FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE Part 401 Schaeffer discusses the character of James Bond SPOILER ALERT Looking at sacrifice Bond is willing to make to protect others! Featured artist is John Akomfrah

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Francis Schaeffer talked about popular culture and I have access to hundreds of his talks from the 1960’s and he commented in one of those recordings that Sean Connery had a villa close to where Schaeffer lived in Switzerland. In that same talk  in 1966 Schaeffer went on to discuss an analysis of James Bond that found interesting.

James Bond faces the irony in life in the movie NO TIME TO DIE. That is why the choice of the Louis Armstrong song We Have All The Time in the World was so brilliant to close the film. More on that later. Now let us summarize NO TIME TO DIE (Watch out SPOILER ALERT):

‘No Time to Die’ Ending Explained: Daniel Craig’s Grand Finale

Warning: This article contains major spoilers for “No Time to Die.”

Daniel Craig’s tenure as James Bond comes to an end in “No Time to Die,” the newest Bond film that makes some of the most ambitious moves of the entire franchise. Indeed, “No Time to Die” is a groundbreaking Bond film in a lot of ways, but it also brings the arc of Craig’s character to a close in satisfying, conclusive fashion — unlike most of his predecessors.

The plot of “No Time to Die” is complicated to say the least, but the film picks up where we left off with “Spectre” as Bond and Dr. Madeline Swan (Lea Seydoux) are trying to live a peaceful life of retirement. But when Bond is attacked by Spectre, he suspects Swan has double-crossed him and pushes her out of his life for good. Or so he thinks.

The film’s opening scene explains how Swan is connected to Rami Malek’s villain Lyutsifer Safin – he’s the man who came to Madeline’s house when she was a child, looking for Madeline’s father Mr. White. But when he only found Madeline and her mother, he killed Madeline’s mother and spared the child’s life.

This comes full circle as the film flashes forward five years after Bond and Swan broke up, and Safin is now a bioterrorist in possession of a biological weapon that, when released, can target specific individuals’ DNA. It’s used in “No Time to Die” to kill every member of Spectre while leaving innocent bystanders in the room unharmed. But as we barrel towards the movie’s conclusion at Safin’s island lair – where he’s holding Madeline and her young daughter Mathilde (surprise!) hostage – Safrin reveals his intention to unleash the weapon on the world at large, plunging it into chaos.

A Ticking Clock

MGM

Bond descends upon Safin’s lair and manages to get Madeline and Mathilde out safely (with help from Lashana Lynch’s Nomi aka the new 007), but he stays behind to ensure that missiles that M (Ralph Fiennes) fires from nearby ships will destroy the lair for good. In order for the missiles to wipe out every trace of the bioweapon before it’s unleashed, Bond has to open the blast doors from a control room.

With Q’s (Ben Whishaw) help, Bond manages to get the doors open, only for Safin to close them again. The clock is ticking as the missiles have already been launched, and Bond and Safin get into a fist fight during which Safin breaks a vile of the bioweapon on Bond’s head. Safin reveals that this is a version of the bioweapon tied directly to Madeline’s DNA, which means that if Bond comes into contact with Madeline or Mathilde, he’ll kill them instantly.

Bond shoots Safin, and now resigned to his fate makes his way back to the control room to open the blast doors again. He confirms with Q that once exposed to the bioweapon, it cannot be cleaned off – it’s “eternal” in Q’s own words. He cannot leave this island alive.

Q patches Bond in to speak with Madeline one last time, who immediately understands there’s no coming back. The two share a tearful goodbye, and we watch as Daniel Craig’s Bond stares out at the ocean while missiles rain down on him.

Yes indeed, “No Time to Die” marks a first for the franchise in that it literally kills off James Bond. Craig’s character makes the ultimate sacrifice, and the scenes that follow – a eulogyand a final goodbye from Madeline and Mathilde – make clear that James Bond is dead. It’s an ambitious move, but one that the film makes skillfully.

Since “Casino Royale,” Craig’s Bond has been a different breed from his predecessors. A more empathetic, more thoughtful, more vulnerable iteration of the character. To that end, a selfless sacrifice makes perfect sense as an ending. We’ve watched Craig’s Bond try to peacefully retire multiple times now, only to always get pulled back into another scheme. Always looking for a happy ending, never finding it. This time he didn’t get near enough time to spend with his family, but his sacrifice ensures they’ll have – in his words – all the time in the world.

