Monthly Archives: August 2012

Dear Senator Pryor, why not pass the Balanced Budget Amendment? (“Thirsty Thursday”, Open letter to Senator Pryor)

Dear Senator Pryor,

Why not pass the Balanced  Budget Amendment? As you know that federal deficit is at all time high (1.6 trillion deficit with revenues of 2.2 trillion and spending at 3.8 trillion).

On my blog www.HaltingArkansasLiberalswithTruth.com I took you at your word and sent you over 100 emails with specific spending cut ideas. However, I did not see any of them in the recent debt deal that Congress adopted. Now I am trying another approach. Every week from now on I will send you an email explaining different reasons why we need the Balanced Budget Amendment. It will appear on my blog on “Thirsty Thursday” because the government is always thirsty for more money to spend.

____________

(CNSNews.com) – Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-Texas) will not vote for a balanced budget amendment proposal unless it includes a cap on federal spending. However, he is undecided whether the amendment absolutely must require a supermajority of Congress to approve a tax hike for him to support it.

“The most important element is the cap on spending,” Gohmert told CNSNews.com. “If there is no cap on spending, then the balanced budget amendment is a formula for ever- increasing spending and ever-increasing taxing that will just spiral upward and upward again. So there’s got to be included a cap on spending, and best if it’s related to a percentage of GDP. But, absolutely, if there is no cap on spending, I could not vote for it.”

The actual language of the balanced budget amendment that Congress will vote on before the end of the year has not yet been determined. However, many conservatives fear that Republican leaders may agree to vote on a stripped down amendment that requires Congress to balance the budget but does not cap spending as a percentage of GDP or require supermajorities to raise taxes. They fear that an amendment of that nature–which might win the backing of some incumbent congressional liberals–would become a constitutional lever for sustaining big government via ever-escalating federal taxation.

When the Republican-controlled-House approved the cut, cap and balance plan last on July 19 in 234-190 vote, it included a version of the balanced budget amendment to cap federal spending at 19.9 percent of GDP. The GOP originally sought to hold federal spending to 18 percent of GDP.

The version of the balanced budget amendment in the cut, cap and balance plan also required two-thirds majorities in both houses to approve a tax increase. The amendment also would have prohibited deficit spending unless there was a national security emergency or a supermajority of Congress voted for it. On July 22, the Senate voted 51-46 to approve a procedural motion that blocked substantive consideration of the cut, cap and balance bill in that body.

The debt-limit deal reached by President Barack Obama, House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) requires that both houses of Congress give an up or down vote to a balanced budget amendment before the end of the year. However, it does not specify what the language of the amendment would be.

If two-thirds of Congress votes to approve a balanced budget amendment, it would then have to be ratified by 38 states, or three-fourths.

The House passed that debt-limit deal by a 269-161 vote on Aug. 1. Gohmert was one of 66 Republicans who voted against it.

“As far as the supermajority to raise taxes, that’s our preference, but the key element, the most important element is the cap on spending,” Gohmert said. “If there is no supermajority to raise taxes then I’d just have to look at it more closely to see what all was there to see if it was something I could vote for or not.”

Gohmert believes this is a winning issue for Republicans.

“Well, I think it’s like this: We either have a legitimate Balanced Budget Amendment pass with a cap on spending, or I really believe if it does not pass, you will see many of those who voted against it turned out both in the House and Senate in the next election,” Gohmert said. “So I think it’s an either/or. Either people vote for it and it passes, or we have a significant change in the people that are in the House and Senate that voted against it.”

Who deserved the 1978 national championship: USC or Bama?

John Robinson of USC should have an opinion, but no one asked him on August 27, 2012 when he spoke to the Little Rock Touchdown Club.

 Wikipedia reports USC’s results that year:

The 1978 USC Trojans football team represented the University of Southern California in the 1978 NCAA Division I-A football season. Following the season, the Trojans were crowned national champions according to the Coaches Poll. While Alabama claimed the title because it had defeated top-ranked Penn State on the field, the Trojans pointed out that they had also only lost once and had beaten Alabama in the regular season.

Date Opponent# Rank# Site Result Attendance
September 9 Texas Tech* #9 Los Angeles Memorial ColiseumLos Angeles, CA W 17–9   50,321
September 16 at Oregon #8 Autzen StadiumEugene, OR W 37–10   31,000
September 23 vs. #1 Alabama* #7 Legion FieldBirmingham, AL W 24–14   77,313
September 29 Michigan State* #3 Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum • Los Angeles, CA W 30–9   65,319
October 14 at Arizona State #2 Sun Devil StadiumTempe, AZ L 7–20   70,138
October 21 Oregon Statedagger #7 Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum • Los Angeles, CA W 38–7   53,734
October 28 California #6 Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum • Los Angeles, CA W 42–17   56,954
November 4 at Stanford #6 Stanford StadiumPalo Alto, CA W 13–7   84,084
November 11 #19 Washington #5 Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum • Los Angeles, CA W 28–10   54,071
November 18 at #14 UCLA #5 Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum • Los Angeles, CA (Battle for the Victory Bell) W 17–10   90,387
November 25 #8 Notre Dame* #3 Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum • Los Angeles, CA (Notre Dame – USC rivalry) W 27–25   84,256
December 2 at Hawaii* #3 Aloha StadiumHonolulu, HI W 21–5   48,767
January 1 vs. #5 Michigan* #3 Rose BowlPasadena, CA (1979 Rose Bowl) W 17–10   105,629
*Non-conference game. daggerHomecoming. #Rankings from AP Poll.

Alabama’ results according to Wikipedia:

The only blemish on Alabama’s record in 1978 was a loss to Southern California. Bama turned the ball over six times in that game.[23] The next week’s 51–28 victory over Vanderbilt started what became an all-time school record 28-game winning streak.

The 1979 Sugar Bowl against Penn State would go down as a classic.[13] Alabama scored in the second quarter, then Penn State answered in the third, then Alabama took a 14–7 lead on a touchdown set up by a 62-yard punt return. Penn State had a chance to tie in the fourth, but quarterback Chuck Fusina threw an interception into the Alabama end zone.[24] Then Alabama had a chance to put the game away, but fumbled the football back to Penn State at the Nittany Lion 19-yard-line with four minutes to go.[13] Penn State drove to a first and goal at the Alabama eight. On third and goal from the one, Fusina asked Bama linebacker Marty Lyons “What do you think we should do?”, and Lyons answered “You’d better pass.”[25] On third down, Penn State was stopped inches short of the goal line. On fourth down, Penn State was stopped again, Barry Krauss meeting Mike Guman and throwing him back for no gain. Alabama held on for a 14–7 victory. The Crimson Tide split the national championship, winning the AP poll while Southern California won the UPI Coaches’ poll. It was Alabama’s fifth wire service national championship.

Date Opponent# Rank# Site Result Attendance
September 2 #10 Nebraska* #1 Legion FieldBirmingham, AL W 20–3   77,023
September 16 at #11 Missouri* #1 Memorial StadiumColumbia, MO W 38–20   73,655
September 23 #7 USC* #1 Legion Field • Birmingham, AL L 14–24   77,313
September 30 Vanderbilt #7 Bryant-Denny StadiumTuscaloosa, AL W 51–28   56,910
October 7 at Washington* #8 Husky StadiumSeattle, WA W 20–17   60,975
October 14 Florida #7 Bryant-Denny Stadium • Tuscaloosa, AL W 23–12   60,210
October 21 at Tennessee #4 Neyland StadiumKnoxville, TN (Third Saturday in October) W 30–17   85,436
October 28 Virginia Tech*dagger #3 Bryant-Denny Stadium • Tuscaloosa, AL W 35–0   60,210
November 4 Mississippi State #3 Legion Field • Birmingham, AL W 35–14   74,217
November 11 #10 LSU #3 Legion Field • Birmingham, AL W 31–10   76,831
December 2 vs. Auburn #2 Legion Field • Birmingham, AL (Iron Bowl) W 34–16   79,218
January 1, 1979 vs. #1 Penn State* #2 Louisiana SuperdomeNew Orleans, LA (Sugar Bowl) W 14–7   76,824
*Non-conference game. daggerHomecoming. #Rankings from AP Poll.

