eastern arrangements. For this album, in addition to originals like “Genghis Khan” and “Sixty Forty”, Nico recorded covers of The Velvet Underground’s “I’m Waiting For The Man” and David Bowie’s “Heroes”. Uniquely, Drama Of Exile was released twice (in two different versions). The second version appeared in 1983.

After relocating to Manchester, England in the early ‘80s, Nico acquired a manager, Alan Wise, and began working with a variety of backing bands for her many live performances. These bands included Blue Orchids, The Bedlamites and The Faction.

In 1981, Nico released the Philippe Quilichini-produced single “Saeta”/”Vegas” on Flicknife Records. The following year saw another single, “Procession” produced by Martin Hannett and featuring The Invisible Girls. Included on the “Procession” single was a new version of The Velvet Underground‘s “All Tomorrow’s Parties”.

At this time, Nico was often cited as an influence on the gothic rock scene, admired by such artists as Peter Murphy of Bauhaus, among others. At Salford University in 1982, Nico would join Bauhaus for a performance of “I’m Waiting For The Man”. That same year, Nico’s supporting acts included The Sisters Of Mercy and Gene Loves Jezebel. The Marble Index has frequently been cited as the first goth album, while Nico’s dark lyrics, music and persona were also influential.

In September 1982, Nico performed at the Deeside Leisure Centre for the Futurama Festival. The line-up for this show also included The Damned, Dead or Alive, Southern Death Cult, Danse Society, and Gene Loves Jezebel, to name a few.

The live compilation Do Or Die! Nico – In Europe: 1982 Tour Diary was released in November 1982 on the ROIR cassette label in November 1982, followed by more live performances throughout Europe over the next few years.

She recorded her final solo album, Camera Obscura, in 1985, with The Faction (James Young and Graham Dids). Produced by John Cale, it featured Nico’s version of the Richard Rodgers/Lorenz Hart song “My Funny Valentine“. The album’s closing song was an updated version of “Konig”, which she had previously recorded for La cicatrice interieure. This was the only song on the album to feature only Nico’s voice and harmonium. A music video for “My Heart Is Empty” was filmed at The Fridge in Brixton.

The next few years saw frequent live performances by Nico, with tours of Europe, Japan and Australia (usually with The Faction or The Bedlamites). A number of Nico’s performances towards the end of her life were recorded and released, including 1982’s Heroine, Live In Tokyo, and her final concert, Fata Morgana, recorded on 6 June 1988. The double live album Behind the Iron Curtain was recorded during a tour of Eastern Europe, before the fall of the Berlin Wall, and made from recordings of concerts in Warsaw, Prague, Budapest and other cities, and was released before her death in 1988.

A duet called “Your Kisses Burn” with singer Marc Almond was her last studio recording (about a month before her death). It was released a few months after her death on Almond’s album The Stars We Are.

Nico’s final recording was of her last concert, ‘Fata Morgana’, at the Berlin Planetarium on the 6th June 1988. This was a special event created by Lutz Ulbrich and featured a number of new compositions by Nico and The Faction. As an encore, Nico performed a song from The End…, “You Forget To Answer”. A CD of this concert was released in 1994 and again in 2012.

Personal life

Nico’s grave in Berlin

Nico had an affair with French actor Alain Delon and from this relationship conceived a son Christian Aaron Boulogne, whom Nico called “Ari.”[4] Delon denied paternity and Nico had difficulty raising Ari, so the boy was raised by Delon’s parents. Ari became a photographer and actor, and had a son in 1999.

Nico saw herself as part of a tradition of bohemian artists, which she traced back to the Romanticism of the early 19th century. She led a nomadic life, living in different countries. Apart from Germany, where she grew up, and Ibiza, where she died, Nico lived in Italy and France in the 1950s, spent most of the 1960s in the US, and lived in London in the early 1960s and again later in the 1980s, when she lived intermittently between London and Manchester.

During the final years of her life she was based around the Prestwich and Salford area of Greater Manchester and although she was still struggling with addiction had started to become interested in music again. She shared an apartment in Brixton, London, for a few months in the mid-80s with punk poet John Cooper Clark.

Nico was a heroin addict for over 15 years. In the book Songs They Never Play on the Radio, James Young, a member of her band in the 1980s, recalls many examples of her troubling behaviour due to her “overwhelming” addiction – and also that Nico claimed to have never taken the drug while with the Velvets/Factory scene but only began using during her relationship with Philippe Garrel in the 1970s.[6] Shortly before her death, Nico stopped taking heroin and began methadone replacement therapy and embarked upon a regimen of bicycle exercise and healthy eating.

Despite her career in music, she was deaf in one ear, which made it difficult for her to understand what others were saying.[19]

Death

On 18 July 1988, while on a vacation on Ibiza with her son Ari, Nico had a heart attack while riding a bicycle, and she hit her head as she fell. A passing taxi driver found her unconscious, and he had difficulty getting her admitted to local hospitals. She was incorrectly diagnosed as suffering from heat exposure, and she died at eight o’clock that evening. X-rays later revealed a severe cerebral hemorrhage as the cause of her death.[4]

Nico was buried in her mother’s plot in Grunewald Forest Cemetery in Berlin. A few friends played a tape of “Mütterlein,” a song from Desertshore, at her funeral.

Legacy

Nico has influenced many musicians, including Siouxsie and the Banshees, Bauhaus, Elliott Smith, Patti Smith, Morrissey, Björk, Henry Rollins, Coil, Jocelyn Pook, Fabienne Shine (who covered “All Tomorrow’s Parties”), Dead Can Dance, Marcus Reeves as well as numerous contemporary goth bands.[citation needed] Kevin Ayers painted a withering and beautiful portrait of Nico in “Decadence” (the centerpiece of his Bananamour album in 1973) Late singer-songwriter Elliott Smith cited her as a major inspiration and was said to have listened to The Marble Index for months. Smith performed covers of some of her songs – most notably “Chelsea Girls” and “These Days”, both of which he performed live at Satyricon in Portland, Oregon in October 1999. Two of her songs from Chelsea Girl, “The Fairest of the Seasons” and “These Days“, both written by Jackson Browne, are featured in Wes Anderson‘s film The Royal Tenenbaums. Shannon Hoon of Blind Melon named his daughter ‘Nico Blue’ partly after Nico. Blind Melon’s album Nico was released after Hoon’s death.

Hedwig and the Angry Inch, a movie written by John Cameron Mitchell, mentions Nico as an influential artist in its song, “Midnight Radio“. The song is written by Stephen Trask. Icelandic singer Björk opened concerts on her 1995–1997 Post tour with “Le Petit Chevalier” from Desertshore. The Cult recorded the song “Nico”, which celebrates the life of the singer, on their 2001 album Beyond Good And Evil. For her 2002 album, Kissin’ Time, Marianne Faithfull recorded “Song for Nico”, cowritten with Dave Stewart. Los Angeles band The Warlocks recorded a different song, also entitled “Song for Nico” on their 2003 album, “Rise and Fall“.

Nico was portrayed by Christina Fulton in the 1991 biopic The Doors. She was later portrayed by Meredith Ostrom in the 2006 film, Factory Girl, which chronicles the life of fellow “Warhol Superstar“, Edie Sedgwick. Soap & Skin portrayed Nico in the theatre play Nico – Sphinx aus Eis in 2008, written by Werner Fritsch. In the play, Nico was portrayed by several actresses. Soap & Skin also recorded her song “Janitor of Lunacy”. Natasha Khan (Bat for Lashes) has quoted Nico as an influence in particular Desertshore (The opening song on her first album, Fur and Gold, uses the name of the album in its lyrics). During 2007 she would start concerts with “Le Petit Chevalier” from that record.[20]

Singer-songwriter Patrick Wolf has been influenced by Nico, and released cover versions of “Afraid” and “Ari’s Song” as b-sides on EPs. Rock band Anberlin named one of their songs after her: “Dance, Dance Christa Päffgen” on their album “Never Take Friendship Personal“. The song also makes reference to her death, and her drug use. Austin based band Shearwater dedicated their album Palo Santo to the memory of Nico. The opening song (“La Dame Et La Licorne”) depicts Nico’s death at Ibiza, Spain. Windsor for the Derby, another Austin-based band, released an instrumental track named “Nico” in 2000 on their Young God Release “Difference and Repetition.” A live version of the song can be found on a limited edition 7-inch.

Marc Almond recorded his song ‘Your Kisses Burn’ from his ‘The Stars We Are’ album together with Nico in 1988. It was to be Nico’s last studio recording.

Low, an American indie rock group from Duluth, Minnesota, has a song titled “Those Girls (Song For Nico)”. It is included on the box set A Lifetime of Temporary Relief: 10 Years of B-Sides and Rarities, released in 2004.[21][22]

Two Nico tribute concerts took place in Europe in the autumn of 2008 to commemorate the 70th anniversary of Nico’s birth and the 20th anniversary of her death. On 11 October 2008, John Cale, James Dean Bradfield (of Manic Street Preachers), Fyfe Dangerfield of The Guillemots, Mark Linkous (of Sparklehorse), Peter Murphy (of Bauhaus), Lisa Gerrard and Mark Lanegan appeared on stage at the Royal Festival Hall in London. On 17 October 2008 at the Volksbuehne in Berlin, Nico’s ex-boyfriend Lutz Ulbrich presented another tribute concert, which featured Marianne Rosenberg, Soap & Skin, Marianne Enzensberger and James Young, the keyboardist from The Faction, Nico’s last band. Nico’s son, Ari Boulogne (sometimes called Ari Päffgen), made a brief appearance on stage at the close.

The Scooby-Doo! Mystery Incorporated episode “Art of Darkness” featured a parody of Nico named Eeko.

In 2012, X-TG (featuring members of industrial band Throbbing Gristle) released a re-interpretation of Nico’s Desertshore album.

In Autumn of 2012, Rooster Gallery in New York City presented an exhibit called “Nico: New York, New York”. This featured photographs by Jerry Schatzberg.

In January 2013, John Cale organized a tribute A Life Along the Borderline at the Brooklyn Academy of Music in New York City. Performers included Cale, Kim Gordon wcth Bill Nace, Sharon Van Etten, Meshell Ndegeocello, Stephen Merritt, Peaches[disambiguation needed], Alison Mosshart, Joan As Police Woman, Greg Dulli, Yeasayer, and Mercury Rev.[23]

Nico’s song “Afraid” was covered by Neko Case on the 2013 album The Worse Things Get, The Harder I Fight, The Harder I Fight, The More I Love You.

Discography

Reference: The Great Rock Discography[1]

Solo studio albums

Year Title
1967 Chelsea Girl
1969 The Marble Index
1970 Desertshore
1974 The End…
1981 Drama of Exile
1985 Camera Obscura

Collaborative album

Year Title
1967 The Velvet Underground & Nico (United States #171, UK #59, IRL #56, IT #76)

Live albums

Year Title
1974 June 1, 1974
1983 Do or Die: Nico in Europe
1985 Nico Live in Pécs
1986 Behind the Iron Curtain
1987 Nico in Tokyo
1988 Fata Morgana (Nico’s Last Concert)
1989 Hanging Gardens
1994 Heroine
1997 Chelsea Girl / Live
2003 Femme Fatale: The Aura Anthology (Drama of Exile expanded, plus live disc)
2004 Nico: All Tomorrow’s Parties (Tracks 5 to 11 recorded live in Tokyo 11.4.1986)
2007 All Tomorrow’s Parties (live double album)

Compilation albums

Year Title
1986 Live Heroes
1998 Nico: The Classic Years
2002 Innocent & Vain — An Introduction to Nico
2003 Femme Fatale — The Aura Anthology (Re-issue of Drama of Exile with bonus tracks plus Live at Chelsea Town Hall 9.8.85)
2007 The Frozen Borderline – 1968–1970 (Re-issue of The Marble Index and Desertshore with bonus tracks)

Singles

Year Title
1965 I’m Not Sayin’” / “The Last Mile”
1981 “Vegas” / “Saeta” – Flicknife Records FLS 206
1982 “Procession” / “All Tomorrow’s Parties” (Recorded with The Invisible Girls & Martin Hannett)
1983 “Heroes” / “One More Chance”
1985 “My Funny Valentine” / “My Heart Is Empty”

Bibliography

  • Nico: The Life and Lies of an Icon by Richard Witts, (Virgin Books: London, 1992).
  • Up-tight: the Velvet Underground Story by Victor Bockris and Gerard Malanga (Omnibus Press: London, 1995 reprint).
  • Songs They Never Play on the Radio: Nico, the Last Bohemian by James Young, Bloomsbury, London 1992 ISBN 0-7475-1194-2
  • Nico: Photographies by Antoine Giacomoni, (Dragoon: Paris, 2002).
  • Nico: Cible mouvante. Chansons, Poèmes, Journal by Nico, Jacques Pauvert and Ari Boulogne, (Pauvert: Paris, 2001).
  • L’amour n’oublie jamais by Ari Boulogne, (Pauvert: Paris, 2001).
  • Please Kill Me: The Uncensored Oral History of Punk by Legs McNeil and Gilliamn Mccain, (Grove Press: New York, 1996).
  • Lüül: Ein Musikerleben zwischen Agitation Free, Ashra, Nico, der Neuen Deutschen Welle und den 17 Hippies by Lutz Ulbrich (Schwarzkopf & Schwarzkopf: Berlin, 2007).

