AFTER LIFE 3 Review and Open Letter to Ricky Gervais Part 30 AFTER LIFE Soundtrack is the best! Aaron Espe – Back to the Beginning

Penelope Wilton: Life After working with Ricky Gervais… I’d do it all again

ricky gervais penelope wilton after life


DAME PENELOPE Wilton is in awe of the writing, acting and directing skills of Ricky Gervais, who she worked with for the first time in the role of wise widow Anne in his hit show After Life. And astonishingly, the veteran actress says she “learnt a great deal” about tolerance from Gervais, known for his outspoken views and shocking Hollywood with tasteless jokes while hosting the Golden Globes.

By ALEX LLOYD

11:41, Wed, Feb 9, 2022 | UPDATED: 08:21, Fri, Feb 11, 2022

In fact, Gervais who plays Tony in the award-winning After Life – which is back for a third series – has been a lifelong fan of Wilton, having watched her in 1980s sitcom Ever Decreasing Circles.

He used the name of her character in that show, Anne, in After Life and even cast her former co-star Peter Egan as Tony’s boss and her love interest.

Wilton, 75, plays a real-life angel toTony in the Netflix comedy-drama about a suicidal local newspaper writer struggling to come to terms with his wife’s death because she takes the time to listen – something she says we should all do more often.

Netflix donated a number of benches to councils across Britain to mark the release of the third series last month, with plaques displaying QR codes that link to online resources from the Campaign Against Living Miserably.

Wilton said she had not expected a TV show about grief and death to be so popular.

“I don’t think Ricky did either,” she says.

“I did a ‘question and answer’ with him recently and he said that the show wasn’t going to be entirely about grief. That was the starting point.

“But he got so much feedback from the public about the first series and dealing with this very difficult subject that he continued. He felt the onus was on him to continue with those themes.

“I was in the park the other day and a young woman in her late 30s came up to me and said, ‘I’ve lost my mother and this has been a great help.’ It touches people.

“Men are very bad at anything that means they have to show their vulnerable side, like going to the doctors.

“But to see Ricky in extremis in After Life, when he is watching old videos of his late wife, it is very helpful to other men I think. It’s like when footballers come out as gay – it is jolly brave and helpful to others. This macho business only seems to start wars.”

The veteran actress had never met Gervais before he approached her to take the role of his confidante, but was instantly attracted to his script.

“I can only go by the word. That’s all I have. I thought those scenes seemed very authentic. I didn’t know Ricky, I’d never met him, but I was a great admirer of The Office and I’d seen a couple of his one-man shows on the television.

“I thought he was a very clever writer and I thought the whole series had something to say but was extremely funny too – and outrageous to say the least.” It turned out that Gervais was an admirer of Wilton, purposely naming her character Anne, after the one she played opposite Richard Briers in Ever Decreasing Circles.The link between the two shows was extended to Egan’s character Paul – publisher of the paper Tony writes for.

Wilton explains: “Ricky was a great fan of that series and I think the reason he cast me was his homage to it. He has called me Anne and Peter Egan’s character has been called Paul, like in the show.

“I think secretly he hoped Anne and Paul would dash off together and leave Richard’s character Martin by himself, putting the telephone receiver round the right way and organising all those different societies he was keen on.”

The scenes between Wilton and Gervais are incredibly moving as she tries to help Tony overcome his paralysing grief.

“When something is well written, it’s not always about the dialogue, it’s often about the silences between the speech, because that is how we are in real life. I think he has portrayed grief very well. He is a very empathetic person.

th ti “In the scenes in After Life where you can see him with his wife in old videos, you can see what he’s lost. It’s such a wonderful relationship that they have.

“They were two people who found each other. To lose your partner like that, it’s awful. But this is the same for many, many people – and it is difficult to cope with loss like that.”

Wilton – whose most famous roles include Homily in The Borrowers, Ruth in Calendar Girls and Isobel Crawley in Downton Abbey – has become a patron of bereavement charity The Good Grief Trust as a result of her After Life role.

