Tag Archives: frank broyles

DAVID BAZZEL COMES UP WITH ANOTHER GREAT LINEUP OF SPEAKERS FOR 2015 at LITTLE ROCK TOUCHDOWN CLUB!!!!!

________________

David Bazzel pictured below:

I have written about my past visits to the Little Rock Touchdown Club many times and I have been amazed at the quality of the speakers. One of my favorite was  Phillip Fulmer, but Frank Broyles was probably my favorite, and  Paul Finebaum, Mike Slive, Willie Roaf,Randy White, Howard Schnellenberger, John Robinson, Mark May, Gene Stallings, Bobby Bowden, Lloyd Carr, Johnny Majors, Pat Summerall, Pat Dye, Vince Dooley , Eric Mangino, and many more were very good too.

If pressed then right behind Frank was  Phillip Fulmer, Howard Schnellenberger, John Robinson, Gene Stallings, Bobby Bowden, Lloyd Carr, Johnny Majors, Pat Summerall, Pat Dye, and Vince Dooley .

The Little Rock Touchdown Club website noted today:

You won’t want to miss a single meeting in 2015! We have another terrific lineup but we can’t be successful without your participation and support.

Our first full meeting will be Monday, August 24th, 2015 at the Little Rock Marriott and will feature Arkansas Razorback Head Football Coach Bret Bielema. Membership in the Little Rock Touchdown Club includes lunch at a reduced rate at all weekly meetings.

(Rex Nelson pictured below)

2015 Speaker Lineup

2015-tdclub-tb

 

Rex Nelson impersonates Houston Nutt at LRTC 08 27 12

Published on Oct 2, 2012

Little Rock Touchdown Club has Rex Nelson do the stats for the games played that week. Rex does a lot of impersonations of different people but I like his Houston Nutt the best. Video by Popeye Video – Mrpopeyevideo

______________

Tom Osborne below:

_____________

Little Rock Touchdown Club founder David Bazzel announced the club’s new awards and 2013 speakers Tuesday

Frank Broyles below:

__________

Frank Broyles, Barry Switzer, and Bobby Burnett (L-R) (1965 Cotton Bowl)

Bazzel a deserving, easy target for Toast & Roast

David Bazzel is the honoree of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Arkansas' 41st annual Toast & Roast banquet Aug. 13 at the Embassy Suites in Little Rock.

David Bazzel is the honoree of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Arkansas’ 41st annual Toast & Roast banquet Aug. 13 at the Embassy Suites in Little Rock.
AUG11
0
Comments

Going Deep: A sports column by Nate Olson

When I interviewed David Bazzel back in late January, I finally got to ask the question I had wanted to ask him for a long time: “Do you ever sleep?”

Bazzel, a former Arkansas linebacker, told me that the answer — which is especially true during football season — is: “Very little.” Bazzel’s day job is co-host of the morning-drive radio program The Show With No Name on KABZ-FM, 103.7 The Buzz. The show airs weekdays from 6-10 a.m. He says he regularly stays up until midnight working on his other projects that include the Little Rock Touchdown Club, which is now in its 12th year, and the Broyles Award, which honors the nation’s top college assistant football coaches. He admitted during the interview that he doesn’t profit financially from either endeavor, even though he pours hundred of hours into the events each year. He does those things, as well as originated the The Golden Boot, the trophy awarded to the winner of the Arkansas-LSU game, because he genuinely loves football and promoting the game, Little Rock and the state of Arkansas.

Add to that, attending every University of Arkansas football game as an analyst for The Buzz and KATV, Channel 7 and the numerous speaking engagements, commercials and other business ventures Bazzel somehow manages to do all of those things at a high level. Something I have long admired.

He also squeezes in time to volunteer. While his work ethic is to be admired, it is his humble, genuine personality that shines through. Always friendly, always smiling (his teeth are the whitest I’ve seen) and very approachable. He gets ribbed from time to time because of his attention to his finely coiffed hair, his teeth, muscular physique and flair for fashion (he must own 200 suits and matching pocket squares), but he is well liked by many because, at the core, he is a good, caring person. He is also a devout Christian and shared his testimony with the congregation of Chenal Valley Baptist Church last winter.

Because of those qualities, Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Arkansas tabbed Bazzel as its 41st annual Toast & Roast honoree. The banquet begins Thursday at the Embassy Suites in Little Rock with a reception at 6 p.m., and the program begins at 7 p.m. Tickets can be purchased for $150. The cause is terrific (it is the biggest fundraiser of the year for the organization), and the entertainment will be outstanding. Check out this lineup of roasters: Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson; former NFL tight end and play-by-play voice for Arkansas football Keith Jackson; former Hog and NBA center Joe Kleine; former Hog, NFL receiver and co-host of Overtime on The Buzz Matt Jones; former Hog guard and The Buzz’s The Zone co-host Pat Bradley; Arkansas Democrat-Gazette sports editor Wally Hall; KATV sports director Steve Sullivan; KATV co-anchor Beth Hunt; car dealer Frank Fletcher; longtime journalist, broadcaster and Simmons First National Corp Director of Corporate Communications Rex Nelson; Tommy Smith, Bazzel’s co-host on The Show With No Name; Roger Scott, another co-host on The Show With No Name; and Bill Vickery, political consultant and host of The Sunday Buzz on The Buzz.

KATV morning show anchor Chris Kane gets the unenviable task of emceeing this free for all. It could get a tad uncomfortable for ol’ No. 53. No doubt, it will be funny with the cast of characters that have been assembled. Scott and his many impressions could fill the the entire time slot by himself. Most all of the roasters love to hear their own voices, so the biggest challenge of the evening might be wrapping it up by 9 p.m., as I am told is the goal. Good luck with that.

I attended my first Toast & Roast last year with former Arkansas basketball coach Nolan Richardson as the honoree. Bradley, current UA basketball coach Mike Anderson, and former Hogs and NBA standout Todd Day raised a high bar for this year. With some of the stories told and jokes delivered by last year’s emcee — KTHV-TV, Channel 11’s Craig O’Neill — I didn’t quit laughing.

Congratulations to Bazzel. The honor is well deserved, and his presence and the all-star roaster roster should make for a huge crowd and a memorable night for all.

For more information on purchasing tickets, go to bbsca.org. Read Nate’s sports blog atgoingdeep.syncweekly.com.

____

David Bazzel, Muskie Harris, Ron Calcagni, Lou Holtz of Orlando, Fla., Bert Zinamon, Kelly Lasseigne, and Nancy Monroe at the Little Rock Touchdown Club

Related posts:

Shawn Andrews at Little Rock Touchdown Club

Andrews supports athletes Share on facebook Share on twitter More Sharing Services0 By Jeff Halpern This article was published November 25, 2014 at 2:37 a.m. PHOTO BY JEFF HALPERN Former Arkansas offensive lineman Shawn Andrews was the guest at the Little Rock Touchdown Club on Nov. 24, 2014. Comments aAFont Size It’s been 11 years […]

Rocket Ismail does a great job at Little Rock Touchdown Club (with Video of full event)

_______ Little Rock Touchdown Club – November 3, 2014 I really enjoyed the stories that Rocket told about Lou Holtz. I noticed another big crowd today at the lunch when I looked around at the audience. Lou told Rocket to make the play Share on facebookShare on twitterMore Sharing Services0 By Jeremy Muck This article […]

SEC Network Analyst Dari Nowkah said at the Little Rock Touchdown Club that those outside the SEC say the conference is overrated but that obviously is not true!