Films and plays

  • Nico – In Memoriam (1988), documentary directed by Bernd Gaul
  • Nico Icon (1995), documentary directed by Susanne Ofteringer
  • Nico Icon Play by Stella Grundy premièred at Studio Salford on 5 September 2007
  • Nico. Sphinx aus Eis by Werner Fritsch (2005)

References

  1. ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f Strong, Martin C. (2000). The Great Rock Discography (5th ed.). Edinburgh: Mojo Books. pp. 696–697. ISBN 1-84195-017-3.
  2. Jump up ^ Talevski, Nick. (2006). Knocking on Heaven’s Door: Rock Obituaries. Omnibus Press. p. 462. ISBN 1846090911.
  3. ^ Jump up to: a b Gilbert, Pat (August 29, 1994). Heroine.She was related to Hermann Päffgen, who founded the Päffgen brewery in 1883 in Cologne. (CD booklet). Nico. United Kingdom: Anagram Records. CDMGRAM85.
  4. ^ Jump up to: a b c d e Prümper, Dr. Jochen. “Nico: A Short Biography”. Retrieved 8 August 2011.
  5. Jump up ^ Reynolds, Simon (2007-03-16). “NICO: The Inner Scar director’s cut”. The Guardian. Retrieved 2013-10-27.
  6. ^ Jump up to: a b Young, James (1992). Songs They Never Play on the Radio: Nico, the Last Bohemian. London: Bloomsbury. p. 150. ISBN ISBN 0-7475-1194-2.
  7. Jump up ^ “George Starostin’s review of the album “The End””. Starling.rinet.ru. Retrieved 2013-09-03.
  8. Jump up ^ Prague Post: Life among the ruins; Poignant moments of love and loneliness in postwar Europe
  9. Jump up ^ Johnson, D. B. Night Lights 16 December 2007
  10. Jump up ^ Holden, Stephen (1996-01-03). “Movie Review – Nico Icon – FILM REVIEW;The Life and Times of a Doomed Warhol Superstar – NYTimes.com”. Movies.nytimes.com. Retrieved 2013-09-03.
  11. Jump up ^ “Nachrichten”. BerlinOnline.de. 2013-08-29. Retrieved 2013-09-03.
  12. Jump up ^ Harvard, J., The Velvet Underground and Nico. Continuum International Publishing Group, 2004 ISBN 0-8264-1550-4, ISBN 978-0-8264-1550-9, 152 pages
  13. Jump up ^ Please Kill Me: The Uncensored Oral History of Punk (1996) p. 9
  14. Jump up ^ John Cale, What’s Welsh for Zen.
  15. Jump up ^ “Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Albums of All Time”. Rolling Stone.
  16. Jump up ^ Gross, Joe. “Nico: Biography”. Rolling Stone via Internet Archive. Archived from the original on 22 June 2008. Retrieved 11 June 2010.
  17. Jump up ^ Nico quoted in Dave Thompson’s liner notes for the 2002 Deluxe re-issue of The Velvet Underground & Nico, which includes all five Velvet collaborations for Chelsea Girl.
  18. Jump up ^ “Melody Maker : Orange Appeal – 25 years of ambient pioneers Tangerine Dream”. Arm.ac.uk. October 8, 1994. Retrieved 2013-09-03.
  19. Jump up ^ How the dramatic Nico became a music iconoclast Times Online, 26 September 2008 (retrieved 5 July 2009)
  20. Jump up ^ “Bats for Lashes – Live at Maxwells NJ”. Punkcast. 2007-07-24. Retrieved 12 December 2007.
  21. Jump up ^ “Low Song Backgrounds – Chairkickers Google Group”. unknown. 2 July 2008. Retrieved 3 February 2008.
  22. Jump up ^ “Low Discography – Lifetime boxset”. unknown. 3 February 2009. Retrieved 3 February 2009.[dead link]
  23. Jump up ^ “Life Along the Borderline: A Tribute to Nico”. BAM. Retrieved 2013-09-03.

External links

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“All Tomorrow’s Parties” and “Sunday Morning” are two of the best songs by the Velvet Underground and Nico!!!

 

“All Tomorrow’s Parties” and “Sunday Morning” are two of the best songs by the Velvet Underground and Nico!!!

Nico Icon (Documentary) part6.

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The Velvet Underground-Sunday Morning

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Velvet Underground-All Tomorrow’s Parties

Sunday Morning (The Velvet Underground song)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
“Sunday Morning”
Single by The Velvet Underground
from the album The Velvet Underground & Nico
B-side Femme Fatale
Released December 1966 (single)
March 1967 (album)
Recorded November 1966 Mayfair Studios, New York City
Genre Pop,[1] psychedelic rock,[2] art rock[3]
Length 2:56
Label Verve
Writer(s) Lou Reed, John Cale
Producer Tom Wilson
The Velvet Underground singles chronology
All Tomorrow’s Parties / I’ll Be Your Mirror
(1966)
Sunday Morning / Femme Fatale
(1966)
White Light/White Heat / Here She Comes Now
(1968)
The Velvet Underground & Nico track listing
  1. Sunday Morning
  2. I’m Waiting for the Man
  3. Femme Fatale
  4. Venus in Furs
  5. Run Run Run
  6. All Tomorrow’s Parties
  7. Heroin
  8. There She Goes Again
  9. I’ll Be Your Mirror
  10. The Black Angel’s Death Song
  11. European Son

Sunday Morning” is a song by The Velvet Underground. It is the opening track on their 1967 debut album The Velvet Underground & Nico. It was also released as a single in 1966 with “Femme Fatale“.

Recording

In late 1966, “Sunday Morning” was the final song to be recorded for The Velvet Underground & Nico. It was requested by Tom Wilson, who thought the album needed another song with lead vocals by Nico with the potential to be a successful single. The final master tape of side one of the album shows “Sunday Morning” only penciled in before “I’m Waiting for the Man“.

Wilson brought the band into a New York City recording studio in November. The song was written with Nico’s voice in mind by Lou Reed and John Cale on a Sunday morning. The band previously performed it live with Nico singing lead, but when it came time to record it, Lou Reed sang the lead vocal. Nico would instead sing backing vocals on the song.

Aiming to create a hit for the album, “Sunday Morning” features noticeably more lush and professional production than the rest of the songs on the album. The song’s prominent use of celesta was the idea of John Cale, who noticed the instrument in the studio and decided to use it for the song.

Personnel

Cover versions

“Sunday Morning” has been covered by various bands, including Rusty, Villagers, Bettie Serveert, Beck, Chris Coco & Nick Cave, Nina Hagen, James, Oh-OK, Elizabeth Cook, NY Loose, The Feelies, Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark, The Queers, Strawberry Switchblade, and Matthew Sweet & Susanna Hoffs.[4] The song has also been covered by Belle & Sebastian during live shows. A live version recorded by Oh-OK is compiled on The Complete Recordings.

A cover of the song by the Doug Anthony All Stars was used in a season 1 episode of DAAS Kapital, but did not appear on the DVD set of the sci-fi sitcom due to “contractual reasons… and because we never paid to use it in the first place,” according to Paul McDermott. In its place is the newly recorded original song “Saturday’s The Day For Leaving”.[5] During the song, the DVD displays text to this effect, before mentioning the original version “is still on YouTube“.[6]

The chord progression is used in Kramer‘s “Don’t Come Around“, which includes the lyric, “I love this song,” presumably referring to the Velvet Underground song rather than the Kramer song.

Notes

  1. Jump up ^ The Velvet Underground & Nico: Review. allmusic.com. Retrieved 04 July 2012.
  2. Jump up ^ DeRogatis, Jim (2003). Turn on Your Mind: Four Decades of Great Psychedelic Rock. Hal Leonard Corporation. p. 79. ISBN 1617802158. Retrieved August 1, 2013. “…psychedelic rock masterpiece…”
  3. Jump up ^ DeRogatis, Jim (February 14, 2003). “Gettin’ Your Groove On”. Chicago Sun-Times. p. 26. Retrieved August 1, 2013. “…this enduring art-rock masterpiece…”
  4. Jump up ^ Full Albums: The Velvet Underground & Nico. covermesongs.com. Retrieved 14 September 2012
  5. Jump up ^ All Star secrets revealed – Doug Anthonys share anecdotes, Chortle.co.uk, 13 April 2013.
  6. Jump up ^ DAAS Kapital DVD, S1E3 “Gluttony” (DVD). ABC. 2013.

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Velvet Underground-All Tomorrow’s Parties

Uploaded on Jun 28, 2010

Video was created using a video from Rai Tre. The video is them jamming live most likely at The Factory in New York. Not sure of year. Song is from The Velvet Underground And Nico. (Album) TheDrakeHotel also uses this video.

Copyright Rai Tre (For Video)
Copyright Verve Records (For Song)

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All Tomorrow’s Parties

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
“All Tomorrow’s Parties”
Single by The Velvet Underground
from the album The Velvet Underground & Nico
B-side I’ll Be Your Mirror
Released July 1966 (single)
March 1967 (album)
Recorded April 1966 at Scepter Studios in New York City
Genre Experimental rock, art rock, psychedelic rock[1]
Length 2:49 (single version)
6:00 (album version)
Label Verve (VK10427)
Writer(s) Lou Reed
Producer Andy Warhol
The Velvet Underground singles chronology
  All Tomorrow’s Parties” / I’ll Be Your Mirror
(1966)
Sunday Morning” / “Femme Fatale
(1966)
The Velvet Underground & Nico track listing
  1. Sunday Morning
  2. I’m Waiting for the Man
  3. Femme Fatale
  4. Venus In Furs
  5. Run Run Run
  6. All Tomorrow’s Parties
  7. Heroin
  8. There She Goes Again
  9. I’ll Be Your Mirror
  10. The Black Angel’s Death Song
  11. European Son

All Tomorrow’s Parties” is a song by The Velvet Underground, written by Lou Reed and released on the group’s 1967 debut album, The Velvet Underground & Nico.

Inspiration for the song came from Reed’s observation of the Warhol clique; according to Reed, the song is “a very apt description of certain people at the Factory at the time. … I watched Andy. I watched Andy watching everybody. I would hear people say the most astonishing things, the craziest things, the funniest things, the saddest things.”[2] The song was Andy Warhol’s favorite by The Velvet Underground.[3]

The song has notably lent its name to a music festival, a William Gibson novel, and a Yu Lik-wai film. The song also appears prominently in the horror film The Lords of Salem.

Recording

The song was recorded at Scepter Studios, New York, during April 1966. It features a piano motif played by Cale (initially written as an exercise) based largely on tone clusters. It was one of the first pop songs to make use of prepared piano[4] (a chain of paper clips were intertwined with the piano strings to change their sounds). The song also features the ostrich guitar tuning by Reed, by which all of the guitar strings were tuned to D.[3]

Nico provides lead vocals. The song was originally recorded with only one track of her vocals; they were later double-tracked for the final album version. Most versions of the album use this version of the song, though the initial 1987 CD release uses the original mix without the double-tracking.

Personnel

Alternate versions

Ludlow Street Loft, July 1965

The earliest known recorded version of “All Tomorrow’s Parties” was recorded on reel to reel tape by Lou Reed, John Cale and Sterling Morrison in a New York apartment loft on Ludlow Street. With Reed on acoustic guitar, the song features a strong folk music sound—particularly in Cale and Morrison’s harmony vocals—which critic David Fricke[5] suggests demonstrates Reed’s fondness for Bob Dylan. This version, released on the Peel Slowly and See box set, is composed of multiple takes, which add up to a time of 18:26.

Single version, July 1966

An edited version of the song was released in July 1966 as a single with “I’ll Be Your Mirror” as a B-side. The song cuts out about half of the studio version at just under three minutes. It did not chart.

This version later became available in 2002 on the “Deluxe Edition” of The Velvet Underground & Nico.

Cover versions

Both Nico and Lou Reed have recorded solo versions of the song. Other artists who have covered it include Jun Togawa, Apoptygma Berzerk,[6] the Ass Ponys, Buffalo Tom, Japan,[7] Bauhaus, Jeff Buckley, Icehouse,[8] Los Tres,[9] The Method Actors, Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds,[10] the Oysterband, Tom Robinson, Kikka Sirén, Simple Minds,[11] Siouxsie and the Banshees,[12] Rasputina, Kendra Smith, Bryan Ferry,[13] June Tabor, Johnette Napolitano, Iron and Wine, Deerhoof, Hole, The Music Tapes, Ordo Rosarius Equilibrio and Black Tape for a Blue Girl. Les Rita Mitsouko covered the song for the Velvet Underground tribute album Les Enfants du Velvet in 1985.

Sample

Menu
0:00
The sixth track from The Velvet Underground & Nico, featuring Nico’s double-tracked lead vocals. This sample contains the beginning of the third verse.

Problems playing this file? See media help.

References

  1. Jump up ^ J. DeRogatis, Turn On Your Mind: Four Decades of Great Psychedelic Rock (Milwaukie, Michigan: Hal Leonard, 2003), ISBN 0-634-05548-8, p. 80.
  2. Jump up ^ Fricke, David (1995). Peel Slowly and See liner notes, p.22
  3. ^ Jump up to: a b Harvard, Joe (2007) [2004]. The Velvet Underground & Nico. 33⅓. New York, NY: Continuum International Publishing Group. pp. 107 / 109–110. ISBN 0-8264-1550-4.
  4. Jump up ^ Mitchell, Tim Sedition and Alchemy : A Biography of John Cale, 2003, ISBN 0-7206-1132-6
  5. Jump up ^ David Fricke, liner notes for the Peel Slowly and See box set (Polydor, 1995)
  6. Jump up ^ “Apoptygma Berzerk’s All Tomorrow’s Parties cover of The Velvet Underground and Nico’s All Tomorrow’s Parties”. WhoSampled.com. Retrieved 18 July 2013.
  7. Jump up ^ “Japan’s All Tomorrow’s Parties cover of The Velvet Underground and Nico’s All Tomorrow’s Parties”. WhoSampled.com. Retrieved 18 July 2013.
  8. Jump up ^ Kelvin Hayes. “The Berlin Tapes review on Allmusic”. Allmusic. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved 18 July 2013.
  9. Jump up ^ “Los Tres’s All Tomorrow’s Parties cover of The Velvet Underground and Nico’s All Tomorrow’s Parties”. WhoSampled.com. Retrieved 18 July 2013.
  10. Jump up ^ “Full Albums: The Velvet Underground & Nico » Cover Me”. Covermesongs.com. Retrieved 2012-01-13.
  11. Jump up ^ MacKenzie Wilson. “Neon Lights review on Allmusic”. Allmusic. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved 18 July 2013.
  12. Jump up ^ “O Baby, Pt. 1 review on Allmusic”. Allmusic. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved 18 July 2013.
  13. Jump up ^ Ned Raggett. “Taxi review on Allmusic”. Allmusic. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved 18 July 2013.

