“Woody Wednesday” ECCLESIASTES AND WOODY ALLEN’S FILMS: SOLOMON “WOULD GOT ALONG WELL WITH WOODY!” (Part 17 MIDNIGHT IN PARIS Part P Ernest Hemingway 5th part “We fear death because we feel that we haven’t loved well enough” )

“We fear death because we feel that we haven’t loved well enough or loved at all.” These are words put in Hemingway’s mouth by Woody Allen in MIDNIGHT IN PARIS, but what did Hemingway believe about death?

“All men fear death. It’s a natural fear that consumes us all. We fear death because we feel that we haven’t loved well enough or loved at all, which ultimately are one and the same. However, when you make love with a truly great woman, one that deserves the utmost respect in this world and one that makes you feel truly powerful, that fear of death completely disappears. Because when you are sharing your body and heart with a great woman the world fades away. You two are the only ones in the entire universe. You conquer what most lesser men have never conquered before, you have conquered a great woman’s heart, the most vulnerable thing she can offer to another. Death no longer lingers in the mind. Fear no longer clouds your heart. Only passion for living, and for loving, become your sole reality. This is no easy task for it takes insurmountable courage. But remember this, for that moment when you are making love with a woman of true greatness you will feel immortal.
I believe that love that is true and real creates a respite from death. All cowardice comes from not loving or not loving well, which is the same thing. And when the man who is brave and true looks death squarely in the face like some rhino hunters I know or Belmonte, who is truly brave, it is because they love with sufficient passion to push death out of their minds. Until it returns, as it does to all men. And then you must make really good love again. Think about it.”
Woody Allen

tags: corey-stoll, ernest-hemingway, midnight-in-paris

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Midnight in Paris OST – 15 – Ballad Du Paris

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This series deals with the Book of Ecclesiastes and Woody Allen films.  The first post  dealt with MAGIC IN THE MOONLIGHT and it dealt with the fact that in the Book of Ecclesiastes Solomon does contend like Hobbes  and Stanley that life is “nasty, brutish and short” and as a result has no meaning UNDER THE SUN.

The movie MIDNIGHT IN PARIS offers many of the same themes we see in Ecclesiastes. The second post looked at the question: WAS THERE EVER AGOLDEN AGE AND DID THE MOST TALENTED UNIVERSAL MEN OF THAT TIME FIND TRUE SATISFACTION DURING IT?

In the third post in this series we discover in Ecclesiastes that man UNDER THE SUN finds himself caught in the never ending cycle of birth and death. The SURREALISTS make a leap into the area of nonreason in order to get out of this cycle and that is why the scene in MIDNIGHT IN PARIS with Salvador Dali, Man Ray, and Luis Bunuel works so well!!!! These surrealists look to the area of their dreams to find a meaning for their lives and their break with reality is  only because they know that they can’t find a rational meaning in life without God in the picture.

The fourth post looks at the solution of WINE, WOMEN AND SONG and the fifthand sixth posts look at the solution T.S.Eliot found in the Christian Faith and how he left his fragmented message of pessimism behind. In the seventh post the SURREALISTS say that time and chance is all we have but how can that explain love or art and the hunger for God? The eighth  post looks at the subject of DEATH both in Ecclesiastes and MIDNIGHT IN PARIS. In the ninth post we look at the nihilistic worldview of Woody Allen and why he keeps putting suicides into his films.

In the tenth post I show how Woody Allen pokes fun at the brilliant thinkers of this world and how King Solomon did the same thing 3000 years ago. In the eleventh post I point out how many of Woody Allen’s liberal political views come a lack of understanding of the sinful nature of man and where it originated. In the twelfth post I look at the mannishness of man and vacuum in his heart that can only be satisfied by a relationship with God.

In the thirteenth post we look at the life of Ernest Hemingway as pictured in MIDNIGHT AND PARIS and relate it to the change of outlook he had on life as the years passed. In the fourteenth post we look at Hemingway’s idea of Paris being a movable  feast. The fifteenth and sixteenth posts both compare Hemingway’s statement, “Happiness in intelligent people is the rarest thing I know…”  with Ecclesiastes 2:18 “For in much wisdom is much vexation, and he who increases knowledge increases sorrow.” The seventeenth post looks at these words Woody Allen put into Hemingway’s mouth,  “We fear death because we feel that we haven’t loved well enough or loved at all.”