Alabama Football-1978 Poll Controversy

Uploaded by on Jun 25, 2011

Alabama Football-1978 Poll Controversy involving Alabama and Southern Cal

USC’s John Robinson speaks at Little Rock Touchdown Club Part 4

USC vs. Tennessee 1980

Uploaded by on Jan 5, 2011

Hate that we lost, but I love watching games from this era. Fans were really into the games and it was a great game.
All video footage is copyright of the University of Tennessee, but legally reproduced here in conjunction with Fair Use laws.

__________

John Robinson actually coached a highschool team to be close to his grandkids:

John Robinson Gideon Rubin John Robinson has decided to coach high school football to be closer to his grandchildren.

SAN MARCOS, Calif. — The second of San Marcos High School’s two-a-days is set to start under a scorching, late-afternoon San Diego County sun, when John Robinson emerges from the “Blue Barn.”

He’s a bit more stooped and graying than you might remember, but, yes, it is that John Robinson, the man who took the Los Angeles Rams to two NFC Championships and who led USC to a shared national championship. Robinson, now 75 and out of football since 2004 after a stint at UNLV, calls a 600-square foot prefab shed his office.

Until now, Robinson had never coached high school ball. But earlier this year, he signed on as the defensive coordinator at San Marcos, where he can get back to the grass roots of coaching.

“We have everything we need [in the Blue Barn],” Robinson said. “They have computers and high-tech tools [in college and the NFL], but it’s the really the same thing. Eventually, it has to come up on a screen and somebody has to take a look at it and make a judgment on what they see and explain it [to the players].”

Robinson said he took the gig because he wanted to give back to the sports community in which his two grandsons, Johnny Jay and Tyson McWilliams, 13 and 9, are involved. They play youth basketball and Pop Warner football. Johnny Jay will be a San Marcos freshman next fall.

San Marcos, a perennially down program in one of the most competitive high school sports regions in the nation, isn’t the type of program where John Robinsons typically surface. Players acknowledge that college scout sightings at practice are a rarity, usually the result of a missed turn on San Marcos Boulevard.

But Robinson isn’t here for glamour and glitz.

“Within this field, this is no less important than what the Chargers are doing in practice five miles away,” he said. “It’s great fun. These are tough kids, and they want to be successful.”

During an intra-squad scrimmage, Robinson is animated as he pushes his players.

“Don’t slow down at the end,” he implored his players during a linebackers drill, “Finish it! It’s the last five yards that count!”

Although separated from them by as much as 60 years, Robinson is by all accounts in tune with today’s player, whose respect he commands like no other.

Defensive co-captain Connor Kuehnle credits Robinson with helping instill in him the discipline to stick to the script on a Cover 3 zone defense, fighting his own instinctive pull to chase after the slot receiver.

Just as important, he’s learned how to bark orders at teammates without sounding like he’s barking orders at teammates.

“It’s definitely changed the way I run the defense out there,” Kuehnle said. “Instead of just yelling at somebody because they did something wrong, now it’s ‘let’s do this and you’ll be fine.'”

And nobody ever, ever, argues with “Coach.”

“It helps if you don’t say anything,” defensive co-captain Noel Garcia said. Everything Robinson says “is final.”

For Robinson, whether he’s in the tech-savvy NFL or a shed in suburban San Diego, he believes his job is about building athletes.

“It really doesn’t matter if it’s Noel [Garcia] or Shawne Merriman or Ray Lewis,” he said. “If you get a person to develop a skill, it’s the same thing. You can find differences, but the essence is the same.”

Gideon Rubin is a freelance writer for Sports Media Exchange, a national freelance writing network.

Related posts:

Steve Sullivan, Wally Hall and Jim Harris talk at Little Rock Touchdown Club on 11-28-11

I enjoyed the Little Rock Touchdown Club and have posted a lot about it all fall. I have links below to earlier posts. Yesterday Wally Hall and Steve Sullivan had some good insights. Below are some of the thoughts of Jim Harris that he shared at the lunch. BUILDING THE DEFENSE: How nice it would […]

ESPN’s Mark Schlabach at Little Rock Touchdown Club (Part 3)

Earlier I wrote about where I think Arkansas could win a national championship with just two more wins. Below is a portion of an article by Jim Harris of the website Arkansas 360: AND ON BOBBY: Schlabach, on Arkansas’ coach: “I said when he was hired that Bobby Petrino would make Arkansas a contender for […]

The most significant game in Arkansas razorback football history? (Part 2)

A few days ago it looked like we would not have the opportunity to play into the national championship game, but now all that has changed. Life is funny that way sometimes. The Arkansas News Bureau reported: “I think we’ll have the opportunity,” Bequette said. “That’s what I believe.” All we got to do is […]

ESPN’s Mark Schlabach at Little Rock Touchdown Club (Part 2)

Earlier I wrote about where I think Arkansas could win a national championship with just two more wins. Below is a portion of an article by Jim Harris of the website Arkansas 360: STILL THERE’S LES AT LSU: Schlabach, in saying that LSU and Alabama are the two best teams in the country, had high […]

The most significant game in Arkansas razorback football history?

Wally Hall actually said on his radio program on Nov 22, 2011 that the Arkansas v. LSU game on Nov 25, 2011 is the most significant game in razorback history. I have to respectfully disagree. I will agree that it is in the top 5, but I will start a  list today of other games […]

After blowout at Arkansas, Vols coach Dooley felt like celebration after Vandy win was warrented

I saw the end of the Tennessee/Vandy game on tv and my brother-in-law went to the game (pictures from him below). I have written about the game earlier on this blog so I will not go into that again. I just wanted to comment on the video clip above. I think it is fine that […]

 

ESPN’s Mark Schlabach at Little Rock Touchdown Club (Part 1)

Earlier I wrote about where I think Arkansas could win a national championship with just two more wins. Below is a portion of an article by Jim Harris of the website Arkansas 360: What kind of college football polling world do we live in now that a No. 3 Arkansas could win Friday at No. […]

Mangino speaks at Little Rock Touchdown Club (Part 3)

Mangino at a 2007 KU basketball game Eric Mangino is a fine coach. Here is a portion of an article by Jim Harris: Jim Harris’ Notebook: Mangino Ready To Return; Big Week For Central Arkansas by Jim Harris STRANGE YEAR: Mark Mangino noted the unusual college football season, from six more more teams being in […]

Mangino speaks at Little Rock Touchdown Club (Part 2)

Mangino at a 2007 KU basketball game Eric Mangino is a very good speaker. Here is a portion of an article by Jim Harris: Jim Harris’ Notebook: Mangino Ready To Return; Big Week For Central Arkansas by Jim Harris 11/14/2011 at 3:37pm It’s easy for fans who don’t follow Kansas football closely to forget just […]