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Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art opens on 11-11-11

  Around 4 years ago I was in Philadelphia and the local radio station had a talk show that was blasting Alice Walton for coming into town and buying  the 1876 Thomas Eakins’ masterpiece “The Gross Clinic” which was hanging at the  Jefferson Medical College. However, the people of Philadelphia were given 45 days to […]

By Everette Hatcher III | Posted in Arkansas Times, Current Events | Tagged , , , , , , | Edit | Comments (0)

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I’m Waiting for the Man sung by Nico in 1982 (about waiting for drug fix)

I’m Waiting for the Man sung by Nico in 1982 (about waiting for drug fix)

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Nico Icon documentary part 3

Nico Icon documentary part 4

NICO – I’m Waiting For The Man – (1982, Warehouse, Preston, UK)

One of the top 10 songs from The Velvet Underground and Nico is the song “I’m Waiting for the Man

I’m Waiting for the Man

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
“I’m Waiting for the Man”
Song by The Velvet Underground from the album The Velvet Underground & Nico
Released March 1967
Recorded May 1966 T.T.G. Studios, Hollywood, California, U.S.
Genre Garage rock,[1] protopunk,[2] hard rock[3]
Length 4:39
Label Verve Records
Writer Lou Reed
Composer Lou Reed
Producer Andy Warhol
The Velvet Underground & Nico track listing
  1. Sunday Morning
  2. I’m Waiting for the Man
  3. Femme Fatale
  4. Venus in Furs
  5. Run Run Run
  6. All Tomorrow’s Parties
  7. Heroin
  8. There She Goes Again
  9. I’ll Be Your Mirror
  10. The Black Angel’s Death Song
  11. European Son

I’m Waiting for the Man” is a song by the American rock band The Velvet Underground, written by Lou Reed. It was first released on their 1967 debut album, The Velvet Underground & Nico.

The song is about purchasing $26 worth of heroin in a Harlem brownstone near the intersection of Lexington Avenue and 125th Street in New York City. The song is sung from the point of view of the purchaser who is presumably traveling to Harlem from another part of the city; the “man” in the song’s title is a drug dealer. Along with traditional guitar, bass, and drums, the song also features pounding, percussive rock-and-roll barrelhouse-style piano. It is one of the band’s more popular songs, and one of their many compositions featuring drugs as subject matter. After leaving the band in 1970, Lou Reed continued to incorporate the song into his solo live performances.

It was released as a single in October 1971 (with “There She Goes Again” on the B-side) as Andy Warhol’s Velvet Underground on MGM Records.[4]

In 2004, Rolling Stone magazine ranked it #159 on their list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.[5][6]

Alternate versions

Ludlow Street Loft, July 1965

A row of tenements on the Lower East Side.

The song was among a set of early songs to be recorded by Lou Reed, John Cale and Sterling Morrison in the band’s Ludlow Street loft in Manhattan. This version of the song, free of percussion, has a considerably more folk and even blues influence in style than the album version. It is available on the first disc of the Peel Slowly and See box set.

Scepter Studios, April 1966

Before the final album version of the song was re-recorded at T.T.G. Studios, in Hollywood, California, a different take of the song was originally recorded at Scepter Studios in New York City. This take of the song is slightly shorter, the piano is less audible and instead of drums, a tambourine is employed. Also of note is that Reed sings “I’m waiting for the man” at the beginning of the song. Though the album version, Reed sings “I’m waiting for my man.”

Personnel

Cover versions

Velvet Underground members Lou Reed, John Cale, Nico, and Maureen Tucker have all recorded solo versions.

Other artists who have recorded covers of the song include:

Live covers

Remixed forms and lyric usage

  • 2 Many DJs compilation album As Heard On Radio Soulwax Pt. 2 uses the song’s original recording in remixed form.
  • Death Cab for Cutie‘s lyric “To a brownstone, up three flights of stairs” in their song “No Joy in Mudville” is a direct, uncredited lift from “I’m Waiting For The Man”.
  • The lyrics were used in the 2002 ballet by Édouard Lock and La La La Human Steps “Amelia” with completely different music by David Lang.

In Pop Culture

See also

References

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Related posts:

Jim Morrison’s sad drug death was followed by Pamela Courson’s sad story!!!

Jim Morrison’s sad drug death was followed by Pamela Courson’s sad story!!! pamela courson/ jim morrison interview   Interview with Jim Morrison’s father and sister Uploaded on Aug 9, 2010 This interview is from “When You’re Strange” DVD bonus material. I do not own this video and own no rights to it! Pamela Courson Uploaded […]

I’m Waiting for the Man sung by Nico in 1982 (about waiting for drug fix)

__________ NICO – I’m Waiting For The Man – (1982, Warehouse, Preston, UK)   One of the top 10 songs from The Velvet Underground and Nico is the song “I’m Waiting for the Man I’m Waiting for the Man From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search “I’m Waiting for the Man” Song by […]

The life of Lou Reed (includes videos from 1960′s and 1970′s)

The life of Lou Reed (includes videos from 1960′s and 1970′s) ____________ Rock & Roll – Velvet Underground The Velvet Underground – Venus in Furs – Live 1) Lou Reed – Sweet Jane – live in Paris, 1974 Velvet Underground-”Sunday Morning” from “Velvet Underground and Nico” LP Lou Reed From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump […]

Jim Morrison’s relationship with Nico

Jim Morrison’s relationship with Nico   Nico Icon documentary part 1. Nico Icon documentary part 2. ______________ Jim Morrison at Andy Warhol’s Party.wmv (with Nico) Uploaded on Apr 26, 2010 From the Oliver Stone movie. The Doors. _______________________ nico discusses jim morrison. Uploaded on Jan 2, 2008 nico discusses jim, and how he impacted her […]

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Pictures and Videos of Edie Sedgwick and the story of her losing battle against drugs and alcohol Part 2 Drugs and alcohol have taken the life of many people and I have posted many times about their unfortunate deaths. Whitney Houston, Amy Winehouse, Gary Thain, Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, Brian Jones, Kurt Cobain, and Jim […]

Pictures and Videos of Edie Sedgwick and the story of her losing battle against drugs and alcohol Part 1

Pictures and Videos of Edie Sedgwick and the story of her losing battle against drugs and alcohol Part 1 Factory Girl – The Real Edie Uploaded on Aug 30, 2011 Friends and family of Edie Sedgwick discuss what the factory girl was really like, and the battles and relationships she went through _____________ Edie Sedgwick Excerpt […]

Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art opens on 11-11-11

  Around 4 years ago I was in Philadelphia and the local radio station had a talk show that was blasting Alice Walton for coming into town and buying  the 1876 Thomas Eakins’ masterpiece “The Gross Clinic” which was hanging at the  Jefferson Medical College. However, the people of Philadelphia were given 45 days to […]

By Everette Hatcher III | Posted in Arkansas Times, Current Events | Tagged , , , , , , | Edit | Comments (0)

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Jim Morrison’s sad drug death was followed by Pamela Courson’s sad story!!!

Jim Morrison’s sad drug death was followed by Pamela Courson’s sad story!!!

pamela courson/ jim morrison interview

 

Interview with Jim Morrison’s father and sister

Uploaded on Aug 9, 2010

This interview is from “When You’re Strange” DVD bonus material.
I do not own this video and own no rights to it!

Pamela Courson

Uploaded on May 9, 2009

Had to, felt I should. She was very important in Jims life, and she’s so beautiful.

Song: Mad world.

🙂

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Pamela Courson

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Pamela Courson
Pamela Courson.jpg
Born Pamela Susan Courson
December 22, 1946
Weed, California, USA
Died April 25, 1974 (aged 27)
Los Angeles, California, USA
Nationality American

Pamela Susan Courson (December 22, 1946 – April 25, 1974) was the long-term companion of Jim Morrison, singer of The Doors. After the deaths of Morrison and Courson, her parents petitioned an out-of-state court to declare that the couple had a common-law marriage.

Early life and involvement with Morrison

Courson was born in Weed, California. She was described as a reclusive young girl from a family that did not mix with the neighbors very much. She did well in school until junior high, when records show that her family was contacted about truancy. Courson hated high school, attending Orange High School, and her grades declined when she was sixteen. That spring, she left for Los Angeles, where she and a friend got an apartment. Rumor has it that Neil Young wrote the song “Cinnamon Girl” about her, as well as “The Needle and the Damage Done“, but both have been denied.[1]

In his 1998 memoir, Light My Fire: My Life with the Doors, former keyboardist Ray Manzarek stated that Courson and Morrison met at a nightclub called London Fog on the Sunset Strip in 1965, while she was an art student at Los Angeles City College. Courson’s relationship with Morrison was tumultuous with loud arguments and repeated infidelities by both partners.

Courson briefly operated Themis, a fashion boutique that Morrison bought for her.[2] Her death certificate lists her occupation as “women’s apparel”.[citation needed]

Deaths of Morrison and Courson

On July 3, 1971, Courson found Morrison dead in the bathtub of their apartment in Paris, France. The official coroner‘s report listed his cause of death as heart failure, although no autopsy was performed. Questions persist over the actual cause of death. Under Morrison’s will, which stated that he was “an unmarried person”, Courson inherited his entire fortune. Lawsuits against the estate would tie up her quest for inheritance for the next two years. Courson did not remain in contact with the remaining Doors members after she received her share of Morrison’s royalties.

After Morrison’s death, Courson became a recluse in Los Angeles, using heroin and showing signs of mental instability. In his follow-up book to the seminal Jim Morrison biography, No One Here Gets Out Alive, Jerry Hopkins mentions that Courson might have prostituted herself after Morrison’s death, probably to keep up with the costly lifestyle she was used to, and was apparently pimped by a former Doors chauffeur. Doors historian Danny Sugerman became friendly with her in Los Angeles after Morrison’s death. Many years later he wrote in Wonderland Avenue that Courson’s heroin addiction progressed to the point that when she smuggled her drugs in her car she hid them in different-colored balloons.[3] She planned to swallow them if an officer pulled her over, and to “shit them out” upon returning home.[4]

On April 25, 1974, Courson died of a heroin overdose on the living room couch at the Los Angeles apartment she shared with two male friends. A neighbor said she had talked about looking forward to seeing Morrison again soon. Her parents intended that she be buried next to Morrison at Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris, and they listed this location as the place of burial on her death certificate, but due to legal complications with transporting the body to France, her remains were buried at Fairhaven Memorial Park in Santa Ana, California, under the name Pamela Susan Morrison. Several months after her death, her parents, Columbus and Peny Courson, inherited Morrison’s fortune. Morrison’s parents later contested their executorship of the estate.

Estate controversy

In his will, made in Los Angeles County on February 12, 1969, Morrison left his entire estate to Courson, also naming her co-executor with his attorney, Max Fink.

When Courson died, a battle ensued between Morrison’s and Courson’s parents over who had legal claim to Morrison’s estate. On his death, his property became Courson’s; on her death, her property passed to her next heirs at law, her parents. Morrison’s parents contested the will under which Courson and subsequently her parents had inherited their son’s property.

To bolster their positions, Courson’s parents presented an unsigned document that they claimed Pam Courson had acquired in Colorado, apparently an application for a declaration that she and Morrison had contracted a common-law marriage under the laws of that state. The ability to contract a common-law marriage was abolished in California in 1896, but the state’s conflict of laws rules provided for recognition of common-law marriages lawfully contracted in foreign jurisdictions. Colorado was one of the 11 U.S. jurisdictions that still recognized common-law marriage. As long as a common-law marriage was lawfully contracted under Colorado law, it was recognized as a marriage under California law. However, neither Morrison nor Courson had signed the document, nor was there any proof that either of the deceased had even been aware of the document’s existence. Neither Morrison nor Courson was ever a resident of Colorado.

Whatever the circumstances of the unsigned document, the court case, and the controversy surrounding it, the California probate court decided that Courson and Morrison had a common-law marriage under the laws of Colorado. The effect of the court ruling was to close probate of Morrison’s and Courson’s estates and to reinforce the Courson family’s hold on the inheritance.

Fictional portrayals

Courson was portrayed by Meg Ryan in Oliver Stone‘s 1991 film The Doors.[5]

References

  1. Jump up ^ Davis, Stephen. Jim Morrison: Life, Death, Legend. New York: Gotham, 2005. ISBN 978-1-59240-099-7.
  2. Jump up ^ Butler 107
  3. Jump up ^ Sugerman, Danny. Wonderland Avenue: Tales of Glamour and Excess. London, United Kingdom: Abacus, 1991. pg. 276.
  4. Jump up ^ Sugerman, Danny. Wonderland Avenue: Tales of Glamour and Excess. London, United Kingdom: Abacus, 1991. pg. 276.
  5. Jump up ^ Kagan, Norman. The cinema of Oliver Stone. Continuum, 2000. p. 312. ISBN 0-8264-1244-0.

Further reading

  • Butler, Patricia. Angels Dance and Angels Die: The Tragic Romance of Pamela and Jim Morrison. Schirmer Books, 2000. ISBN 978-0-8256-7153-1

External links

Zacchaeus was the most hated tax collector ever (although President Obama is trying to come in 2nd place) Part 2

Zacchaeus was the most hated tax collector ever (although President Obama is trying to come in 2nd place) Part 2

 

 

People are starting to resent paying such a large portion of their income to the government in taxes. Back in Bible times the most hated man was the taxcollector that was collecting money for Rome which the Romans could use to hire more soldiers to torture more Jews. Now our representatives just can’t to say no to governemnt spending either.

The Washington metropolitan area has become America’s wealthiest region because trillions of dollars are taken every year from the productive sector of the economy and then divvied up by the politicians, bureaucrats, lobbyists and interest groups that benefit from federal largess.

But there’s always an appetite in Washington for even more money.  Former Senator Kent Conrad just wrote in the Washington Post that “Our country needs more revenue to help us get back on track.”

I guess that means back on track to becoming Greece, though I suspect he would have an alternative explanation. All I can say for sure is that he probably wasn’t paying attention when I testified to his Committee last year about pro-growth tax policy.