 

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Ernest Hemingway with Friends on Safari in Tanganyika, Africa

Love & Death: An Uncanny Relationship

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I’ve always contemplated about what it means to love a woman – the meaning still eludes me, but there’s no harm in understanding love and how it relates to our fear of death. I’ll start by interpreting some things I’ve researched about and draw on some experiences.

We can all agree that most people fear dying alone, or fear being someone who never loved outright. That being said, we try to make lasting impressions before our time is done, thus resulting in our fear of death.

In Woody Allen’s film “Midnight In Paris”, Ernest Hemingway offers Owen Wilson’s character – Gil Pender – some inspiring words of wisdom about the fear of death. Whether Woody Allen took this from an actual quote by Hemingway or simply adapted it for the film, I’m not entirely sure. However, I did find an expanded quote, and I’d like to share it because it rings true on many situations; situations people cannot easily explain to their significant others. Even more so, it touches on many things men should strive for when loving their women.

Guys, have a seat.

“All men fear death. It’s a natural fear that consumes us all. We fear death because we feel that we haven’t loved well enough or loved at all, which ultimately are one and the same. However, when you make love with a truly great woman, one that deserves the utmost respect in this world and one that makes you feel truly powerful, that fear of death completely disappears. Because when you are sharing your body and heart with a great woman, the world fades away. You two are the only ones in the entire universe. You conquer what most lesser men have never conquered before; you have conquered a great woman’s heart, the most vulnerable thing she can offer to another. Death no longer lingers in the mind. Fear no longer clouds your heart. Only passion for living, and for loving, become your sole reality. This is no easy task for it takes insurmountable courage. But remember this, for that moment when you are making love with a woman of true greatness you will feel immortal. I believe that love that is true and real creates a respite from death. All cowardice comes from not loving or not loving well, which is the same thing. And when the man who is brave and true looks death squarely in the face like some rhino hunters I know or Belmonte, who is truly brave, it is because they love with sufficient passion to push death out of their minds. Until it returns, as it does to all men. And then you must make really good love again. Think about it.” 

– Ernest Hemingway in “Midnight In Paris” , a film by Woody Allen, Goodreads.

When Hemingway mentions at least for that moment”, he’s talking about that moment a woman bestows all that she is to you. It begs the question that how can you, as a man, not do the same? How can you not give all that you are and reassure your woman of her decision? How can you half-a** it and simply roll over after it’s done if you feel elevated; stronger than you have ever been? We are experts at taking advantage of a woman’s vulnerability and reducing it to a few seconds of perceived euphoria.

A woman can make you feel that there is absolutely nothing you can’t do. You conjure up the courage to face your demons and the demons of others. Why then do you no longer fear death? Because conquering “the most vulnerable thing she can offer to another” is sometimes surreal. You’ve taken something immaterial with you to your grave – the “warmth and love of a great woman’s heart”transcend any material or immaterial achievement. You rise above all the “lesser men”  who look for shortcuts to women’s hearts.

It then has become customary for men to believe that the more women they’ve been with the better. Women know we revel in the chase. They believe that the chase is our prize, and this comes from men who want nothing but to get another tick on their mental list. I’d rather be on the lookout for the one that stands out; the one that makes us both better people, even if it only lasts a relationship. No matter who she’s been with before, make it matter when she’s with you.

Yes, there are lesser men conquering many women’s hearts, but maybe not the right ones. Yes, they will be with women almost every other night, but your one woman is worth a hundred of theirs. They’ll have several women on call, but you’ll be with the one that makes you breakfast the next morning (after making great love of course). It’s not about how many you love, but about how you love.

The quote’s ending shouldn’t be taken literally though. When Hemingway says “And then you must make really good love again”, he means to make great love to your woman – or go find love if you haven’t already. I don’t think Hemingway meant that you should have one night stands left, right and center. Finding a truly great woman is circumstantial and you are sometimes lucky. You don’t plan for it and you certainly don’t see it coming. And as with all great things, they take time.

In the end, I related to the quote profoundly because I think I did have that feeling. I did feel that I had nothing to fear. I felt that as long as I loved with passion and a true heart, I didn’t have to worry about anything else. Only a woman can give that to you. If you can relate to this existential feeling, it’s your duty as a man to send your woman to heaven and back on every occasion. If you don’t, there are plenty of men willing to “step” in.

Am I naive to think this way? Maybe, but that feeling made me look at things differently. A woman should not simply be a gateway that allows you to lose the fear of death, but rather a woman should be the sole reason death becomes unimportant. Whether she’s someone you just met, you’re married to or you’re well into a relationship with, if you get this feeling, be the best man you can be.