Johnny Majors speaks at Little Rock Touchdown Club (Part 12)jh80

Uploaded by TheMemphisSlim on Sep 3, 2010 Johnny Majors from Huntland, TN tried out for the UT Football team weighing 150 pounds. His Father, Shirley Majors his HS Coach,encourage him and then 4 younger brothers all to be Vols. Johnny Majors was the runner-up in 1956 for the Heisman Trophy to Paul Horning, on a loosing Notre Dame […]

Johnny Majors speaks at Little Rock Touchdown Club (Part 11)jh79

Interview with Johnny Majors after 1982 Kentucky game Below is a picture of Lane Kiffin with Johnny Majors. I enjoyed hearing Johnny Majors speak at the Little Rock Touchdown Club on 11-7-11. He talked a lot about the connection between the Arkansas and Tennessee football programs. It reminded me of what Frank Broyles had said […]

Will Dooley be given enough time to turn Vols around? Arkansas loss energizes foes of Dooley jh84

Photo by Amy Smotherman Burgess, ©KNS/2011 Tennessee head coach Derek Dooley reacts as Arkansas scores their seventh touchdown of the night at Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium in Fayetteville on Nov. 12, 2011. (AMY SMOTHERMAN BURGESS/NEWS SENTINEL)

Johnny Majors speaks at Little Rock Touchdown Club (Part 10)jh78

FB: The Best of Johnny Majors at Iowa St I got to hear Johnny Majors talk on 11-7-11 and he talked about the connection that Arkansas and Tennessee had with their football programs. Two years ago I got to hear Frank Broyles speak at the Little Rock Touchdown Club and he said that too. As […]

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By Everette Hatcher III, on August 9, 2012 at 2:49 pm, under Current Events. No Comments

Who appointed Obama king? “We Can’t Wait” effort suggests he doesn’t have to wait for the throne to show up!!!

Dan Mitchell Talking about China, Regulation, and Wealth with Cavuto

Published on Mar 21, 2012 by

No description available.

___________________

We should reduce government’s influence on our lives and that can only be done if Washington gets spending under control and balances the budget and shrinks out debt without increasing taxes. I am upset that the “We Can’t Wait”  effort (started in early 2012) suggests that the office of President does not have to wait for the other branches of government to do their part in order for laws to be inacted. This is a power grab pure and simple and this effort doesn’t respect what our government is all about.

Matthew Spalding, Ph.D.

June 5, 2012 at 9:23 am

There’s no way to predict how the 2012 elections will turn out. But it will be a turning point in American history: Either our leaders will guide the country even further along the road to “progressivism” or they will begin a long, slow turn back toward the principles of the American Founding. To help our leaders make the correct choices, The Heritage Foundation is putting a marker down with a publication called Changing America’s Course that gives our political leaders recommendations on how to stay within the limits of the Constitution.

You’ve probably read Heritage’s financial proposal, Saving the American Dream, and our prescription for a Conservative foreign policy. Those ideas are crucial building blocks in our approach. But they are only parts of the larger crisis facing Americans today–the crisis of constitutional government–that Saving the American Dream deals with.

The United States is unique. Ours is a republic dedicated to the universal principles of human liberty: that all are fundamentally equal and equally endowed with unalienable rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.

Our government exists to secure these God-given rights, deriving its just powers from the consent of the governed. Our Constitution limits the power of government under the rule of law, creating a vigorous framework for expanding economic opportunity, protecting national independence, and securing liberty and justice for all.

Today, though, the federal government has acquired an all but unquestioned dominance over virtually every area of American life. It acts without constitutional limits and is restricted only by expediency, political will, and (less and less) budget constraints.

The unlimited scope and depth of its rules means that the federal government increasingly regulates more and more of our most basic activities, from how much water is in our toilets to what kind of light bulbs we can buy. This is a government that is unlimited by any organizing principle, increasingly undemocratic and damaging to popular self-government.

For example, as part of his reelection campaign, Obama has launched an effort called “We Can’t Wait“ to highlight his actions independent of Congress. This is more than the usual politics of a president running for reelection against Congress. Obama’s idea seems to be that the president, charged with the execution of the laws, doesn’t have to wait for the lawmaking branch to make, amend or abolish the laws but that he can and should act on his own.

This violates the spirit–and potentially the letter–of the Constitution’s separation of the legislative and executive powers of Congress and the president.

For its part Congress has also failed to fulfill its constitutional duties. Under the current Democratic party leadership, it’s been more than three years since the U.S. Senate even passed a budget. And under Republican leadership in 2003, the House of Representatives unethically kept a voting window open for three hours (instead of the scheduled 15 minutes) so party leaders could twist arms, change minds and ram through Medicare Part D.

Even worse, Congress has fallen into the habit of legislating without regard to any limits on its powers. Although the Constitution vests legislative powers in Congress, the majority of “laws” are actually promulgated by agencies and bureaucracies in the guise of “regulations.” Recent examples include the massive Dodd-Frank financial regulation and, of course, ObamaCare.

As a result, key policy decisions which were previously the constitutional responsibility of elected legislators are delegated to executive branch administrators whose rules have the full force and effect of laws passed by Congress. Having passed massive, broadly written pieces of legislation with little serious deliberation, Congress is increasingly an administrative body overseeing a vast array of bureaucratic policymakers and rule-making bodies.

Changing America’s Course charts a constitutional path to a brighter future of opportunity and independence. If our political leaders follow its recommendations and begin confining themselves to the limited powers the Constitution gives them, America will once again be on the principled path to liberty, opportunity and constitutional self-government.

The first step is to reduce the size and scope of government and unleash the engines of economic productivity and the institutions of cultural renewal. Only then can we change America’s course, begin to get spending under control, balance the budget, and shrink our debt without increasing taxes.

Matthew Spalding, Ph.D., is Vice President, American Studies and Director, B. Kenneth Simon Center for Principles and Politics B. Kenneth Simon Center for Principles and Politics at The Heritage Foundation.

Open letter to President Obama (Part 131 B)

President Obama c/o The White House
1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW
Washington, DC 20500

Dear Mr. President,

I know that you receive 20,000 letters a day and that you actually read 10 of them every day. I really do respect you for trying to get a pulse on what is going on out here.

We need to cut taxes and not raise them if we want the economy to grow. Sweden is a good example of that lately.

David Weinberger

May 11, 2012 at 10:00 am

Since the beginning of the recession, academics, authoritative international institutions, and most government officials pushed for massive stimulus spending. Sweden bucked the trend, focusing instead on slashing marginal tax rates and peeling government back. How did it fare?

The Spectator reports:

While most countries in Europeborrowed massively, Borg did not. Since becoming Sweden’s finance minister, his mission has been to pare back government. His ‘stimulus’ was a permanent tax cut. To critics, this was fiscal lunacy — the so-called ‘punk tax cutting’ agenda. Borg, on the other hand, thought lunacy meant repeating the economics of the 1970s and expecting a different result.

Three years on, it’s pretty clear who was right. ‘Look atSpain,Portugalor theUK, whose governments were arguing for large temporary stimulus,’ he says. ‘Well, we can see that very little of the stimulus went to the economy. But they are stuck with the debt.’ Tax-cuttingSweden, by contrast, had the fastest growth inEuropelast year, when it also celebrated the abolition of its deficit.

Too bad the U.S. decided against Sweden’s advice. Still, missing one opportunity doesn’t mean we have to miss another: Tax reform is calling.   

______________

Thank you so much for your time. I know how valuable it is. I also appreciate the fine family that you have and your commitment as a father and a husband.