________ SEC Network Analyst Dari Nowkah said at the Little Rock Touchdown Club that those outside the SEC say the conference is overrated but that obviously is not true!!!! With SEC teams winning seven consecutive national championships in 2006-2012 and having at least one team in each of the past eight BCS Championship Games, Nowkah […]

Lee Roy Jordan does a great job at Little Rock Touchdown Club!!!

___________ Little Rock Touchdown Club – October 6 2014 This is what the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette had to say about Lee Roy: After last season, Alabama lost a three-year starter at quarterback, AJ McCarron, who led the Crimson Tide to national championships after the 2011 and 2012 seasons, and was a fifth-round draft pick of the […]

Little Rock Touchdown Club Ed Orgeron Part 4

Little Rock Touchdown Club Ed Orgeron Published on Sep 29, 2014 Ed Orgeron speaks to the Little Rock Touchdown Club. ____________________________________ Coach O did a great job speaking at our luncheon on Monday. Former USC, Ole Miss coach Ed Orgeron enjoys being with family after years on the road Ed Orgeron, center, is happy to […]

Little Rock Touchdown Club Ed Orgeron Part 3

Little Rock Touchdown Club Ed Orgeron Published on Sep 29, 2014 Ed Orgeron speaks to the Little Rock Touchdown Club. ____________________________________ I enjoyed hearing Coach Orgeron at luncheon this week. Ed Orgeron covets Kansas job  9h ago Charlie Weis had barely been gone as head coach of the Kansas Jayhawks for 24 hours when former […]

Little Rock Touchdown Club Ed Orgeron Part 2

Little Rock Touchdown Club Ed Orgeron Published on Sep 29, 2014 Ed Orgeron speaks to the Little Rock Touchdown Club. ____________________________________ I always enjoy going to the Little Rock Touchdown Club and hearing Rex Nelson go through the SEC Roundup of the previous week is usually one of the highlights. He started off by saying: […]

Little Rock Touchdown Club Ed Orgeron Part 1

Little Rock Touchdown Club Ed Orgeron Published on Sep 29, 2014 Ed Orgeron speaks to the Little Rock Touchdown Club. ____________________________________ I really enjoyed hearing Ed Orgeron speak at the Little Rock Touchdown Club yesterday and Little Rock native George Schroeder got to interview him afterwards and his is the result below. Ed Orgeron, college […]

Charlotte Jones Anderson did a great job at Little Rock Touchdown Club!!!

________________ I really enjoyed hearing Jerry Jones’ daughter speak at the Little Rock Touchdown Club this week. Like it is Savvy Anderson graces Jerry’s Cowboys Share on facebookShare on twitterMore Sharing Services1 By Wally Hall This article was published September 23, 2014 at 2:31 a.m. Comments aAFont Size Looks like Jane, plays like Tarzan. Charlotte […]

Evangelical Mike Singletary to speak at Little Rock Touchdown Club Today!!!!

___________ Today downtown at the Little Rock Touchdown Club Mike Singletary is speaking.  Mike Singletary: Christ Means Everything – CBN.com SPORTS Mike Singletary: ‘Christ Means Everything’ By Shawn BrownThe 700 Club CBN.com – Mike Singletary spent 12 seasons as a key member of the celebrated Chicago Bears defense of the 1980s. This NFL Hall of […]

 

 

______________

Advertisements

The most significant game in Arkansas razorback football history? (Part 2)

A few days ago it looked like we would not have the opportunity to play into the national championship game, but now all that has changed.

Life is funny that way sometimes. The Arkansas News Bureau reported:

“I think we’ll have the opportunity,” Bequette said. “That’s what I believe.”

All we got to do is beat LSU and keep that boot in Arkansas hands. Max Brantley of the Arkansas Times Blog rightly noted, “The Boot looms larger than ever.” (Picture below from Arkansas Times Blog)

boot.JPG

Wally Hall actually said on his radio program on Nov 22, 2011 that the Arkansas v. LSU game on Nov 25, 2011 is the most significant game in razorback history. I have to respectfully disagree. I will agree that it is in the top 5, but I will continue  my  list today of other games that were more significant.

I got this info from wikipedia about the game that sealed Arkansas’ first national championship:

5 Cotton Bowl Classic

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

 

 

Jump to: navigation, search

 

1965 Cotton Bowl Classic
Nebraska Cornhuskers Arkansas Razorbacks
(9-1) (10-0)
7 10
Head coach: 
Bob Devaney
Head coach: 
Frank Broyles
AP   Coaches  
6   6  
AP   Coaches  
2   2  
  1 2 3 4 Total
Nebraska 0 7 0 0 7
Arkansas 3 0 0 7 10
 
Date January 1, 1965
Season 1964
Stadium Cotton Bowl
Location Dallas, Texas
MVP Ronnie Caveness, ArkansasFred Marshall, Arkansas
Attendance 75,000
Cotton Bowl Classic

 < 1964  1966 (Jan)

The 1965 Cotton Bowl Classic was a post-season college football bowl game with national championship implications[1] between the Southwest Conference champion Arkansas Razorbacks[2] and the champions of the Big 8, the Nebraska Cornhuskers.[2] Arkansas defeated Nebraska, 10-7 in front of 75,000 spectators, to win their first national title.[3][4][5]

Contents

 [hide

[edit] Setting

[edit] Arkansas

The Razorbacks stormed into Dallas after going 10-0 and winning the Southwest Conference.[2] The Hogs defeated #1 Texas 14-13 in Austin to clinch the bowl berth, and the conference championship. Longhorn coach Darrell Royal went for two in the game and failed, giving the game, conference, bowl bid, and later the national crown to the Razorbacks.

Razorback guard Ronnie Caveness was named an All-American. Ken Hatfield again led the nation in punt return yards, with 518. Tom McKnelly scored 45 points kicking 27 extra points and 6 field goals, which tied him with LSU’s Doug Moreau for fourth place nationally.

Arkansas had also entered the bowl season on a sour note, losing bowl games in 1961, 1962, and 1963.

[edit] Nebraska

Nebraska went 9-1, losing only a 17-7 contest to Oklahoma. The Huskers previous bowl trips were split at 2-2, with the two most recent contests being Nebraska victories.

[edit] Game summary

Arkansas and Nebraska met for the first time in this game in Dallas, Texas. Arkansas’ number-one rated defense was giving up only 5.7 points per game, where Nebraska’s #7 scoring offense was scoring 24.9 points per contest.