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Francis Schaeffer’s sermon on Ecclesiastes included these words below:

Ecclesiastes is the only pessimistic book in the Bible and that is because of the place where Solomon limits himself. He limits himself to the question of human life, life under the sun between birth and death and the answers this would give.

Ecclesiastes 1:4

English Standard Version (ESV)

A generation goes, and a generation comes,
    but the earth remains forever.

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Ecclesiastes 4:16

English Standard Version (ESV)

16 There was no end of all the people, all of whom he led. Yet those who come later will not rejoice in him. Surely this also is vanity and a striving after wind.

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In verses 1:4 and 4:16 Solomon places man in the cycle. He doesn’t place man outside of the cycle. Man doesn’t escape the cycle. Man is only cycle. Birth and death and youth and old age. With this in mind Solomon makes this statement.

Ecclesiastes 6:12

12 For who knows what is good for a man during his lifetime, during the few years of his futile life? He will spend them like a shadow. For who can tell a man what will be after him under the sun?

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There is no doubt in my mind that Solomon had the same experience in his life that I had as a younger man. I remember standing by the sea and the moon arose and it was copper and beauty. Then the moon did not look like a flat dish but a globe or a sphere since it was close to the horizon. One could feel the global shape of the earth too. Then it occurred to me that I could contemplate the interplay of the spheres and I was exalted because I thought I can look upon them with all their power, might, and size, but they could contempt nothing and I felt as man as God. Then came upon me a horror of great darkness because it suddenly occurred to me that although I could contemplate them and they could contemplate nothing yet they would continue to turn in ongoing cycles when I saw no more forever and I was crushed.

THIS IS SOLOMON’S FEELING TOO. The universal man, Solomon, beyond our intelligence with an empire at his disposal with the opportunity of observation so he could recite these words here in Ecclesiastes 6:12, “For who knows what is good for a man during his lifetime, during the few years of his futile life? He will spend them like a shadow. For who can tell a man what will be after him under the sun?”

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Ernest Hemingway and Fidel Castro chat in Havana on May 15, 1960, just over a year before Hemingway’s death. The two men sometimes went fishing together. AP________

Related posts:

A list of the most viewed posts on the historical characters mentioned in the movie “Midnight in Paris”

Characters referenced in Woody Allen’s movie “Midnight in Paris” (Part 38,Alcoholism and great writers and artists)

The characters referenced in Woody Allen’s movie “Midnight in Paris” (Part 36, Alice B. Toklas, Woody Allen on the meaning of life)

Characters referenced in Woody Allen’s movie “Midnight in Paris” (Part 35, Recap of historical figures, Notre Dame Cathedral and Cult of Reason)

The characters referenced in Woody Allen’s movie “Midnight in Paris” (Part 34, Simone de Beauvoir)

The characters referenced in Woody Allen’s movie “Midnight in Paris” (Part 33,Cezanne)

The characters referenced in Woody Allen’s movie “Midnight in Paris” (Part 32, Jean-Paul Sartre)

The characters referenced in Woody Allen’s movie “Midnight in Paris” (Part 31, Jean Cocteau)

The characters referenced in Woody Allen’s movie “Midnight in Paris” (Part 30, Albert Camus)

The Characters referenced in Woody Allen’s “Midnight in Paris” (Part 29, Pablo Picasso)

The Characters referenced in Woody Allen’s “Midnight in Paris” (Part 8, Henri Toulouse Lautrec)

The Characters referenced in Woody Allen’s “Midnight in Paris” (Part 7 Paul Gauguin)

The Characters referenced in Woody Allen’s “Midnight in Paris” (Part 6 Gertrude Stein)

The Characters referenced in Woody Allen’s “Midnight in Paris” (Part 5 Juan Belmonte)

The Characters referenced in Woody Allen’s “Midnight in Paris” (Part 4 Ernest Hemingway)

The Characters referenced in Woody Allen’s “Midnight in Paris” (Part 3 Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald)

The Characters referenced in Woody Allen’s “Midnight in Paris” (Part 2 Cole Porter)

The Characters referenced in Woody Allen’s “Midnight in Paris” (Part 1 William Faulkner)

MUSIC MONDAY Cole Porter “Let’s Do it, Let’s Fall in Love” in the movie MIDNIGHT IN PARIS

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