FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE Part 374 My 8th LETTER TO HUGH HEFNER “I have no idea what we are doing here” Featured Artist is Arlene Shechet

November 26, 2015 (Thanksgiving)

Hugh Hefner
Playboy Mansion  
10236 Charing Cross Road
Los Angeles, CA 90024-1815

Dear Mr. Hefner,

In this eighth letter  I am not going to mention that sermon THE PLAYBOY’S PAYDAY in today’s letter other to say that I am not going to even touch on that subject. Today is Thanksgiving and we both have so much to be thankful for. Just last night I looked up in the sky at the stars and felt blessed to be a part of this grand universe that God has made. It seems that you have also thought long and hard about this same subject. I did notice that in  1974 in an interview with R. Couri Hay you noted:

I have no idea what we are doing here, but we are here and that wasn’t just man’s invention.  I mean there is something beyond all of this and whether it has a purpose or a point, grander plan. I don’t know.

Evidently you do believe there possibly a personal God that created this whole world. That is what I wanted to talk you about today. You may think that your beliefs have been with you so long that there is no chance you would ever change them, but in my experience I have learned that one’s world can be turned upside down if they truly take time to look at the other side with an open mind. Let me give you an example using an experience I had in 1995. 

HUGH, AFTER READING A FEW OF MY PREVIOUS LETTER YOU KNOW WHAT WORLDVIEW THAT I COME FROM. SO THE FOLLOWING STORY YOU MIGHT FIND VERY FANTASTIC BUT IT ACTUALLY IS JUST AN EDITED VERSION OF A  PAPER I WROTE FOR THE Freedom Writer | May/June 1997 ISSUE:

As an evangelical Christian and a member of the Christian Coalition, I felt obliged to expose a misquote of John Adams’ I found in an article entitled “America’s Unchristian Beginnings” (Los Angeles Times, August 3, 1995, p.B-9) by the self-avowed atheist Dr. Steven Morris. However, what happened next changed my focus to the use of misquotes, unconfirmed quotes, and misleading attributions by the religious right.

In the process of attempting to correct Morris, I was guilty of using several misquotes myself. Dr John George  coauthor (with Paul Boller Jr.) of the book They Never Said It! (Oxford University Press, 1989) set me straight. George pointed out that George Washington never said, “It is impossible to rightly govern the world without God and the Bible.” (They Never Said It! pp. 126-127). I had cited page 18 of the 1927 edition of Halley’s Bible Handbook. This quote was probably generated by a similar statement that appears in A Life of Washington (New York: Harper and Brothers, 1835) by James Paulding. Sadly, no one has been able to verify any of the quotes in Paulding’s book since no footnotes were offered.

After reading They Never Said It! I had a better understanding of how widespread the problem of misquotes is. Furthermore, I discovered that many of these had been used by the leaders of the religious right. I decided to confront over three dozen leaders in my own religious right political movement concerning their misquotes. WallBuilders, the publisher of David Barton’s The Myth of Separation (published in 1989), helped me further by providing me with their “Questionable Quote” list (now called UNCONFIRMED QUOTES LIST). The list contained a dozen quotes of the founders that Barton could only confirm with secondary sources.

The first was the reaction that I expected. Several thanked me for bringing these corrections to their attention. They agreed that it is wrong to use disputed quotes as if they were authentic.

The second, which was the most common response, was to claim that their critics were biased skeptics who find the truth offensive. The premise of this argument is, “We know our critics are 100% wrong all the time, so who cares what they have to say anyway. We are the only unbiased ones.”

And the third response was from one who defended his method of research and his method of confirming sources. Furthermore, he said that he pursued his graduate education in order to improve his level of scholarship. Nevertheless, that respondent never provided me with his original sources.

David Barton has tried to raise the level of scholarship in the debate concerning the founders by committing to use only quotes that have been confirmed by primary sources. Dr. John George has commented, “While not agreeing with Bartonconcerning separation of church and state, I must say he has done everyone a service by circulating the ‘Questionable Quote List.’ Especially gratifying is his encouraging those in his own Religious Right camp to cite only primary sources for the quotes they utilize. Unfortunately, a sizable minority will ignore the advice.”

Many separationists like Dr. George praised Barton for challenging others to a higher level of scholarship concerning these unconfirmed quotes.

_________

HUGH, DO YOU SEE HOW SOMEONE LIKE YOU AND ME NEED TO TAKE TIME AND LOOK AT THE FACTS AND NOT JUST RELY ON OLD STEREOTYPES TO GUIDE US? WHO WOULD HAVE GUESSED THAT A RELIGIOUS RIGHT GUY LIKE ME WOULD HAVE CONFRONTED OVER THREE DOZEN LEADERS IN MY OWN CAMP?