“It’s a very worthwhile charity, especially in these times. But it’s not just now, it’s forever. People will always need help with grief, but not everyone knows where to find it.

“We’re not very good at talking about grief in this country and it’s a great pity.That’s why it is important to be in touch with people you can talk to about it, like Anne and Tony.

That shared experience. But I can’t emphasise enough that everybody’s grief is unique to them. There’s no generalisation, everyone requires different help.

“The good thing about Good Grief is it is an umbrella for all these groups and people, to find what suits them at different times.”

Twice divorced, Wilton, who was born in Scarborough, now lives alone in London, close to her theatre producer daughter Alice Massey, and two grandchildren.

She has experienced grief first-hand, having had a stillborn son before Alice, who was never named.

Last September, her older sister Rosemary died of a Covid-related illness, leaving the star “heartbroken”.

“Luckily we were out of that period of restrictions and able to have a proper funeral,” she says. “But I know some people who went through that awful situation. A great friend of mine, the actor Geoffrey Palmer, died in November 2020 and still hasn’t had a memorial.

“He was older than me so consequently all of his contemporaries are older too, meaning his wife has had to wait. These delays area terrible, terrible thing and there is no end. There is no way grieving families can feel they have done their loved ones justice. The isolation of grieving during the lockdowns must have been unbearable.

downtown abbey dame penelope wilton

TV ROYALTY: Dame Penelope with Dame Maggie Smith in Downton Abbey (Image: ITV)

“To not be with someone when they are dying and then not to talk about it afterwards or to go to someone’s cremation and be told your son can’t sit with you, it was a terrible time.

“One can’t underestimate the emotional turmoil people went through.The poignancy of that image of the Queen sat alone at her husband’s funeral – it was terrible.

“The British are the British. I think we have certain rituals that help us with grief and if those are taken away, as they were over the last two years, it makes life very difficult.

“We used to have periods where people did mourn people.When I was a very young child, men used to wear a black band on their arm to say they had lost somebody.

“Funerals are very important, wakes are important, memorials are very important, just as weddings and christenings are.

“They are there to mark certain key times in our lives. If one cuts short those things, it makes it very difficult.”

Theatre is Wilton’s first love, having started her career at the Nottingham Playhouse in 1969 and winning an Olivier Award in 2015 after six nominations for best actress.

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Her mum Alice Travers was an acress and a tap dancer, as were her uncles Bill and Linden Travers, while her maternal grandparents owned theatres.

The impact of the pandemic on the industry she adores concerns her greatly.

“It has suffered enormously. It has been a terrible time, not just for the actors but the theatre staff – stagehands, costume designers, scenery designers. All those jobs were redundant for a time.

“We bring a lot of money into the country and that has been knocked on the head. The West End has been dead.

“There have been wonderful people like Andrew Lloyd Webber fighting for the theatre and luckily now it has been coming back.

“But there have been young people coming out of drama school with nowhere to go. It has been devastated – it can’t be underestimated.

“Hopefully I will be doing a play at the end of the year, but we don’t know what the situation will be. I’m keeping my fingers crossed.”

Luckily Wilton has been kept busy reprising one of her most adored roles as Isobel Crawley in Downton Abbey. Her character is a firm frenemy of Dame Maggie Smith’s Dowager Countess,Violet Crawley.

As an original character from 2010, having starred in all six series and both films, she said reuniting with her old friend and the rest of the cast to make the Downton

Abbey: A New Era movie last summer was very special. “We had to stay together in a hotel because of Covid, in one wing of a hotel and saw a lot of each other and we couldn’t go home on a day off.

“We had some very nice people join us this time, like Dominic West.

“The younger actors have such a work ethic and have gained such success from the show.

“I don’t think any of us anticipated what a hit it would be, not even Julian Fellowes, the creator. I thought we had signed up for three series and that would be it.

“We had no idea it would be so successful around the world.”

