FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE PART 173 Nat Hentoff, historian,atheist, pro-life advocate, novelist, jazz and country music critic, and syndicated columnist (Featured artist is Sedrick Huckaby )

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Nat Hentoff on abortion

Secular Pro-Lifer Nat Hentoff Showed Me the Holistic Power of Truth

Image: Waring Abbott / Getty Images

Nat Hentoff—author, jazz critic, and Village Voice columnist for 50 years—died this weekend at the age of 91. Hentoff was a liberal, progressive atheist—yet he profoundly shaped my Christian belief and practice.

In 1986, when he was already a wizened old civil libertarian and secularist pundit, Hentoff researched a number of high-profile cases of disabled infants who had been denied simple, life-saving procedures and instead allowed to die of starvation and dehydration. The resulting story, “The Awful Privacy of Baby Doe,” was published in The Atlantic and marked the awakening of Hentoff’s conscience on abortion.

He had to admit, he later explained in a lecture given to Americans United for Life, that the slope from abortion to infanticide to euthanasia is “not slippery at all, but rather a logical throughway once you got on to it”:

Now, I had not been thinking about abortion at all. I had not thought about it for years. I had what W. H. Auden called in another context a “rehearsed response.” You mentioned abortion and I would say, “Oh yeah, that’s a fundamental part of women’s liberation,” and that was the end of it.

But then I started hearing about “late abortion.” The simple “fact” that the infant had been born, proponents suggest, should not get in the way of mercifully saving him or her from a life hardly worth living. At the same time, the parents are saved from the financial and emotional burden of caring for an imperfect child.

And then I heard the head of the Reproductive Freedom Rights unit of the ACLU saying—this was at the same time as the Baby Jane Doe story was developing on Long Island—at a forum, “I don’t know what all this fuss is about. Dealing with these handicapped infants is really an extension of women’s reproductive freedom rights, women’s right to control their own bodies.”

That stopped me. It seemed to me we were not talking about Roe v. Wade. These infants were born. And having been born, as persons under the Constitution, they were entitled to at least the same rights as people on death row—due process, equal protection of the law. So for the first time, I began to pay attention to the “slippery slope” warnings of pro-lifers I read about or had seen on television. Because abortion had become legal and easily available, that argument ran—as you well know—Infanticide would eventually become openly permissible, to be followed by euthanasia for infirm, expensive senior citizens.

His words, although based in reason, not faith, demonstrate that all truth is God’s truth and that the truth of the Bible governs the nature of reality in ways that even the unbeliever can recognize.

Hentoff’s growing awareness of the nature of abortion-on-demand wasn’t an isolated incident; the 1980s raised consciousness for a lot of us on the issue of abortion. In 1987, a year following his Atlantic essay, I, too, became pro-life. For me it was the result of viewing The Silent Scream, a video showing via ultrasound a first-trimester abortion taking place.

As a cradle Christian who had never doubted Jesus or my saving faith in him, I, like Hentoff, had before my pro-life conversion relied on my own “rehearsed responses.” I had never needed to defend my faith (to others or, more importantly, myself) until I began to apply my Christian beliefs to the issue of abortion amid the culture wars.

But that was just the start. The abortion issue helped me to live out my Christian worldview more consistently and courageously. From the opposite end of the worldview spectrum, Hentoff’s example helped me to understand the holism of truth. The battle over abortion—or any “issue” at any time—must always be for the Christian a greater battle for truth, wherever, as Augustine said, it may be found.

Shortly after adopting my pro-life views, I began protesting at local clinics. Coincidentally (or, more likely, providentially), I had also just begun my PhD program. Imagine a pro-life Christian activist at the most liberal department in a liberal public university in one of the most liberal states in the country. As far as I know, I was the only Christian in my department. I was certainly the only one publicly opposing abortion. In such an environment, I knew I wouldn’t likely be popular—but I had no idea that I would be hated and silenced. I had thought we were all there to pursue truth in our learning, but it seems I was mistaken.

