“Woody Wednesday” Trivia about Woody Allen Part 2

Dick & Woody get semi-metaphysical

I have spent alot of time talking about Woody Allen films on this blog and looking at his worldview. He has a hopelessmeaningless, nihilistic worldview that believes we are going to turn to dust and there is no afterlife. Even though he has this view he has taken the opportunity to look at the weaknesses of his own secular view. I salute him for doing that. That is why I have returned to his work over and over and presented my own Christian worldview as an alternative.

My interest in Woody Allen is so great that I have a “Woody Wednesday” on my blog www.thedailyhatch.org every week. Also I have done over 30 posts on the historical characters mentioned in his film “Midnight in Paris.” (Salvador Dali, Ernest Hemingway,T.S.Elliot,  Cole Porter,Paul Gauguin,  Luis Bunuel, and Pablo Picasso were just a few of the characters.) Check out these trivia facts below.

Here is some trivia about Woody Allen:

Suspended from New York University.

He loves Venice, and helped to raise funds to rebuild the Venetian theater La Fenice, which was destroyed by a fire.

Chosen by Empire magazine as one of the 100 Sexiest Stars in film history (#89) (1995).

Adopted his second daughter Manzie Tio Allen, named after Manzie Johnson, a drummer with Sidney Bechet‘s band, after she had been born in Texas. (February 2000).

Older brother of Letty Aronson.

Was once invited to appear with the Royal Shakespeare Company. Stanley Kubrick also considered casting him in Sydney Pollack‘s part in Eyes Wide Shut (1999).

Among his biggest idols are Ingmar Bergman, Groucho Marx, Federico Fellini, Cole Porter, and Anton Chekhov.

One of the most prolific American directors of his generation, he has written, directed, and more often than not starred in a film just about every year since 1969.

Accused British interviewer Michael Parkinson of having a morbid interest in his private life and rejected questions about the custody battle for his children during his appearance on the BBC’s “Parkinson” (1971) in 1999.

Born at 10:55 PM EST.

Despite the advancement of sound technology, all of his films are mixed and released in monaural sound, although later ones have a mono Dolby Digital mix.

Made his first appearance at the Oscars in Hollywood to make a plea for producers to continue filming their movies in New York after the 9/11 tragedy (2002).

Wrote the concept for the film Hollywood Ending (2002) on the back of a matchbook. Years later, he found the matchbook with the notes for the film on it and made the film.

Attended the Cannes Film Festival for the first time to receive the Palm of Palms award for lifetime achievement (2002).

He has more Academy Award nominations (14) for writing than anyone else, all of them are in the Written Directly for the Screen category.

After completing his first musical, Everyone Says I Love You (1996), he stated that he’d like to do another in the future with an all-original score. Since making that statement, however, nothing has yet to materialize.

In addition to being a comedian, musician and filmmaker, he is also a respected playwright.

Legally changed his name to Heywood Allen. Goes by “Woody” in honor of Woody Herman.

Graduated from Midwood High School at Brooklyn College.

Son of bookkeeper Martin Konigsberg (December 25, 1900-January 13, 2001) and his wife Nettie Konigsberg (November 8, 1906-January 27, 2002).

Related posts:

I love the movie “Midnight in Paris” by Woody Allen and I have done over 30 posts on the historical characters mentioned in the film. Take a look below:

“Midnight in Paris” one of Woody Allen’s biggest movie hits in recent years, July 18, 2011 – 6:00 am

(Part 32, Jean-Paul Sartre)July 10, 2011 – 5:53 am

 (Part 29, Pablo Picasso) July 7, 2011 – 4:33 am

(Part 28,Van Gogh) July 6, 2011 – 4:03 am

(Part 27, Man Ray) July 5, 2011 – 4:49 am

(Part 26,James Joyce) July 4, 2011 – 5:55 am

(Part 25, T.S.Elliot) July 3, 2011 – 4:46 am

(Part 24, Djuna Barnes) July 2, 2011 – 7:28 am

(Part 23,Adriana, fictional mistress of Picasso) July 1, 2011 – 12:28 am

(Part 22, Silvia Beach and the Shakespeare and Company Bookstore) June 30, 2011 – 12:58 am

(Part 21,Versailles and the French Revolution) June 29, 2011 – 5:34 am

(Part 16, Josephine Baker) June 24, 2011 – 5:18 am

(Part 15, Luis Bunuel) June 23, 2011 – 5:37 am

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“Woody Allen Wednesdays” can be seen on the www.thedailyhatch.org

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Comments

  • David Lloyd-Jones  On April 10, 2013 at 8:23 am

    Everette,

    You write ” He has a hopeless, meaningless, nihilistic worldview that believes we are going to turn to dust and there is no afterlife.”