A standing room only crowd watched as the Hogs opened the scoring on a Tom McKnelly field goal, but the Huskers responded with a Harry Wilson punching it in from one yard out. The third quarter passed with no scoring before Arkansas quarterback Fred Marshall took over in the fourth quarter. Engineering an 80 yard drive with little time, Marshall pitched to Bobby Burnett, who scampered in from the three yard line with the game’s final touchdown.

[show]Scoring summary
Quarter Time Drive Team Scoring Information Score
Plays Yards TOP NEB ARK
1 9:47   42 8 ARK 31-yard field goal by Tom McKnelly 0 3
2 7:45   69 10 NEB Harry Wilson 1-yard touchdown run, Duncan Drum kick good 3 7
4 4:41   80 9 ARK Bobby Burnett 3-yard touchdown run, Tom McKnelly kick good 10 7
“TOP” = Time of Possession. For other American football terms, see Glossary of American football. 7 10

[edit] Aftermath

The Razorbacks were selected as national champions by the Football Writers Association of America and the Helms Athletic Foundation as the #1 Alabama Crimson Tide lost their bowl game against the Texas Longhorns in the Orange Bowl.[6][7] Because the final AP and Coaches (UPI) Polls were released before bowl games were played at the time, the Crimson Tide was selected national champions by the AP and Coaches (UPI) Polls.[8] Because of the controversy, the AP Poll decided to wait until after the bowl games to select their champion in the 1965 season.

Arkansas improved to 3-4-2 in bowls with the win, while Nebraska’s record in the postseason dropped to 2-3. Nebraska ended sixth in the AP poll, while Arkansas ended the season second despite being the only undefeated team.[9]

Jerry Jones, the Arkansas co-captain, went on to build the stadium where the Cotton Bowl Classic is now played.

Ken Hatfield of Arkansas returned to the Cotton Bowl Classic in 1989 as the Razorbacks head coach, where Arkansas was defeated by UCLA (quarterbacked by Troy Aikman whom Jones signed for the Dallas Cowboys.)

[edit] References

  1. ^ Robertson, Walter. “Porkers, Longhorns Bowling Champs.” 1/2/1965. Story. The Dallas Morning News. Retrieved on February 19, 2009.
  2. ^ a b c “Major Conference Champions.” 1964 SWC Champions. Infoplease.com. Retrieved on July 13, 2008.
  3. ^ “2009 AT&T Cotton Bowl-Past Classics.” History. The official site of the 2009 Cotton Bowl Classic. Retrieved on February 19, 2009
  4. ^ “Arkansas 10, Nebraska 7.” Summary. Retrieved on February 19, 2009.
  5. ^ “1964 College Football Recap.” Arkansas- 1964 National Champions. Infoplease.com. Retrieved on February 19, 2008.
  6. ^ “All-Time Grantland Rice Trophy Winners”. Football Writers Association of America. http://www.sportswriters.net/fwaa/awards/rice/winners/index.html. Retrieved 2007-12-31. 
  7. ^ Kirlin, Bob. “Helms Athletic Foundation/Bill Schroeder National Champions of College Football 1883-1982”. http://homepages.cae.wisc.edu/~dwilson/rsfc/history/helms.html. Retrieved 2007-12-31. 
  8. ^ Kirlin, Bob. “Coaches’ polls (UPI 1950-1990, CNN/USA Today 1991-present)”. http://homepages.cae.wisc.edu/~dwilson/rsfc/history/CoachPolls.txt. Retrieved 2007-12-31. 
  9. ^ “Final AP Top 10.” 1964 AP Poll. Infoplease.com. Retrieved on July 11, 2008.
93470638_crop_650x440

 

This story below is from a LSU fan evidently:

Chris Graythen/Getty Images

The LSU Tigers and Arkansas Razorbacks battle it out Friday for the SEC West and a national championship bid, and it features the most interesting matchups of the year.

I’ve been saying it all season that I could not wait to see LSU’s amazing secondary going against the best wide receiving corps in college football, and here it is.

It’s going to be fantastic, and even though the Tigers’ defense looks nearly invincible, the Hogs possess enough talent on offense to put points on the board.

For those who complained about the defensive struggle between LSU and the Alabama Crimson Tide on Nov. 5, this game will be more pleasing to you.

The road to the BCS Championship Game has been full of unexpected turns and thrilling football games.

It’s only fitting that it comes down to this Friday’s top-three matchup between two of the best teams in the nation. Here are the five matchups that will decide Friday’s outcome.

Related posts:

The most significant game in Arkansas razorback football history?

Wally Hall actually said on his radio program on Nov 22, 2011 that the Arkansas v. LSU game on Nov 25, 2011 is the most significant game in razorback history. I have to respectfully disagree. I will agree that it is in the top 5, but I will start a  list today of other games […]

Reading Louisiana newspapers makes me mad

Reading Louisiana newspapers makes me mad and this video doesn’t make me any happier. LSU says past 11 wins prepared them for Arkansas LSU coach Les Miles yells out to receiver Kadron Boone (86) during the first half of its game against Ole Miss Saturday in Oxford, Miss. Brett Martel The Associated Press Published: Tuesday, […]

ESPN’s Mark Schlabach at Little Rock Touchdown Club (Part 1)

Earlier I wrote about where I think Arkansas could win a national championship with just two more wins. Below is a portion of an article by Jim Harris of the website Arkansas 360: What kind of college football polling world do we live in now that a No. 3 Arkansas could win Friday at No. […]

Video and story on Iowa St victory over Oklahoma State

Several pieces of the puzzle have to come together for Arkansas to have a chance at the national title. This was a big piece!!! Mark Schlabach of ESPN wrote this article below: AMES, Iowa — So what happens now? We’ve spent the past few weeks wondering what would happen to the BCS national championship race […]

Razorbacks’ road to national championship just got more simple

[+] Enlarge Before the BCS standings came out yesterday, it was the common belief that the Arkansas Razorbacks were possibly going to finish 11-1 and miss out on a BCS bowl, but now that has all changed. Arkansas is sitting pretty at number 3 and I no longer hope Auburn beats Alabama so we can […]

Mangino speaks at Little Rock Touchdown Club (Part 2)

Mangino at a 2007 KU basketball game Eric Mangino is a very good speaker. Here is a portion of an article by Jim Harris: Jim Harris’ Notebook: Mangino Ready To Return; Big Week For Central Arkansas by Jim Harris 11/14/2011 at 3:37pm It’s easy for fans who don’t follow Kansas football closely to forget just […]

Arkansas razorback Garrett Uekman found dead this morning

Photo by Stephen B. Thornton I saw him play for Catholic against Bryant and I saw him run out on the field just yesterday, but he was found dead this morning in Fayetteville. The Arkansas News Bureau noted: I am proud of the way he represented our program,” Petrino said. “He did everything right and had […]

Johnny Majors speaks at Little Rock Touchdown Club (Part 12)jh80

Uploaded by TheMemphisSlim on Sep 3, 2010 Johnny Majors from Huntland, TN tried out for the UT Football team weighing 150 pounds. His Father, Shirley Majors his HS Coach,encourage him and then 4 younger brothers all to be Vols. Johnny Majors was the runner-up in 1956 for the Heisman Trophy to Paul Horning, on a loosing Notre Dame […]

The most significant game in Arkansas razorback football history?