Sincerely,

Everette Hatcher III, 13900 Cottontail Lane, Alexander, AR 72002, ph 501-920-5733, lowcostsqueegees@yahoo.com

USC’s John Robinson speaks at Little Rock Touchdown Club Part 3

2005 USC Trojans vs Arkansas Part 1 (Rewind)

Uploaded by on Oct 13, 2008

2005 USC Trojans vs Arkansas

__________

I really enjoyed Robinson talk on 8-27-12.

Robinson talks past UA, USC matchups

Former football coach John Robinson was 3-2 in his career at Southern California and UNLV against the Arkansas Razorbacks.

JEFF HALPERN

Former football coach John Robinson was 3-2 in his career at Southern California and UNLV against the Arkansas Razorbacks.

By Jeff Halpern

Tuesday, August 28, 2012

LITTLE ROCK — Former Southern California Coach John Robinson faced the Arkansas Razorbacks five times in his coaching career and talked about four of those games Monday.

Robinson, 72, who was 3-2 against the Razorbacks in his career, was the guest speaker at the Little Rock Touchdown Club luncheon. He was an assistant to John McKay when the No. 8-ranked Trojans defeated the No. 4 Razorbacks 31-10 in the 1972 season opener at War Memorial Stadium in Little Rock. A year later, No. 1-ranked USC defeated Arkansas 17-0 in Los Angeles. In 1974, the No. 5-ranked Trojans opened the season with a 22-7 loss to the No. 20 Razorbacks in Little Rock.

In 2000, when Robinson was the head coach at UNLV, his Rebels defeated the Razorbacks 31-14 in the2000 Las Vegas Bowl. A year later in the season opener in Little Rock, Arkansas won 14-10 on a 1-yard touchdown run by Cedric Cobbs with 18 seconds left.

“In 1972, I remember Arkansas had Joe Ferguson at quarterback and we had one of the best teams that USC ever had,” Robinson said.

That team averaged 39 points per game, never trailed in the second half and its closest victory was 30-21 over No. 15 Stanford. The 1972 Trojans defeated Ohio State 42-17 in the Rose Bowl.

Two years later, Robinson recalled Arkansas, “beating the hell out of us.” He said McKay was not happy and threatened to fire the coaching staff a number of times.

Robinson, who was in his second year at UNLV in 2000, recalls Arkansas “being a lot more focused on”its visit to Las Vegas. He said, “I recall [then-Arkansas Coach] Houston Nutt saying, we’re playing U-N-L-V,” with an emphasis that his team didn’t seem to be focused on the Rebels. That game allowed the Rebels to finish 8-5 while Arkansas, in its third season under Nutt, finished 6-6.

A year later, Robinson and the Rebels suffered heartbreak. UNLV led 10-7 with 1:53 left when Rebels punter Ryan McDonald bobbled a snap and was tackled at the UNLV 49. Arkansas’ Ryan Sorahan completed a 13-yard pass to George Wilson on fourth-and-10 and a 23-yard pass to Richard Smith to set up Cobbs’ run, on a night in which the Razorbacks used four quarterbacks – Zak Clark, Sorahan, Gerald Howard and Tarvaris Jackson – and totaled 114 yards.

“Our regular punter had an awful night and I put in a freshman and if he gets the ball off, then we win the game,” Robinson said. “I put him in and the snap hits him in the helmet.”

The Trojans and Razorbacks haven’t met since the 2005 and 2006 seasons when USC won 70-17 and 50-14, Robinson hopes the teams meet in the BCS national championship game in Miami.

“I know you guys have a good quarterback, but we feel we have the best one in the country in Matt Barkley,” Robinson said. “I know if that happens, then I can continue to wear the red shirt that I have on today and you guys would think I’m pulling for you.”

Sports, Pages 15 on 08/28/2012

 

Related posts:

Steve Sullivan, Wally Hall and Jim Harris talk at Little Rock Touchdown Club on 11-28-11

I enjoyed the Little Rock Touchdown Club and have posted a lot about it all fall. I have links below to earlier posts. Yesterday Wally Hall and Steve Sullivan had some good insights. Below are some of the thoughts of Jim Harris that he shared at the lunch. BUILDING THE DEFENSE: How nice it would […]

ESPN’s Mark Schlabach at Little Rock Touchdown Club (Part 3)

Earlier I wrote about where I think Arkansas could win a national championship with just two more wins. Below is a portion of an article by Jim Harris of the website Arkansas 360: AND ON BOBBY: Schlabach, on Arkansas’ coach: “I said when he was hired that Bobby Petrino would make Arkansas a contender for […]

The most significant game in Arkansas razorback football history? (Part 2)

A few days ago it looked like we would not have the opportunity to play into the national championship game, but now all that has changed. Life is funny that way sometimes. The Arkansas News Bureau reported: “I think we’ll have the opportunity,” Bequette said. “That’s what I believe.” All we got to do is […]

ESPN’s Mark Schlabach at Little Rock Touchdown Club (Part 2)

Earlier I wrote about where I think Arkansas could win a national championship with just two more wins. Below is a portion of an article by Jim Harris of the website Arkansas 360: STILL THERE’S LES AT LSU: Schlabach, in saying that LSU and Alabama are the two best teams in the country, had high […]

The most significant game in Arkansas razorback football history?

Wally Hall actually said on his radio program on Nov 22, 2011 that the Arkansas v. LSU game on Nov 25, 2011 is the most significant game in razorback history. I have to respectfully disagree. I will agree that it is in the top 5, but I will start a  list today of other games […]

After blowout at Arkansas, Vols coach Dooley felt like celebration after Vandy win was warrented

I saw the end of the Tennessee/Vandy game on tv and my brother-in-law went to the game (pictures from him below). I have written about the game earlier on this blog so I will not go into that again. I just wanted to comment on the video clip above. I think it is fine that […]

 

ESPN’s Mark Schlabach at Little Rock Touchdown Club (Part 1)

Earlier I wrote about where I think Arkansas could win a national championship with just two more wins. Below is a portion of an article by Jim Harris of the website Arkansas 360: What kind of college football polling world do we live in now that a No. 3 Arkansas could win Friday at No. […]

Mangino speaks at Little Rock Touchdown Club (Part 3)

Mangino at a 2007 KU basketball game Eric Mangino is a fine coach. Here is a portion of an article by Jim Harris: Jim Harris’ Notebook: Mangino Ready To Return; Big Week For Central Arkansas by Jim Harris STRANGE YEAR: Mark Mangino noted the unusual college football season, from six more more teams being in […]

Mangino speaks at Little Rock Touchdown Club (Part 2)

Mangino at a 2007 KU basketball game Eric Mangino is a very good speaker. Here is a portion of an article by Jim Harris: Jim Harris’ Notebook: Mangino Ready To Return; Big Week For Central Arkansas by Jim Harris 11/14/2011 at 3:37pm It’s easy for fans who don’t follow Kansas football closely to forget just […]

Johnny Majors speaks at Little Rock Touchdown Club (Part 12)jh80

Uploaded by TheMemphisSlim on Sep 3, 2010 Johnny Majors from Huntland, TN tried out for the UT Football team weighing 150 pounds. His Father, Shirley Majors his HS Coach,encourage him and then 4 younger brothers all to be Vols. Johnny Majors was the runner-up in 1956 for the Heisman Trophy to Paul Horning, on a loosing Notre Dame […]