The film comes out in April and Wilton will also be on the big screen the same month in the war drama Operation Mincemeat, directed by John Madden, which wrapped filming in early 2020.

And she says she would jump at the chance to work with Gervais again.

He is a charming man to work for, I really enjoyed it. I’m sorry it has come to an end.

“He has an old-fashioned courtesy as a director and he has a difficult job because he is everything – writer, director, actor.

“He is an extremely clever man. I’m very lucky to have met him. I hope to work with him again. I’m not sure we’ll be doing any more After Life but there might be something else he finds for me.”

Aaron Espe – Back to the Beginning

10cc – The Things We Do For Love (W/Lyrics)

10cc – The Things We Do For Love

Death Cab For Cutie – I Will Follow You Into The Dark +Lyrics

Death Cab for Cutie – I Will Follow You into the Dark (Official Music Vi…

BBC Radio 2 My Life In A Mixtape – Ricky Gervais – Opening

After Life Season 3 Soundtrack | Back to the Beginning – AARON ESPE |

After Life

—-

After Life TV Show on Netflix: canceled or renewed?

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After Life TV Show on Netflix: canceled or renewed?

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After Life TV Show on Netflix: canceled or renewed?

World Exclusive: After Life Season 3: The First few Minutes

After Life | Season 3 Official Trailer | Netflix

episodes will be released on January 14th.

Just Three Things. Written for #Afterlife by Ricky Gervais and Andy Burrows

After Life TV Show on Netflix: canceled or renewed?
After Life TV Show on Netflix: canceled or renewed?
After Life TV Show on Netflix: canceled or renewed?
After Life TV Show on Netflix: canceled or renewed?


March 2, 2022

Ricky Gervais

London, W1F 0LE
UK

Dear Ricky,


After Life season 3 soundtrack: Every song featured in Ricky Gervais sitcom

The series finale is particularly jam-packed with recognisable tunes.

Ricky Gervais blowing an airhorn

By David Craig

Published: Friday, 14th January 2022 at 12:07 pm 

The third season of After Life launches on Netflixtoday, bringing the latest comedy project from Ricky Gervais to an emotional conclusion.

The so-called ‘sadcom’ has tackled some heavy themes during its rollercoaster run, which has seen widow Tony Johnson (Gervais) give into self-destructive tendencies as he struggles to come to terms with his wife’s tragic death.

Adding some extra heft to the most dramatic scenes are the music choices, which are usually directly relatable to the difficult situation that Tony finds himself in.

After Life season 3 features a wide range of musical acts, including legendary songwriters Bob Dylan and Cat Stevens, as well as rock bands Radiohead and Death Cab for Cutie.

For any viewers who hear something they like in the last six episodes, we’ve compiled a full list of the licensed songs in After Life season 3, of which the finale has the largest jukebox.

Read on for the full tracklist, while we also have details on the After Life cast and locations for you to peruse at your leisure.

Episode 1

The Things We Do for Love by 10cc

Back to the Beginning by Aaron Espe

Episode 2

Not Dark Yet by Bob Dylan

Who Will Sing Me Lullabies by Kate Rusby

Episode 3

Let Down by Radiohead

Episode 4

The Wind by Cat Stevens

Episode 5

Hammer and Felt by Beneath the Mountain

Episode 6

I Will Follow You Into the Dark – Death Cab for Cutie

Love Is the Answer (Single Version) by England Dan & John Ford Coley

Introspective Inquiries by Margaret Dahlberg

Mandolin Wind by Rod Stewart

Both Sides Now by Joni Mitchell

Song TitleBack to the Beginning.
SingerAaron Espe
SongwriterAaron Espe

START

Can I Go Back There Back To The Beginning Again Lyrics

Snow lightly falling on the collar of my coat
Silence lies heavy on the pines
Following our footsteps back before it gets too cold
Reaching out, I warm your hand in mine

Can I go back there, back to the beginning again?
Can I go back there, back to the beginning?
Can I go back there, back to the beginning again?
Some place back where we were just beginning?
We were just beginning