Wally Hall actually said on his radio program on Nov 22, 2011 that the Arkansas v. LSU game on Nov 25, 2011 is the most significant game in razorback history. I have to respectfully disagree. I will agree that it is in the top 5, but I will start a  list today of other games that were more significant.

Today it is easy to make the case for the big shootout.

Here is the info from wikipedia:

1969 Texas vs. Arkansas football game

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

 

 

Jump to: navigation, search

 

The “Game of the Century”
(1969 version)
 
Texas Longhorns Arkansas Razorbacks
(9-0) (9-0)
15 14
Head coach: 
Darrell Royal
Head coach: 
Frank Broyles
AP   Coaches  
1   1  
AP   Coaches  
2   2  
  1 2 3 4 Total
Texas 0 0 0 15 15
Arkansas 7 0 7 0 14
 
Date December 6, 1969
Stadium Razorback Stadium
Location Fayetteville, Arkansas
Attendance 47,500[1]
United States TV coverage
Network ABC
Announcers Chris Schenkel and Bud Wilkinson

The 1969 Texas vs. Arkansas football game, dubbed The Big Shootout and sometimes referred to as the “Game of The Century”, was a legendary college football game on December 6, 1969 in which the top-ranked Texas Longhorns visited the second-ranked Arkansas Razorbacks at Razorback Stadium in Fayetteville, Arkansas. The Longhorns came back from a 14-0 deficit after three quarters to win 15-14. [2] They would go on to win the Cotton Bowl Classic and be selected National Champions. [3]

Contents

 [hide

[edit] Buildup

The relative parity which had existed within the Southwest Conference ended with the arrival of Darrell Royal and Frank Broyles at their respective schools, with either Texas or Arkansas winning or sharing the SWC crown 8 out of the 10 years leading up to the game. [1] Both Texas and Arkansas had won one national championship in the 1960s, and the schools developed a bit of a rivalry after Arkansas defeated in consecutive years top-ranked Texas teams in 1964 and 1965. [4] In 1968 Texas handed Arkansas their only loss of the year.

The 1969 season marked the 100th anniversary of college football. This game would decide the Southwest Conference Championship, as well as its berth in the Cotton Bowl Classic, and ABC television executive Beano Cook arranged for Texas and Arkansas to play the final game of the regular season, moving their usual October date to the first weekend in December. The deal ABC Sports executive Roone Arledge persuaded Arkansas coach Frank Broyles to move the game was a promise that President Richard Nixon would attend and that ABC would televise Arkansas the next season’s opener (against Stanford and its star quarterback, Jim Plunkett). Broyles even talked Arkansas officials into installing AstroTurf, then still a novelty, at Razorback Stadium. The game would kick off at Noon Central Standard Time since the stadium in Fayetteville did not have lights at the time. There were early discussions of moving the game to an evening start at War Memorial Stadium in Little Rock, where Arkansas played two or three home games per season, but ABC did not consider the lights at Little Rock to be sufficient.

For a long while, it looked as though the game would be a meeting of also-rans. Ohio State was dominating the Big Ten and the chances of the game being anything other than just the last game of the season were pretty remote. However, as the Longhorns took a Saturday off to prepare for their upcoming game on Thanksgiving Day with Texas A&M, Michigan and its upstart coach Bo Schembechler upset the Buckeyes. Texas vaulted to No. 1 in the polls and Arkansas claimed the No. 2 spot. Ultimately, due to good fortune, it worked as the move made the game the focus of the entire sporting world doing a television rating of a 52.1 share, meaning more than half the TV sets in the country were tuned to this game.

That set the stage. Even the day took on an eerie feeling. Billy Graham attended to give the pregame prayer. The night before, a steady, cold rain fell in Fayetteville and an icy fog hovered over the stadium as the crowd awaited the arrival of President Nixon, who would award a plaque symbolic of the National Championship to the winner. Due to the lack of a suitable airport in northwest Arkansas (Fayetteville’s Drake Field was far too small, and Northwest Arkansas Regional Airport would not open for another 30 years), Marine One landed on the practice fields just east of Razorback Stadium as the game was starting.

[edit] The game

In the 100th year of college football, it truly was the “Game of the Century.” In a game between unbeatens played at Arkansas’ Razorback Stadium in Fayetteville, the Texas Longhorns were ranked Number 1 in the country, having won 18 straight games. The Arkansas Razorbacks were ranked Number 2, having won 15 straight. The Texas wishbone attack, then still a novelty, was an offensive juggernaut that averaged over 44 points per game coming into the contest. Arkansas led the nation in scoring defense, yielding only 6.8 points per game. In addition, both the Razorback offense and Texas defense were ranked in the top ten nationally.

 

The Longhorns got off to a sloppy start, losing a fumble on the second play from scrimmage and turning the ball over a total of six times. A 1-yard leap into the end zone by Bill Burnett in the first quarter and a 29-yard touchdown reception by Chuck Dicus in the third quarter put the Hogs up 14-0 with 15:00 to play.

James Street scrambled for a touchdown on the first play of the fourth quarter. Longhorns coach Darrell Royal had decided before the game to go for a two-point conversion after the Longhorn’s first touchdown to avoid a tie, and Street dove into the end zone to make it 14-8.

Arkansas quarterback Bill Montgomery next led the Razorbacks on a 73-yard drive down to the Texas 7. On third down, Montgomery was intercepted in the end zone by Danny Lester, Arkansas’ first turnover of the game. A field goal would have likely put the game out of reach for Texas.

Still down 14-8, Texas began a desperate drive for the end zone that appeared to stall with 4:47 remaining when Royal opted for yet another gamble on fourth-and-3 from their own 43-yard line. During a timeout that Texas took before the fateful play, Royal shouted at Street, “Right 53 Veer pass.” The play was a deep pattern throw to the tight end. The play wasn’t in the Texas game plan package. “Are you sure that’s the call you want?” Street said. “Damn right I’m sure!” Royal snapped. Street had noticed Arkansas defenders looking into the Texas huddle, so he fixed his gaze on split end Cotton Speyrer while explaining the play to Randy Peschel, saying “Randy, I’m looking and pointing at Cotton, but I’m talking to you.” Street then hit Peschel on the dramatic play, with Peschel making a difficult catch over his shoulder in double coverage. It not only converted on fourth down, but also gained 44 yards, putting the Longhorns on the Razorbacks 13.

[2] Two plays later Jim Bertelsen ran in for the game-tying touchdown. Donnie Wigginton, the third-string quarterback who was the holder, made a big save on a high snap and Happy Feller booted the extra point for the winning score with 3:58 remaining.

Arkansas made a push into Texas territory, hoping for a field goal from All-American kicker Bill McClard. Arkansas was down to the Texas 40 when Tom Campell intercepted Montgomery on the Texas 21-yard line with less than a minute left.