Another major twist in “No Time to Die” involves the revelation that James Bond may or may not have a daughter. When Mathilde is first revealed in the third act, Madeline insists she’s not James’ daughter. But Bond is smarter than that, and immediately points out her blue eyes.

The film doesn’t try to hide the true nature of Bond’s relationship to Mathilde, and Madeline confirms once and for all that he’s the father during their final phone call together, just moments before Bond dies. So yes, while it’s slightly ambiguous throughout, Mathilde is James Bond’s daughter.

The deeply romantic and tragic nature of “No Time to Die,” while effective, is not entirely new to the franchise. 1969’s “On Her Majesty’s Secret Service” found Bond falling in love with a woman named Tracy (Diana Rigg) and going so far as to get married to her, only for Blofeld to return at the very end of the film and kill her. George Lazenby’s Bond is devastated, and while cradling her lifeless body he says to a police officer, “There’s no hurry, you see. We have all the time in the world.”

In “No Time to Die,” Bond tells Madeline that she and Mathilde have “all the time in the world” during their final phone call, and the Louis Armstrong song “All the Time in the World” plays over the end credits of the film. “No Time to Die” even foreshadows a tragic ending as composer John Barry’s theme “We Have All the Time in the World” from “On Her Majesty’s Secret Service” is a recurring motif throughout Hans Zimmer’s score for “No Time to Die.”

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So James Bond sacrifices his life to save others. This reminds me of the prophetic words of Caiaphas. Here is his story:

Who Was Caiaphas, the Official at the Trial of Jesus?

By Wayne Jackson

Caiaphas, an important official in the city of Jerusalem, is mentioned nine times by name in the New Testament (Mt. 26:3,57; Lk. 3:2; Jn. 11:49; 18:13,14,24,28; Acts 4:6).

Next to Pilate, the Roman governor, Caiaphas was the most powerful dignitary in Judea. He served for eighteen years (A.D. 18-36) as an appointee of the Roman government. This unusually long administration reveals that he was a skillful politician.

There are several significant matters to be considered in connection with this man.

The Enemy of Christ

Caiaphas was a vicious enemy of Jesus. Following the resurrection of Lazarus, as some of the Jewish leaders began to sense the impact of Christ’s miracles, a council was convened. The fear was expressed that if the Lord was simply ignored the whole populous might be swept away with this mania, and that could bring the Romans down upon them (Jn. 11:47, 48). It was Caiaphas who suggested that there was a solution —put this man to death (49-53). [Note: It is one of the major ironies of history that this very “solution” was that which brought about the end of the Hebrew nation (cf. Mt. 21:33-44; 22:1-7).]

The scheme to kill Jesus was vigorously discussed in “the court of the high priest, who was called Caiaphas” (Mt. 26:3), and when the Lord was later arrested, he was led to Caiaphas’ house (26:57; cf. Jn. 18:24). It was he who fiercely interrogated Christ, charging the Savior with blasphemy. This fueled the crowd to a feverish pitch and ultimately brought about the Lord’s death (cf. Mt. 26:62ff).

After the establishment of the church, Caiaphas was a persecutor of Christians (cf. Acts 4:6ff). Hendriksen was quite accurate when he described this high priest as

“a rude and sly manipulator, an opportunist, who did not know the meaning of fairness or justice and who was bent on having his own way ‘by hook or by crook’” (163).

The Prophecy

In view of the abominable character of this wretch, it is a surprise when one notes that Caiaphas, on one occasion, is said to have “prophesied.” When the suggestion was made that the influence of Jesus imperiled the nation, Caiaphas declared:

“You know nothing at all, nor do you take account that it is expedient for you that one man should die for the people, and that the whole nation perish not.”

The inspired writer adds:

“Now this he said not of himself: but being high priest that year, he prophesied that Jesus should die for the nation; and not for the nation only, but that he might also gather together into one the children of God that are scattered abroad” (Jn. 11:49-52).

There are several important points here.

First, in his own inexplicable fashion, God was able to use the mouth of a corrupt ruler to declare a divine truth. Caiaphas meant his utterance for evil, but Jehovah so ordered the words that they expressed a magnificent truth (cf. Gen. 50:20).