I’m sorry, son, I never told you which way you should go
I was taught you gotta learn that on your own
But now here in this moment listening to you on the phone
It occurs to me you must have felt alone

Can I go back there, back to the beginning again?
Can I go back there, back to the beginning?
Can I go back there, back to the beginning again?
Some place back where we were just beginning?
When were just beginning

Mmmm
Mmmm
Mmmm
Mmmm

Let me go back there, back to the beginning again
(Mmmm,mmmm)
Let me go back there, back to the beginning (Mmmm,mmmm)
Let me go back there, back to the beginning again
(Mmmm,mmmm)
Let me go back there, back to the beginning (Mmmm,mmmm)
Back to the beginning (Mmmm)

Mmmm

Let me make two comments on these lyrics below:

I’m sorry, son, I never told you which way you should go
I was taught you gotta learn that on your own
But now here in this moment listening to you on the phone
It occurs to me you must have felt alone
Can I go back there, back to the beginning again?

There is the obvious application to Tony missing his wife Lisa and wanting to go back to the beginning and experiencing that love relationship again. Let me point out that Ricky you believe in a secular materialist point of view that we basically are machines and you say that evolution explains our beginnings. Tony has stated this in AFTER LIFE too. Here is a response from former atheist Lee Strobel:

EVOLUTION EXPLAINS LIFE, SO GOD ISN’T NEEDED
Charles Darwin didn’t want to murder God, as he once put it. But he did.
Time magazine 1
[Evolutionary theory] is still, as it was in Darwin’s time, a highly speculative hypothesis entirely without direct factual support and very far from that self-evident axiom some of its more aggressive advocates would have us believe.

DARWIN’S ACCOMPLISHMENT
Although there was much that led up to it, I guess you could say I lost the last remnants of my faith in God during biology class in high school. So profound was the experience that I could take you back to the very seat where I was sitting when I first was taught that evolution explained the origin and development of life. The implications were clear: Charles Darwin’s theory eliminated the need for a supernatural Creator by demonstrating how naturalistic processes could account for the increasing complexity and diversity of living things.
My experience was not uncommon. Scholar Patrick Glynn has described how he took a similar path that ended up in atheism:
I embraced skepticism at an early age, when I first learned of Darwin’s theory of evolution in, of all places, Catholic grade school. It immediately occurred to me that either Darwin’s theory was true or the creation story in the Book of Genesis was true. They could not both be true, and I stood up in class and told the poor nun as much. Thus began a

long odyssey away from the devout religious belief and practice that had marked my childhood toward an increasingly secular and rationalistic outlook.6
In the popular culture, the case for evolution is generally considered shut. “Darwinism remains one of the most successful scientific theories ever promulgated,” Time magazine said in its recap of the second millennium.7 To Charles Templeton, it’s simply beyond dispute that “all life is the result of timeless evolutionary forces.”8
Biologist Francisco Ayala said Darwin’s “greatest accomplishment” was to show how the development of life is “the result of a natural process, natural selection, without any need to resort to a Creator.”9 Michael Denton, the Australian molecular biologist and physician, agreed that Darwinism “broke man’s link with God” and consequently “set him adrift in the cosmos without purpose.”10 He added:
As far as Christianity was concerned, the advent of the theory of evolution … was catastrophic…. The decline in religious belief can probably be attributed more to the propagation and advocacy by the intellectual and scientific community of the Darwinian version of evolution than to any other single factor.11
As the textbook Evolutionary Biology declares: “By coupling undirected, purposeless variation to the blind, uncaring process of natural selection, Darwin made theological or spiritual explanations of the life processes superfluous.”12 British biologist Richard Dawkins was speaking for many when he said that Darwin “made it possible to be an intellectually fulfilled atheist.”13
In fact, prominent evolutionist William Provine of Cornell University candidly conceded that if Darwinism is true, then there are five inescapable implications: there’s no evidence for God; there’s no life after death; there’s no absolute foundation for right and wrong; there’s no ultimate meaning for life; and people don’t really have free will.14
But is Darwinism true? I walked away from my formal education convinced it was. As my spiritual journey began taking me into the realm of science, however,
I started to have an increasingly uneasy feeling. Like the hair-comparison evidence in the Williamson case, did the evidence for evolution purport to prove more than it actually does?
The more I investigated the issue, the more I saw how I had glossed over significant nuances in a rush to judgment, reminiscent of the Oklahoma murder trial. When
I examined the matter thoroughly, I began to question whether the sweeping conclusions of Darwinisms are really justified by the hard scientific facts. (A similar journey, incidentally, helped lead Glynn back to faith in God.)
This is not, I soon discovered, a case of religion versus science; rather, this is an issue of science versus science. More and more biologists, biochemists, and other researchers-not just Christians-have raised serious objections to evolutionary theory in recent years, claiming that its broad inferences are sometimes based on flimsy, incomplete, or flawed data.
In other words, what looks at first blush like an airtight scientific case for evolution begins to unravel upon closer examination. New discoveries during the past thirty years have prompted an increasing number of scientists to contradict Darwin by concluding that there was an Intelligent Designer behind the creation and development of life.
“The result of these cumulative efforts to investigate the cell-to investigate life at the molecular level-is a loud, clear, piercing cry of `design!”‘ biochemist Michael Belie of Lehigh University said in his groundbreaking critique of Darwinism. 15 He went on to say:

The conclusion of intelligent design flows naturally from the data itself-not from sacred books or sectarian beliefs…. The reluctance of science to embrace the conclusion of intelligent design . . . has no justifiable foundation…. Many people, including many important and well-respected scientists, just don’t want there to be anything beyond nature.”
That last sentence described me. I was more than happy to latch onto Darwinism as an excuse to jettison the idea of God so I could unabashedly pursue my own agenda in life without moral constraints.
Yet someone who knows me well once described me as being “a sucker for the truth.”17 My training in journalism and law compels me to dig beneath opinion, speculation, and theories, all the way down until I hit the bedrock of solid facts. And try as I might, I couldn’t turn my back on nagging inconsistencies that were undermining the foundation of Darwin’s theory.

Click to access Case_for_+Faith.pdf

The answer to find meaning in life is found in putting your faith and trust in Jesus Christ. The Bible is true from cover to cover and can be trusted.

Thanks for your time.

Sincerely,

Everette Hatcher, everettehatcher@gmail.comhttp://www.thedailyhatch.org, cell ph 501-920-5733, 13900 Cottontail Lane, Alexander, AR 72002

PS: Try out the film series HOW SHOULD WE THEN LIVE? by Francis Schaeffer on You Tube. It shows how Humanism has been to blame for many of the problems in the western world in the 
past and the alternative worldview of Biblical Christianity.

Francis Schaeffer pictured above


Taking on Ark Times Bloggers on various issues Part I “Old Testament Bible Prophecy” includes the film TRUTH AND HISTORY and article ” Jane Roe became pro-life”

April 12, 2013 – 5:45 am

I have gone back and forth and back and forth with many liberals on the Arkansas Times Blog on many issues such as abortion, human rights, welfare, poverty, gun control  and issues dealing with popular culture. Here is another exchange I had with them a while back. My username at the Ark Times Blog is Saline […]By Everette Hatcher III | Posted in Biblical ArchaeologyFrancis SchaefferProlife | Edit|Comments (0)

John MacArthur on fulfilled prophecy from the Bible Part 2

August 8, 2013 – 1:28 am

I have posted many of the sermons by John MacArthur. He is a great bible teacher and this sermon below is another great message. His series on the Book of Proverbs was outstanding too.  I also have posted several of the visits MacArthur made to Larry King’s Show. One of two most popular posts I […]By Everette Hatcher III | Posted in Adrian RogersCurrent Events | Edit|Comments (0)