[edit] Controversy

President Richard Nixon attended the game along with several members of his staff and U.S. Representatives George H.W. Bush of Texas and John Paul Hammerschmidt of Arkansas, having announced that he would give a plaque to the winner, proclaiming it to be the National Champion — to the chagrin of observers who thought it premature to do so before the New Year’s Day bowl games, and of fans of Penn State, which would also end the season undefeated. Arkansas took a 14-0 lead, and held it into the fourth quarter, but Texas came from behind to win, 15-14, and accepted Nixon’s plaque.

Texas beat Notre Dame in the Cotton Bowl Classic, and removed any doubt as to whether it deserved consideration as National Champion, although Penn State fans still insist that their team, also undefeated and winner of the Orange Bowl, was better. However, it is worth noting that the Cotton Bowl Classic first invited Penn State to play the Southwest Conference champions. The Nittany Lions declined the invitation, preferring to spend New Year’s Day in warm Miami, where they defeated Big Eight champion Missouri. This decision was made while Ohio State was still ranked #1 with only one game to play, so at the time, it did not appear that a national championship was likely to be at stake. The 1969 Texas-Penn State conflict, never settled on the field, has been one of the major arguments in favor of a Division I-A playoff. Arkansas lost the 1970 Sugar Bowl to Ole Miss, led by Archie Manning. The entire Texas-Penn State debate and Nixon’s involvement led to a quote from Penn State coach Joe Paterno, a conservative Republican, during a commencement speech at Penn State in 1974 about Nixon, “How could Nixon know so much about college football in 1969 and so little about Watergate in 1973?”

This game has been nicknamed “Dixie’s Last Stand,” since it was the last major American sporting event played between two all-white teams, although two schools in the Southeastern Conference (SEC), LSU and Ole Miss, did not integrate their varsity football squads until 1972.

With the Vietnam War still raging and Nixon in attendance, protestors came to the game, and one of them got into a tree overlooking the stadium and held up an antiwar sign. An urban legend grew up around this game, claiming that this protestor was Arkansas native and future President Bill Clinton. Clinton, however, was not at the game, as he was then a Rhodes Scholar at the University of Oxford in England, and was listening to the game on a shortwave radio with some American friends.

The two coaches in this game, Darrell Royal of Texas and Frank Broyles of Arkansas, both retired after the 1976 season. Both became athletic directors at their respective schools, Royal for the entire Texas athletic program and Broyles solely for the Arkansas men’s program, as Arkansas had a completely separate women’s athletic department from 1971 through 2007. Royal retired from his AD job in 1980, but Broyles continued on through 2007, with the men’s and women’s athletic programs merging immediately after his retirement. Broyles spearheaded Arkansas’ move from the SWC to the SEC in 1991, and was later instrumental in the Razorbacks and Longhorns playing a two-year series in 2003 (at Austin) won by Arkansas and 2004 (at Fayetteville) won by Texas. The last meeting was in 2008 in Austin won by Texas 52-10. Texas holds a 56-21-0 (72%) lead in the all-time series between the schools. They are scheduled to play again in Fayetteville in 2014.

Below is an article I got from ESPN that calls this Friday’s game the game of the century:

Originally Published: November 22, 2011

Arkansas-LSU, BCS future and more

Wojciechowski By Gene Wojciechowski
ESPN.com
Archive

This week’s top 20:

20. Game Of The Century Jr.

Friday is why God invented the couch, the 52-inch plasma, leftover turkey and the Southeastern Conference.

[+] EnlargeLes Miles

Ronald Martinez/Getty ImagesLes Miles’ team is getting used to being the center of attention.

At precisely 2:30 p.m. ET, my rear end will be sofa bound and the TV remote will summon the satellite waves from faraway Baton Rouge, La. And for the next glorious three hours or so (or until I have to drive to O’Hare and catch my flight to Atlanta for Saturday’s Iron Bowl at Auburn), I’ll watch, like many of you, the supposed second-best matchup of the season: No. 3 Arkansas at No. 1 LSU.

I can’t wait. Then again, I also couldn’t wait for the Nov. 5 LSU-Bama game — Game of the Century Sr.

That was No. 1 versus No. 2, but the game itself didn’t live up to the hype. How could it?

And in retrospect, the outcome didn’t do much to really define the national championship race. Bama lost, 9-6, but it’s no worse off today than it was after missing four field goals that night at Bryant-Denny Stadium. It was No. 2 then, it’s No. 2 now.

The same sort of thing could happen Friday afternoon. A scenario exists where LSU could lose, but still end up in the national championship game against Bama. And if that happens, we’d have Game of the Century III … in less than 2½ months.

The dominoes could fall this way: Arkansas upsets LSU, Bama beats Auburn, Georgia beats Arkansas in the SEC championship game. Or … LSU beats Arkansas, Bama beats Auburn, Georgia beats LSU in the SEC championship.

Depending on what happens with Oklahoma State (or maybe not), we could have a No. 1 Bama versus No. 2 LSU on Jan. 9 at the Superdome.

Meanwhile, the smart guys in Vegas seem to be leaning heavily toward LSU beating up the Razorbacks. LSU is a 14-point favorite, though that could be Tigers fans driving up the spread. But as a helpful reminder, Oklahoma State was nearly a four-touchdown favorite against Iowa State last Friday. How’d that work out?

Anyway, I’m taking LSU, but unlike Century Sr., this one will have actual offense. Something in the 28-24 neighborhood sounds about right.

Related posts:

The most significant game in Arkansas razorback football history?

Wally Hall actually said on his radio program on Nov 22, 2011 that the Arkansas v. LSU game on Nov 25, 2011 is the most significant game in razorback history. I have to respectfully disagree. I will agree that it is in the top 5, but I will start a  list today of other games […]

Reading Louisiana newspapers makes me mad

Reading Louisiana newspapers makes me mad and this video doesn’t make me any happier. LSU says past 11 wins prepared them for Arkansas LSU coach Les Miles yells out to receiver Kadron Boone (86) during the first half of its game against Ole Miss Saturday in Oxford, Miss. Brett Martel The Associated Press Published: Tuesday, […]

ESPN’s Mark Schlabach at Little Rock Touchdown Club (Part 1)

Earlier I wrote about where I think Arkansas could win a national championship with just two more wins. Below is a portion of an article by Jim Harris of the website Arkansas 360: What kind of college football polling world do we live in now that a No. 3 Arkansas could win Friday at No. […]

Video and story on Iowa St victory over Oklahoma State

Several pieces of the puzzle have to come together for Arkansas to have a chance at the national title. This was a big piece!!! Mark Schlabach of ESPN wrote this article below: AMES, Iowa — So what happens now? We’ve spent the past few weeks wondering what would happen to the BCS national championship race […]

Razorbacks’ road to national championship just got more simple

[+] Enlarge Before the BCS standings came out yesterday, it was the common belief that the Arkansas Razorbacks were possibly going to finish 11-1 and miss out on a BCS bowl, but now that has all changed. Arkansas is sitting pretty at number 3 and I no longer hope Auburn beats Alabama so we can […]

