FRANCIS SCHAEFFER ANALYZES ART AND CULTURE PART 251  Rolling Stones  “Rocks Off” (Featured artist is Michael Ray Charles )

In the 1960’s there was a generation that took drugs because philosophically they thought it was leading to an answer, but then when the violence entered in at the Rolling Stones Altamont concert in 1970 when a person was stabbed to death, the age of innocence ended. What is left at this point? More drugs were used but only to kill the pain. Where do people turn for answers at this point? In the song ROCKS OFF it appears that the Rolling Stones moved to their hopes to the night when they are dreaming. It seems that excessive sex does nothing to satisfy a person (see the song I CAN’T GET NO SATISFACTION too).

Image result for rolling stones rocks off song meaning

Rolling Stones – Rocks Off (1972)

  • Oh yeah
  • I hear you talking when I’m on the street
  • Your mouth don’t move but I can hear you speak
  • What’s the matter with the boy?
  • He don’t come around no more
  • Is he checking out for sure?
  • Is he gonna close the door on me?
  • I’m always hearing voices on the street
  • I want to shout, but I can’t hardly speak
  • I was making love last night
  • To a dancer friend of mine
  • I can’t seem to stay in step
  • ‘Cause she come ev’ry time that she pirouettes over me
  • And I only get my rocks off while I’m dreaming
  • I only get my rocks off while I’m sleeping
  • I’m zipping through the days at lightning speed
  • Plug in, flush out and fire the f@$kin’ feed
  • Heading for the overload
  • Splattered on the dirty road
  • Kick me like you’ve kicked before
  • I can’t even feel the pain no more
  • But I only get my rocks off while I’m dreaming
  • (only get them off)
  • I only get my rocks off while I’m sleeping
  • (only get them off)
  • I feel so hypnotized, can’t describe the scene
  • Its all mesmerized all that inside me
  • The sunshine bores the daylights out of me
  • Chasing shadows moonlight mystery
  • Headed for the overload
  • Splattered on the dirty road
  • Kick me like you’ve kicked before
  • I can’t even feel the pain no more
  • But I only get my rocks off while I’m dreaming
  • (only get them off, get them off)
  • I only get my rocks off while I’m sleeping
  • (only get them off, get them off)
General Comment
To me this song is at once celebratory and miserable & jaded. 

The singer of the song has led a life of such excess that things that were once great fun now just don't do anything for him. In fact he's so jaded that even things that used to cause him pain don't make him feel anything anymore.

His only escape, his only way of getting any kind of 'satisfaction' is to escape into his dreams, into sleep. 

God, what a  horrible thing to have happen to you. And yet, somehow the song, the music, seems so celebratory, maybe ironically so. I dunno, it's a really great song though, pretty mature thinking.
flyingroboton June 17, 2004   Link
Image result for francis schaeffer

Francis A. Schaeffer  wrote something about the ROLLING STONES:
At about the same time as the Berkeley Free Speech Move- 
ment came a heavy participation in drugs. The beats had not 
been deeply into drugs the way the hippies were. But soon 
after 1964 the drug scene became the hallmark of young 
people.
The philosophic basis for the drug scene came from Aldous 
Huxley's concept that, since, for the rationalist, reason is not 
taking us anywhere, we should look for a final experience, one 
that can be produced "on call," one that we do not need to 
wait for. The drug scene, in other words, was at first an ideol- 
ogy, an ideology that had very practical consequences. Some of 
us at L'Abri have cried over the young people who have blown 
their minds. But many of them thought, like Alan Watts, Gary 
Snyder, Alan Ginsberg and Timothy Leary, that if you could 
simply turn everyone on, there would be an answer to man's 
longings. It wasn't just the far-out freaks who suggested that 
you could put drugs in the drinking water and turn on a whole 
city so that the "pigs" and the kids would all have flowers in 
their hair. In those days it really was an optimistic ideological 
concept. 

So two things have to be said here. FIRST, the young people's 
analysis of culture was right, and, SECOND, they really thought 
they had an answer to the problem. Up through Woodstock 
(1969) the YOUNG PEOPLE WERE OPTIMISTIC CONCERNING DRUGS-- 
BEING THE IDEOLOGICAL ANSWER. The desire for community and 
togetherness that was the impetus for Woodstock was not wrong, of course. God has made us in his own image, and he 
means for us to be in a strong horizontal relationship with each 
other. While Christianity appeals and applies to the individual, 
it is not individualistic. God means for us to have community. 
There are really two orthodoxies: an orthodoxy of doctrine 
and an orthodoxy of community, and both go together. So the 
longing for community in Woodstock was right. But the path 
was wrong. 

AFTER WOODSTOCK TWO EVENTS "ENDED THE AGE OF INNOCENCE," 
to use the expression of Rolling Stone magazine. The FIRST 
occurred at Altamont, California, where the ROLLING STONES put 
on a festival and hired the Hell's Angels (for several barrels of 
beer) to police the grounds. Instead, the Hell's Angels killed 
people without any cause, and it was a bad scene indeed. But 
people thought maybe this was a fluke, maybe it was just 
California! IT TOOK A SECOND EVENT TO BE CONVINCING. 

On the Isle of Wight, 450,000 people assembled, and it was 
totally ugly. A number of people from L'Abri were there, and I 
know a man closely associated with the rock world who knows 
the organizer of this festival. Everyone agrees that the situation 
was just plain hideous. 

THUS, AFTER THESE TWO ROCK FESTIVALS THE PICTURE CHANGED. IT IS  
NOT THAT KIDS HAVE STOPPED TAKING DRUGS, FOR MORE ARE TAKING  
DRUGS ALL THE TIME. And what the eventual outcome will be is 
certainly unpredictable. I know that in many places, California 
for example, drugs are down through the high schools and on 
into the heads of ten- and eleven-year-olds. But drugs are not 
considered a philosophic expression anymore; among the very 
young they are just a peer group thing. It's like permissive 
sexuality. You have to sleep with a certain number of boys or 
you're not in; you have to take a certain kind of drug or you're 
not in. THE OPTIMISTIC IDEOLOGY HAS DIED. 

XXXXXXXXXXXX

XXXXXXX

_

Featured artist is Michael Ray Charles

Michael Ray Charles

Michael Ray Charles was born in 1967 in Lafayette, Louisiana, and graduated from McNeese State University in Lake Charles, Louisiana, in 1985. In college, he studied advertising design and illustration, eventually moving to painting, his preferred medium. Charles also received an MFA degree from the University of Houston in 1993. His graphically styled paintings investigate racial stereotypes drawn from a history of American advertising, product packaging, billboards, radio jingles, and television commercials.

Charles draws comparisons between Sambo, Mammy, and minstrel images of an earlier era and contemporary mass-media portrayals of black youths, celebrities, and athletes—images he sees as a constant in the American subconscious. “Stereotypes have evolved,” he notes. “I’m trying to deal with present and past stereotypes in the context of today’s society.” Caricatures of African-American experience, such as Aunt Jemima, are represented in Charles’s work as ordinary depictions of blackness, yet are stripped of the benign aura that lends them an often-unquestioned appearance of truth. Charles says, “Aunt Jemima is just an image, but it almost automatically becomes a real person for many people, in their minds. But there’s a difference between these images and real humans.” In each of his paintings, notions of beauty, ugliness, nostalgia, and violence emerge and converge, reminding us that we cannot divorce ourselves from a past that has led us to where we are, who we have become, and how we are portrayed. Charles lives in Texas and teaches at the University of Texas at Austin.

_


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