Johnny Majors speaks at Little Rock Touchdown Club (Part 11)jh79

Interview with Johnny Majors after 1982 Kentucky game Below is a picture of Lane Kiffin with Johnny Majors. I enjoyed hearing Johnny Majors speak at the Little Rock Touchdown Club on 11-7-11. He talked a lot about the connection between the Arkansas and Tennessee football programs. It reminded me of what Frank Broyles had said […]

Will Dooley be given enough time to turn Vols around? Arkansas loss energizes foes of Dooley jh84

Photo by Amy Smotherman Burgess, ©KNS/2011 Tennessee head coach Derek Dooley reacts as Arkansas scores their seventh touchdown of the night at Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium in Fayetteville on Nov. 12, 2011. (AMY SMOTHERMAN BURGESS/NEWS SENTINEL)

Johnny Majors speaks at Little Rock Touchdown Club (Part 10)jh78

FB: The Best of Johnny Majors at Iowa St I got to hear Johnny Majors talk on 11-7-11 and he talked about the connection that Arkansas and Tennessee had with their football programs. Two years ago I got to hear Frank Broyles speak at the Little Rock Touchdown Club and he said that too. As […]

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By Everette Hatcher III, on August 9, 2012 at 2:49 pm, under Current Events. No Comments

Francis Schaeffer’s film series “How should we then live?” (Final Choices) can be seen on the www.thedailyhatch.org

Francis and Edith Schaeffer January 1975
Huemoz sur Ollon at L’abri, Switzerland

America has some big choices to make and Francis Schaeffer does a great job of showing what the problems are and what choices we have. Below is a portion of this episode with links below to the complete episodes:

E P I S O D E 1 0

How Should We Then Live 10#1

FINAL CHOICES

I. Authoritarianism the Only Humanistic Social Option

One man or an elite giving authoritative arbitrary absolutes.

A. Society is sole absolute in absence of other absolutes.

B. But society has to be led by an elite: John Kenneth Galbraith, Robert Theobald.

C. Daniel Bell’s prophecy of technocratic elite.

D. Bell’s warning of cultural contradiction: no absolute ethic to accompany absolute power.

II. Nature of the New Authoritarianism

A. Do not think of the model of Hitler and Stalin.

B. Probably a manipulative, authoritarian elite.

III. Possible Forms of Manipulation

A. Review from Episode Six: Koestler—chemical agents; Krantz—birth control in world’s drinking supply; Clark—political leaders should take anti-aggression pills; Lee—psychological tests for public officials; Skinner—reinforcers to modify behavior.

B. Genetic condition: Francis Crick.

1. He advocates:

a) That some group of people is to decide who should be the parents of the next generation and who should be born.

b) That some group of people should determine what kind of people they want in the future and will set out genetically to make them.

2. Once Man is no longer seen as made in God’s image, there is no reason not to “tinker” with Man genetically.

C. The mass media.

1. TV conditions by selective editing. Illustration: simulated riot filmed in San Jose.

2. No collusion needed if views of elite and newsmakers coincide. Media not monolithic, but total control not needed to achieve manipulation.

IV Authoritarianism in Government. Illustration: United States

A. The dilemma of people who speak out for civil liberties but are also committed to the government’s having a responsibility to solve every problem.

B. Christian freedoms without Christian base produce chaos.

C. In the United States an authoritarian, manipulating government could come from the administrative (executive) side, the legislature, or from the courts functioning on variable, sociological law.

Other segments:

Francis Schaeffer’s “How should we then live?” Video and outline of episode 10 “Final Choices” (Schaeffer Sundays)

E P I S O D E 1 0 How Should We Then Live 10#1 FINAL CHOICES I. Authoritarianism the Only Humanistic Social Option One man or an elite giving authoritative arbitrary absolutes. A. Society is sole absolute in absence of other absolutes. B. But society has to be led by an elite: John Kenneth […]

Francis Schaeffer’s “How should we then live?” Video and outline of episode 9 “The Age of Personal Peace and Affluence” (Schaeffer Sundays)

E P I S O D E 9 How Should We Then Live 9#1 T h e Age of Personal Peace and Afflunce I. By the Early 1960s People Were Bombarded From Every Side by Modern Man’s Humanistic Thought II. Modern Form of Humanistic Thought Leads to Pessimism Regarding a Meaning for Life and for Fixed […]

Francis Schaeffer’s “How should we then live?” Video and outline of episode 8 “The Age of Fragmentation” (Schaeffer Sundays)

E P I S O D E 8 How Should We Then Live 8#1 I saw this film series in 1979 and it had a major impact on me. T h e Age of FRAGMENTATION I. Art As a Vehicle Of Modern Thought A. Impressionism (Monet, Renoir, Pissarro, Sisley, Degas) and Post-Impressionism (Cézanne, Van Gogh, Gauguin, […]

Francis Schaeffer’s “How should we then live?” Video and outline of episode 7 “The Age of Non-Reason” (Schaeffer Sundays)

E P I S O D E 7 How Should We Then Live 7#1 I am thrilled to get this film series with you. I saw it first in 1979 and it had such a big impact on me. Today’s episode is where we see modern humanist man act on his belief that we live […]

Francis Schaeffer’s “How should we then live?” Video and outline of episode 6 “The Scientific Age” (Schaeffer Sundays)

E P I S O D E 6 How Should We Then Live 6#1 I am sharing with you a film series that I saw in 1979. In this film Francis Schaeffer asserted that was a shift in Modern Science. A. Change in conviction from earlier modern scientists.B. From an open to a closed natural system: […]

Francis Schaeffer’s “How should we then live?” Video and outline of episode 5 “The Revolutionary Age” (Schaeffer Sundays)

E P I S O D E 5 How Should We Then Live 5-1 I was impacted by this film series by Francis Schaeffer back in the 1970′s and I wanted to share it with you. Francis Schaeffer noted, “Reformation Did Not Bring Perfection. But gradually on basis of biblical teaching there was a unique improvement. A. […]

Francis Schaeffer’s “How should we then live?” Video and outline of episode 4 “The Reformation” (Schaeffer Sundays)

How Should We Then Live 4-1 I was impacted by this film series by Francis Schaeffer back in the 1970′s and I wanted to share it with you. Schaeffer makes three key points concerning the Reformation: “1. Erasmian Christian humanism rejected by Farel. 2. Bible gives needed answers not only as to how to be right with […]

Francis Schaeffer’s “How should we then live?” Video and outline of episode 3 “The Renaissance”

How Should We Then Live 3-1 I was impacted by this film series by Francis Schaeffer back in the 1970′s and I wanted to share it with you. Schaeffer really shows why we have so many problems today with this excellent episode. He noted, “Could have gone either way—with emphasis on real people living in […]

Francis Schaeffer’s “How should we then live?” Video and outline of episode 2 “The Middle Ages” (Schaeffer Sundays)

How Should We Then Live 2-1 I was impacted by this film series by Francis Schaeffer back in the 1970′s and I wanted to share it with you. Schaeffer points out that during this time period unfortunately we have the “Church’s deviation from early church’s teaching in regard to authority and the approach to God.” […]

Francis Schaeffer’s “How should we then live?” Video and outline of episode 1 “The Roman Age” (Schaeffer Sundays)

How Should We Then Live 1-1 Today I am starting a series that really had a big impact on my life back in the 1970′s when I first saw it. There are ten parts and today is the first. Francis Schaeffer takes a look at Rome and why it fell. It fell because of inward […]

Influences on Woody Allen’s pictures “Woody Wednesday”

Here is a great link on Woody Allen.

midnight-in-paris-movie-image-slice-01

Great website discusses the influences on Woody Allen:

kenny

about 3 years ago

In interview after interview, down through the decades Woody Allen has spoken repeatedly of his love of Ingmar Bergman and the influenece he’s had upon his films. While Interiors is clearly an homage to Bergman, Cries and Whispers in particular, to me his movies have been much more influenced by the films of Fellini. Stardust Memories is clearly a tip of the cap to 8 1/2, Celebrity to La Dolce Vita, Radio Days to Amarcord and Sweet And Lowdown to La Strada in that they both featured an emotionally crippled protagonist who realizes too late he’s fallen in love with a simple minded young woman.