Mangino speaks at Little Rock Touchdown Club (Part 2)

Mangino at a 2007 KU basketball game Eric Mangino is a very good speaker. Here is a portion of an article by Jim Harris: Jim Harris’ Notebook: Mangino Ready To Return; Big Week For Central Arkansas by Jim Harris 11/14/2011 at 3:37pm It’s easy for fans who don’t follow Kansas football closely to forget just […]

Arkansas razorback Garrett Uekman found dead this morning

Photo by Stephen B. Thornton I saw him play for Catholic against Bryant and I saw him run out on the field just yesterday, but he was found dead this morning in Fayetteville. The Arkansas News Bureau noted: I am proud of the way he represented our program,” Petrino said. “He did everything right and had […]

Johnny Majors speaks at Little Rock Touchdown Club (Part 12)jh80

Uploaded by TheMemphisSlim on Sep 3, 2010 Johnny Majors from Huntland, TN tried out for the UT Football team weighing 150 pounds. His Father, Shirley Majors his HS Coach,encourage him and then 4 younger brothers all to be Vols. Johnny Majors was the runner-up in 1956 for the Heisman Trophy to Paul Horning, on a loosing Notre Dame […]

 

Johnny Majors speaks at Little Rock Touchdown Club (Part 11)jh79

Interview with Johnny Majors after 1982 Kentucky game

Below is a picture of Lane Kiffin with Johnny Majors.

Image Detail

I enjoyed hearing Johnny Majors speak at the Little Rock Touchdown Club on 11-7-11. He talked a lot about the connection between the Arkansas and Tennessee football programs. It reminded me of what Frank Broyles had said two years earlier when I heard him speak. Broyles told a very interesting story that involved individuals that were involved with the UT football program. John Barnhill was the Athletic Director at Arkansas (former football coach of UT) and he hired a former UT player Bowden Wyatt to be the head football coach at Arkansas (future football coach of great UT team of 1956 with Johnny Majors at QB). John Barnhill noticed that in south Arkansas the radio stations were carrying the LSU football games and in the East part of Arkansas the radio stations were carrying Ole Miss and in the west they were carrying Oklahoma. Therefore, John Barnhill offerred all the radio staions in the whole state free access to the radio broadcast of the Razorbacks and the result was all the stations in the whole state carried the Razorbacks and Bowden Wyatt benefitted from the great increase in school spirit and support and a young Frank Broyles saw this great support in all the store windows of every store and every city in Arkansas had all this great support for the Razorbacks and Frank had never seen that at Baylor or Georgia Tech or any other school he had been around and he decided he would take the job as soon as it came open. Bowden Wyatt coached the first razorback team that got national attention but he left after getting the razorbacks to the cotton bowl and got a cadillac from the grateful fans of Arkansas and drove it straight to Knoxville where my Uncle Blythe told me that he used the talent left there and drank himself out of a job later.

Tennessee quarterback Tyler Bray warms up with the team before the game against Arkansas at Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium in Fayetteville on Nov. 12, 2011. (AMY SMOTHERMAN BURGESS/NEWS SENTINEL)

Photo by Amy Smotherman Burgess, ©KNS/2011

Tennessee quarterback Tyler Bray warms up with the team before the game against Arkansas at Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium in Fayetteville on Nov. 12, 2011. (AMY SMOTHERMAN BURGESS/NEWS SENTINEL)

_________________________

 Tennessee football was both defined by and in a sense, spoiled by Robert Neyland, one of the all-time greats of college football coaching. “The Titan of Tennessee”, a College Football Hall Of Fame member, posted a 173-31-12 record in a twenty-one year coaching reign that spanned twenty-seven years as it was twice interrupted for military service. He played at Texas A&M and Army, served in World War I, then at West Point, worked directly for General Douglas MacArthur. Neyland eventually retired from the Army as a Brigadier General but served in Panama and in WW II which interrupted his UT coaching career. His unbelievable success put Tennessee football and his version of the Single Wing on the map, earning respect for southern football. He served to spoil fans and boosters with his .829 winning percentage and National Championships of 1938 and ’51. In one six-year period he went 53-1-5! After his retirement to the full-time athletic director’s position in 1952, every coach at UT was held to his standard. His final stint at UT spanned the years of 1946 through ’52. He inherited successful teams coached by John Barnhill who “kept the throne warm” for The General while he served during WW II. Barnhill was a former player and current assistant to Neyland when military duty called and upon Neyland’s return in ’46, Barnhill’s UT success brought him the head coaching job at Arkansas, one he kept for eight years until giving it over to former Tennessee star, assistant coach, and future head Volunteer mentor, Bowden Wyatt. Neyland of course, took Barnhill’s team to the next level, bringing the 1946 squad to the Orange Bowl.

Tennessee wide receiver Da'Rick Rogers looks for a call after he lost the ball against Arkansas at Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium in Fayetteville on Nov. 12, 2011.  (AMY SMOTHERMAN BURGESS/NEWS SENTINEL)

Photo by Amy Smotherman Burgess, ©KNS/2011

Tennessee wide receiver Da’Rick Rogers looks for a call after he lost the ball against Arkansas at Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium in Fayetteville on Nov. 12, 2011. (AMY SMOTHERMAN BURGESS/NEWS SENTINEL)

_________________________

After a two-year rebuilding effort, the 1949 team finished with a 7-2-1 mark

Former UT All American end Bowden Wyatt who had turned around the fortunes of Wyoming, at one point winning twenty-seven of thirty games, and then guided a down-trodden Arkansas to the Cotton Bowl in only his second year at the helm there, was rumored to be the incoming new Vols coach which predictably, contributed to the Hogs’ loss to Georgia Tech in their bowl game. On January 8, 1955 Wyatt was officially named and drove into Knoxville in a brand-new Cadillac that had been purchased by appreciative Razorback fans after clinching the Cotton Bowl berth. Using the same fundamental football he learned from General Neyland, Wyatt was tireless and dynamic in teaching the Tennessee Single-Wing which featured “fierce blocking and sound defense.” Wyatt’s first team featured John Gordy at tackle, Charley Coffey at guard, and Johnny Majors at tailback. Majors’ 1133 total yards made him the SEC MVP. Some felt that the 6-3-1 record would have improved if solid FB Tom Tracy had not had a personal falling-out with Wyatt which led him to quit the squad during spring ball. Tracy still went on to a productive nine-year NFL career with Detroit, Pittsburgh, and Washington.
Tennessee defensive back Izauea Lanier is unable to stop Arkansas wide receiver Jarius Wright from scoring at Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium in Fayetteville on Nov. 12, 2011.   (AMY SMOTHERMAN BURGESS/NEWS SENTINEL)
Photo by Amy Smotherman Burgess, ©KNS/2011Tennessee defensive back Izauea Lanier is unable to stop Arkansas wide receiver Jarius Wright from scoring at Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium in Fayetteville on Nov. 12, 2011. (AMY SMOTHERMAN BURGESS/NEWS SENTINEL)