My officemate asked me to take my pro-life flyers down from our door (offering to take down her lesbian literature in return). A professor recorded a complaint about my protest activities in my grade report. Worst was how some professors and fellow students avoided eye contact with me in the halls. One student wrote a column in a student newspaper objecting to the pro-life week my club held on campus, exhorting students to spit on and kick the pro-lifers. The university ordered our club to cancel our display.

I was naïve enough to think that standing up for what I believed in would bring some respect even if others didn’t agree. Studying within the liberal arts, I thought truth might prevail. But I was mistaken. These liberals weren’t tolerant. They weren’t even truly liberal—not in the classical sense of freely pursuing knowledge.

I later came across Nat Hentoff’s 1992 book, Free Speech for Me—But Not for Thee: How the American Left and Right Relentlessly Censor Each Other. In the prologue, Hentoff explained that part of his inspiration was the oppression of pro-life activists and the failure of liberals to speak out against it—at last, a liberal thinker striving for consistency. His efforts helped me to see where Christians and conservatives must do the same.

Reading Hentoff’s work, I was awed at one for whom integrity meant more than merely marching in lockstep with his own kind. While Hentoff objected, rightly, in his book to the censoriousness of conservatives, he called out his fellow leftists for similar impulses, finding such behavior contradictory to liberal values.

As I began thinking through free speech issues, I realized that Christians, not liberal secularists, have more to lose from censorship. The legal cases piling up against my fellow pro-life activists and me attested to this. But even more important, I came to understand that not only do Christians have more to lose from restrictions on speech, but we have less reason to fear even wrong ideas.

The way to combat falsehood is not in suppressing it, but in countering it with truth. For just as light dispels darkness, so wisdom excels folly (Ecc. 2:13). The 17th century Puritan and poet John Milton was one of the first modern Christians to defend free speech. He did so by affirming truth’s undefeatable power:

For who knows not that Truth is strong, next to the Almighty? She needs no policies, nor stratagems, nor licensings to make her victorious; those are the shifts and the defences that error uses against her power. Give her but room, and do not bind her when she sleeps . . . And though all the winds of doctrine were let loose to play upon the earth, so Truth be in the field, we do injuriously, by licensing and prohibiting, to misdoubt her strength.

Let her and Falsehood grapple; who ever knew Truth put to the worse, in a free and open encounter? Her confuting is the best and surest suppressing.

In Milton’s day, suppression of truth was a matter of life and death. Nat Hentoff recognized that this is still true today. And when my university tried to prevent my pro-life student club from expressing our ideas about abortion in display of commemorative crosses, Hentoff was one of the first to call in support of our effort.

Despite my disagreements with Hentoff on other topics, to him I owe my understanding as a Christian that because we believe in and have access to the truth, we have the least to fear from the free and open exchange of ideas. When someone with such a dramatically different worldview recognized and upheld at great personal cost the belief that all lives are indeed created equal, I saw the power of truth at work.

Thank you, Nat. Your legacy of integrity and courage lives on.

Nat Hentoff like and Milton Friedman and John Hospers was a hero to Libertarians. Over the years I had the opportunity to correspond with some prominent Libertarians such as Friedman and Hospers. Friedman was very gracious, but Hospers was not. I sent a cassette tape of Adrian Rogers on Evolution to John Hospers in May of 1994 which was the 10th anniversary of Francis Schaeffer’s passing and I promptly received a typed two page response from Dr. John Hospers. Dr. Hospers had both read my letter and all the inserts plus listened to the whole sermon and had some very angry responses. If you would like to hear the sermon from Adrian Rogers and read the transcript then refer to my earlier post at this link.  Earlier I posted the comments made by Hospers in his letter to me and you can access those posts by clicking on the links in the first few sentences of this post or you can just google “JOHN HOSPERS FRANCIS SCHAEFFER” or “JOHN HOSPERS ADRIAN ROGERS.”

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Likewise I read a lot of material from Nat Hentoff and I wrote him several letters. In the post I will include one of those letters.