But it’s not just Democrats who are greedy for more of our money. Republican Congressman Tom Cole of Oklahoma joined the Charlie Brown Club by stating, “we’re willing to put more revenue on the table.”

If you ask politician why they want more revenue in Washington, they invariably state that America’s long-term fiscal challenges are so large that you need a “balanced” package.

But why should there be “balance” between tax hikes and spending cuts (which would merely be reductions in planned increases) when more than 100 percent of America’s long-run fiscal problem is because of a rising burden of government spending?

Does that sound like an exaggeration? Well, check out this data from the Congressional Budget Office’s 2013 Long-Term Budget Outlook.

As you can see, tax revenues are supposed to jump substantially as a share of GDP in coming decades. Indeed, they will rise far above the long-run average of 17.7 percent of economic output.

Long-Run Tax Revenue

In other words, a big increase in the tax burden already is set to occur, largely because of real bracket creep. This means tax cuts (ideally accompanied by tax reform) are needed to protect taxpayers from rising tax rates.

And if we want to deal with America’s real fiscal challenge, that means modest spending restraint in the short run and genuine entitlement reform in the long run.

P.S. Do you need more evidence that taxes should go down rather than up? Well, the New York Times inadvertently revealed that the only “grand bargain” that actually resulted in a budget surplus was the 1997 pact that lowered the tax burden.

P.P.S. I’ve admitted that – in theory – it might be reasonable to acquiesce to a tax hike if accompanied by some genuine reforms to control spending. But in reality that will never happen. The evidence from Europe is very persuasive that more revenue simply leads to a larger burden of government spending.

 

 

I have talked about the morality of conservatism concerning welfare, and the morality of the free enterprise system, and today I am looking at the life and times of the most hated tax collector of all time, Zacchaeus!!!

Here is what John MacArthur had to say:

A Sinner Meets a Seeking Savior, Part 1 (Luke 19:1-10) John MacArthur

I would invite you to open your Bible now to the nineteenth chapter of the gospel of Luke. Luke chapter 19 and the opening ten verses which provide for us one of the most familiar New Testament stories in all the Bible. If you were raised in the church and if you attended Sunday School, you were taught the story of Zacchaeus, a little man who climbed up a tree to see Jesus. Here is that wonderful story. It is only recorded by Luke, does not appear in the other three gospels, but Luke’s account is rich and instructive. Luke chapter 19 and I’ll read, starting at verse 1 down through verse 10.

“And He…meaning Jesus…entered and was passing through Jericho. And behold, there was a man called by the name of Zacchaeus and he was a chief tax-collector, and he was rich. And he was trying to see who Jesus was, and he was unable because of the crowd, for he was small in stature. And he ran on ahead and climbed up into a sycamore tree in order to see Him, for He was about to pass through that way. And when Jesus came to the place, He looked up and said to him, ‘Zacchaeus, hurry and come down, for today I must stay at your house.’ And he hurried and came down and received Him gladly. And when they saw it, they all began to grumble, saying, ‘He has gone to be the guest of a man who is a sinner.’ And Zacchaeus stopped and said to the Lord, ‘Behold, Lord, half of my possessions I will give to the poor, and if I have defrauded anyone of anything, I will give back four times as much.’ And Jesus said to him, ‘Today salvation has come to this house because he, too, is a son of Abraham. For the So9n of Man has come to seek and to save that which was lost.'”

That final verse, verse 10, that final statement of our Lord Jesus is the most valuable, the most glorious and the most important truth ever revealed in Scripture. As far as we are concerned, this is why we are saved, because God is a seeker and a saver of those who are lost. This is true to the nature of God. From the fall of man in the garden, when the Lord came searching for Adam and Eve who were hiding from Him, and He said, “Where are you?” Genesis 3:8 and 9, God has continued to seek for lost and hidden sinners. It all began in the garden and it still goes on. In one of the most beautiful Old Testament passages, Ezekiel quotes God as saying this, “I will seek the lost. Bring back the scattered, bind up the broken and strengthen the weak,” Ezekiel 34:16. God is a seeker of those who are lost and in grave danger. This is critical. This is foundational to our understanding of the Bible and of God’s divine purpose in history. We need only to be reminded from Romans 3:11 that no man seeks after God to be grateful that God seeks after us. In our sinfulness, in our fallenness, in our reprobation, in our blindness, in our ignorance, in our association and relationship to the kingdom of darkness and under the power of Satan, we cannot seek after God, we do not seek after God. There would then be no reconciliation, no salvation, no forgiveness, no hope of heaven if God did not seek after us. God does the initial seeking. God does the saving of those who apart from Him would hide themselves from Him like Adam and Eve, running from His presence with no capacity in them to ever turn and pursue Him.

This is what our Lord is saying here. He is the seeker. He is the saver of those who are lost. And the story is an illustration. A man out of a massive crowd sitting in a tree has a divine appointment with the seeking, saving Lord who spots him, names him and by divine necessity says, “I’m coming to your house because this is the day of your salvation.” This is one of the great biblical illustrations of sovereign salvation, of God seeking not just sinners in a general or vague way but seeking sinners in a very specific personal way. And this is the work of the Son of Man. The Son of Man in verse 10 is a title which Jesus used of Himself more than any other, by far. It refers to Him as man, that is His humanity but far more than that, it is a messianic title referring to Him as the all-glorious, chosen One by God to rule and reign over an ever-lasting Kingdom. That is prophesied as He is there identified in Daniel chapter 7. So it sees Him yes in His humanity, but far more in His divine glory and everlasting rule. Son of Man has come…has come refers to His incarnation, not has come to Jericho, but has come into the world, at His birth He came, incarnation, for the purpose of seeking and saving. Those are two infinitives which means it starts with to, t-o. That’s an infinitive, these are what we call in the Greek infinitives of purpose, two purposes to seek, to save. The word seek, zeteo,means to pursue, to look for, to search for. To save means basically to rescue from harm, to deliver from danger. And the amazing irony of it all is that God sends Christ to seek and to save those who are headed for His own wrath and judgment.

To sum that up, God seeks to save people from Himself, from His own wrath and His own holy judgment. The ones that He seeks to save are identified here as that which was lost, that which was lost. Literally in the Greek it’s a condition of being, the having been lost one, the one who is in a permanent state of lostness. But even being lost doesn’t express the fullness of this word. It’s a very strong word in the Greek, apollumi, any Greek students know, it’s a familiar word, it means to be ruined, it means to be destroyed. The Son of Man then was incarnated coming into this world for the purpose of pursuing and saving those who are in a condition of ruination and destruction and headed for damnation. Couldn’t be more clear. Jesus did not come into the world to be a good teacher. He did not come into the world to be a moral leader. He did not come to espouse religious ideas. He did not come to raise the religious consciousness of the people in His community and society. He did not come into the world to show us what a good life looks like. He came into this world to rescue doomed sinners. That is the Christian message. That is the only Christian message. Everything in the Old Testament points to that. Everything in the New Testament defines that.

Sin has devastated all of humanity and all of humanity is marred, corrupted, evil ruined, headed for eternal damnation. We are all in that same condition. In fact, that condition needs to be understood and so we read in Romans 3, starting in verse 10, a very careful description of that condition. “There is none righteous, not even one. There is none who understands. There is none who seeks for God. All have turned aside. Together they have become useless. There is none who does good. There is not even one. Their throat is an open grave. With their tongues they keep deceiving. The poison of asps, or snakes, are under their lips. Whose mouth is full of cursing and bitterness. Their feet are swift to shed blood. Destruction and misery are in their paths. The path of piece have they not known. There is no fear of God before their eyes.” So writes the Apostle Paul and every single sentence he drew from the Old Testament. This is not a new description of man, this is God’s description of man’s sinful condition from the start.

In Ephesians chapter 4, an even more concise description of the human condition. Verse 17, “We walk in the futility of our minds, darkened in our understanding, excluded from the life of God because of the ignorance in us, because of the hardness of our hearts we are callous given over to sensuality for the practice of every kind of purity with greediness.” We can never get enough impurity. This is the human condition. And the purpose of the coming of the Son of Man, the Lord Jesus into the world, is to rescue sinners from this condition with its inevitable result of eternal damnation. So God sends Christ to rescue the lost from God’s own wrath and to preserve them safe and unharmed in heaven’s eternal joys. That is the Christian gospel. That is the Christian message. Nothing less and there could be nothing more.

So I say, verse 10 is the most important truth laid out in all of Scripture, that God seeks and saves otherwise damned sinners. It should have been clear from the very beginning that this is true. Matthew 1:21, the angel says upon announcing the birth of Jesus, “Call His name Jesus, for He will save His people from their sins.” At His very birth it was clear that that is why He came. First Timothy 1:15, Paul writes, “Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners, among whom I am foremost.” He came to save sinners. At the very birth of the Lord, the announcement was made, He will save His people from their sins and here at the end of His ministry as the exclamation point of His itinerant ministry, He reiterates the reason He came, the same reason announced at His birth, to save lost sinners. And so, at the beginning and the end of His life, the purpose for His coming is clear.

No writer in the New Testament puts more emphasis on this than does Luke. In fact, Luke’s marvelous and unique emphasis is found in chapter 15. Go back to it for a moment. It will be a wonderful memory for those of you who were with us when we went through chapter 15, to be reminded that God likens Himself to a shepherd seeking a lost sheep, a woman seeking a lost coin, and a father seeking a lost son.

In the first parable that the Lord gives, verse 4, “What man among you if he has a hundred sheep and has lost one of them doesn’t leave the ninety and nine in the open pasture and go after the one which is lost until he finds it?” This is God, the shepherd, who goes after the lost sheep who is in grave danger. “And when he has found it, he lays it on his shoulders rejoicing, comes home, calls together his friends and neighbors saying to them, ‘Rejoice with me, for I have found my sheep which was lost. I tell you in the same way, there will be more joy in heaven over one sinner who repents than over ninety-nine righteous persons who need no repentance.” The joy of God and the joy of heaven is in the recovery of lost sinners. That’s the point of the story. The Lord finds His heavenly joy and the joy of all the saints and angels that surround His throne in the recovery of lost sinners. God does it for His own joy. He does it for His own glory.

And then the second story about a woman. God is first likened to a shepherd, then He is likened to a woman who had several…namely ten silver coins and lost one. Lit the lamp, swept the house, searched until she found it. Same response. Called her friends and neighbors saying, ‘Rejoice with me, I found the coin which I had lost, in the same way there’s joy in the presence of the angels of God over one sinner who repents.” And again, here is God the seeker looking, searching, finding the lost, bringing the lost home and all heaven celebrates the joy of God and the joy of all who surround Him.

And then the next story. You remember the son who was the prodigal. The father pursued him. He was coming back with a lot of misconceptions. But verse 20 says, “While he was still a long ways off, his father saw him, felt compassion for him, ran, embraced him, kissed him.” Here is the seeking shepherd, the seeking woman, the seeking father. God seeks to save the lost for His own joy and the concomitant of all the inhabitants of holy heaven. God finds His own satisfaction in the recovery of lost sinners. He finds His own delight in it.

In Isaiah 62:5, “As the bridegroom rejoices over the bride, so your God will rejoice over you.” And here is an illustration as the highest joy in human life is the joy of a man and a woman in love coming together in the union of marriage. God finds His highest joy in the restoration and recovery of sinners. The Old Testament even says God shouts for joy, He’s exuberant.

Jeremiah 32:41 says, “And I will rejoice over them to do them good and I will faithfully plant them in this land with all my heart and with all my soul.” It is all soul and all heart for God to recover lost sinners. He does it because it’s His greatest satisfaction and highest joy. And none of us is going to seek God unless God seeks us.

The Bible talks about men seeking God. It talks about sinners seeking God. But when you put the two together, it’s pretty clear the only way we can ever seek His…seek Him is if He seeks us. And I think John summed it up when he said, “We love Him because He first loved us.” Once God begins that seeking, once He opens our understanding to our own sinfulness, once He illuminates us as to the glory of the gospel, once He takes away the blindness and the darkness, once He gives life to our deadness, the awaken sinner, the enlightened lost one, the one who has been given life responds by seeking the one who sought Him.

And then Proverbs 8:17 says, “Those who diligently seek Me will find Me.” And Isaiah 65:6 says, “Seek the Lord while He may be found.” And Jeremiah 29:13 says, “And you will seek Me and find Me when you search for Me with all your heart.” Amos 5:4, “Seek Me that you may live.” Or Matthew 6:33, “Seek ye first the Kingdom of God and His righteousness and all these things shall be added.” Or Matthew 7:7, in the same Sermon on the Mount, “Seek and you shall find.” We are only enabled to seek when God has first sought us. That’s exactly what happens in the story of Zacchaeus. Out of nowhere Jesus seeks him and before it’s over, his heart responds by seeking Jesus. Any seeking on the part of a sinner must be in response to the seeking on the part of God. The generation of those who seek the Lord, in the words of Psalm 24:6, are those whom the Lord has sought.

So here the Lord seeks a man who then seeks Him. Now once more, for the last time, Jesus is headed for Jerusalem, leaving His ministry behind as He heads for the cross in a few days. He’s about to give His life as the only acceptable sacrifice that satisfies God, the only ransom price paid to God for sin. It is imminent. He’s wrapped up His earthly ministry. Spent most of that last year in Judea, just before this occasion had made a little foray into Galilee and then down through Peraea, crossing the Jordan to the east so as not to go through Samaria which the Jews did not traverse normally and coming down the east side of Jordan back across the river, headed through Jericho up to Jerusalem for the Passover. This would be His last time. And so He arrives at the city of Palms, as it was called, the city of Jericho six miles north of the Dead Sea and six miles west of the Jordan River.