Second, the statement heralded the doctrine of the atoning death of Jesus. It was said that “one man should die for (huper) the people….” The Greek preposition huper literally means “over.” Out of that concept grew the sense of protection or defense (Robertson, 630). Thus, Jesus was to die “on behalf of,” or “for the benefit of,” others. Without him, there is no salvation.

Next, John also notes that the Lord’s death would result in redemption being offered universally, i.e., to the Jewish “nation,” and to “the [potential] children of God that are scattered abroad” (Gentiles).

Finally, all who submit to Christ (Heb. 5:8-9) are to be “gathered together into one” (i.e., body, church —Eph. 4:4; 1:22-23).

Archaeology

In 1990, just south of Jerusalem, a Jewish burial cave was accidentally discovered. When the cave was finally entered, archaeologists found several limestone ossuaries (boxes containing bones). One of these contained the remnants of several persons, including those of a man about sixty years of age. The box was elaborately decorated, suggesting that it housed the remains of someone important.

On the exterior were these words, “Joseph, son of Caiaphas,” or, as scholars suggest the meaning may be, “Joseph of the family of Caiaphas.” “Caiaphas” was apparently a family nickname. According to Josephus, the high priest who succeeded Annas was “Joseph Caiaphas” (Antiquities, 18.2.2; 18.4.3).

Ronny Reich, of the Israel Antiquities Authority, suggests that these bones are “in all probability” the bones of that same high priest who prosecuted Jesus Christ (30). Now, he awaits judgment!

Works Cited
  • Chilton, Bruce. 1992. The Anchor Bible Dictionary. Vol. 1. David Noel Freedman, Ed. New York, NY: Doubleday.
  • Foakes-Jackson, F. J. 1931. The Acts of the Apostles. New York, NY: Harper & Bros.
  • Harrison, Everett F. 1975. Acts: The Expanding Church. Chicago, IL: Moody.
  • Hendriksen, William. 1954. The Gospel According to John. Vol. II. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker.
  • Lewis, Jack P. 1976. The Gospel According to Matthew. Vol. II. Austin, TX: Sweet Publishing Co.
  • Reich, Ronnie. 1992. Biblical Archaeology Review. Sep/Oct.
  • Robertson, A. T. 1914. Historical Grammar of the Greek New Testament. London: Hodder & Stoughton.
Scripture References

Matthew 26:3, 57; Luke 3:2; John 11:49, 18:13, 14, 24, 28; Acts 4:6; John 11:49, 18:13; John 18:13; John 11:47, 48; Matthew 21:33-44, 22:1-7; Matthew 26:3; John 18:24; Matthew 26:62; John 11:49-52; Genesis 50:20; Hebrews 5:8-9; Ephesians 4:4, 1:22-23


James Bond lays down his life to protect others. Sadly in this life we live in a fallen world and it appears that UNDER THE SUN (without God in the picture) that might makes right and that is what Bond has been dealing with in these films filled with little Hitlers!

Francis Schaeffer discussed this situation in his commentary on ECCLESIASTES:

Oppressed have no comforter

Ecclesiastes 4:1

 Then I looked again at all the acts of oppression which were being done under the sun. And behold I saw the tears of the oppressed and that they had no one to comfort them; and on the side of their oppressors was power, but they had no one to comfort them.

Between birth and death power rules. Solomon looked over his kingdom and also around the world and proclaimed that right does not rule but power rules.

Ecclesiastes 7:14-15

14 In the day of prosperity be happy, but in the day of adversity consider—God has made the one as well as the other so that man will not discover anything that will be after him.

15 I have seen everything during my lifetime of futility; there is a righteous man who perishes in his righteousness and there is a wicked man who prolongs his life in his wickedness.

Ecclesiastes 8:14

14 There is futility which is done on the earth, that is, there are righteous men to whom it happens according to the deeds of the wicked. On the other hand, there are evil men to whom it happens according to the deeds of the righteous. I say that this too is futility.

We could say it in 20th century language, “The books are not balanced in this life.”

In the above review of NO TIME TO DIE the reviewer noted:

The deeply romantic and tragic nature of “No Time to Die,” while effective, is not entirely new to the franchise. 1969’s “On Her Majesty’s Secret Service” found Bond falling in love with a woman named Tracy (Diana Rigg) and going so far as to get married to her, only for Blofeld to return at the very end of the film and kill her. George Lazenby’s Bond is devastated, and while cradling her lifeless body he says to a police officer, “There’s no hurry, you see. We have all the time in the world.”

