MUSIC MONDAY:Foreigner’s connection to Amy Winehouse (Great song by Lou)

The Lou Gramm Band – You Saved Me (great song)

Uploaded by on May 2, 2011

This song is taken from The Lou Gramm Band (LGB – 2009).

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The Lou Gramm Band – I Wanna Testify (great song)

Uploaded by on May 2, 2011

This song is taken from The Lou Gramm Band (LGB – 2009).

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The Lou Gramm Band – So Great

Uploaded by on May 2, 2011

This song is taken from The Lou Gramm Band (LGB – 2009).

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Foreigner-Feels Like The First Time

Foreigner guitarist Mick Jones wrote this song. He told us: “‘I Want To Know What Love Is’ started off on more of a personal level. I’d been through a lot of relationships that eventually failed, and still searching for something that could really endure. And that sort of took a life of its own as well. It became more of a universal feeling. I adjusted that during the recording of it, and ended up putting a gospel choir on it. And you know, realized suddenly that I’d written almost a spiritual song, almost a gospel song. Sometimes, you feel like you had nothing to do with it, really. You’re just putting it down on paper, or coming up with a melody that will bring the meaning of the song out, bring the emotion out in the song.”Jones’ relationship that sparked the song was with his then future wife Ann Dexter-Jones. Ann Dexter-Jones had previously been married to Laurence Ronson, a music publisher who discovered the British group Bucks Fizz. Their oldest child is the successful producer Mark Ronson, the man behind Amy Winehouse’s Back To Black album. Jones raised Ronson from the age of 7, providing a rich musical environment that led to his success. On Foreigner’s 2009 album Can’t Slow Down, Ronson produced a new version of Foreigner’s 1977 track “Fool For You Anyway.”

The New Jersey Mass Choir was brought in to sing the backing vocals. It was their first performance in a recording studio. The New Jersey Mass Choir released its own version of the song, which peaked at #37.

 

Foreigner recorded for Atlantic Records, and their 1981 album 4 spent more weeks at #1 than any album released by the label. Ahmet Ertegun, who was the head of Atlantic, cried when he first heard this song. Mick Jones explains: “Part of my dream at the beginning was to be on Atlantic Records, because of the heritage: all the R&B stars of the ’50s, people like Ray Charles and Aretha Franklin. It meant so much to me and my growing up in music. So it meant a lot to have Ahmet Ertegun, who had been a part of that magical era and a person who I respected and looked up to, come into the studio. I took him aside and I said, ‘I have a song to play you, Ahmet.’ I took him into the studio, and we just sat there in two chairs, and I put the song on. Halfway through I looked over and indeed, there were tears coming out of his eyes. I thought, Whoa, this is a major moment for me. I’ve been able to impress this man who has heard some of the best, and produced some of the best music in the world. And here he is, and I’ve reached him emotionally. By the end of the song we were both in tears. Wonderful moments like that, they’re just very meaningful.”

 

Jennifer Holliday sang backup. She is an R&B singer who has sung for Michael Jackson, Luther Vandross, and Barbra Streisand, among others. She starred in the play Dreamgirls.

 

Most of Foreigner’s songs were co-written by Jones and their lead singer Lou Gramm, but this was a solo composition for Jones, and a song that was not met with enthusiasm by Gramm, who felt it might push the band into Adult Contemporary territory and away from their Rock base. Jones spoke to Billboard magazine about Lou Gramm’s reservations over this song: “If you look at our whole history, each album had a couple of ballads on it. I think that Lou aired his opinion about it at the time, and that’s what led to people jumping on it as a reason for our differences. But I can never really think that having a worldwide #1 song would be detrimental to a band.”
 
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