Justin Biberkopf

about 3 years ago

Kenny, the La Strada connection is very perceptive. Sweet and Lowdown being less tragic, of course. But yes, I just rewatched Amarcord and was reminded of how much the whole structure of Radio Days borrows from it. Amarcord is such a dense text by comparison, though. At its funniest, I think it’s funnier than a lot of Allen’s movies, too. But then, Fellini is generally more of a comic director than Bergman, so that’s another connection with Woody.

kenny

about 3 years ago

Good points Justin. I was even tempted to compare Le notti di Cabiria to Mighty Aphrodite but decided their only real similarities is they both feature a prostitute as a main character.

Charulata

about 3 years ago

Also, the last scene of ‘Sweet and Lowdown’ seems to be a direct reference to the last scene of ‘La Strada’.

leah

about 3 years ago

Stardust memories is totally Woody’s 8 1/2. He said himself said in an interview, “I am not even half of the Fellini of 8 1/2”

Justin Biberkopf

about 3 years ago

Yes, the dream sequence that starts Stardust Memories is very Fellini-esque, with the sensuous woman and the party on the other train. Woody Allen isn’t half of Marcello Mastroinanni, either.

Jeff D

about 3 years ago

A few Woody Allen films are built around the conceit of a fake documentary (Zelig, Husbands and Wives, Sweet and Lowdown), a device that he may have gotten from Fellini (The Clowns, Roma, Intervista), although Bergman also uses this device at least once that I can think of: at the end of Hour of the Wolf. But Woody Allen’s borrowings aren’t limited to Fellini and Bergman. Manhattan Murder Mystery is basically Rear Window, for example.

kenny

about 3 years ago

That’s a great point Jeff D about the fake documentary device although Allen did also use it as early as 1969 with Take The Money and Run. Perhaps no director has used it as well as Fellini did with Roma.

Jeff D

about 3 years ago

Fellini also used it as early as 1969 in Director’s Notebook, which I believe was made for American television.

Jeff D

about 3 years ago

Another Woody Allen movie that bears comparison to a Fellini movie is Alice to Juliet of the Spirits.

stewart SFA Adams

about 3 years ago

Woody Allen adresses the camera in Annie Hall like several characters do in Amarcord

horace

about 3 years ago

I would think that Purple Rose of Cairo was inspired by The White Sheik, a movie I know Woody loves.

kenny

about 3 years ago

More good points and similarities than I was aware of.

hari

almost 3 years ago

Fellini seems to be the bigger influence primarily because of the fact that he was a lot more unneurotic, a lot less austere and not as rigorous as Bergman was. If u watch Fellini’s films there are always moments of quiet humor in them. Like in 81/2, u see Guido being sorrounded by his cast and crew asking him for directions, he sees a person coming ,quietly avoids talking to him by taking another guy in his fold and whispering in his ear, “I just called you, cos I did not want to talk to that guy”.. Also, Fellini’s films are soaked in a dream-like structure. Bergman’s films were probably born out of his own dreams, but they were then religiously fitted into a certain kind of worldly realism.
But then at the end of the day, I always watch Woody’s films to see the fun of it, to revel in the parody it brings with itself.
They should only be seen as approximations of something great that has been done before. To me, they are mere condensations..

Other posts with Woody Allen:

The Characters referenced in Woody Allen’s “Midnight in Paris” (Part 15, Luis Bunuel)

Belle de Jour Presentation In a film class my partner and I did a video presentation on the film Belle de Jour and the filmmaker Luis Bunuel. Bunuel was a surrealist, so if the video doesn’t quite makes sense, its not supposed to. ___________________________________________________ I am presently going through the characters referenced in Woody Allen’s […]

The Characters referenced in Woody Allen’s “Midnight in Paris” (Part 14, Henri Matisse)

I am currently going through the characters referenced in the Woody Allen movie “Midnight in Paris.” Today I am looking at Henri Matisse. Below is a press release from a museum in San Francisco:  the steins were known for their saturday evening salons, where artists, writers, musicians, intellectuals, and collectors gathered to discuss contemporary art, […]

The Characters referenced in Woody Allen’s “Midnight in Paris” (Part 13, Amedeo Modigliani)

Adriana and Gil are seen above walking together in the movie “Midnight in Paris.” Adriana was a fictional character who was Picasso’s mistress in the film. Earlier she had been Modigliani’s mistress and later Georges Braque’s mistress before moving on to Picasso according to the film story line. Actually Picasso had taken girls from others […]

The characters referenced in Woody Allen’s “Midnight in Paris” (Part 12, Gabrielle “Coco” Chanel)

An article from Biography.com below. I am currently going through all the personalities mentioned in Woody Allen’s movie “Midnight in Paris.” Today I am spending time on Coco Chanel. By the way, I know that some of you are wondering how many posts I will have before I am finished. Right now I have plans […]

The characters referenced in Woody Allen’s “Midnight in Paris” (Part 11, Rodin)

The Thinker (1879–1889) is among the most recognized works in all of sculpture. In fact, below you can see Paul who constantly is showing up Gil with his knowledge about these pieces of art. He shows off while describing Rodin’s life story when all four of them are taking in “The Thinker.” However, he is […]

The Characters referenced in Woody Allen’s “Midnight in Paris” (Part 10 Salvador Dali)

Artists and bohemians inspired Woody Allen for ‘Midnight in Paris I love the movie “Midnight in Paris” by Woody Allen and I am going through the whole list of famous writers and artists that he included in the movie. Today we will look at Salvador Dali. In this clip below you will see when Picasso […]

The Characters referenced in Woody Allen’s “Midnight in Paris” (Part 9, Georges Braque)

2011 Roger Arpajou / Sony Pictures Classics Lea Seydoux as Gabrielle in “Midnight in Paris.” Adriana and Gil are seen above walking together in the movie “Midnight in Paris.” Adriana was a fictional character who was Picasso’s mistress in the film. Earlier she had been Georges Braque’s mistress before moving on to Picasso according to […]

The Characters referenced in Woody Allen’s “Midnight in Paris” (Part 8, Henri Toulouse Lautrec)

How Should We Then Live 7#3 2011 Roger Arpajou / Sony Pictures Classics Owen Wilson as Gil in “Midnight in Paris.” Paul Gauguin and Henri Toulouse Lautrec were the greatest painters of the post-impressionists. They are pictured together in 1890 in Paris in Woody Allen’s new movie “Midnight in Paris.” My favorite philosopher Francis Schaeffer […]

The Characters referenced in Woody Allen’s “Midnight in Paris” (Part 7 Paul Gauguin)

How Should We Then Live 7#1 Dr. Francis Schaeffer examines the Age of Non-Reason and he mentions the work of Paul Gauguin. 2011 Roger Arpajou / Sony Pictures Classics Kurt Fuller as John and Mimi Kennedy as Helen in “Midnight in Paris.” I love the movie “Midnight in Paris” by Woody Allen and I am […]