_______________________________

  
A defensive stand-off that featured a lot of punting and strategy was the 1956 season’s highlighted game, a 6-0 win over powerful Georgia Tech in the seventh game of the year that spurred the Vols on to an undefeated season. All SEC T Gordy led the way for Majors and wingback Bill Anderson before the big lineman left to play for the Lions for eleven good years. Majors finished with 1101 yards, consensus All American ranking and finished second in the Heisman voting, an honor many experts believe he should have won. Once again his ability to run, pass, block and perform as one of the best punters in the nation gave him the SEC MVP for the second straight year and he was named as UPI’s National Back Of The Year. E Buddy Cruze was also All American and Wyatt was National Coach Of The Year for guiding his Vols to a number-two national ranking. The season ended on a down note as the mighty Vols lost a mistake-ridden Sugar Bowl game 13-7 to Baylor, the game marred when Vol guard Bruce Burnham was kicked by Baylor’s Larry Hickman after a play with Burnham going into convulsions. What was believed to possibly be a broken neck proved to be but a minor injury but the myth of an “unbeatable Tennessee team” had been exploded.
Tennessee tailback Marlin Lane carries the ball against Arkansas at Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium in Fayetteville on Nov. 12, 2011.  (AMY SMOTHERMAN BURGESS/NEWS SENTINEL)
Photo by Amy Smotherman Burgess, ©KNS/2011Tennessee tailback Marlin Lane carries the ball against Arkansas at Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium in Fayetteville on Nov. 12, 2011. (AMY SMOTHERMAN BURGESS/NEWS SENTINEL)

Johnny Majors speaks at Little Rock Touchdown Club (Part 2) jh71

Johnny Majors broke the streak of Alabama victories over Tennessee with this victory over Bama pictured below.

Image Detail

When Johnny Majors was introduced today at the Little Rock Touchdown Club, it was mentioned that he caused a stir back in 2005 with his previous visit to the Little Rock Touchdown Club. Here is an article from ESPN on that visit:

Updated: November 22, 2005, 9:15 AM ET

Associated Press

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. — Johnny Majors has made it clear in the past he was not happy with the way he left Tennessee. Majors was fired in 1992, and his assistant, Phillip Fulmer, succeeded him.

On Monday at the Little Rock Touchdown Club, Majors said he still has fond memories of Tennessee, but he drew a laugh from the crowd full of Arkansas fans when a took a small dig at Fulmer.

“I don’t pull against those players up there,” Majors said. “But I don’t have any regard for Judas Brutus, who’s coaching up there.”

Fulmer, the current coach of the Volunteers, was a top assistant to Majors when Majors underwent heart surgery in 1992, and took over the team for three victories while Majors was recovering. He was named head coach following Majors’ dismissal.

A call to the Tennessee sports information office seeking comment from Fulmer was not returned.

Majors spoke for about 45 minutes, entertaining the crowd with stories about his playing days at Tennessee, his years as an assistant to Arkansas coach Frank Broyles, and a head coaching career that spanned almost three decades.

Majors was a star running back at Tennessee during the 1950s, finishing second to Notre Dame’s Paul Hornung in the ’56 Heisman Trophy race. He went 184-137-10 as a head coach at Iowa State, Tennessee and Pittsburgh.

He led Pitt to the 1976 national title, then left a few days later to coach Tennessee. He spent 16 seasons there, but missed the first three games in 1992 while he recovered from heart bypass surgery. The Volunteers, coached by Fulmer, got off to a 3-0 start.

Majors unexpectedly returned and Tennessee lost three of its next five games. With three games left, the university said Majors would not return for another season. He later went back to Pitt.

Majors has returned to Tennessee’s campus only a few times since stepping down as coach, but he was there last month for a tribute to his 1985 team that won the Sugar Bowl.

“They’ve been great to me and my family for a long, long time since I went there as a freshman in 1953.” Majors said Monday. “I am not a bitter man, I am not an angry man. I am having too much of a good time living.”

Majors amused the Razorback partisans with his comments about Tennessee, but they appeared just as interested when he talked about his experiences at Arkansas. Majors became an assistant on the Razorbacks’ staff in 1964, the year Arkansas went 11-0 and finished ranked No. 1 by the Football Writers Association of America.

Arkansas shut out its last five regular-season opponents that year before beating Nebraska 10-7 in the Cotton Bowl.

“When they don’t score, it’s pretty hard to lose,” Majors said.

Majors became the coach at Iowa State in 1968, where his assistants included Jimmy Johnson, Jackie Sherrill and Larry Lacewell.

Lacewell, who went on to coach at Arkansas State, was in the audience Monday. Majors took the opportunity to needle him a bit.

“Larry Lacewell, Jimmy Johnson and Jackie Sherrill were on my first staff up there. Man, they had all the answers,” he said with a touch of sarcasm.

Majors went to Pitt in 1973, taking over a team that had won one game the previous season and eventually winning a national title. After a 16-year stay at Tennessee, he went back to coach the Panthers, trying to resurrect the program for a second time. But he went 11-32 in his second stint and retired at the end of the 1996 season.

Majors said he never forgot the lessons he learned from Broyles and the rest of the Arkansas staff, and he still has an obvious soft spot for the school and its supporters.

“There’s none better anywhere in the country than the Arkansas Razorback fans,” he said. “You have a stellar group here.”


Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press

Head coaching record

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs Coaches# AP°
Iowa State Cyclones (Big Eight Conference) (1968–1972)
1968 Iowa State 3–7 1–6 7th      
1969 Iowa State 3–7 1–6 7th      
1970 Iowa State 5–6 1–6 T–6th      
1971 Iowa State 8–4 4–3 4th L Sun 17  
1972 Iowa State 5–6–1 2–4–1 5th L Liberty    
Iowa State: 24–30–1 9–25–1  
Pittsburgh Panthers (Independent) (1973–1976)
1973 Pittsburgh 6–5–1     L Fiesta    
1974 Pittsburgh 7–4          
1975 Pittsburgh 8–4     W Sun 13 15
1976 Pittsburgh 12–0     W Sugar 1 1
Tennessee Volunteers (Southeastern Conference) (1977–1992)
1977 Tennessee 4–7 1–5 8th      
1978 Tennessee 5–5–1 3–3 T–4th      
1979 Tennessee 7–5 3–3 T–5th L Bluebonnet    
1980 Tennessee 5–6 3–3 6th      
1981 Tennessee 8–4 3–3 T–4th W Garden State    
1982 Tennessee 6–5–1 3–2–1 5th L Peach    
1983 Tennessee 9–3 4–2 T–3rd W Citrus    
1984 Tennessee 7–4–1 3–3 T–5th L Sun    
1985 Tennessee 9–1–2 5–1 1st W Sugar 4 4
1986 Tennessee 7–5 3–3 6th W Liberty    
1987 Tennessee 10–2–1 4–1–1 3rd W Peach 13 14
1988 Tennessee 5–6 3–4 T–6th      
1989 Tennessee 11–1 6–1 T–1st W Cotton 5 5
1990 Tennessee 9–2–2 5–1–1 1st W Sugar 7 8
1991 Tennessee 9–3 5–2 3rd L Fiesta 15 14
1992 Tennessee 5–3* 3–3* 3rd (East)* * 12* 12*
Tennessee: 116–62–8 57–40–3  
Pittsburgh Panthers (Big East Conference) (1993–1996)
1993 Pittsburgh 3–8 2–5 6th      
1994 Pittsburgh 3–8 2–5 7th      
1995 Pittsburgh 2–9 0–7 8th      
1996 Pittsburgh 4–7 3–4 5th      
Pittsburgh: 45–45–1 7–21 *Three early games and the Bowl game are credited to Phillip Fulmer.
Total: 185–137–10  
      National Championship         Conference Title         Conference Division Title
#Rankings from final Coaches’ Poll.
°Rankings from final AP Poll.