As I told you last time, it was really a wonderful city. It was the garden city of the ancient world, certainly of the land of Israel at that time. Far more wonderful place then than it is frankly is now. It was fed by springs that were producing ample amounts of water which was brought by aqueduct into the city and used to irrigate the area so that it bloomed in a magnificent way. It was a walled city, new walls, not the ones that fell down in the Jericho of the Old Testament. There was a theater there, there was an amphitheater there built by Herod. There was a new palace as well. Gardens designed by Achilleas, it was a magnificent, magnificent place. Edersheim, the great historian, says, “It was characterized by groves of feathery palms rising in stately beauty, stretched gardens of roses and sweet scented balsam plantations. The largest behind the royal gardens of which the perfume is carried by the wind almost out to the sea and which may have been given to the city…may have been used as the reason the name was given to the city, Jericho. Jericho meaning ‘the perfumed.'” Edersheim says, “It was the Eden of Palestine, the fairy land of the Old World.”

Deep down in a hallowed valley it sits, massive limestone mountains to the west. The sunken Jordan Valley to the east and off in the distance the purple mountains of Moab, a remarkable place, the streets filled with a motley throng. Pilgrims from Galilee and Peraea, priests who live there and serve there, traders from all lands, it was one of the high density trading centers, there were routes going north, east, west and south, it was a busy, busy place, full of good people in a human sense, full of the wretched, the worst who occupied places where there was lots to steal. The robbers were there in mass. The great caravans came through there. There was ample supply for those who stole, as well for those…as well as for those who bought and sold. Soldiers were there, courtiers were there, the worst of everything, the best of everything, tax collectors had a high profile there because it was one of the three regional tax centers in the land of Israel, the northern one being Capernaum, the central one on the coast being Caesarea, the southern one being Jericho.

So here Jesus came with His disciples headed for Jerusalem, not just His disciples but all other kinds of followers that had collected with Him, plus all the pilgrims headed for a Passover. It was a huge crowd that crossed the Jordan and came into…entering says verse 1, and passing through Jericho. And the question was on people’s minds…is this Jesus the Messiah? Is He going to bring the promised Kingdom? They knew He had miracle power, He had filled the land with His miracles. They knew He was a teacher like no other teacher. And in Jericho they knew He had raised Lazarus from the dead because just up the hill a little ways from Jericho is Bethany before you enter into Jerusalem where Lazarus lived and was well known and it was only a matter of weeks before this event that He had raised him from the dead. And the word would have spread everywhere, we know it spread, it spread right up to the upper echelons of the leadership of Jerusalem. We can be certain that it spread down the hill into Jericho that He had power over death as well as disease, as well as demons.

So He was followed by a curious pilgrim crowd. And when He came into town, it was a customary thing that when pilgrims came through your town, to come out and greet them, asked them if they needed a drink, asked them if they needed something to eat. That’s what you did. That’s just normal in the course of events. But in this case because it was Jesus, the crowd was bigger coming in and the crowd coming out of their homes would have been greater than normal as well. It was a melee, it was a mob of people because it included Jesus of Nazareth, the Prophet, the Healer and perhaps the Messiah. It is to this huge crowd in this city that Jesus declares He is come to seek and to save the lost and gives a magnificent example of that in the salvation, the sovereign salvation of Zacchaeus.

So Luke is telling us the story of Zacchaeus, but it’s really the story of God. It’s really the story of the purpose of God fulfilled in Jesus Christ. But let’s meet the sinner, okay? Then we’ll meet the Savior. And then we’ll talk about salvation.

Let’s meet the sinner. Verse 1, “He entered and was passing through Jericho and behold, there was a man called by the name of Zacchaeus and he was a chief tax-gatherer and he was rich.” So into this little paradise, as it was called, the city of Jericho, comes Jesus with His massive accumulating crowd. Comes in to this crossroad city, highway going to the north headed toward Damascus, Tyre and Sidon. Great trade centers of the north. Highway going through the west through Jerusalem, headed for Caesarea and Joppa, great trade centers also on the Mediterranean Sea. Highway going through headed to Egypt in the south and cities east of the Jordan into Moab and the far east from which all kinds of products came and went, great exchange center. This city would have had many, many tax collectors. This man is identified as a chief tax gatherer.

As you know, because we’ve seen our tax gatherers before, this is number six in the gospel of Luke. This is the sixth time our Lord has an encounter with a tax gatherer. And by the way, all of them are favorable. So He defies the conventional wisdom and the attitude of the people toward these men. And in so doing, reminds us that it’s not a crime to be a tax collector. That may encourage those of you who are. It is a noble calling if you do it right because taxation is a divine institution. Jesus said, “Render to Caesar the things that are Caesar’s.” Pay your taxes, He did. Paul said, “Custom to whom custom is due, tribute to whom tribute is due, tax to whom tax is due,” Romans 13. The entire theocratic kingdom of Israel in the Old Testament was basically functioning by a very carefully laid out taxation system in which every Jewish person paid essentially twenty-three and a third of their average income to the theocratic kingdom in order to fund the government. The Lord instituted taxation because He instituted government. Powers that be are ordained of God. The Lord never had a problem with the people who collected tax because He never had a problem with tax as such. But the Lord does have a problem with abusive taxes with illegitimate taxes, with corruption, dishonesty, crime and separating people from their money illegitimately by use of physical force and cruelty, which is what the tax collectors in the ancient world did.

In order to have a tax franchise, you had to buy it from Rome. So you were a traitor from the very outset to your own people who were occupied by the Roman idolatrous and despised pagans. Rome would set a certain amount that the tax gatherer had to pay. Whatever else he could collect, he could keep…a formula for corruption for sure. And there were so many ways to tax. The people had no idea what they were supposed to pay. Yes, there were some sort of foundational taxes. There was, for example, an individual tax, kind of a poll tax for men from 14 to 65 and women from 12 to 65 and they paid that tax. There was a ground tax called like a property tax, one tenth of all grain or something the equivalent of grain, one fifth of wine and oil. So there were some fixed taxes. Even a kind of income tax which was about one percent of a person’s income. So they had those that were fixed. But beyond that, you could tax anything that you could get away with taxing. You could tax everybody’s commerce by taxing every wheel, every axle on their cart, taxing every animal pulling the cart, taxing every product that they bought and sold, every way imaginable. And so tax collectors became filthy rich because what they paid Rome was only a portion of what they actually collected. They also became despised and hated. They couldn’t attend the synagogue. They couldn’t have any social relationships with people because the people wouldn’t get near them because they were considered unclean and anybody who came near one of them would be polluted. So the only people they could associate were the people who were also unclean, and so they were the collection of people called the tax collectors and sinners that we meet so often in Jesus’ ministry, the very people that God loves to save. “He came not to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance.” In fact, Jesus spent so much time with the scum and the riff-raff, the tax gatherers and their assorted criminals, that they called Him, Luke 7:34, Matthew 11:9, “a friend of tax gatherers and sinners.” They would have said that with such disdain you couldn’t imagine it. And it is really why they thought that He represented Satan because He spent so much time with the people that they thought belonged to Satan.

Well here’s one of them. There was a man called by the name of Zacchaeus. Now his mom and dad had good intentions for him when he was born. Zacchaeus means, are you ready for this?, clean, innocent, pure and righteous. Nice try, things didn’t go the way they intended them to go. So he in his life defies the intent of his parents and becomes unclean, guilty, impure and unrighteous.

It’s interesting that He gave him a name. This is the first for us to see a tax gatherer who actually named other than Matthew who is called an Apostle by Jesus. Why the name? Well again, remember when we studied Bartimaeus and we suggested the church historians have said that Bartimaeus later became a very prominent Christian and his name was used because everybody knew who he was and this would have associated him with that great moment in his life when he was given sight and saved in Jericho. Well here you have, according to some church historians, a similar situation. It’s Clement of Alexandria, one of the church fathers, who says that this man, Zacchaeus, became a very prominent Christian leader and ended up a pastor of the church in Caesarea, later to be succeeded by none other than Cornelius, the centurion. That’s from church history. We can’t find that in the Word of God. So perhaps it’s so and that’s why his name was used.

Nonetheless this is Zacchaeus, he was, it says, architelones, architelones, actually means commissioner of taxes, commissioner of taxes. He was at the top of the pyramid, top of the pile. Everybody who collected everything, and there were lots of tax collectors, had to pay him a piece of the action. So everything came up the…up the pyramid and landed eventually in his pocket. Everybody extorted for him. He got a piece of everybody’s action. And as a result, he was rich…a combination of legitimate and illegitimate activity, the people saw him as a sinner, verse 7, they all began to grumble saying He’s going to be the guest of a man who is a sinner. That category is not simply a commentary on his personal life, that is not a commentary on his character, it is a statement of the category in which he belongs. He is in the category of outcasts. He is in the category of the defiled. He is in the category of those that you don’t go near or you will become defiled. He is sorted. He is outside the pale of social contact. He can’t go the synagogue and no one can come near him without a defilement. So this man was left to live with the rest of the scum who were disallowed from any social or religious contact with the rest of the population. Life would have been pretty tragic for him…a lot of money but outside of everything that was good and noble and meaningful.

Verse 3 tells us that he was interested in Jesus. He was trying to see who Jesus was. Everybody heard about Jesus, he probably had heard about the fact that Jesus raised Lazarus from the dead and he got the word from the folks that were first in the crowd coming into town that Jesus was in this pilgrimage group and he wanted to see who Jesus was…which one in this pilgrim crowd was Jesus. He was trying to see Him, perfect tense, he was in an ongoing continual effort to try to see Jesus. And you can just see the picture of him because you know his stature was small and the crowd is massive and he’s bouncing up and down, bobbing back and forth trying to get a glimpse of this massive people flowing between two crowds on either side of this dusty road and he can’t see Jesus. Is he curious? Sure he’s curious. Is it more than that? Sure it’s more than that, he has a dissatisfied heart. He knows he’s alienated from God. He knows he has no eternal life. He knows that he’s overwhelmed with guilt and sin. He knows the kind of man he is. I don’t know exactly what was going on in his heart, but he was after Jesus for more than just curiosity because the Holy Spirit made sure he was in the right place at the right moment for Jesus to look at him and speak to him.

Now he had two problems. Simple, verse 3, big crowd, small man…two problems, he was unable to see Jesus, see who He was, because of the crowd for he was small in stature. The crowd was too large and he was too small. Can’t see past them because they’re too thick, can’t see over them, he’s too short. But he’s determined to see Jesus, setting aside all sense of embarrassment and these guys would probably keep to themselves and not expose themselves to large crowds very often because they didn’t want to take the abuse that came to them because of who they really were. He sets all of that aside, he ceases to be self-protective, or self-conscious as he normally would have been. He comes out of his low profile kind of existence and he determines that he’s going to see who Jesus is. We can be sure he’s being prompted by the Spirit of God, so what’s he going to do? Well, you’ve got to get ahead of the crowd. So verse 4, he did what is obvious, he ran on ahead. He climbed up into a sycamore tree in order to see Him for He was about to pass through that way. He knew the route, through the street, up the hill to Jerusalem, he knew exactly the path that Jesus would go. So he ran ahead of where Jesus was, ahead of where all the crowd was and got beyond the crowd and he found a sycamore tree, sometimes indicated as a mulberry tree. What’s important to know, it’s a very…very low tree, short fat trunk and low broad branches that a little guy could climb rather easily and get up above the crowd and perch himself in those branches. And that’s exactly what he did. It’s a lot like an oak tree, some writers tell us, with very low branches. And he sits there in the tree, waiting for Jesus to arrive.

So we meet the sinner, the sinner that Jesus is going to save. And this sinner is going to get the shock of his life. Man, he’s going to be the shock of the town, too. Secondly, we meet the Savior in verse 5. “And when Jesus came to the place,” the place where he was sitting in the tree, the exact spot, “He looked up and said to him, ‘Zacchaeus,'” I think if that were me at that moment, I’d have fallen out of the tree, landed on my head and had to be taken to the hospital and been unconverted because Jesus would have kept going. He said his name. This is a reminder that the Son of Man knows who He’s seeking. It reminds me of Nathaniel in John 1 and Nathaniel said, “How do You know me?” And He says, “I knew you before you ever showed up.” He knows His own. He never expected to catch the eyes of Jesus. He never ever dreamed that Jesus would know him. But He does. And He says, “Zacchaeus, hurry and come down, for today I must stay at your house.”

Whoa! The first stunner must have been the eye contact. The second stunner, “Zacchaeus.” The third one, “Hurry and come down, I’m coming to your house to stay.” The jolt to that poor little Jew’s system must have been beyond description. But it was an irresistible call…an irresistible call because verse 6 says, “And he hurried and came down and received Him gladly.”

Now I just need to kind of take this part a little bit for you for a minute. “Hurry and come down,” that’s an imperative, calls for immediate action, no delay. Why? “For today,” listen, God not only knows who He will save, He knows when He will save and where He will save. “Today is the day of your salvation…today I must stay at your house.” Well who said? Who determined that? This is what we call the divine necessity, a little particle deiin the Greek, d-e-i, transliterated in English, dei, it’s used throughout Luke for divine necessity. For it must be, it is necessary, this is divine necessity, it is predetermined before the foundation of the world, if you will, that this is the day that I come to your house.

Wow. “Today, I must stay at your house.” And that phrase, “stay at your house,” indicates to spend the night. I’m coming and I’m going to stay overnight. This is not, by the way, a request and he didn’t run a Bed and Breakfast. This is a divine command. Zacchaeus never could have anticipated anything like this because he knew he was a defiled person and no one who considered himself righteous or clean would ever come near him, let alone near his house, and worst of all, eat a meal with him which was tantamount to affirmation and partnership. Yes, Zacchaeus wanted to see who Jesus was, but far more than that, Jesus wanted to see Zacchaeus. So in verse 6, he hurried, came down and received Him gladly.

It would have been the first time any righteous, clean, noble, respected person had come to his house. And here is the Lord, like that father, throwing his arms around a stinking prodigal son, kissing him all over the head and reconciling him and embracing him. Of course he received Him gladly, profusely because he was so overjoyed. Contrast that with the crowd in verse 7 and you understand the difference between the heart of God and apostate first century Judaism. “And when they saw it, they all said, ‘Isn’t it wonderful to see the grace of God toward a sinner.'” Oh, is that what it says? Afraid not. What it says is, “They all began to grumble,” that is in the Greek an onomatopoetic word. You remember what an onomatopoeia is? It is a word whose meaning sounds like it. The word is diagonguzo, da-ga-da-go, diagonguzo, it’s a compound strong term.