Nat Hentoff on abortion

Published on Nov 5, 2016

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 xxxxxxxxxxTo Nat Hentoff c/o Cato Institute,   From everettehatcher@gmail.com,        6-26-14 

 

You are one of my biggest pro-life heroes along with Leo Alexander!!!!      Just the other day I sent you the CD called “Dust in the Wind, Darwin and Disbelief.” I know you may not have time to listen to the CD but on the first 2 1/2 minutes of that CD is the hit song “Dust in the Wind” by the rock group KANSAS and was written by Kerry Ligren in 1978. Would you be kind enough to read these words of that song given below and refute the idea that accepting naturalistic evolution with the exclusion of God must lead to the nihilistic message of the song! Or maybe you agree with Richard Dawkins and other scholars below?

DUST IN THE WIND:

I close my eyes only for a moment, and the moment’s gone

All my dreams pass before my eyes, a curiosity

Dust in the wind, all they are is dust in the wind

Same old song, just a drop of water in an endless sea

All we do crumbles to the ground, though we refuse to see

Dust in the wind, all we are is dust in the wind

Now, don’t hang on, nothing lasts forever but the earth and sky

It slips away, and all your money won’t another minute buy

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Humans have always wondered about the meaning of life…life has no higher purpose than to perpetuate the survival of DNA…life has no design, no purpose, no evil and no good, nothing but blind pitiless indifference. —Richard Dawkins

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The vast majority of people believe there is a design or force in the universe; that it works outside the ordinary mechanics of cause and effect; that it is somehow responsible for both the visible and the moral order of the world. Modern biology has undermined this assumption…But beginning with Darwin, biology has undermined that tradition. Darwin in effect asserted that all living organisms had been created by a combination of chance and necessity–natural selection… First, God has no role in the physical world…Second, except for the laws of probability and cause and effect, there is no organizing principle in the world, and no purpose.  (William B. Provine, “The End of Ethics?” in HARD CHOICES ( a magazine companion to the television series HARD CHOICES, Seattle: KCTS-TV, channel 9, University of Washington, 1980, pp. 2-3).

That Man is the product of causes which had no prevision of the end they were achieving; that his origin, his growth, his hopes and fears, his loves and his beliefs, are but the outcome of accidental collocations of atoms; …that all the labors of the ages, all the devotion, all the inspiration, all the noonday brightness of human genius, are destined to extinction in the vast death of the solar system, and that the whole temple of Man’s achievement must inevitably be buried beneath the debris of a universe in ruins—all these things, if not quite beyond dispute, are yet so nearly certain, that no philosophy which rejects them can hope to stand. Bertrand Russell

The British humanist H. J. Blackham (1903-2009) put it very plainly: On humanist assumptions, life leads to nothing, and every pretense that it does not is a deceit. If there is a bridge over a gorge which spans only half the distance and ends in mid-air, and if the bridge is crowded with human beings pressing on, one after the other they fall into the abyss. The bridge leads nowhere, and those who are pressing forward to cross it are going nowhere….It does not matter where they think they are going, what preparations for the journey they may have made, how much they may be enjoying it all. The objection merely points out objectively that such a situation is a model of futility“( H. J. Blackham, et al., Objections to Humanism (Riverside, Connecticut: Greenwood Press, 1967).

In the 1986 debate on the John Ankerberg show between Paul Kurtz (1925-2012) and Norman Geisler, Kurtz reacted to the point Blackham was making by asserting:

I think you may be quoting Blackham out of context because I’ve heard Blackham speak, and read much of what he said, but Blackham has argued continuously that life is full of meaning; that there are points. The fact that one doesn’t believe in God does not deaden the appetite or the lust for living. On the contrary; great artists and scientists and poets and writers have affirmed the opposite.