Johnny Majors
Majors in 2009
Sport(s) Football
Biographical details
Born May 21, 1935 (age 76)
Place of birth Lynchburg, Tennessee
Playing career
1954–1956
1957
Tennessee
Montreal Alouettes
Position(s) Halfback
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1957
1958–1959
1960–1963
1964–1967
1968–1972
1973–1976
1977–1992
1993–1996
Tennessee (GA)
Tennessee (backfield)
Mississippi State (DB)
Arkansas (assistant)
Iowa State
Pittsburgh
Tennessee
Pittsburgh
Head coaching record
Overall 185–137–10
Bowls 9–7
Statistics
College Football Data Warehouse
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
National (1976)
SEC (1985, 1989–1990)
Awards
All-American, 1956
2x SEC MVP (1955–1956)
Walter Camp Coach of the Year (1973)
AFCA Coach of the Year (1976)
Sporting News College Football COY (1976)
SEC Coach of the Year (1985)
College Football Hall of Fame
Inducted in 1987 (profile)

Johnny Majors speaks at Little Rock Touchdown Club (Part 1)jh70

Below is a picture of Lane Kiffin with Johnny Majors.

Image Detail

Today Johnny Majors spoke at the Little Rock Touchdown Club. Majors told several revealing stories about his time at Arkansas from 1964-1968 when he was an assistant coach under Frank Broyles. One of the funniest stories concerned fellow assistant coach Jim MacKenzie who knew how to play Broyles at times according to Majors.

One such occasion the assistant coaches were being pressed into working long hours by Broyles during a time that Broyles thought he needed to see some progress with the team. Earlier the assistant coaches had been allowed to leave at noon and go fishing or play golf when the razorbacks had been winning almost all their games.

It was in July and Majors and some of the other coaches wanted to go play golf. Coach Broyles came into the room and asked how things were going. Coach MacKenzie asked Broyles what were the shots Broyles had on the first hole on Augusta when he got that 72. Broyles went to the chalk board and erased the plays and began to draw the placement of the ball on the first hole as he outlined the birdie he got .

By the time Broyles recalled the first 5 holes, he put down the chalk and said that it appeared we were all caught up around here and we should go play some golf!!!!

Johnny Majors

Over and over today, Majors talked about his respect for Coach Broyles. In this article below Johnny Majors lists the top coaches of all time and he includes Frank Broyles who hired Majors as an assistant.

Former Tennessee star, coach Johnny Majors says new Vols coach Derek Dooley will succeed if given time

Published: Tuesday, August 31, 2010, 7:00 AM

Derek Dooley may not have been the first choice to replace Lane Kiffin as head coach at Tennessee, but he was the right choice, said former Tennessee All-American and coach Johnny Majors.

The son of former Georgia coach Vince Dooley “knows how to coach,” Majors said, and he’ll get the job done if given the opportunity.

“I think he’ll do very well,” Majors said before speaking at the Cellular South 1st and 10 Club Monday night at Heron Lakes Country Club. “I think he was a very good pick. I’ve been an advocate of his the last two or three years since I’ve got to know him at a lot of coaching clinics.

“I’ve known him since he was a kid. … He’s got a good background, he’s intelligent, competent and … he’s learned a lot by osmosis, being around his dad and being raised up by his dad.”

The keys for Dooley are getting the time and power to turn around a program in decline, Majors said.

“It’s going to take time,” Majors said. “I think they’re going to have a very challenging struggle this year, very challenging — the most since I took over. It took us five or six years. … He’s got a tough job.

“People ask, ‘Do you think they’ll give him time?’ I tell them, ‘Frankly speaking, they don’t have a choice.’ … It’s been a mess for several years. They’ve had a tough time finding a president. They’ve had three presidents that didn’t last. So they need to learn how to hire the right person and stay with that person.

“They’ve got no choice. They’re going to have to tough it out. If you’ve got a strong back and strong spine and strong-minded, loyal person you’re working for (it’s easier). Its been a mess and they’re going to have to give him a chance to get it straightened out.”

Majors said he believes the Vols were headed in the right direction with Lane Kiffin, who led the program for one year before leaving for Southern Cal.

“Kiffin took over a bad situation,” Majors said. “After me, he took over the job in the worst situation it’s been in. No question about it. It’s been going that way, downhill, for 10 years at least, especially the last three.

“Lane Kiffin would have won there. He stopped the bleeding. He stopped a runaway truck. You don’t want a runaway truck, an 18-wheeler, going down the Sewanee Mountain. He got it braked and turned the cab sideways and was going to turn it back uphill. He would have won there, because they knew how to coach.”

Coaching drove Majors for many years, not only at Tennessee, but also at Iowa State and twice at Pitt, where he won the 1976 national championship. Before that, he was SEC MVP twice and runner-up for the Heisman Trophy his senior year.

“I don’t remember my first spoken word or my first conscious thought, but surely I can’t remember when I didn’t love football,” Majors said. “I think it’s a great game.”

Although it’s a different game than when he played or even coached, the best level of football, in his opinion, is still special.

That’s why he still loves to watch the game, why he loves watching other men coach the game, especially the great ones. One of those coaches is a Dooley mentor for whom he served as an assistant for seven years — Alabama’s Nick Saban.

“There’s no one that can coach ’em up any better than Saban can,” Majors said. “Intensity, focus, discipline, tenacious, clever, keeps his eyes on the bull’s-eye. He’s very demanding of his coaches and they have a great amount of respect for him. … Saban knows how to coach.”

Others on that list would include Frank Broyles, Vince Lombardi, Vince Dooley and Bear Bryant, among others, Majors said.

The College Football Hall of Fame member said he hopes Derek Dooley will make that list by leading Tennessee back to its glory years.

“Watching (Tennessee) practice, he’s made an impression on me,” Majors said. “He can coach. … But they’re going to have to give him a chance.”

McGill-Toolen’s E.J. May (defense) and Mary Montgomery’s Harrison Corley (offense) were recognized at the meeting as the Cellular South student-athletes of the week.

The next 1st and 10 Club meeting is on Sept. 20 with ESPN college football analyst Joe Schad as the guest speaker.