This is absolutely predictable. This is…you know they’re going to do this, outraged propriety, religious incorrectness, no self-respecting Jew would ever expose himself to such severe pollution by staying at the house of the chief administrator of taxation, the most corrupt of all tax gatherers and then to eat a meal with him, to sleep at his house, absolute outrage. And then you’ve got to realize that there are people in the crowd who are just looking for some action on the part of Jesus to take them on the last few steps to being convinced that He’s the Messiah, and instead He does something that would literally undo all of their previous idea that He would be the Messiah by defiling Himself in this way. It’s just against the grain of everything that was a part of their religious thinking. He’s gone to be the guest of a man, that is a Greek verb, kataluo, and it means to loose in a…in a compound sense, to take off. What it means is to be a guest…He went to take His clothes off to stay the night, He went to loose His clothing. It’s also used to unhitch an animal. It’s only here and in Luke 9:12. But it means to take everything apart, to take all your clothes off, get ready for the night. And this man is a hamartolo, he’s in the category of the wretched that spies the rejected, the category of those people who are the unclean and the untouchable.

No Jew would go to his house because then he would be basically a partaker in his evil deed. He would be guilty of all his crimes and all his corruption. But Jesus goes to his house because He seeks to save this lost man. He is on a divine mission, established by divine sovereign grace and a divine timetable. He knows exactly who he is though he’s never met Him. He knows his name though he’s never heard it. And he has an appointment with salvation. He received Him gladly. What a contrast. And when they saw it, they began to grumble. They never got it. People of Israel never got it. All the way to the end they’re holding on to their vile, damning self-righteous religion while Jesus is saving sinners who have no merit, nothing to commend them to Him.

At this point the curtain goes down on that day. Jesus has gone now to Zacchaeus’ house. What happens? Come back next week. We’re out of time. But what happens is the best thing that can ever happen to anyone and we’ll see that next time.

Father, again we thank You for the revelation, the wonderful and rich revelation that You are the seeking God. That You pursue the sinner before the sinner could ever pursue You. We thank You, Lord, that You know our names before we can ever introduce ourselves because our names are already written down in Your book and they were written down before creation. You know us, You know those You will seek and save. And, Lord, we would ask that today even this day You might come to the house of some poor sinner here, that You might call that poor sinner and say, “Today, I must come into your life. Today, salvation is coming to your house.” I just pray, Lord, that there are some Zacchaeus’ here. They came. They’re sitting in the tree this morning and You’ve passed by and they’ve seen you. I just pray, Lord, that this would be the day when You would call out to them and go to their house and bring them salvation. Do it for Your own glory and for Your own joy as well as the joy that comes to the rescued sinner. We thank You. We want to live for Your glory, all this because of Christ in whose name we pray. Amen.

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The life of Lou Reed (includes videos from 1960’s and 1970’s)

The life of Lou Reed (includes videos from 1960’s and 1970’s)

____________

Rock & Roll – Velvet Underground

The Velvet Underground – Venus in Furs – Live

1) Lou Reed – Sweet Jane – live in Paris, 1974

Velvet Underground-“Sunday Morning” from “Velvet Underground and Nico” LP

Lou Reed

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Lou Reed
Lou Reed (5900407225).jpg

Reed performing at the Hop Farm Music Festival (2011)
Background information
Birth name Lewis Allan Reed
Born March 2, 1942
Brooklyn, New York, United States
Died October 27, 2013 (aged 71)
Southampton, New York, United States
Genres Rock, experimental rock, art rock, protopunk, glam rock, avant-garde
Occupations Musician, singer-songwriter, producer, photographer
Instruments Vocals, guitar, bass, synthesizer, keyboards, piano, harmonica, drums, percussion
Years active 1964–2013
Labels Matador, MGM, RCA, Sire, Reprise, Warner Bros., Pickwick
Associated acts The Velvet Underground, John Cale, Nico, David Bowie, The Killers, Mick Ronson, Laurie Anderson, Peter Gabriel, Metallica
Notable instruments
Ostrich guitar

Lewis AllanLouReed (March 2, 1942 – October 27, 2013) was an American rock musician and songwriter.[1] After being guitarist, vocalist, and principal songwriter of the Velvet Underground, his solo career spanned several decades. The Velvet Underground were a commercial failure in the late 1960s, but the group has gained a considerable cult following in the years since its demise and has gone on to become one of the most widely cited and influential bands of the era[2] – hence Brian Eno‘s famous quote that while the Velvet Underground’s debut album only sold 30,000 copies, “everyone who bought one of those 30,000 copies started a band.”[3]

After his departure from the group, Reed began a solo career in 1972. He had a hit the following year with “Walk on the Wild Side“, but subsequently lacked the mainstream commercial success its chart status seemed to indicate.[4] In 1975, Reed released a double album of feedback loops, Metal Machine Music, upon which he later commented, “No one is supposed to be able to do a thing like that and survive.”[5] Reed was known for his distinctive deadpan voice, poetic lyrics and for pioneering and coining the term ostrich guitar tuning.[6]

Early life

Reed was born at Beth El Hospital (now Brookdale) in Brooklyn and grew up in Freeport, Long Island.[7] Contrary to some sources, his birth name was Lewis Allan Reed, not Louis Firbanks, a name that was coined as a joke by Lester Bangs in Creem magazine.[8] Reed is the son of Toby (née Futterman) and Sidney Joseph Reed, an accountant.[9] His family was Jewish,[10] and although he said that he was Jewish, he added, “My God is rock’n’roll. It’s an obscure power that can change your life. The most important part of my religion is to play guitar.”[11][12]

Reed as a high school senior, 1959

Having learned to play the guitar from the radio, he developed an early interest in rock and roll and rhythm and blues, and during high school played in a number of bands.[13] His first recording was as a member of a doo wop-style group called The Jades. In 1956, Reed, who was bisexual,[14] received electroconvulsive therapy as a teenager, which was intended to cure his bisexuality; he wrote about the experience in his 1974 song, “Kill Your Sons”.[15][16] In an interview, Reed said of the experience:

“They put the thing down your throat so you don’t swallow your tongue, and they put electrodes on your head. That’s what was recommended in Rockland State Hospital to discourage homosexual feelings. The effect is that you lose your memory and become a vegetable. You can’t read a book because you get to page 17 and have to go right back to page one again.”

—Lou Reed quoted in Please Kill Me (1996)[17]

Reed began attending Syracuse University in 1960, studying journalism, film directing, and creative writing. He was a platoon leader in ROTC and later booted from the program for holding an unloaded gun to his superior’s head.[18] In 1961 he began hosting a late-night radio program on WAER called “Excursions On A Wobbly Rail”.[13] Named after a song by pianist Cecil Taylor, the program typically featured doo wop, rhythm and blues and jazz, particularly the free jazz developed in the mid-1950s.[19] Many of Reed’s guitar techniques, such as the guitar-drum roll, were inspired by jazz saxophonists, notably Ornette Coleman. Reed graduated with honors[20] from Syracuse University’s College of Arts and Sciences with a B.A. in June 1964.[16]

While enrolled at Syracuse University, he studied under poet Delmore Schwartz, who he said was “the first great person I ever met”, and they would become friends. He credited Schwartz with showing him how “with the simplest language imaginable, and very short, you can accomplish the most astonishing heights.”[21] Reed dedicated the song “European Son“, from the Velvet Underground’s debut album, to Schwartz.[22] In 1982, Reed also recorded “My House” as a tribute to his late mentor. He later said that his goals as a writer were “to bring the sensitivities of the novel to rock music” or to write the Great American Novel in a record album.[23]

Songwriter at Pickwick Records

In 1964, Reed moved to New York City and began working as an in-house songwriter for Pickwick Records. In 1964, he scored a minor hit with the single “The Ostrich”, a parody of popular dance songs of the time, which included lines such as “put your head on the floor and have somebody step on it”. His employers felt that the song had hit potential, and arranged for a band to be assembled around Reed to promote the recording. The ad hoc group, called “The Primitives”, included Welsh musician John Cale, who had recently moved to New York to study music and was playing viola in composer La Monte Young‘s Theater of Eternal Music, along with Tony Conrad. Cale and Conrad were both surprised to find that for “The Ostrich”, Reed tuned each string of his guitar to the same note, which they began to call his ‘ostrich guitar‘ tuning. This technique created a drone effect similar to their experimentation in Young’s avant-garde ensemble. Disappointed with Reed’s performance, Cale was nevertheless impressed by Reed’s early repertoire (including “Heroin“), and a partnership began to evolve.[21]

The Velvet Underground

Reed and Cale lived together on the Lower East Side, and after inviting Reed’s college acquaintances, guitarist Sterling Morrison and drummer Maureen Tucker, to join the group, they formed the Velvet Underground. Though internally unstable (Cale left in 1968, Reed in 1970), and without commercial success, the band has a long-standing reputation as one of the most influential in rock history.[24]

“Had he accomplished nothing else, his work with the Velvet Underground in the late Sixties would assure him a place in anyone’s rock & roll pantheon; those remarkable songs still serve as an articulate aural nightmare of men and women caught in the beauty and terror of sexual, street and drug paranoia, unwilling or unable to move. The message is that urban life is tough stuff—it will kill you; Reed, the poet of destruction, knows it but never looks away and somehow finds holiness as well as perversity in both his sinners and his quest. . . . [H]e is still one of a handful of American artists capable of the spiritual home run.”

The group soon caught the attention of artist Andy Warhol. One of Warhol’s first contributions was to integrate them into the Exploding Plastic Inevitable. Warhol’s associates inspired many of Reed’s songs as he fell into a thriving, multifaceted artistic scene.[citation needed] Reed rarely gave an interview without paying homage to Warhol as a mentor. Conflict emerged when Warhol had the idea for the group to take on a chanteuse, the European former model and singer Nico. Reed and the others registered their objection by titling their debut album The Velvet Underground & Nico to imply that Nico was not accepted as a member of the group.[citation needed] Despite his initial resistance, Reed wrote several songs for Nico to sing, and the two were briefly lovers (as were Nico and Cale later). The Velvet Underground & Nico reached No. 171 on the charts.

The album is now widely considered one of the most influential rock albums ever recorded. Rolling Stone has it listed as the 13th most influential album of all time. Brian Eno once famously stated that although few people bought the album, most of those who did were inspired to form their own band.[26]

By the time the band recorded White Light/White Heat, Nico had quit and Warhol was fired, both against Cale’s wishes.[citation needed] Warhol’s replacement as manager, Steve Sesnick, convinced Reed to drive Cale out of the band. Morrison and Tucker were discomfited by Reed’s tactics but continued with the group.[citation needed] Cale’s replacement was Doug Yule, whom Reed would often facetiously introduce as his younger brother.[citation needed] The group now took on a more pop-oriented sound and acted more as a vehicle for Reed to develop his songwriting craft.[citation needed] The group released two albums with this line up: 1969’s The Velvet Underground and 1970’s Loaded. The latter included two of the group’s most commercially successful songs, “Rock and Roll” and “Sweet Jane“. Reed left the Velvet Underground in August 1970; the band disintegrated as core members Sterling Morrison and Maureen Tucker departed in 1971 and 1972, respectively. Yule continued until early 1973, and the band released one more studio album, Squeeze, under the Velvet Underground name.

After the band’s move to Atlantic RecordsCotillion label, their new manager pushed Reed to change the subject matter of his songs to lighter topics in hopes of commercial success. The band’s album Loaded had taken more time to record than the previous three albums together, but had not broken the band through to a wider audience. Reed briefly retired to his parents’ home on Long Island.[citation needed]

1970s

After quitting the Velvet Underground in August 1970, Reed took a job at his father’s tax accounting firm as a typist, by his own account earning $40 a week. In 1971, he signed a recording contract with RCA Records and recorded his first solo album in London with top session musicians including Steve Howe and Rick Wakeman, members of the progressive rock group Yes. The album, simply titled Lou Reed, contained smoothly produced, re-recorded versions of unreleased Velvet Underground songs, some of which were originally recorded by the Velvets for Loaded but shelved (see the Peel Slowly and See box set). This first solo album was overlooked by most pop music critics and it did not sell well, although music critic Stephen Holden, in Rolling Stone, called it an “almost perfect album. . . . which embodied the spirit of the Velvets.”[27] Holden describes Reed’s unique qualities, in both his voice and lyrics, in the album:

Reed’s voice hasn’t changed much since the early days. Outrageously unmusical, it combines the sass of Jagger and the mockery of early Dylan, but is lower-pitched than either. It is a voice so incapable of bullshit that it makes even an artsy arrangement work by turning the whole thing into a joyous travesty. Just as arresting as Reed’s voice are his lyrics, which combine a New York street punk sensibility and rock song cliches with a powerful poetic gift.[27]

“His artistic self-awareness is so secure that he invariably turns less into more. For he not only awakens nostalgia for Fifties rock, he shows that it is still a vital resource for today’s musicians. . . . The overall impression is that of a knowing primitivism, as serious as it is playful, and never less than refreshing. . . . By keeping close to the roots he is keeping the faith.”

Rolling Stone, (1972)[27]

In December 1972, Reed released Transformer. David Bowie and Mick Ronson co-produced the album and introduced Reed to a wider popular audience (specifically in the U.K.). The hit single “Walk on the Wild Side” was an ironic yet affectionate salute to the misfits, hustlers, and transvestites who once surrounded Andy Warhol. When he was first introduced to Reed’s music, Bowie stated, “I had never heard anything quite like it. It was a revelation to me.”[28]

Each of the song’s five verses poignantly describes an actual person who had been a fixture at The Factory during the mid-to-late 1960s: (1) Holly Woodlawn, (2) Candy Darling, (3) “Little Joe” Dallesandro, (4) “Sugar Plum Fairy” Joe Campbell and (5) Jackie Curtis. The song’s transgressive lyrics evaded radio censorship. Though the jazzy arrangement (courtesy of bassist Herbie Flowers and saxophonist Ronnie Ross) was musically somewhat atypical for Reed, it eventually became his signature song. The song came about as a result of his commission to compose a soundtrack to a theatrical adaptation of Nelson Algren‘s novel of the same name, though the play failed to materialize. Ronson’s arrangements brought out new aspects of Reed’s songs. “Perfect Day,” for example, features delicate strings and soaring dynamics. It was rediscovered in the 1990s and allowed Reed to drop “Walk on the Wild Side” from his concerts.