I read the book FORBIDDEN FRUIT by Paul Kurtz and I had the opportunity to correspond with him but I still reject his view that optimistic humanism withstand the view of nihilism if one accepts there is no God. Christian philosopher R.C. Sproul put it best:

Nihilism has two traditional enemies–Theism and Naive Humanism. The theist contradicts the nihilist because the existence of God guarantees that ultimate meaning and significance of personal life and history. Naive Humanism is considered naive by the nihilist because it rhapsodizes–with no rational foundation–the dignity and significance of human life. The humanist declares that man is a cosmic accident whose origin was fortuitous and entrenched in meaningless insignificance. Yet in between the humanist mindlessly crusades for, defends, and celebrates the chimera of human dignity…Herein is the dilemma: Nihilism declares that nothing really matters ultimately…In my judgment, no philosophical treatise has ever surpassed or equaled the penetrating analysis of the ultimate question of meaning versus vanity that is found in the Book of Ecclesiastes. 

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Kerry Livgren is the writer of the song “Dust in the Wind” and he said concerning that song in 1981 and then in 2006:

 1981: “When I wrote “Dust in the Wind” I was  writing about a yearning emptiness that I felt which millions of people identified with because the song was very popular.” 2006:“Dust In the Wind” was certainly the most well-known song, and the message was out of Ecclesiastes. I never ceased to be amazed at how the message resonates with people, from the time it came out through now. The message is true and we have to deal with it, plus the melody is memorable and very powerful. It disturbs me that there’s only part of the [Christian] story told in that song. It’s about someone yearning for some solution, but if you look at the entire body of my work, there’s a solution to the dilemma.”

Ecclesiastes reasons that chance and time have determined the past and will determine the future (9:11-13), and power reigns in this life and the scales are not balanced(4:1). Is that how you see the world? Solomon’s experiment was a search for meaning to life “under the sun.” Then in last few words in Ecclesiastes he looks above the sun and brings God back into the picture: “The conclusion, when all has been heard, is: Fear God and keep His commandments, because this applies to every person. For God will bring every act to judgment.”

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Featured artist is Sedrick Huckaby

Artist Spotlight – Sedrick Huckaby – Painter

Published on Jul 14, 2016

His artworks hang in major museums, he was educated on the East Coast and in Europe. But Sedrick Huckaby still lives in Fort Worth and his subjects are still his own family, their quilts, their African-American neighborhood. He turns these subjects into canvases of such density, it’s like he’s compressing entire histories into paint. Part of Art&Seek’s Artist Spotlight series, exploring the personal journeys of North Texas creatives. Learn more at http://artandseek.org/spotlight.

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Sedrick Huckaby

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Sedrick Ervin Huckaby (1975) is an American artist who is known for his use of thick, impasto paint to create murals that evoke traditional quilts and to produce large portraits that represent his personal history through images of family members and neighbors.[1][2]Huckaby has worked with images from quilts for many years, moving them from background components of portraits into the subject of his work.[3] He was interviewed about his quilt-influenced abstract work in a podcast for Painters Table.[4] His work is on display at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Museum of Fine arts in Boston, the Minneapolis Institute of Art, The Art Institute of Chicago, and the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University.

Biography[edit]

Huckaby is a native of Fort Worth, Texas. As a child, Huckaby spent time drawing characters from TV shows such as Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and Battlestar Galactica. While in High School, he attended classes at the Modern Art Museum where he met fellow artist Ron Tomlinson, who encouraged Huckaby to pursue art as a career.[5] He studied art at Texas Wesleyan University before receiving a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Boston University in 1997 and a Master of Fine Arts from Yale University in 1999.[6] He has lectured on the Grant Hill Collection of African American Art at the Dallas Museum of Art, and through the The Artist’s Eye series at the Kimbell Art Museum in Fort Worth.[7] He is currently an assistant professor of painting in the Department of Art and Art History at UT Arlington, where he has been teaching since 2009. He is married to artist Letitia Huckaby.