John MacArthur on fulfilled prophecy from the Bible Part 1

August 6, 2013 – 1:24 am

I have posted many of the sermons by John MacArthur. He is a great bible teacher and this sermon below is another great message. His series on the Book of Proverbs was outstanding too.  I also have posted several of the visits MacArthur made to Larry King’s Show. One of two most popular posts I […]By Everette Hatcher III | Posted in Adrian RogersCurrent Events |Tagged Bible Prophecyjohn macarthur | Edit|Comments (0)

John MacArthur: Fulfilled prophecy in the Bible? (Ezekiel 26-28 and the story of Tyre, video clips)

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Prophecy–The Biblical Prophesy About Tyre.mp4 Uploaded by TruthIsLife7 on Dec 5, 2010 A short summary of the prophecy about Tyre and it’s precise fulfillment. Go to this link and watch the whole series for the amazing fulfillment from secular sources. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qvt4mDZUefo________________ John MacArthur on the amazing fulfilled prophecy on Tyre and how it was fulfilled […]By Everette Hatcher III | Posted in Biblical Archaeology | Edit|Comments (1)

John MacArthur on the Bible and Science (Part 2)

August 1, 2013 – 12:10 am

John MacArthur on the Bible and Science (Part 2) I have posted many of the sermons by John MacArthur. He is a great bible teacher and this sermon below is another great message. His series on the Book of Proverbs was outstanding too.  I also have posted several of the visits MacArthur made to Larry […]By Everette Hatcher III | Posted in Current Events | Edit|Comments (0)

John MacArthur on the Bible and Science (Part 1)

July 30, 2013 – 1:32 am

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Adrian Rogers: “Why I believe the Bible is true”

July 9, 2013 – 8:38 am

Adrian Rogers – How you can be certain the Bible is the word of God Great article by Adrian Rogers. What evidence is there that the Bible is in fact God’s Word? I want to give you five reasons to affirm the Bible is the Word of God. First, I believe the Bible is the […]By Everette Hatcher III | Posted in Adrian RogersBiblical Archaeology | Edit|Comments (0)

The Old Testament is Filled with Fulfilled Prophecy by Jim Wallace

June 24, 2013 – 9:47 am

Is there any evidence the Bible is true? Articles By PleaseConvinceMe Apologetics Radio The Old Testament is Filled with Fulfilled Prophecy Jim Wallace A Simple Litmus Test There are many ways to verify the reliability of scripture from both internal evidences of transmission and agreement, to external confirmation through archeology and science. But perhaps the […]By Everette Hatcher III | Posted in Biblical ArchaeologyCurrent Events | Edit|Comments (0)

Taking on Ark Times Bloggers on various issues Part M “Old Testament prophecy fulfilled?”Part 3(includes film DEATH BY SOMEONE’S CHOICE)

April 19, 2013 – 1:52 am

  I have gone back and forth and back and forth with many liberals on the Arkansas Times Blog on many issues such as abortion, human rights, welfare, poverty, gun control  and issues dealing with popular culture. Here is another exchange I had with them a while back. My username at the Ark Times Blog is […]By Everette Hatcher III | Posted in Francis SchaefferProlife | Edit|Comments (0)

Evidence for the Bible

March 27, 2013 – 9:43 pm

Here is some very convincing evidence that points to the view that the Bible is historically accurate. Archaeological and External Evidence for the Bible Archeology consistently confirms the Bible! Archaeology and the Old Testament Ebla tablets—discovered in 1970s in Northern Syria. Documents written on clay tablets from around 2300 B.C. demonstrate that personal and place […]By Everette Hatcher III | Posted in Biblical Archaeology | E

On Saturday April 18, 2020 at 6pm in London and noon in Arkansas, I had a chance to ask Ricky Gervais a question on his Twitter Live broadcast which was  “Is Tony a Nihilist?” At the 20:51 mark Ricky answers my question. Below is the video:

Ricky Gervais 25/07/2021 Facebook Live at 28:29 mark Ricky answers my question about Sam Harris

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