    I think you are projecting your own fears, vacuums and doubts onto Allen.

    My feeling would be that he would probably subscribe to Bertrand Russell’s grand syllogism, “The universe is random and without meaning; therefore let us conduct ourselves with dignity, good humour and decency.”

    This, you will notice, contrasts with the parallel Christian syllogism “Christ died for our sins; Whooppee! Let’s go crusade, rape and pillage, bomb, burn and preach a whole lot about our loving values.”

    Yours,

    -dlj.

    • Everette Hatcher III  On April 10, 2013 at 10:13 am

      You are correct about Bertrand Russell’s conclusion but does it make sense to you? It doesn’t logically make sense like the conclusions of Solomon of life “under the sun” because Solomon says some very tragic conclusions should follow when we lock God out and all we are left with is life from birth to death. Christian scholar Ravi Zacharias has noted, “The key to understanding the Book of Ecclesiastes is the term ‘under the sun.’ What that literally means is you lock God out of a closed system, and you are left with only this world of time plus chance plus matter.”
      Let me show you some inescapable conclusions if you choose to live without God in the picture. Solomon came to these same conclusions when he looked at life “under the sun.”
      DEATH IS THE GREAT EQUALIZER (3:20).

      CHANCE AND TIME HAVE DETERMINED THE PAST, AND THEY WILL DETERMINE THE FUTURE (9:11-13).

      POWER REIGNS IN THIS LIFE, AND THE SCALES ARE NOT BALANCED (4:1; 7:15).

      NOTHING IN LIFE GIVES TRUE SATISFACTION WITHOUT GOD INCLUDING KNOWLEDGE (1:16-18), LADIES AND LIQUOR (2:1-3, 8, 10, 11), AND GREAT BUILDING PROJECTS (2:4-6, 18-20).

      In the last chapter of Ecclesiastes you see Solomon bring God back into the picture and then Solomon gives his final conclusion.

      I have included many posts that includes quotes and video clips of Bertrand Russell. He intrigued me. Russell’s essay “A Free Man’s Worship” also includes these words:

      Such, in outline, but even more purposeless, more void of meaning, is the world which Science presents for our belief. Amid such a world, if anywhere, our ideals henceforward must find a home. That Man is the product of causes which had no prevision of the end they were achieving; that his origin, his growth, his hopes and fears, his loves and his beliefs, are but the outcome of accidental collocations of atoms; that no fire, no heroism, no intensity of thought and feeling, can preserve an individual life beyond the grave; that all the labors of the ages, all the devotion, all the inspiration, all the noonday brightness of human genius, are destined to extinction in the vast death of the solar system, and that the whole temple of Man’s achievement must inevitably be buried beneath the debris of a universe in ruins—all these things, if not quite beyond dispute, are yet so nearly certain, that no philosophy which rejects them can hope to stand. Only within the scaffolding of these truths, only on the firm foundation of unyielding despair, can the soul’s habitation henceforth be safely built.
      ______________
      Without God in the picture then Solomon’s conclusions hold fast. With God in the picture then everything changes. By the way, why do you think that because some hypocrites exist in the church that we should be critical of everyone in the church?

      Thanks for your comments. They are well thought out.

    • Everette Hatcher III  On April 10, 2013 at 4:18 pm

      Let me further reply to things that you said.

      HERE ARE YOUR WORDS:
      My feeling would be that he would probably subscribe to Bertrand Russell’s grand syllogism, “The universe is random and without meaning; therefore let us conduct ourselves with dignity, good humour and decency.”
      ____________
      I would love to hear from any atheist that would present a case for lasting meaning in life apart from God. Evidently you are agreeing with me that according to humanist assumptions that there is no lasting meaning in life for the atheist. Since you agree with Russell then you will probably agree with the British humanist H. J. Blackham too:

      On humanist assumptions [the assumption that there is no God and life has evolved by time and chance alone], life leads to nothing, and every pretense that it does notis a deceit. If there is a bridge over a gorge which spans only half the distance andends in mid-air, and if the bridge is crowded with human beings pressing on, oneafter another they fall into the abyss. The bridge leads to nowhere, and those who are pressing forward to cross it are going nowhere. . . It does not matter where they think they are going, what preparations for the journey they may have made, how much they may be enjoying it all . . . such a situation is a model of futility (H. J. Blackham et al., Objections to Humanism (Riverside, Connecticut: Greenwood Press, 1967).)
      _________________
      I don’t think I have overstated Woody Allen’s views on the meaninglessness of life.
      https://thedailyhatch.org/2012/05/02/according-to-woody-allen-life-is-meaningless-woody-wednesday-2/