Works[edit]

His 2008 series Big Momma’s House includes 65 paintings, pastels, and drawings created over a two-year period. The focus of this collection is his maternal grandmother, Hallie Beatrice Carpenter, the matriarch of his family and more affectionately known an “Big Momma”.[8] His work ” A Love Supreme (Spring)”, is based on the jazz song of the same name by John Coultrane, and depicts a series of quilts draped across the canvas emphasizing weight and texture. In this mural sized-oil painting, the painted folds of brightly colored fabrics mimic the rhythm and syncopation of Coultrane’s jazz hit while paying homage to his grandmother’s traditional African-American quilts.[9] His series The 99% – Highand Hills is a collection of portraits inspired by the 2011 Occupy Wall Street movement, showcasing the economic disparities of the U.S. population through sketches of community members alongside quotes from each person.[5]

Awards and Distinctions[edit]

In 1999, Huckaby was awarded the Kate Neal Kinley Memorial Fellowship from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Illinois.[8] He was awarded the Alice Kimball English Traveling Fellowship from Yale University in 1999 which funded his travels to study the works of Henry Tanner.[10] Again in 1999 he was awarded the Provincetown Fellowship from the Fine Arts Work Center and subsequently spent siz months making work there.[10][8] In 2001, he was awarded the Best of Show and subsequently held a solo exhibition for the The 20th Carrol Harris Simms National Black Art Competition and Exhibition at the African American Museum in Dallas, Texas.[8]

In 2004, Huckaby was awarded a Joan Mitchell Foundation Painters and Sculptors Grant, which is given to acknowledge “painters and sculptors creating work of exceptional quality through unrestricted career support”.[11] In 2004 he also received the Beth Lea Clardy Memorial Award (first place) at Art in the Metroplex in Fort Worth, Texas.[8] In 2008 he received a Guggenheim Fellowship, one of the most prestigious art grants in the nation.[10][12] In 2014 he received the Visiting Artist Residency and Fellowship through the Brandywine Workshop as well as the Davidson Family Fellowship sponsored by Amon Carter Museum of American Art.[10] In 2016, he was one of the winners of the Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition, which is hosted by The Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery.[13] In 2017 he received the 2016 Moss/Chumley North Texas Artist Award, which is given annually by the Meadows Museum at Southern Methodist University in Dallas.[14]

Exhibitions[edit]

Selected Solo Exhibitions[8]

Selected Collections[edit]

References[edit]

  1. Jump up^ “”A Legacy of Love and Freedom” Unfolds at the TMA–Quilt Paintings by Texas Artist Sedrick Huckaby On View”. Tyler Museum of Art. April 12, 2011. Retrieved March 17, 2016.
  2. Jump up^ Sherer, Scott. “UTSA Art Gallery features exhibit “Fare Thee Well” through Feb. 20″. UTSA Today. Retrieved March 18, 2016.
  3. Jump up^ Simek, Peter (April 23, 2010). “Letitia and Sedrick Huckaby: An Artist Couple Reaches Into Shared Memory For Inspiration”. Front Row Blog–D Magazine. Retrieved March 17, 2016.
  4. Jump up^ “Sedrick Huckaby: Interview”. Painters’ Table. Retrieved March 17, 2016.
  5. ^ Jump up to:a b Calimbahin, Samantha (2016). “Sedrick Huckaby: Local Artist Gaining National Attention”. Fort Worth Business Press. 29: 28–29.
  6. Jump up^ Samantha Calimbahin. “Sedrick Huckaby: Local artist gaining national attention.” Fort Worth Business. Friday, July 8, 2016. http://www.fortworthbusiness.com/news/arts_and_culture/sedrick-huckaby-local-artist-gaining-national-attention/article_93859204-455a-11e6-b093-e3a02701db95.html
  7. Jump up^ “Artist Biography for Sedrick Huckaby”. AskArt. Retrieved March 18, 2016.
  8. ^ Jump up to:a b c d e f Collins, Phillip (2008). “Big Momma’s House”. Valley House Gallery and Sculpture Garden: 38–41.
  9. Jump up^ Kurzner, Lisa (2008). “A patchwork of color, life: Quilts procide the texture in painter’s series”. The Atlanta Journal – Constitution. 23 March 2008.
  10. ^ Jump up to:a b c d “Sedrick E Huckaby | Explore University Of Texas At Arlington”. mentis.uta.edu. Retrieved 2017-01-28.
  11. Jump up^ “Joan Mitchell Foundation”. Retrieved March 17, 2016.
  12. Jump up^ “Fellows”. John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. Retrieved March 17, 2016.
  13. Jump up^ “UTA Assistant Art Professor Among Winners of Prestigious Smithsonian Portrait Competition”. MyArlingtonTX. Retrieved March 17, 2016.
  14. Jump up^ Michael Granberry, Dallas Morning News, January 19, 2017. “‘Interpreter and innovator’ Sedrick Huckaby wins Meadows Museum’s Moss/Chumley Award. “http://www.dallasnews.com/arts/visual-arts/2017/01/19/noted-artist-sedrick-huckaby-winner-2016-mosschumley-award-given-meadows-museum.