In “No Time to Die,” Bond tells Madeline that she and Mathilde have “all the time in the world” during their final phone call, and the Louis Armstrong song “All the Time in the World” plays over the end credits of the film. “No Time to Die” even foreshadows a tragic ending as composer John Barry’s theme “We Have All the Time in the World” from “On Her Majesty’s Secret Service” is a recurring motif throughout Hans Zimmer’s score for “No Time to Die.”

Louis Armstrong – We Have All The Time in The World – 007 At Her Majesty…

We Have All the Time in the World” is a James Bond theme and popular song sung by Louis Armstrong. Its music was composed by John Barryand the lyrics by Hal David. It is a secondary musical theme in the 1969 Bond film On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, the title theme being the instrumental “On Her Majesty’s Secret Service”, also composed by Barry. The song title is taken from Bond’s final words in both the novel and the film, spoken after the death of Tracy Bond, his wife. Armstrong was too ill to play his trumpet therefore it was played by another musician.[1] Barry chose Armstrong because he felt he could “deliver the title line with irony”.[2]

We Have All The Time In The WorldSong by Louis Armstrong We have all the time in the world
Time enough for life to unfold
All the precious things love has in store
We have all the love in the world
If that’s all we have, you will find
We need nothing moreEvery step of the way will find us
With the cares of the world far behind usWe have all the time in the world
Just for love
Nothing more, nothing less
Only loveEvery step of the way will find us
With the cares of the world far behind us, yesWe have all the time in the world
Just for love
Nothing more, nothing less
Only loveOnly Love 
Louis Armstrong – We Have All The Time in The World – 007 At Her Majesty…

Francis Schaeffer in 1966 had a discussion on James Bond.

The most famous of this kind of thing today in cinema is James Bond. Fortunately we have an expert 

Bringing John Le Carre In From The Cold

Question and answer with John le Carre author of The Spy Who Came in from the Cold.

Timothy Dalton played Bond twice, in 1987 and 1989

INTERVIEWER: But your style goes deeper than this. You have developed what I suppose we can best describe as the anti-hero, haven’t you?
I don’t quite believe in the notion of the anti-hero…Since then something else has emerged , something very interesting . That is the James Bond kind of hero . I call this the consumergoods hero. This is the man who surrounds himself with all the things which are technique—with charms of super cars, super and expendable girls, with cigarette lighters that go off with a bang, with everything which in artistic terms replaces love or emotion. 

Connery in Amsterdam in July 1971, filming Diamonds Are Forever

Smiling man with short, tousled hair, wearing white shirt open at collar, and black jacket.

Pierce Brosnan at the 2002 Cannes Film Festival

(Schaeffer states ”Let me read it again.”) with everything which in artistic terms replaces love or emotion. (Schaeffer “There is no place in James Bond for love or emotion. John Le carrie is absolutely right in this.)

Australian actor George Lazenby and Diana Riggin On Her Majesty’s Secret Service

Daniel Craig at the Berlin premiere of Spectre in October 2015

You could take James Bond on that magic carpet and, given the prerequisites of the affluent society, given above all an identifiable villain of whatever kind—and weak people need enemies—you could dump him in the middle of Moscow and you would get a ready-made Soviet agent. I find him in this sense extremely cosmopolitan. He is an Etonian and so on, but in fact he seems to me to correspond more to the kind of international manager type—the young rich fellow of thirty-eight or thirty-nine who has discovered that promiscuity is one of the privileges of wealth; who has developed a pretty hard-nosed cynicism towards any sense of moral obligation.

Roger Moore in 1973, photographed by Allan Warren

bond old

I have been a James Bond since the 1970’s and have watched all the James Bond movies ever made. I have posted many times on James Bond and on the actors like Roger Moore who have played James Bond.