The Characters referenced in Woody Allen’s “Midnight in Paris” (Part 6 Gertrude Stein)

Midnight In Paris – SPOILER Discussion by What The Flick?! Associated Press Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas in 1934 This video clip below discusses Gertrude Stein’s friendship with Pablo Picasso: I love the movie “Midnight in Paris” by Woody Allen and I am going through the whole list of famous writers and artists that […]

The Characters referenced in Woody Allen’s “Midnight in Paris” (Part 5 Juan Belmonte)

2011 Roger Arpajou / Sony Pictures Classics Gad Elmaleh as Detective Tisserant in “Midnight in Paris.” I love the movie “Midnight in Paris” by Woody Allen and I am going through the whole list of famous writers and artists that he included in the movie. Juan Belmonte was the most famous bullfighter of the time […]

The Characters referenced in Woody Allen’s “Midnight in Paris” (Part 4 Ernest Heminingway)

  Woody Allen explores fantasy world with “Midnight in Paris” 2011 Roger Arpajou / Sony Pictures Classics Corey Stoll as Ernest Hemingway in “Midnight in Paris.” The New York Times Ernest Hemingway, around 1937 I love the movie “Midnight in Paris” by Woody Allen and I am going through the whole list of famous writers […]

The Characters referenced in Woody Allen’s “Midnight in Paris” (Part 3 Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald)

What The Flick?!: Midnight In Paris – Review by What The Flick?! 2011 Roger Arpajou / Sony Pictures Classics Alison Pill as Zelda Fitzgerald and Tom Hiddleston as F. Scott Fitzgerald in “Midnight in Paris.” 2011 Roger Arpajou / Sony Pictures Classics Owen Wilson as Gil in “Midnight in Paris.” 2011 Roger Arpajou / Sony […]

The Characters referenced in Woody Allen’s “Midnight in Paris” (Part 2 Cole Porter)

The song used in “Midnight in Paris” I am going through the famous characters that Woody Allen presents in his excellent movie “Midnight in Paris.” This series may be a long one since there are so many great characters. De-Lovely – Movie Trailer De-Lovely – So in Love – Kevin Kline, Ashley Judd & Others […]

The Characters referenced in Woody Allen’s “Midnight in Paris” (Part 1 William Faulkner)

Photo by Phill Mullen The only known photograph of William Faulkner (right) with his eldest brother, John, was taken in 1949. Like his brother, John Faulkner was also a writer, though their writing styles differed considerably. My grandfather, John Murphey, (born 1910) grew up in Oxford, Mississippi and knew both Johncy and “Bill” Faulkner. He […]

I love Woody Allen’s latest movie “Midnight in Paris”

I love the movie “Midnight in Paris” was so good that I will be doing a series on it. My favorite Woody Allen movie is Crimes and Misdemeanors and I will provide links to my earlier posts on that great movie. Movie Guide the Christian website had the following review: MIDNIGHT IN PARIS is the […]

Solomon, Woody Allen, Coldplay and Kansas (Coldplay’s spiritual search Part 6)

Here is an article I wrote a couple of years ago: Solomon, Woody Allen, Coldplay and Kansas What does King Solomon, the movie director Woody Allen and the modern rock bands Coldplay and Kansas have in common? All four took on the issues surrounding death, the meaning of life and a possible afterlife, although they all came up with their own conclusions on […]

Insight into what Coldplay meant by “St. Peter won’t call my name” (Series on Coldplay’s spiritual search, Part 3)

Coldplay seeks to corner the market on earnest and expressive rock music that currently appeals to wide audiences Here is an article I wrote a couple of years ago about Chris Martin’s view of hell. He says he does not believe in it but for some reason he writes a song that teaches that it […]

USC’s John Robinson speaks at Little Rock Touchdown Club Part 2

On August 27, 2012 I got to hear John Robinson speak at the the Little Rock Touchdown Club and he was a great speaker.

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8/27/2012 at 1:59pm

College Football Hall of Fame coach John Robinson recalled some highlights of his career for the Little Rock Touchdown Club.

College Football Hall of Fame coach John Robinson recalled some highlights of his career for the Little Rock Touchdown Club.

Longtime Arkansas fans no doubt remember when College Football Hall of Famer John Robinson brought his UNLV program to Little Rock and War Memorial Stadium to open the 2001 season. In a game that may have set offensive football back a half-century Arkansas pulled out a 14-10 win on a Thursday night ESPN telecast.

We’ve covered some of the particulars here. Houston Nutt managed to play four quarterbacks, none of whom were named Matt Jones (who sat the entire game on the bench), in the first half. The Hogs barely had 100 yards of offense until the final minute, and it was unlikely they could drive 80 yards in that last minute to pull out the win.

UNLV had to help them out.

“I made one of the biggest coaching blunders of my career that night,” the likeable Robinson recalled for the crowd Monday at the Little Rock Touchdown Club’s weekly meeting at the Embassy Suites ballroom.

Robinson’s regular punter wasn’t having the greatest of nights, but his replacement was a mere kid “who looked about 14,” Robinson said, and the coach was willing to give him a chance to kick the ball away with UNLV at midfield. Even a 30-yard punt would have put the inept Arkansas offense behind the proverbial 8-ball.

Sure enough, the punter let the snap go through his hands and hit him in the helmet, and Arkansas took over in Rebels’ territory. The Hogs managed to cover the short distance with just 18 seconds to spare as Cedric Cobbs ran around right end untouched from one yard.

“If I had had a gun, I’d had committed suicide,” Robinson cracked.

That wasn’t Robinson’s only trip to Little Rock until Monday. He was offensive coordinator for Southern Cal in 1972 when the Trojans ruined a promising Arkansas season from the start, pulling away from a 3-all halftime tie to roll 31-10, the first of 12 straight wins.

“That was maybe the best Southern Cal team they ever had,” sad Robinson, who had the dependable Mike Rae at quarterback and the likes of future NFL Hall of Famer Lynn Swann at receiver.

Two years later, Southern Cal was expected to contend for a national title, while Arkansas was nowhere to be seen in the national polls, having hit the low ebb of Frank Broyles’ coaching career. But Arkansas had a fanatical defensive effort led by Dennis Winston’s 22 tackles from the linebacker spot and the Hogs shocked the Trojans and head coach John McKay 22-7.

“We came in here ranked and got the hell kicked out of us,” the salty Robinson said. “The entire coaching staff was fired on the way home, three different times.”

But Southern Cal, then led by quarterback Pat Haden and running back/kick returner Anthony Davis, didn’t let the loss destroy its season. The Trojans finished 11-1-1, rallied from a 24-0 deficit against Notre Dame to win 55-24, and claimed another national championship for McKay.

They’d win a share in 1978 for Robinson, who took over as head coach in 1976 after one season as a coordinator in 1975 with his childhood buddy John Madden at Oakland. As USC head coach, Robinson would feature Heisman Trophy winners Charles White and Marcus Allen. Robinson twice reached the NFC championship with the Los Angeles Rams and running back Eric Dickerson.

Robinson remembered recruiting Dickerson out of high school for Southern Cal. The prep star out of Sealy, Texas, had appeared to have a splendid visit in Los Angeles and had met Allen and other Trojan greats. But when Robinson and an assistant coach went to Sealy to visit Dickerson, they pulled up next to a Pontiac Trans-Am and Dickerson’s mother was sitting in the car.