External links[edit]

How’d he do? George W. Bush debuts his book of portraits – and we match them up against photos of their counterparts 

  • President George W. Bush  published a book of 66 portraits of wounded veterans that he painted
  • There is also an exhibit of the paintings at the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum in Dallas
  • Bush wrote about the veteran next to their portrait about how they are recovering physically and mentally

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4279914/George-W-Bush-debuts-book-portraits-veterans.html#ixzz4ikukDTJG
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President George W. Bush spent a year creating portraits of veterans who were wounded during his time in office and published a book of the oil paintings.

The book of 66 portraits titled ‘Portraits of Courage: A Commander in Chief’s Tribute to America’s Warriors’ honors Marines, soldiers, sailors and airmen and women who were injured in the line of duty while Bush was in power.

The book was released on February 28 and there is an exhibit of the paintings at the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum in Dallas. It is Bush’s third book he has published since leaving office.

The former president’s passion for the arts is surprising to some, including his own family. Last year at a CNN town hall, former Gov Jeb Bush said his brother’s fondness for painting was was ‘really weird,’ but added, ‘He’s gotten pretty good at it’.

Scroll down for video 

Sergeant Leslie Zimmerman deployed to Kuwait and entered Iraq at the start of Operation Iraqi Freedom. She became an EMT-Intermediate and was honorably discharged when she was diagnosed with PTSD

She became an EMT-Intermediate and was honorably discharged when she was diagnosed with PTSD

Army Sergeant Leslie Zimmerman deployed to Kuwait and entered Iraq at the start of Operation Iraqi Freedom. She became an EMT-Intermediate and was honorably discharged when she was diagnosed with PTS

President George W Bush released his book of portraits of veterans which includes Army Sergeant Leslie Zimmerman (left), and has an exhibit of the paintings at the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum in Dallas

President George W Bush released his book of portraits of veterans which includes Army Sergeant Leslie Zimmerman (left), and has an exhibit of the paintings at the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum in Dallas

President Bush said the trickiest part of the oil painting portraits was capturing the veterans' eyes

President Bush said the trickiest part of the oil painting portraits was capturing the veterans’ eyes

Sergeant First Class Ramon Padilla lost his left arm in combat while serving in Afghanistan in 2007

His portrait is featured in 'Portraits of Courage: A Commander in Chief's Tribute to America's Warriors'

Sergeant First Class Ramon Padilla lost his left arm in combat while serving in Afghanistan in 2007

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4279914/George-W-Bush-debuts-book-portraits-veterans.html#ixzz4ikufgERe
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In the book, Bush wrote about the veterans next to their portraits about how they recovered, both physically and mentally. The stories also highlight their families’ role in the veterans’ adjustment to civilian life.

President Bush took up painting as a hobby in his retirement. Many of the servicemen and women featured in his book have videos featured on the Bush Center YouTube channel.

Part of the description of the book on Amazon reads: ‘Our men and women in uniform have faced down enemies, liberated millions, and in doing so showed the true compassion of our nation.

‘Often, they return home with injuries—both visible and invisible—that intensify the challenges of transitioning into civilian life. In addition to these burdens, research shows a civilian-military divide.’

Army Sergeant Daniel Casara underwent 24 surgeries after his being injured in an explosion in 2005

Proceeds from the book will go to the non-profit George W. Bush Presidential Center

Army Sergeant Daniel Casara underwent 24 surgeries after his being injured in an explosion in 2005

‘Seventy-one percent of Americans say they have little understanding of the issues facing veterans, and veterans agree: eighty-four percent say that the public has “little awareness” of the issues facing them and their families.’