Though Transformer would prove to be Reed’s commercial and critical pinnacle, there was no small amount of resentment in Reed devoted to the shadow the record cast over the rest of his career. An argument between Bowie and Reed ended their working relationship for several years, though its subject is not known. The two reconciled some years later, and Reed performed with Bowie at the latter’s 50th birthday concert at Madison Square Garden in 1997.[29] They would not formally collaborate again until 2003’s The Raven. Touring in support of Transformer posed the challenge of forming a band for the first time since joining the Velvets. Reed took the simple path of hiring an inexperienced bar band, the Tots. Reed spent much of 1972 and the winter of 1973 on the road with them. Though they improved over the months, criticism of their still-basic abilities ultimately led Reed to fire them mid-tour. He chose keyboardist Moogy Klingman to come up with a new five-member backing band on barely a week’s notice. Thus the tour continued through the spring with a denser, bluesier and tighter sound that presaged the very successful live albums Reed would record with all different musicians in December.[30]

Reed followed Transformer with the darker Berlin, a concept album about two junkies in love in the titular city. The songs variously concern domestic abuse (“Caroline Says I,” “Caroline Says II”), drug addiction (“How Do You Think It Feels”), adultery and prostitution (“The Kids”), and suicide (“The Bed”). Reed’s late-1973 European tour, featuring dual lead guitarists Steve Hunter and Dick Wagner, mixed his Berlin material with older numbers.

After Berlin came two albums in 1974, Sally Can’t Dance, and a live record Rock ‘n’ Roll Animal, which contained performances of the Velvet Underground songs “Sweet Jane” and “Heroin” became his biggest selling album. Rock ‘n’ Roll Animal, and its follow-up released in early 1975 Lou Reed Live, primarily featuring live Transformer material, were both recorded at the same show (Academy Of Music, NYC December 21, 1973), and kept Reed in the public eye with strong sales. The later expanded CD version of Rock ‘n’ Roll Animal taken together with Lou Reed Live are the entirety of the show that night, although not in the running order it was performed.

“Lou Reed doesn’t just write about squalid characters, he allows them to leer and breathe in their own voices, and he colors familiar landscapes through their own eyes. In the process, Reed has created a body of music that comes as close to disclosing the parameters of human loss and recovery as we’re likely to find. That qualifies him, in my opinion, as one of the few real heroes rock & roll has raised.”

—Mikal Gilmore, Rolling Stone, (1979)[31]

As he had done with Berlin after Transformer, in 1975 Reed responded to commercial success with a commercial failure, a double album of electronically generated audio feedback, Metal Machine Music. Critics interpreted it as a gesture of contempt, an attempt to break his contract with RCA or to alienate his less sophisticated fans. But Reed claimed that the album was a genuine artistic effort, even suggesting that quotations of classical music could be found buried in the feedback. Lester Bangs declared it “genius,” though also as psychologically disturbing. The album was reportedly returned to stores by the thousands after a few weeks.[32] Though later admitting that the liner notes’ list of instruments is fictitious and intended as parody, Reed maintains that MMM was and is a serious album. He has since stated though that at the time he had taken it seriously, he was also “very stoned”.[citation needed] In the 2000s it was adapted for orchestral performance by the German ensemble Zeitkratzer.

Reed with Patti Smith in the late 1970s. He performed, unannounced, at several of her concerts, and worked with her at the same recording studio in 1977.

By contrast, 1975’s Coney Island Baby was mainly a warm and mellow album, though for its characters Reed still drew on the underbelly of city life. At this time his lover was a transgender woman, Rachel, mentioned in the dedication of “Coney Island Baby” and appearing in the photos on the cover of Reed’s 1977 “best of” album, Walk on the Wild Side: The Best of Lou Reed. While Rock and Roll Heart, his 1976 debut for his new record label Arista, fell short of expectations, Street Hassle (1978) was a return to form in the midst of the punk scene he had helped to inspire. Reed was dismissive of punk, however, and rejected any affiliation with it. “I’m too literate to be into punk rock . . . The whole CBGB‘s, new Max’s thing that everyone’s into and what’s going on in London—you don’t seriously think I’m responsible for what’s mostly rubbish?”[33]

In 1978 Reed released his third live album, Live: Take No Prisoners, which some critics thought was his “bravest work yet,” while others considered it his “silliest.”[31] Rolling Stone described it as “one of the funniest live albums ever recorded [with] Lou’s dark-humored, Lenny Bruce-like monologues. Reed felt it was his best album:

You may find this funny, but I think of it as a contemporary urban-blues album. After all, that’s what I write—tales of the city. And if I dropped dead tomorrow, this is the record I’d choose for posterity. It’s not only the smartest thing I’ve done, it’s also as close to Lou Reed as you’re probably going to get, for better or for worse.[31]

The Bells (1979) featured jazz musician Don Cherry, and was followed the next year by Growing Up in Public with guitarist Chuck Hammer. Around this period he also appeared as a sleazy record producer in Paul Simon‘s film One Trick Pony. Reed also played several unannounced one-off concerts in tiny downtown Manhattan clubs with the likes of Cale, Patti Smith, and David Byrne during this period. Reed and Patti Smith both worked at Record Plant in 1977 at the same time, each trying to complete albums. Bruce Springsteen was also at the studio working on finishing his Darkness on the Edge of Town album.[34]

1980s

In 1980, Reed married British designer Sylvia Morales.[35] They were divorced more than a decade later. While together, Morales inspired Reed to write several songs, particularly “Think It Over” from 1980’s Growing Up in Public and “Heavenly Arms” from 1982’s The Blue Mask with bassist Fernando Saunders.[citation needed] After Legendary Hearts (1983) and New Sensations (1984) fared adequately on the charts, Reed was sufficiently reestablished as a public figure to become spokesman for Honda motorcycles.

In the early 1980s, Reed worked with a number of innovative guitarists including Chuck Hammer and Robert Quine. Hammer appeared on Growing Up in Public (1980) and Quine appeared on The Blue Mask (1982), and Legendary Hearts (1983). It was through working with both of these guitarists that Reed regained his sense of sonic experimentation.[citation needed]

On September 22, 1985, Reed performed at the first Farm Aid concert in Champaign, Illinois. He performed “Doin’ The Things That We Want To”, “I Love You, Suzanne”, “New Sensations” and “Walk on The Wild Side” as his solo set, later playing bass for Roy Orbison during his set. In June 1986, Reed released Mistrial (co-produced with Fernando Saunders), a more commercial album than previous records. To support the release, he released two music videos: “No Money Down” and “The Original Wrapper“.

At the same time of Mistrial’s release, he joined Amnesty International‘s A Conspiracy of Hope Tour and was outspoken about New York’s political issues and personalities. He would later use this experience on the 1989 album New York, commenting on crime, AIDS, Jesse Jackson, Kurt Waldheim, and Pope John Paul II.

Following Warhol’s death after routine surgery in 1987, Reed again collaborated with John Cale on the biographical Songs for Drella, Warhol’s nickname. The album marked an end to a 22-year estrangement from Cale. On the album, Reed sings of his love for his late friend, but also criticizes both the doctors who were unable to save Warhol’s life and Warhol’s would-be assassin, Valerie Solanas.

1990s

In 1990, following a twenty-year hiatus, the Velvet Underground reformed for a Fondation Cartier benefit in France. Reed released his sixteenth solo record, Magic and Loss, in 1992, an album about mortality, inspired by the death of two close friends from cancer. In 1993, the Velvet Underground again reunited and toured throughout Europe, although plans for a North American tour were cancelled following another falling out between Reed and Cale. In 1994, Reed appeared in A Celebration: The Music of Pete Townshend and The Who, also known as Daltrey Sings Townshend. This was a two-night concert at Carnegie Hall produced by Roger Daltrey in celebration of his fiftieth birthday. In 1994, a CD and a VHS video were issued, and in 1998 a DVD was released. Reed performed a radically rearranged version of “Now And Then” from Psychoderelict.

In 1996, the Velvet Underground were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. At the induction ceremony, Reed performed a song entitled “Last Night I Said Goodbye to My Friend” alongside former bandmates John Cale and Maureen Tucker, in dedication to Velvet Underground guitarist Sterling Morrison, who had died the previous August. Reed has since been nominated for the Rock Hall as a solo artist twice, in 2000 and 2001, but has not been inducted.[36]

His 1996 album, Set the Twilight Reeling, met with a lukewarm reception, but 2000’s Ecstasy drew praise from most critics. In 1996, Reed contributed songs and music to Time Rocker, an avant-garde theatrical interpretation of H.G. WellsThe Time Machine staged by theater director Robert Wilson. The piece premiered in the Thalia Theater, Hamburg, Germany, and was later also shown at the Brooklyn Academy of Music in New York.[37]

In 1998, the PBS TV show American Masters aired Timothy Greenfield-Sanders‘ feature documentary Lou Reed: Rock and Roll Heart. This film, which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in the U.S. and at the Berlin Film Festival in Germany went on to screen at over 50 festivals worldwide. In 1999, the film and Reed as its subject received a Grammy Award for best long form music video.

Since the late 1990s, Reed has been romantically linked to the musician, multi-media and performance artist Laurie Anderson, and the two have collaborated on a number of recordings together. Anderson contributed to “Call On Me” from Reed’s project The Raven, to the tracks “Baton Rouge” and “Rock Minuet” from Reed’s Ecstasy, and to “Hang On To Your Emotions” from Reed’s Set the Twilight Reeling. Reed contributed to “In Our Sleep” from Anderson’s Bright Red and to “One Beautiful Evening” from her Life on a String. They married on April 12, 2008.[38]

2000s

2000 to 2003

Reed performing in Portland, Oregon, in January 2004

In May 2000, Reed performed before Pope John Paul II at the Great Jubilee Concert in Rome. In 2000, a new collaboration with Robert Wilson called “POEtry” was staged at the Thalia Theater in Germany. As with the previous collaboration “Time Rocker,” “POEtry” was also inspired by the works of a 19th-century writer: Edgar Allan Poe. Reed became interested in Poe after producer Hal Willner suggested he read some of Poe’s text at a Halloween benefit he was curating at St. Ann’s Episcopal Church in Brooklyn.[39] For this new collaboration, Reed reworked and rewrote some of Poe’s text and included some new songs based on the theme explored in the texts. In 2001, Reed made a cameo appearance in the movie adaptation of Prozac Nation. On October 6, 2001, the New York Times published a Reed poem called Laurie Sadly Listening in which he reflects upon the September 11 attacks.[40]

Incorrect reports of Reed’s death were broadcast by numerous U.S. radio stations in 2001, caused by a hoax email (purporting to be from Reuters) which said he had died of a drug overdose. In 2003, he released a 2-CD set, The Raven, based on “Poe-Try.” Besides Reed and his band, the album featured actors and musicians including singers David Bowie, Laurie Anderson, Kate and Anna McGarrigle, The Blind Boys of Alabama and Antony Hegarty, saxophonist Ornette Coleman, and actors Elizabeth Ashley, Christopher Walken, Steve Buscemi, Willem Dafoe, Amanda Plummer, Fisher Stevens and Kate Valk. The album consisted of songs written by Reed and spoken-word performances of reworked and rewritten texts of Edgar Allan Poe by the actors, set to electronic music composed by Reed. At the same time a single disc CD version of the albums, focusing on the music, was also released.

A few months after the release of The Raven, a new 2-CD Best Of-set was released, entitled NYC Man (The Ultimate Collection 1967-2003), which featured an unreleased version of the song “Who am I” and a selection of career spanning tracks that had been selected, remastered and sequenced under Reed’s supervision. In April 2003, Reed embarked on a new world tour supporting both new and released material, with a band including cellist Jane Scarpantoni and singer Antony Hegarty. During some of the concerts for this tour, the band was joined by Master Ren Guangyi, Reed’s personal T’ai Chi instructor, performing T’ai Chi movements to the music on stage. This tour was documented in the 2004 double-disc live album Animal Serenade, recorded live at The Wiltern in Los Angeles.

In 2003, Reed released his first book of photographs, Emotions in Action. This work was made up out of two books, a larger A4-paper sized called Emotions and a smaller one called Actions which was laid into the hard cover of the former. After Hours: a Tribute to the Music of Lou Reed was released by Wampus Multimedia in 2003.

In 2003, Reed was also a judge for the third annual Independent Music Awards to support independent artists’ careers.[41]

2004 to 2006

Reed performing in Málaga, Spain, July 21, 2008.

In 2004, a Groovefinder remix of his song, “Satellite of Love” (called “Satellite of Love ’04”) was released. It reached No. 10 in the UK singles chart. Also in 2004, Reed contributed vocals and guitar to the track “Fistful of Love” on I Am a Bird Now by Antony and the Johnsons. In 2005, Reed recorded a spoken word text on Danish rock band Kashmir‘s album No Balance Palace.

In January 2006, a second book of photographs, Lou Reed’s New York, was released.[42] At the 2006 MTV Video Music Awards, Reed performed “White Light/White Heat” with The Raconteurs. Later in the night, while co-presenting the award for Best Rock Video with Pink, he exclaimed, apparently unscripted, that “MTV should be playing more rock n’ roll.”

In October 2006, Reed appeared at Hal Willner’s Leonard Cohen tribute show “Came So Far For Beauty” in Dublin, beside the cast of Laurie Anderson, Nick Cave, Antony, Jarvis Cocker, Beth Orton, and others. According to the reports, he played a heavy metal version of Cohen’s “The Stranger Song.”[43] He also performed “One Of Us Cannot Be Wrong” and two duets—”Joan of Arc“, with Cohen’s former back-up singer Julie Christensen, and “Memories”—in a duet with Anjani Thomas.