It is true that you are a prominent public figure and that you are known for your views on the sexual revolution. I want to talk to you about probably the most well known academic in the area of atheistic philosophy and my interaction with him over the last few decades.

I have more articles posted on my blog about the last few yearsof Antony Flew’s life than any other website in the world probably. The reason is very simple. I had the opportunity to correspond with Antony Flew back in the middle 90’s and he said that he had the opportunity to listen to several of the cassette tapes that I sent him with messages from Adrian Rogers and he also responded to several of the points I put in my letters that I got from Francis Schaeffer’s materials. The ironic thing was that I purchased the sermon IS THE BIBLE TRUE? originally from the Bellevue Baptist Church Bookstore in 1992 and in the same bookstore in 2008 I bought the book THERE IS A GOD by Antony Flew. Back in 1993 I decided to contact some of the top secular thinkers of our time and I got my initial list of individuals from those scholars that were mentioned in the works of both Francis Schaeffer and Adrian Rogers. Schaeffer had quoted Flew in his book ESCAPE FROM REASON. It was my opinion after reviewing the evidence that Antony Flew was the most influential atheistic philosopher of the 20th century.

__________

The Fine Tuning Argument for the Existence of God fromAntony Flew!

Imagine entering a hotel room on your next vacation. The CD player on the bedside table is softly playing a track from your favorite recording. The framed print over the bed is identical to the image that hangs over the fireplace at home. The room is scented with your favorite fragrance…You step over to the minibar, open the door, and stare in wonder at the contents. Your favorite beverage. Your favorite cookies and candy. Even the brand of bottled water you prefer…You notice the book on the desk: it’s the latest volume by your favorite author…

Chances are, with each new discovery about your hospitable new environment, you would be less inclined to think it has all a mere coincidence, right? You might wonder how the hotel managers acquired such detailed information about you. You might marvel at their meticulous preparation. You might even double-check what all this is going to cost you. But you would certainly be inclined to believe that someone knew you were coming.      There Is A God  (2007)  p.113-4

HUGH AGAIN I COME BACK TO YOUR OWN WORDS: “I have no idea what we are doing here, but we are here and that wasn’t just man’s invention.  I mean there is something beyond all of this and whether it has a purpose or a point, grander plan. I don’t know.”

The question now becomes do you want to know if there is a God or not? Are you willing to examine the same evidence that I provided to the world’s leading atheistic philosopher in 1994 (Antony Flew) and take time to listen to this short CD I have enclosed?

Below is a piece of that evidence given by Francis Schaeffer and Dr. C. Everett Koop in their book WHATEVER HAPPENED TO THE HUMAN RACE? Chapter 5 concerning the accuracy of the Bible:

Ahab’s line did not last long and was brutally overthrown by a man called Jehu. As one walks toward the Assyrian section in the British Museum, one of the first exhibits to be seen is the famous Black Obelisk. This stands about six feet high and was discovered at Nimrud (Calah) near the Assyrian capital at Nineveh. It describes how King Shalmeneser III compelled Jehu to submit to his authority and to pay him tribute. Here one can see a representation of the kneeling figure of either Jehu or his envoy before the Assyrian king. The inscription tells of Jehu’s submission: “The tribute of Jehu, son of Omri: I received from him silver, gold, a golden bowl, a golden vase with pointed bottom, golden tumblers, golden buckets, tin, a staff for a king and purukhti fruits.”

Jehu is referred to by the Assyrian records as a son of Omri, not because he was literally his son, but because he was on the throne which had been occupied previously by the house of Omri. This event took place about 841 B.C.

Putting them all together, these archaeological records show not only the existence historically of the people and events recorded in the Bible but the great accuracy of the details involved.

The Black Obelisk of Shalmaneser

“He will raise a signal for a nation from afar off, and whistle for it from the ends of the earth; and lo, swiftly, speedily it comes.” Isaiah 5:26

What is The Black Obelisk of Shalmaneser?

The Black Obelisk of Shalmaneser III is a four-sided monument or pillar made of black limestone. It stands about 6 1/2 feet tall. It was discovered in 1846 by A.H. Layard in the Central Palace of Shalmaneser III at the ruins of Nimrud,  known in the Bible as Calah, and known in ancient Assyrian inscriptions as Kalhu. It is now on display in the British Museum.

The Obelisk contains 5 rows of bas-relief (carved) panels on each of the 4 sides, 20 panels in all. Directly above each panel are cuneiform inscriptions describing tribute offered by submissive kings during Shalmaneser’s war campaigns with Syria and the West.