‘Each painting in this meticulously produced hardcover volume is accompanied by the inspiring story of the veteran depicted, written by the President. Readers can see the faces of those who answered the nation’s call and learn from their bravery on the battlefield, their journeys to recovery, and the continued leadership and contributions they are making as civilians.’

‘It is President Bush’s desire that these stories of courage and resilience will honor our men and women in uniform, highlight their family and caregivers who bear the burden of their sacrifice, and help Americans understand how we can support our veterans and empower them to succeed.’

Sergeant First Class Michael R. Rodriguez told the Bush Center in a video he has PTS

He also gets severe headaches from traumatic brain injuries or TBIs

Sergeant First Class Michael R. Rodriguez told the Bush Center in a video he has PTS. He also gets severe headaches from traumatic brain injuries or TBIs

Lance Corporal Timothy John Lang served in the U.S. Marine Corps

He was injured in 2006 in Iraq and his leg was amputated below the knee

Lance Corporal Timothy John Lang served in the U.S. Marine Corps. He was injured in 2006 in Iraq and his leg was amputated below the knee

Paintings of wounded US military veterans painted by former US President George W. Bush hang in 'Portraits of Courage', a new exhibit at the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum in Dallas

Paintings of wounded US military veterans painted by former US President George W. Bush hang in ‘Portraits of Courage’, a new exhibit at the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum in Dallas

Army Lieutenant Colonel Kent Graham Solheim has served in the Army from 1994 to present

He was wounded in 2007 in Iraq where he was shot four times which led to the amputation of his leg

Army Lieutenant Colonel Kent Graham Solheim has served in the Army from 1994 to present. He was wounded in 2007 in Iraq where he was shot four times which led to the amputation of his leg

U.S. Marine Corps Sergeant Michael Joseph Leonard Politowicz served from 2010 to the present

Proceeds from the book will go to the non-profit George W. Bush Presidential Center

U.S. Marine Corps Sergeant Michael Joseph Leonard Politowicz served from 2010 to the present

President Bush was inspired to learn oil painting after reading Winston Churchill's essay 'Painting as a Pastime'

President Bush was inspired to learn oil painting after reading Winston Churchill’s essay ‘Painting as a Pastime’

Proceeds from the book will go to the non-profit George W. Bush Presidential Center. The center has a Military Service Initiative that works to ensure that post-9/11 veterans and their families make successful transitions to civilian life.

Time asked the former president how he chose the subjects. Bush responded: ‘I had painted world leaders with whom I’d served, and my instructor Sedrick Huckaby said, “You know, you ought to paint the portraits of people you know well but who others don’t”.’

‘It instantly hit me that I ought to paint these wounded warriors I’d gotten to know. Most of them I had played golf with or ridden mountain bikes with through the events we host for them at the Bush Center. I’d gotten to know some better than others, of course, but I was equally moved by their stories.’

He said the hardest part of the portraits was capturing the veterans’ eyes.

He told his art teacher that he wanted to discover his ‘inner Rembrandt’ according to CNN .

At the exhibit opening at George W. Bush Presidential Library in Dallas, Bush said: ‘You have to understand when you’re the president you are going at 100 miles per hour and the next day it’s zero. I had this anxiousness to keep moving and to learn something.

Bush said Winston Churchill’s essay ‘Painting as a Pastime’ which inspired him to take up the hobby himself.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4279914/George-W-Bush-debuts-book-portraits-veterans.html#ixzz4ikuauQLR
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UT’s visiting artist in residence uses quilts, illustration and other methods to capture people and places close to home.

FEB 20, 2014 1 PM

If the rarified, white-walled interiors of art galleries can seem far removed from everyday life, Sedrick Huckaby’s art might be the antidote. His paintings and drawings give place of pride to ordinary people — family members and people from the Fort Worth, Tex., neighborhood where he lives — as well as quilts, a homely object central to his personal history and broader American culture. In large-scale canvases, Huckaby imbues quilts with monumental presence and painterly texture; his portraits perform the same work on faces and personalities, embracing subjects well worn with love and normal hardships.
“I want them to have a type of reality to them, almost documentary in a certain way, where it really tells certain truths about life,” Huckaby says.