In December 2006, Reed played a first series of show at St. Ann’s Warehouse, Brooklyn, based on his 1973 Berlin song cycle. Reed was reunited on stage with guitarist Steve Hunter, who played on the original album as well as on Rock ‘n’ Roll Animal, as well as joined by singers Antony Hegarty and Sharon Jones, pianist Rupert Christie, a horn and string section and the Brooklyn Youth Chorus. The show was produced by Bob Ezrin, who also produced the original album, and Hal Willner. The stage was designed by painter Julian Schnabel and a film about protagonist “Caroline” directed by his daughter, Lola Schnabel, was projected to the stage. A live recording of these concerts was also published as a film (directed by Schnabel) which was released in 2008. The show was also played at the Sydney Festival in January 2007 and throughout Europe during June and July 2007. The album version of the concert, entitled Berlin: Live At St. Ann’s Warehouse, was released in 2008.

2007 to 2009

Reed performing the Berlin album in Stockholm, Sweden, 2008.

In April 2007, he released Hudson River Wind Meditations, his first record of ambient meditation music. The record was released on the Sounds True record label and contains four tracks that were said to have been composed just for himself as a guidance for T’ai Chi exercise and meditation. In May 2007, Reed performed the narration for a screening of Guy Maddin‘s silent film The Brand Upon the Brain. In June 2007, he performed live at the Traffic Festival 2007 in Turin, Italy, a five-day free event organized by the city.

In August 2007, Reed went into the studio with the Killers in New York City to record “Tranquilize,” a duet with Brandon Flowers for the Killers’ b-side/rarities album, called Sawdust. During that month, he also recorded guitar for the Lucibel Crater song “Threadbare Funeral” which appears on their album The Family Album. In October 2007, Reed gave a special performance in the Recitement song “Passengers.” The album combines music with spoken word. The album was composed by Stephen Emmer and produced by Tony Visconti. Hollandcentraal was inspired by this piece of music and literature, which spawned a concept for a music video. On October 1, 2008, Reed joined Richard Barone via projected video on a spoken/sung duet of Reed’s “I’ll Be Your Mirror,” with cellist Jane Scarpantoni, in Barone’s FRONTMAN: A Musical Reading at Carnegie Hall.

On October 2 and 3, 2008, he premiered his new group, which later was named Metal Machine Trio, at REDCAT (Walt Disney Concert Hall Complex, Los Angeles). The live recordings of the concerts were released under the title The Creation of the Universe. The Trio features Ulrich Krieger (saxophone) and Sarth Calhoun (electronics), and plays free improvised instrumental music inspired by Reed’s 1975 album Metal Machine Music. The music ranges from ambient soundscapes to free rock to contemporary noise. The trio played further shows at New York’s Gramercy Theater in April 2009, and appeared as part of Reed’s band at the 2009 Lollapalooza, including a ten-minute free trio improvisation.[44] At Lollapalooza, held in Chicago’s Grant Park, Reed played “Sweet Jane” and “White Light/White Heat” with Metallica at Madison Square Garden as part of the twenty-fifth anniversary celebration of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame on October 30, 2009.[45][46] Reed provided the voice of Maltazard, the villain in the 2009 Luc Besson animated film, Arthur and the Vengeance of Maltazard, and played the role of himself in Wim Wenders’ movie Palermo Shooting (2008).

In 2009, Reed became an active member of the Jazz Foundation of America (JFA).[47] He was a featured performer at the JFA’s annual benefit “A Great Night in Harlem” in May 2009.[48]

2010s

Reed remained active doing benefits and composing music. He contributed vocals on the third Gorillaz album, Plastic Beach, on the song “Some Kind Of Nature” [49] and co-wrote and performed backup music for a Chen Style T’ai Chi instructional DVD.[50] He had a co-production credit on Laurie Anderson’s Homeland.

Reed performed a cover of the Buddy Holly song “Peggy Sue” which is featured on the tribute album Rave On Buddy Holly.

In 2010, French/American underground electronic recording artist, Uffie used an instrumental sample of The Velvet Underground track “Rock & Roll” for her debut album’s title track “Sex Dreams and Denim Jeans“. Before the release of the album there was a conflict between Uffie and Reed as to who would be credited as the writer of the track. Reed would only allow her to use the sample if she called “Sex Dreams and Denim Jeans” an adaptation of “Rock & Roll” and he received sole credit as songwriter for the track. This dispute delayed the album by six months and Uffie labeled Reed as “fucking difficult”.[51][52]

Reed began touring with the Metal Machine Trio, which was widely viewed as a return to his exploration of noise and sound. In 2011, heavy metal band Metallica recorded a full length collaboration with Reed entitled Lulu, released on November 1 in North America and October 31 everywhere else.[53]

In January 2012, Reed and John Cale sued the Andy Warhol Foundation for the license to use the yellow banana image from Warhol’s art for The Velvet Underground & Nico album.[54]

Reed contributed vocals to the track “The Wanderlust” on Metric‘s 2012 album Synthetica. He was a well-known supporter of the Free Tibet movement.[citation needed]

In 2012, a bilingual (French and English) book Lou Reed: Rimes/Rhymes[55] was published with a compilation of more than 300 photos of Reed, with comments from co-author Bernard Comment.

Death

In May 2013, Reed underwent a liver transplant in Cleveland. Afterwards he claimed on his website to be “bigger and stronger” than ever. On October 27, 2013, Reed died at the age of 71 from liver disease at his home in Southampton, New York, on Long Island.[56][57][58][59] His physician Charles Miller noted that Reed “was fighting right up to the very end. He was doing his Tai Chi exercises within an hour of his death, trying to keep strong and keep fighting.”[60]

Tributes were paid to Reed on Twitter, including Iggy Pop, Miley Cyrus, Samuel L. Jackson, Lenny Kravitz,[61] Ricky Gervais, Ryan Adams, Elijah Wood, and many others.[62][61] David Bowie posted a comment on his Facebook page saying that Reed “was a master”.[63] Rock band Pearl Jam dedicated their song “Man of the Hour” to Reed at their show in Baltimore and then covered the Velvet Underground’s “I’m Waiting for the Man“.[64] John Cale, his Velvet Underground bandmate, posted on his Facebook: “The world has lost a fine songwriter and poet…I’ve lost my ‘school-yard buddy'”.[65] Later, Universal Music revealed Cale’s full statement on Reed’s death:

“The news I feared the most, pales in comparison to the lump in my throat and the hollow in my stomach. Two kids have a chance meeting and 47 years later we fight and love the same way – losing either one is incomprehensible. No replacement value, no digital or virtual fill … broken now, for all time. Unlike so many with similar stories – we have the best of our fury laid out on vinyl, for the world to catch a glimpse. The laughs we shared just a few weeks ago, will forever remind me of all that was good between us.”

Former Velvet Underground drummer Mo Tucker responded by saying that Reed was “generous, encouraging and thoughtful. Working with him sometimes could be trying to some people, but never to me. I guess we learned from each other. We all learned from each other.[67] Reed became an important influence to numerous singers and songwriters, including British musician Morrissey:

He had been there all of my life. He will always be pressed to my heart. Thank God for those, like Lou, who move within their own laws, otherwise imagine how dull the world would be.[68]

Others from outside the music industry also paid their respects, including the Vatican and Salman Rushdie, who wrote, “My friend Lou Reed came to the end of his song. So very sad. But hey, Lou, you’ll always take a walk on the wild side. Always a perfect day.”[68]

Discography

With the Velvet Underground

As a solo artist

Filmography

References

  1. Jump up ^ Lou Reed – Walk on the Wild Side: The Stories Behind the Songs, Chris Roberts and Lou Reed, 2004, Hal Leonard, ISBN 0-634-08032-6
  2. Jump up ^ Rock and Roll Hall of Fame (2000). “The Velvet Underground”. Archived from the original on June 29, 2006. Retrieved September 15, 2006.
  3. Jump up ^ Sam Jones; Shiv Malik (27). “Lou Reed, lead singer of Velvet Undergound, dies aged 71”. Guardian. Retrieved October 27, 2013.
  4. Jump up ^ Richie Unterberger & Greg Prato (2005). “Lou Reed Biography”. Retrieved September 15, 2006.
  5. Jump up ^ Lou Reed“. The Guardian. Retrieved July 16, 2011.
  6. Jump up ^ McPhedran, Ian (December 2010). “QRD interview with Ian McPhedran of Ostrich Tuning”. silbermedia.com. Retrieved November 24, 2011.
  7. Jump up ^ “Lou Reed, ‘Walk on the Wild Side’ Rocker, Dies at 71”. Bloomberg.com. Retrieved October 28, 2013.
  8. Jump up ^ Lou Reed: The Stories Behind the Songs, Chris Roberts and Lou Reed, 2004, Hal Leonard, ISBN 0-634-08032-6
  9. Jump up ^ “Lou Reed Facts, information, pictures | Encyclopedia.com articles about Lou Reed”. Encyclopedia.com. Retrieved December 24, 2012.
  10. Jump up ^ The Heebie-Jeebies at CBGB’s: A Secret History of Jewish Punk – Steven Lee Beeber – Google Books. Books.google.ca. Retrieved December 24, 2012.
  11. Jump up ^ “The Gospel According to Lou: Interview with Lou Reed,” by Gabriella, http://www.nyrock.com (November 1998). Retrieved October 27, 2013.
  12. Jump up ^ “Lou Reed’s paradoxical Jewishness”, Times of Israel, October 27, 2013
  13. ^ Jump up to: a b “Lou Reed and Julian Schnabel”. Spectacle. Season 1. Episode 2. 2008.
  14. Jump up ^ Lou Reed – Walk on the Wild Side: The Stories Behind the Songs, Chris Roberts and Lou Reed, 2004, Hal Leonard, ISBN 0-634-08032-6
  15. Jump up ^ “Lou Reed Lived and Died with a Broken Heart,” by Todd McFliker (October 27, 2013). Retrieved Oct 27, 2013.
  16. ^ Jump up to: a b Colin, Chris. “Lou Reed – Salon.com”. Salon.com. Retrieved June 23, 2010.
  17. Jump up ^ McNeil, Legs; McCain, Gillian, Please Kill Me: The Uncensored Oral History of Punk, Grove Press, (1996). Cf. pp.3–4
  18. Jump up ^ “Music: Lou Reed’s Nightshade Carnival”. Retrieved October 28, 2013.
  19. Jump up ^ David Fricke, liner notes for the Peel Slowly and See box set (Polydor, 1995)
  20. Jump up ^ “Statement from Syracuse University Regarding the Passing of Lou Reed”. Retrieved October 28, 2013.
  21. ^ Jump up to: a b “Rock and Roll Heart”, documentary on the life of Lou Reed, American Masters
  22. Jump up ^ “Velvet Underground and Nico” (1967), album cover notes and record label.
  23. Jump up ^ Interview in Rolling Stone Magazine Nov/Dec 1987: Twentieth Anniversary Issue
  24. Jump up ^ Black, Johnny. Time Machine: Velvet Underground (1997), Mojo Magazine
  25. Jump up ^ Nelson, Paul. Rolling Stone, June 5, 1975 p. 60
  26. Jump up ^ “BBC – Music – Review of The Velvet Underground – The Velvet Underground & Nico (Deluxe Edition)”. Web.archive.org. Retrieved October 28, 2013.
  27. ^ Jump up to: a b c Holden, Stephen. Rolling Stone magazine, May 25, 1972 p. 68
  28. Jump up ^ David Bowie, Patti Smith and others discuss Lou Reed’s music and Transformer, video, 5 min.
  29. Jump up ^ “”David Bowie 50th Birthday with Lou Reed””. Youtube.com. 2010-12-06. Retrieved 2013-10-28.
  30. Jump up ^ Bershaw. “Concert Summary: May 2, 1973”. Wolfgangs Vault. Retrieved March 2, 2012.
  31. ^ Jump up to: a b c Gilmore, Mikal. “Lou Reed’s heart of darkness”, Rolling Stone magazine, March 22, 1979 pp. 8, 12
  32. Jump up ^ Lou Reed interview with Anthony DeCurtis at the 92nd Street Y New York on September 18, 2006
  33. Jump up ^ Waiting For The Man – A Biography of Lou Reed. Jeremy Reed, 1994 Picador p.156
  34. Jump up ^ Dolan, Marc. Bruce Springsteen and the Promise of Rock ‘n’ Roll, W. W. Norton & Company (2013) p. 160
  35. Jump up ^ Sandall, Robert (February 9, 2003). “Lou Reed: Walk on the mild side”. The Sunday Times (London). Retrieved December 20, 2008.
  36. Jump up ^ Futurerockhall.com[dead link]
  37. Jump up ^ Pareles, Jon (November 14, 1997). “NEXT WAVE FESTIVAL REVIEW/MUSIC; Echoes of H. G. Wells, Rhythms of Lou Reed”. The New York Times.
  38. Jump up ^ Aleksander, Irina (April 23, 2008). “Morning Memo: Lou Reed and Laurie Anderson Make it Legal”. Observer.com. Retrieved October 27, 2013.
  39. Jump up ^ VH1.com : Lou Reed : Lou Reed’s Obsession With Edgar Allan Poe Spawns The Raven – Rhapsody Music Downloads[dead link]
  40. Jump up ^ “War Poems”. Bushwatch.com. Retrieved March 26, 2010.
  41. Jump up ^ “Independent Music Awards – Past Judges”. Independentmusicawards.com. Retrieved October 27, 2013.
  42. Jump up ^ Lou Reed’s New York [dead link]
  43. Jump up ^ “Came so Far For Beauty At The Point Theatre, Dublin, October 4 and 5, 2006”, http://www.leonardcohenfiles.com/dublin.html
  44. Jump up ^ “Rolling Stone review of the Metal Machine Trio concert at the Gramercy in New York”. Rollingstone.com. October 18, 2013. Retrieved October 27, 2013.
  45. Jump up ^ “Lou Reed at Lollapalooza 2009”. 2009.lollapalooza.com. Retrieved March 26, 2010.
  46. Jump up ^ “BLABBERMOUTH.NET – METALLICA With OZZY, LOU REED, RAY DAVIES At ROCK HALL Concert: More Video Footage Available”. Roadrunnerrecords.com. Retrieved March 26, 2010.
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