Sean Connery as James Bond in Dr. No (1962)

Sean Connery James Bond

I have especially enjoyed doing posts on the many songs that the James Bond films have created such as Shirley Bassey –Goldfinger (1964), Moonraker (1979), Diamonds are Forever (1971), Nancy Sinatra – You Only Live Twice (1967), Carly Simon – Nobody Does It Better (1977), Sheena Easton – For Your Eyes Only (1981), Garbage – The World Is Not Enough (1999), Duran Duran – A View To A Kill (1985), Louis Armstrong – We Have All The Time in the World (1969) also used in NO TIME TO DIE (2021), Matt Monro – From Russia With Love (1963), Adele – Skyfall (2012), Sheryl Crow – Tomorrow Never Dies (1997), Chris Cornell – You Know My Name (2006), Paul McCartney & Wings – Live and Let Die (1973), Sam Smith – Writing’s On The Wall (2015), Tom Jones – Thunderball (1965), A-ha – The Living Daylights (1987), Tina Turner – GoldenEye (1995), Madonna – Die Another Day (2002), and finally Billie Eilish – No Time To Die (2020).

(Daniel Craig starred as James Bond in NO TIME TO DIE)

When I think of James Bond’s life I think of someone who is willing to kill when necessary, and it causes him to drink heavily to deal with it. At the same time James Bond is a man who is filled with humor and he laughs at the ironies in life.

Also Bond loves freedom and is willing to sacrifice himself in the defense of it. Of course, his faults can not be overlooked and one of his biggest is womanizing. That is why I have compared James Bond to King Solomon in ECCLESIASTES searching for satisfaction in life. Also a sermon I heard by Adrian Rogers on Ecclesiastes got me interested in the book.

Image result for king solomon


(Adrian Rogers 1931-2005 pictured below)

Image result for young adrian rogers

Francis and Edith Schaeffer

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File:Francis Schaeffer.jpg
(Francis Schaeffer)

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james-bond-no-time-to-die-b25-05907-rc

Daniel Craig’s James Bond: 2006-2021MGM

John Akomfrah: Conversations with Noise | Art21 “Extended Play”

FEATURED ARTIST IS

John Akomfrah

John Akomfrah was born in Accra, Ghana, in 1957. A pioneering filmmaker, Akomfrah creates multichannel video installations that critically examine the legacy of colonialism, the Black diaspora, and environmental degradation. Akomfrah weaves together original footage with archival material to create stirring, layered narratives that juxtapose personal and historical memory, past and present, and environmental and human crises.

During a period of political and social unrest in 1980s England, Akomfrah co-founded the Black Audio Film Collective, a group that developed a groundbreaking experimental style to center Black identity and culture within the British experience. Their celebrated works, such as Expeditions One: Signs of Empire (1983) and Handsworth Songs (1986), are deeply critical portrayals of modern Britain that use archival, newsreel, and original imagery to contextualize civil unrest as the result of a long history of discrimination and suppression of Black citizens by British society. By 1998, Black Audio Film Collective disbanded, but Akomfrah continued making art with two founding members, Lina Gopaul and David Lawson. Since then, Akomfrah has developed his signature multilayered filmic style, creating enormous, multichannel video installations with soundtracks of haunting musical compositions and readings from historical texts. His epic films draw connections across time, history, and themes, poetically weaving together topics such as the cruelty of the whaling industry and the Atlantic slave trade (Vertigo Sea, 2015); the effects of climate change on humans and our ecological landscapes (Purple, 2017); and the wave of recent refugees from Africa, declining elephant populations, and Ghana’s layered political history (Four Nocturnes, 2019).

Akomfrah studied sociology at Portsmouth Polytechnic in Portsmouth, England. His numerous awards include the Artes Mundi Prize (2017); honorary doctorates from Portsmouth University (2014), University of the Arts, London (2013), and Goldsmiths, London (2013); Officer of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (2008); and the Taipei Golden Lion, Taipei Film Festival, Taiwan (1999). He has had solo exhibitions at Seattle Art Museum, Washington (2020); Secession, Vienna, Austria (2020); Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, Massachusetts (2019); Museu Coleção Berardo, Lisbon, Portugal (2018); New Museum, New York (2018); San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, California (2018); National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC (2017); Turner Contemporary, Margate, England (2016); Tate Britain, London, England (2013); Institute of Contemporary Arts, London, England (2012); Museum of Modern Art, New York (2011), and others. His work has also been included the Venice Biennale, Italy (2015, 2019); Prospect, New Orleans, Louisiana (2017); Sharjah Biennial, United Arab Emirates (2013); Sundance Film Festival, Utah (2011, 2013); Liverpool Biennial, England (2012): Taipei Biennial, Taiwan (2012); Documenta, Kassel, Germany (2002); Cannes International Film Festival, France (1989); among others. Akomfrah lives and works in London.

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