The “Jehu Relief” is the most significant panel because it reveals a bearded Semite in royal attire bowing with his face to the ground before king Shalmaneser III, with Hebrew servants standing behind him bearing gifts. The cuneiform text around it reveals the tribute bearer and his gifts, it says:

“The tribute of Jehu, son of Omri: I received from him silver, gold, a golden bowl, a golden vase with pointed bottom, golden tumblers, golden buckets, tin, a staff for a king [and] spears.”

The Assyrians referred to a northern Israel king as a “son of Omri”, whether they were a direct son of Omri or not. Other Assyrian inscriptions reveal Israel’s southern kings from Judah, as recorded on Sennacherib’s Clay Prism (also known as the Taylor Prism) which reads “Hezekiah the Judahite”.

The Black Obelisk has been precisely dated to 841 BC, due to the accurate Assyrian dating methods. One modern scholar refers to the accuracy of Assyrian records:

“Assyrian records were carefully kept. The Assyrians coordinated their records with the solar year. They adopted a system of assigning to each year the name of an official, who was known as the “limmu.” In addition, notation was made of outstanding political events in each year, and in some cases reference was made to an eclipse of the sun which astronomers calculate occured on June 15, 763 B.C. Assyriologists have been able to compile a list of these named years, which they designate “eponyms,” and which cover 244 years (892-648 B.C.). These records are highly dependable and have been used by Old Testament scholars to establish dates in Hebrew History, particularly during the period of the monarchy.”

Walter G. Williams, “Archaeology in Biblical Research” (Nashville, Tennessee: Abingdon Press, 1965) p. 121.

______

Thank you again for your time and I know how busy you are.

Everette Hatcher, everettehatcher@gmail.comhttp://www.thedailyhatch.org, cell ph 501-920-5733, Box 23416, LittleRock, AR 72221

PS: I plan to write you again and will be responding to your past statements like I did today. THE MESSAGE “Is the Bible True” by Adrian Rogers THAT I SENT TO ANTONY FLEW OVER 20 YEARS AGO IS ON THE CD THAT I ENCLOSED FOR YOU TO LISTEN TO. TAKE A CHANCE AND IT MAY GIVE YOU SOME HOPE AND TURN YOUR WHOLE WORLD UPSIDE LIKE IT DID TO THE FAMOUS ATHEIST ANTONY FLEW!!!!

__

Arlene Shechet: Pentimento in Paper | ART21 “Exclusive”

Published on Jun 26, 2015

Episode #224: From the Dieu Donné papermaking studio in New York City, artist Arlene Shechet creates a series of cast paper reliefs. Most known for her ceramic sculptures, Shechet describes herself as being restless in her desire to investigate through various media. “The thing about working with paper is the immediacy of that entire process,” says the artist. “I love seeing the thing and responding.” By layering sheets of paper over rubber molds, which are made in her ceramics studio, Shechet directly links the two practices. The molds transfer the texture of glazed clay, firebricks, and tool markings into the paper pulp. “One other way that this is similar to working in ceramics is that it never looks as good as it looks when it’s wet,” says Shechet. “What I’m always pining for is the wet. It’s closer to the aliveness of the actual experience.” Finished paper works are shown at the Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA) in Boston as part of Shechet’s twenty-year survey, “All at Once,” which is on view until September 7, 2015.

Arlene Shechet likens her studio to both farm and factory. Employing an experimental approach to ceramic sculpture, she tests the limits of gravity, color, and texture by pushing against the boundary of classical techniques, sometimes fusing her kiln-fired creations with complex plinths formed of wood, steel, and concrete. Considering herself an installation artist who happens to make objects, Shechet focuses intently on ensuring that the display, sight lines, and relationships of the objects in her exhibitions change with every view while maintaining formal equilibrium.

Learn more about the artist at:
http://www.art21.org/artists/arlene-s…

“Arlene Shechet: All at Once” at the Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA) in Boston:
http://www.icaboston.org/exhibitions/…

CREDITS: Producer: Ian Forster. Consulting Producer: Wesley Miller & Nick Ravich. Interview: Ian Forster & Wesley Miller. Camera: Ian Forster, Rafael Salazar, Joel Shapiro & Ava Wiland. Sound: Wesley Miller, Roger Phenix & Ava Wiland. Editor: Morgan Riles. Artwork Courtesy: Arlene Shechet & Sikkema Jenkins & Co. Special Thanks: Dieu Donné & ICA Boston. Theme Music: Peter Foley.