      One reviewer of “Midnight in Paris” commented:
      Woody Allen isn’t religious, but he has a rabbinical side, and over the past decade his films have become more and more like Talmudic parables for atheists. On the surface, these movies are streamlined, even breezy, and they often have voice-over narration to get the pesky exposition out of the way fast. Philosophically, Allen has settled on resignation, a cosmic shrug: There’s no God, no justice, people are inconstant, life is meaningless — so where do you wanna eat?
      _____________
      A Christian film reviewer by the name of Brad Williams commented:

      Thursday, January 17, 2008

      Woody Allen and the Meaning of Life

      I have a strange sort of appreciation for Woody Allen, though I can’t say that I’ve ever seen a single one of his many films. My entire sympathy for Allen rests in the interviews and comments that I read about him from time to time. Some day, I may have a Woody Allen film fest to get to know him a little better.Today I read another interview/excerpt about Woody Allen, and it did a good job of expressing his hopeless world view. Here is a quote for you to get the feel of his philosophy, “The fact that there is no god and that we’re alone in the universe makes it more important than ever to act decently, but people don’t, very frequently.” Allen believes that there is no God at all, and yet he persistently and stubbornly insists that people ought to “act decently.” The natural response to that is, “Why, Woody, should we act decently then?” It seems that it is precisely this sort of question that has driven his most recent films.His latest film, “Cassandra’s Dream,” demonstrates Allen’s struggle with this very question. He says, “I’ve always felt that the worst kind of crimes and sometimes not the worst crimes often go unpunished. Everyday, from genocide in the political spectrum to street crime, people do terrible things and get away with it.” If there is no God, then Allen is precisely right, which again begs the question of why people ought to “act decently.” Allen has no good answer for that.

      Eventually, this sort of reasoning must lead one to ponder why to live at all, which is another thing that Allen ponders. What, exactly, is the point of life. Here’s Allen again, “I feel the trick is to try and find, not meaning, because there is no meaning, but to try and find some enjoyment in that context and know that it’s meaningless, short, nasty, brutal, and still, you know, find a modicum of enjoyment, get what you can get out of it, which is not a lot.” Can you see the connection between believing that there is no God to the inevitable conclusion that there is no meaning to life? Once God is erased from the equation, one is left with a meaningless existence in which the best one can hope for is to scratch a “modicum of enjoyment” out of life.

      This leads to the final Allen quote in the article. His philosophy of life eventually cause people to ask him the ultimate question. Here he answers in his own words, “People say, `Well, why go on at all?’ Camus’ question, why choose life? And the only answer I can ever give to that is we seem to be hard-wired to. The brain asks the questions, but the blood says live. So if a guy comes in here with a gun, you do everything you can to get it away from him. You do whatever you can to live. You bargain, you lie, you jump on top of him.

      “You’re hard-wired for self-preservation, but when you think about it cerebrally, why, to what end, what am I savoring here? And you can’t really think of a good answer, so you give up and say, `I can’t think of an answer, but my body fights to live, so I’m not going to resist that. I’m going to go along and trust the impulse toward life.”

      I find Woody Allen interesting because his reasoning is sound. He is right to say that if there is no God, then art and life and love and everything here is meaningless. I like reading about him because he is clearly uncomfortable, or so it seems, with this dismal outlook. His philosophy forces him to admit that horrible crimes will ultimately go unpunished, and that truly, there is no reason to go on living because life is both meaningless and without purpose. In his films, he struggles with this Godless reality. I grieve for him and for others like him who can have no hope for any meaning beyond fleeting, worldly pleasures.

      Perhaps you wonder why I find this interesting at all and not simply morbid. I find it interesting because Woody Allen displays the inherent hopelessness of a godless universe and the bleak truth that without God, there truly is no purpose in the anything. That explanation will never satisfy one made in the image of God. Fallen as we are, we still long for something more than that. I hope that Woody Allen can find mercy in Jesus Christ, in whom we find purpose and justice and meaning for life.
      https://thedailyhatch.org/2013/03/13/woody-wednesday-2008-article-on-woody-allen-on-the-meaning-of-life/

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