On Friday, the University of Tampa’s printmaking workshop, STUDIO-f, celebrates Huckaby with an open house and display of the monoprints he has created there during a residency over the past two weeks. At the same time, UT’s Scarfone/Hartley Gallery (adjacent to STUDIO-f) showcases a selection of Huckaby’s drawings and paintings, including his suite of four 7-foot-tall, 20-foot-wide paintings of draped quilts, A Love Supreme (2001-2009). The monoprints will show how Huckaby has been working to translate his chosen subjects and confident style of draftsmanship into the medium of screenprinting with UT printers, including Carl Cowden III.

“It’s a collaboration in that I’m trying to work the way that he works, and he’s working with the way we have to work with the process,” Cowden says.

The 38-year-old artist is an anomaly. Huckaby grew up in Fort Worth but moved away to pursue the gold standard in art education, an MFA in painting from Yale, after a BFA at Boston University. A 2008 Guggenheim fellowship and other honors have given him the kind of credentials that artists typically try to leverage into international careers, but Huckaby returned to Fort Worth to start a family and, as life unfolded, to make his surrounding community into one of the subjects of his art.

Through his confident handling of paint (and, in other work on view here, a lithographic pencil), Huckaby’s subjects gain universal appeal. The quilts are rendered as massive folds of patterned drapery that want to embrace a viewer, embodying both the monumental aura of abstract expressionist canvases and cozy domesticity. They are organized into a seasonal suite of colors, from warm summer to comparatively icy winter, and possess a delightful dimensionality up close, where fabric patterns are revealed as lovingly built-up in thick impasto daubs — a painterly method that echoes the careful, but creative and improvisational way quilts are stitched together.

The title of the series, A Love Supr eme, after the John Coltrane jazz composition, bolsters their association with that most noble of emotions.

“The idea is starting at a basic kind of love, like that of a mother for her children or a grandmother for her children, with the quilts,” Huckaby says.

“The thought is that, like seasons revolve, you can think about love in multiple ways. So it’s not just about the love of a grandmother. As you look and contemplate, on one level you might think about a connection with the music … then the seasons … then about the cycle of life. Alternately, I hope it would lead you to a place of thinking about a greater love, a love of God.”

The span of life, from birth to death, is the subject of two of Huckaby’s other oil paintings, which depict his grandmother and grandfather in the waning days of their lives. Set in the same bedroom about a decade apart, the images bring tenderness to an experience rarely made visible in contemporary art.

A third project called The 99 Percent focuses on members of his Fort Worth community. Loosely inspired by Occupy Wall Street, Huckaby began visiting public spaces in his neighborhood — the gas station, the Waffle House — to draw and talk to anyone who would let him. As a result, he’s made more than 100 small but robustly drawn portraits, some of which are captioned with a statement from a conversation between Huckaby and his subject about economic stress or political frustration. A selection of the images, which he made into lithographs during a residency in Pennsylvania last year, are on display here.

It’s refreshing that there’s no obscure conceptual angle to Huckaby’s work — just an earnest desire to grapple with the everyday world, and people in it, through drawing and painting.

“It might be that my work is a little too conservative for some groups, but it doesn’t concern me too much,” Huckaby
says.

“One of the things I have found out about art making is that our culture values uniqueness. Some of that uniqueness is a totally different form of art, where you come up with some unique idea. Or you can work in ways that have been worked in before, but you do it your way. That’s more the line that I follow. I’m not trying to make something that’s never been made, but I’m trying to do my own unique take on it.

See Huckaby’s works through Feb. 22 at the University of Tampa Scarfone/Hartley Gallery and STUDIO-f;  open-studio and gallery reception on Fri., Feb. 21, at 6 p.m., 310 N. Boulevard, Tampa, 813-253-6217, gallery.utarts.comstudiof.utarts.com

 

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