ART21 “Exclusive” is supported, in part, by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; 21c Museum Hotel, and by individual contributors.

Arlene Shechet

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia  

Arlene Shechet
Born1951
New York City
NationalityAmerican
EducationRhode Island School of DesignNew York University
Known forVisual arts

Arlene Shechet (born 1951, New York City) is an American artist. She lives and works in New York City and Woodstock, New York.

Contents

 [hide

Work[edit]

Shechet’s early work was influenced by Buddhism, evident in the way it exhibited states of transformation and Buddhist subject matter.[1] In the early ’90s, Shechet made a series of plaster sculptures. The lumpy works, supported by industrial and found objects, and incorporating Buddhist iconography, evolved into a family of Buddhas. In 1996 Shechet was invited to work at the Dieu Donné Papermill in New York. During her residency she created handmade, paper blueprints of stupas as well as paper vessels.[2][3]

Shechet continues to work with paper, implementing a hybrid approach by manipulating paper pulp in a similar fashion to clay.[4] Her recent body of colorful paper works, completed in 2012, reveal her commitment to materials and the mold.[4]

Her fascination with materials extends to clay, for which she is primarily know and has received wide recognition. Over the last decade, Shechet has worked prolifically with clay, creating an impressive body of work[5] and pushing the boundaries of the material. From 2012 to 2013, Shechet held a residency at the Meissen Porcelain Manufactory in Germany, where she made experimental sculptures alongside factory employees making traditional porcelain work.[6] Her time there yielded a new body of work which was installed by Shechet at the RISD Museum, Providence in 2014.

In 2013 for The New York TimesRoberta Smith described Shechet’s work as combining painting and sculpture “with exuberant polymorphous, often comic results”, and noted the variety of glazed surfaces on the vessels in her exhibition Slip, at Sikkema Jenkins & Co.[7] A New Yorker capsule review compared the work in this same exhibition to those of the ceramic artist and printmaker Ken Price.[8] Shechet has also cited references as diverse as Elie NadelmanSophie Taeuber-ArpJim Nutt, and Umberto Boccioni.[9]

Shechet is represented by Sikkema Jenkins & Co. in New York.[10]

Early Life and education[edit]

Shechet was raised in Forest Hills, Queens. She received her Bachelor of Arts from New York University and her Masters of Fine Arts from the Rhode Island School of Design.[11]

Exhibitions[edit]

Solo museum exhibitions of Shechet’s work include the RISD Museum, Providence in 2014; the Weatherspoon Art Museum, Greensboro, in 2013; the Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art, Kansas in 2012; The Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery, Saratoga Springs, NY in 2009; and the Museum of Contemporary Art Denver in 2009. A twenty-year survey of her work opened at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston in June 2015.[12] Shechet is the first living artist to have an exhibition at the Frick Collection, New York,[13][14] which is on view in 2016-2017.[15] She has an exhibition at The Phillips Collection, DC in 2016-2017.[16]

Collections[edit]

Shechet’s work is included in museums and public collections, including the Brooklyn Museum, New York; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Princeton University Art Museum, Princeton, New Jersey; the RISD Museum, Providence, Rhode Island; the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; and the Williams College Museum of Art, Williamstown, Massachusetts.

Awards[edit]

Shechet has received numerous awards, including a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship Award in 2004, a Joan Mitchell Foundation Painters and Sculptors Grant in 2010, an American Arts and Letters Award in 2011, and three New York Foundation for the Arts awards.

References[edit]