“You think that’s a bad sign?” Robinson recalled telling his assistant. Robinson didn’t land Dickerson out of high school, he made the SMU All-American a first-round draft pick when he took over the Rams.

“He never got hurt,” Robinson said, “and we gave him the ball 30 or 35 times a game. Nowadays, a guy runs for 7 yards and taps his helmet, wanting to come out … I gave Ricky Bell the ball 53 times one game at Southern Cal. The Humane Society called me after that.”

John McKay and Frank Broyles were close friends, hence the three games that Southern Cal and Arkansas played in 1972-74. In fact, it almost seems hard to imagine now that Arkansas was able to lure USC to Little Rock twice vs. only one return game.

Robinson remembered Broyles, the former Hog head coach and athletic director, meeting with McKay and him to show his then cutting-edge slant defense that had troubled USC so much in that 1974 upset.

“It was a wonderful education for a young coach,” said Robinson, who these days spends some Sundays as an NFL analysis on radio. “Coaches back then were just guys. That’s how Bo Schembechler and I were. Joe Paterno was like that. They didn’t have an airplane to take them everywhere. They wore tennis shoes and sweatshirts. Of course, we were making about $10,000 then.”

Robinson ranked his 1978-79 Trojans among the best teams he coached, but for opponents he put the 49ers of the 1980s and the Bears’ 1985 team as the best among the NFL opponents. “Joe Montana [49ers quarterback] was the best player I saw. He was the ultimate competitor,” Robinson said. “Bill Walsh was a great coach. A great player has a to have a great coach or a great system to work in. That’s what ends up making him great.”

Robinson said the Penn State scandal and what it did to Joe Paterno’s legacy “was such a tragedy,” but he assured the Touchdown Club crowd that “a lot of things about college football are better than they’ve ever been. Southern Cal will have 17 seniors this season and will graduate every one of those players.”

After his Club talk, he told the a few media members that he felt the SEC would again have one of the teams in the national title game, with perhaps Southern Cal, Oregon or Oklahoma making it as well. His wife is an LSU graduate and Tiger fan, and she’s made sure Robinson has a healthy dose of what football is like in the South.

In two years, college football is expected to have a four-team playoff. Eight teams would be too many and would “break” some of the fans who would want to travel to the games, Robinson said. A playoff in the 1970s might have given Robinson one ore two more national titles to his credit.

“Well, in 1979 we lost a game, and Alabama didn’t. Really, what was important to us back then was making the Rose Bowl, like for Alabama it was making the Sugar Bowl,” Robinson said. “We didn’t really think as much about winning a national title as much as making the Rose Bowl.”

Email: jharris@abpg.com. Also follow Jim on Twitter @jimharris360

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Interview with Johnny Majors after 1982 Kentucky game Below is a picture of Lane Kiffin with Johnny Majors. I enjoyed hearing Johnny Majors speak at the Little Rock Touchdown Club on 11-7-11. He talked a lot about the connection between the Arkansas and Tennessee football programs. It reminded me of what Frank Broyles had said […]

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Johnny Majors speaks at Little Rock Touchdown Club (Part 10)jh78

FB: The Best of Johnny Majors at Iowa St I got to hear Johnny Majors talk on 11-7-11 and he talked about the connection that Arkansas and Tennessee had with their football programs. Two years ago I got to hear Frank Broyles speak at the Little Rock Touchdown Club and he said that too. As […]

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By Everette Hatcher III, on August 9, 2012 at 2:49 pm, under Current Events. No Comments

Open letter to President Obama (Part 131)

Dan Mitchell on Taxing the Rich

President Obama c/o The White House
1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW
Washington, DC 20500

Dear Mr. President,

I know that you receive 20,000 letters a day and that you actually read 10 of them every day. I really do respect you for trying to get a pulse on what is going on out here.

Why are you changing the subject during this election instead of addressing the real issues?

J.D. Foster, Ph.D. and Curtis Dubay

April 10, 2012 at 11:53 am

What do you do when you’re losing a debate?  Change the subject.  That’s really all you need to know to understand President Obama’s resuscitation of his infamous “Buffett Rule” that would impose a minimum 30 percent effective tax rate on businesses and families earning $1 million.

The Supreme Court gave Obamacare a nasty audition two weeks ago, leaving even staunch defenders of the law grasping for straws while the former constitutional law professor now in the White House outrageously flailed the court for doing exactly what the Constitution intends.  So what is the President’s response? Change the subject, of course.

After releasing a non-budget that completely ignored the nation’s near-term, medium-term, and long-term fiscal plight – an extraordinary trifecta not easily achieved – the President then tried to take the House Republicans to task for their proposed real solutions on all three. Nothing highlights irresponsibility like responsible behavior, and so Obama found sharp rhetoric and a frowning visage to be thin gruel when you’ve no policies of your own. Response? Change the subject.

Soaring gas prices have put enormous strains on family budgets and business plans. The President might deflect some of the resulting popular anger if he actually had an energy policy that might produce more energy. Instead, his policies have produced only more examples of why government should not be in the business of picking winners and losers (Solyndra). When your most notable policies relating to gas prices is to kill a major oil pipeline like Keystone, propose algae as an energy source and seek to raise taxes on oil companies, you’ve nowhere to hide. Response? Change the subject.

Then came last Friday’s jobs report, which was universally acknowledged as disappointing: job growth cut in half from the modest levels of previous months, and an unemployment rate that fell only because thousands of Americans just gave up looking.  If Washington had merely left the economy to heal itself, performance today would have been much stronger and unemployment markedly lower. Instead, almost everything this Administration has tried has failed noticeably, and voters have noticed. Response? Change the subject.

With nowhere else to go, Obama has fallen back to his most comfortable setting – class warfare. Now that it is painfully obvious the Buffett Rule is the President’s chief policy priority and the centerpiece of his reelection campaign, it is fair to ask, what would the policy do to address any of the nation’s problems?

The answer is – absolutely nothing.

Strengthen the economy? No, when it comes to economic growth the Buffett Rule would weaken the economy. The tax would fall most heavily on job creators like businesses that pay their taxes through the individual income tax, investors, and entrepreneurs. The higher levy would confiscate from them resources they would otherwise use to start new businesses, grow existing businesses, and hire more workers. This will slow economic growth, job creation, and wage increases.

Reduce the budget deficits? More like “budget pixie dust” in the words of House Budget Chairman Paul Ryan (R-WI). According to a recent analysis by the congressional Joint Committee on Taxation, the Buffett Rule would raise $47 billion over ten years. And that assumes no negative economic effects, which are certain to reduce the revenues gained. For perspective, during that period President Obama’s budget calls for adding $6.7 trillion to the national debt. The Buffett Rule would reduce the increase in debt in Obama’s budget by about one half of one percent.  No joke.

The Buffett Rule debate is desperate political prestidigitation. President Obama is losing the fight over Obamacare, which remains intensely unpopular. Gas prices show no sign of descending. The economy at best is muddling. And the nation is looking for answers on the budget and the President has none. The President needed a change of subject. For Obama, what better time for a distracting, divisive fight over fairness?

When a President refuses to address the issues the country cares about, they tune out.  Obama’s fairness fight is likely to fare about as well as the rest of his policies.

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Thank you so much for your time. I know how valuable it is. I also appreciate the fine family that you have and your commitment as a father and a husband.

Sincerely,

Everette Hatcher III, 13900 Cottontail Lane, Alexander, AR 72002, ph 501-920-5733, lowcostsqueegees@yahoo.com