  1. Jump up^ Dixon, Jane (September 7, 2010). “Arlene Shechet”BOMB Magazine. Retrieved March 8, 2015.
  2. Jump up^ “Arlene Shechet, Workspace Program Artist in Residence, 1996“. Dieu Donné. residencies.dieudonne.org. Retrieved January 2, 2017.
  3. Jump up^ “Arlene Shechet: Once Removed Series”. 1998. Retrieved March 16, 2015.[dead link]
  4. Jump up to:a b Woodward, Daisy (May 13, 2014). “Arlene Shechet: Ceramic Meets Paper”AnOther Magazine. Retrieved March 9, 2015.
  5. Jump up^ “Arlene Shechet: All at Once”. ICA Boston. March 2015. Archived from the original on March 24, 2015. Retrieved March 16, 2015.
  6. Jump up^ Walsh, Brienne (January 27, 2014). “The Alchemist: Arlene Shechet Converts ‘White Gold’ Into Artworks”Art in America. Retrieved March 9, 2015.
  7. Jump up^ Smith, Roberta (November 7, 2013). “Arlene Shechet: ‘Slip'”New York Times. Retrieved March 9, 2015.
  8. Jump up^ “Arlene Shechet: October 10, 2013 – November 16, 2013”The New Yorker. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved January 2, 2017.
  9. Jump up^ “Arlene Shechet: Slip“. Sikkema Jenkins & Co. sikkemajenkinsco.com. Retrieved January 2, 2017.
  10. Jump up^ “Artists: Arlene Shechet“. Sikkema Jenkins & Co. sikkemajenkinsco.com. Retrieved January 2, 2017.
  11. Jump up^ “Arlene Shechet”. Ceramics Now. Retrieved 8 March 2015.
  12. Jump up^ “Arlene Shechet: All at Once”. ICA Boston. March 2015. Archived from the original on March 24, 2015. Retrieved March 16, 2015.
  13. Jump up^ Scott, Andrea K. (June 27, 2016). “Porcelain, No Simple Matter: Arlene Shechet and the Arnhold Collection (Frick Collection)”The New Yorker. Retrieved January 2, 2017.
  14. Jump up^ Dailey, Meghan (2016-05-24). “Contemporary Ceramics, Up Against 18th-Century Pieces — Literally”The New York TimesISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2016-10-18.
  15. Jump up^ “Current Exhibition | The Frick Collection”http://www.frick.org. Retrieved 2016-10-18.
  16. Jump up^ “Arlene Shechet: From Here On Now”http://www.phillipscollection.org. Retrieved 2016-10-18.

External links[edit]

Authority controlWorldCat IdentitiesVIAF26971618LCCNnr97030765ULAN500333623

Categories:

___

Related posts:

Ecclesiastes 2 — The Quest For Meaning and the failed examples of Howard Hughes and Hugh Hefner

June 27, 2013 – 12:49 am

Ecclesiastes 2-3 Published on Sep 19, 2012 Calvary Chapel Spring Valley | Sunday Evening | September 16, 2012 | Derek Neider _____________________________ I have written on the Book of Ecclesiastes and the subject of the meaning of our lives on several occasions on this blog. In this series on Ecclesiastes I hope to show how secular […] By Everette Hatcher III | Posted in Current Events | Edit | Comments (0)

FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE PART 162 A look at the BEATLES Breaking down the song ALL WE NEED IS LOVE Part C (Featured artist is Grace Slick)

May 4, 2017 – 1:40 am

 Is Love All You Need? Jesus v. Lennon Posted on January 19, 2011 by Jovan Payes 0 On June 25, 1967, the Beatles participated in the first worldwide TV special called “Our World”. During this special, the Beatles introduced “All You Need is Love”; one of their most famous and recognizable songs. In it, John Lennon […] By Everette Hatcher III | Posted in Francis Schaeffer | Edit | Comments (0)

FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE Part 158 THE BEATLES (breaking down the song WHY DON’T WE DO IT IN THE ROAD?) Photographer Bob Gomel featured today!

April 6, 2017 – 12:25 am

___________________ Something happened to the Beatles in their journey through the 1960’s and although they started off wanting only to hold their girlfriend’s hand it later evolved into wanting to smash all previous sexual standards. The Beatles: Why Don’t We Do It in the Road? _______ Beatle Ringo Starr, and his girlfriend, later his wife, […] By Everette Hatcher III | Posted in Current Events | Edit | Comments (0)

FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE PART 142 Marvin Minsky Part G (Featured artist is Red Grooms)

December 15, 2016 – 7:18 am

__________ Marvin Minsky __ I was sorry recently  to learn of the passing of one of the great scholars of our generation. I have written about Marvin Minsky several times before in this series and today I again look at a letter I wrote to him in the last couple of years. It is my […] By Everette Hatcher III | Posted in Adrian RogersFrancis Schaeffer | Edit | Comments (0)

FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE Part 118 THE BEATLES (Why was Tony Curtis on cover of SGT PEP?) (Feature on artist Jeffrey Gibson )

June 30, 2016 – 5:35 am

Why was Tony Curtis on the cover of SGT PEPPERS? I have no idea but if I had to hazard a guess I would say that probably it was because he was in the smash hit SOME LIKE IT HOT.  Above from the  movie SOME LIKE IT HOT __ __ Jojo was a man who […] By Everette Hatcher III | Posted in Current Events | Edit | Comments (0)

FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE Part 101 BEATLES,(MANY CHRISTIANS ATTACKED THE BEATLES WHILE FRANCIS SCHAEFFER STUDIED THEIR MUSIC! Part B) Artist featured today is Cartoonist Gahan Wilson

March 3, 2016 – 12:21 am

Post a comment or leave a trackback: Trackback URL.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: