Coldplay’s spiritual search continues with song “Major Minus” (Coldplay’s spiritual search Part 7)jh64

Rare picture: Elusive couple Gwyneth Paltrow and Chris Martin are photographed together at a beach party in the Hamptons

Elusive: Gwyneth Paltrow and Chris Martin in a rare shot together at a beach party in the Hamptons

I was very interested in the first single that came out from Coldplay a few weeks ago, but this second single escaped my attention. Then this morning my son Hunter told me all about this second song and he said that something in the song may be talking about God.
I told you guys earlier that in 2008 Coldplay and Chris in particular was on a spiritual search. I predicted that it would continue. With the song “Major Minus” we have some very interesting lyrics. Take a look:

They got one eye on what you knew

And one eye on what you do
So be careful who it is you’re talking to

They got one eye on what you knew
And one eye on what you do
So be careful what it is you’re trying to do

And be careful when you’re walking in the view
Just be careful when you’re walking in the view!

Ooh-oooh-oooh
Ooh-oooh-oooh-ooh
Got one eye on the road and one on you!

Ooh-oooh-oooh
Ooh-oooh-oooh-ooh
Got one eye on the road and one on

They got one eye on what you knew
And one eye on what you do
So be careful ’cause nothing they say is true

But they don’t believe a word
It’s just us against the world
And we just gotta turn up to be heard

Hear those crocodiles ticking ’round the world
Hear those crocodiles ticking (they go) ticking ’round the world

Ooh-oooh-oooh
Ooh-oooh-oooh-ooh
Got one eye on the road and one on you!
Ooh-oooh-oooh
Ooh-oooh-oooh-ooh
Got one eye on the road.

She can’t hear them climbing the stairs
I got my right side fighting
While my left eye’s on the chairs

Ooh-oooh-oooh
Ooh-oooh-oooh-ooh
Got one eye on the road and one on you!

Ooh-oooh-oooh
Ooh-oooh-oooh-ooh
Got one eye on the road and one on you

___________________________________

Here are the main points of the song.

1. Heaven is watching us constantly. (They got one eye on what you knew,And one eye on what you do)

2. We should be careful because what we do does matter to God. (And be careful when you’re walking in the view, Just be careful when you’re walking in the view!)

3. There are dangers in this world that you must avoid because they will eat you up.(Hear those crocodiles ticking ’round the world, Hear those crocodiles ticking (they go) ticking ’round the world )

4.Chris Martin’s plan is to keep one eye on the road ahead and one on the wife that he loves. (Got one eye on the road and one on you!)

___________________________

These interpretations are based on the assumption that Chris is building on the theme of his last cd. We will have to wait and see what the rest of the cd sounds like. Feel free to share with me your thoughts.

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Comments

  • Ion  On August 28, 2013 at 2:12 pm

    I think this song is warning against the Illuminati, but I could be wrong. That “one eye” as being the all seeing eye!

  • kendra  On November 13, 2016 at 5:42 pm

    OMG, THANK YOU! Illuminati is exactly what I thought of when I heard the song for the first time, then Googled the lyrics and read them through. This song has NOTHING to do with God or Heaven. Coldplay are secular humanist/new age/Hinduism believers. The Illuminati run Hollywood, and especially celebrities at Coldplay’s level; Chris Martin and Coldplay have sold themselves over to the music business, and like so many other artists, are their puppets. This makes me incredibly sad, because Chris was raised as a Christian; however I think it was presented with a lot of guilt, and he has unfortunately turned his back on it. Don’t allow yourself to be fooled into thinking this is a spiritual song. It is not.

    • Everette Hatcher III  On November 14, 2016 at 6:02 am

      I did a series in 2011 on COLDPLAY’S SPIRITUAL SEARCH and I had 7 parts to it and I admit that the 7th part with the song MAJOR MINUS was a stretch compared to some of the earlier posts. By the way one of my most popular posts with the most hits in this series is “Insight into what Coldplay meant by “St. Peter won’t call my name” (Series on Coldplay’s spiritual search, Part 3).” You can read that at this link:
      https://thedailyhatch.org/2011/06/04/insight-into-what-coldplay-meant-by-st-peter-wont-call-my-name-series-on-coldplay%E2%80%99s-spiritual-search-part-3/

      Back in 2008 I wrote a paper on the spiritual themes of Coldplay’s album Viva La Vida and I predicted this spiritual search would continue in the future. Below is the first part of the paper, “Coldplay’s latest musical lyrics indicate a Spiritual Search for the Afterlife.”

      Coldplay’s latest musical lyrics indicate a Spiritual Search for the Afterlife

      In Coldplay’s latest songs you can see that something has changed about the focus of the band’s song writing. What is going on? The internet has been full of speculation concerning the radical lyrical change in the latest Coldplay work compared to the previous 3 albums.

      Russ Briemeier of Christianity Today: “What does it all mean? With so many questions posed, a single interpretation of this album is virtually impossible…

      Yet taken collectively, there is no ignoring the fact that spiritual themes are prevalent throughout the album. Viva La Vida seems to be about coping with death in a world corrupted by sin, temptation, and war. Though it never goes deeper than mentioning God or referencing a specific theology, the lyrics often yearn with hope and love for a better world—utopia or heaven, it’s up to your interpretation… Viva La Vida is often provocative, spiritual, and seemingly on the verge of identifying a greater Truth, asking and inspiring many questions without providing the answers.”

      The Spiritual Search for the Afterlife

      Many of Coldplay’s latest songs mention God and other Biblical themes such as dealing with death, and the afterlife and the shortness of life. It seems to me that Coldplay has focused on spiritual issues in their lyrics but they are still in the process of working out all the answers and still formulating their religious belief systems. Here is a sample of their latest works:

      In the song “Glass of Water”:

      Oh he said you could see a future,
      inside a glass of water,
      With riddles and the rhymes
      He asked ‘Will I see heaven in mine’
      Ooooh, oooh, ooooh …

      Possibly searching for the path to Heaven or hoping after death heaven is the destination. It reminds me also of the song “42” that says, “You thought you might be a ghost, You didn’t get to heaven but you made it close.

      In the song “Now my feet won’t touch the ground”:

      Now my head won’t stop
      You wait a lifetime to be found

      Here someone maybe searching for you instead of you searching for someone else? Could it be a way of saying that God is searching for you in a sense? In the context of the rest of the album that may not be such a bad interpretation.
      The song “42” states,

      Those who are dead are not dead
      They’re just living my head
      And since I fell for that spell
      I am living there as well
      Oh…

      Time is so short and I’m sure
      There must be something more

      This is the same question that Solomon asked 3000 years ago in the Book of Ecclesiastes. He knew there was something more. The Christian Philosopher Francis Schaeffer noted that Solomon took a look at the meaning of life on the basis of human life standing alone between birth and death “under the sun.” This phrase UNDER THE SUN appears over and over in Ecclesiastes. The Christian Scholar Ravi Zacharias noted, “The key to understanding the Book of Ecclesiastes is the term UNDER THE SUN — What that literally means is you lock God out of a closed system and you are left with only this world of Time plus Chance plus matter.”

      Solomon had all the resources in the world and he found himself searching for meaning in life and trying to come up with answers concerning the afterlife. However, it seems every door he tries to open is locked. Solomon found no lasting satisfaction in riches (Ecclesiastes 2:8-11), pleasure (2:1), education (2:3) and his work (2:4). None of those were able to “fill the God-sized vacuum in his heart” (quote from famous mathematician and philosopher Blaise Pascal). That reminds of the Coldplay’s words in the song “Lost”: “Every river that I tried to cross, Every door I ever tried was locked.”

      Moreover, what looms over Solomon’s search for meaningful answers is his upcoming death. In the song, “The Escapist,” which shares tract 10 with the song “Death and all his Friends,” Coldplay notes:

      And in the end
      We lie awake
      And we dream
      We’ll make an escape

      Is this an escape from Death? Since this song follows the song “Death and all his Friends,” it seems that would be the case.

    • Everette Hatcher III  On November 14, 2016 at 6:31 am

      Will Champion is the drummer for Coldplay and he grew up at Highfield Church according to Wikipedia (link is https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Will_Champion ). I have been to the Highfield website and they have an amazing website and I have heard many outstanding evangelical sermons by their ministers on that website. Here is the link: http://www.highfield.org.uk/
      Therefore, there are two members of Coldplay that grew up as evangelicals even though it did not stick. Yes I would agree that they as a group have embraced the secular humanist position. However, Francis Schaeffer has rightly noted concerning humanist man:

      “Humanist man beginning only from himself has concluded that he is only a machine. Humanist man has no place for a personal God, but there is also no place for man’s significance as man and no place for love, no place for freedom.

      Man is only a machine, but the men who hold this position could not and can not live like machines. If they could then modern man would not have his tensions either in his intellectual position or in his life, but he can’t. So they leap away from reason to try to find something that gives meaning to their lives, to life itself, even though to do so they deny their reason.

      Once this is done any type of thing could be put there. Because in the area of nonreason, reason gives no basis for a choice. This is the hallmark of modern man. How did it happen? It happened because proud humanist man, though he was finite, insisted in beginning only from himself and only from what he could learn and not from other knowledge, he did not succeed.”

      __
      I quote this on my blog at this link: https://thedailyhatch.org/2014/02/04/francis-schaeffer-analyzes-art-and-culture-part-7-jean-paul-sartre-feature-on-artist-david-hooker/

      You can see that even though Chris Martin and Will Champion will philosophically say that don’t believe in the Christian God, they are forced to admit that they believe we were put here for a purpose and you can see that in the lyrics of many of their songs. Schaeffer pointed out that even the atheist must live in the world that God created and this causes a tension in their lives.

      • Chris  On November 14, 2016 at 9:19 am

        He is one of the two witnesses mentioned in the books of Zechariah and Revelation. He is singing to the other witness. They are called the two anointed that stand before the Lord of the earth. Christopher means “anointed one”. When he sings “and in the end we lie awake and dream we’ll make an escape” he is talking of his martyrdom. The two witnesses are slain in Jerusalem and are not granted burial because of the torment they caused. Then they ascend into heaven as they are raised three and a half days later. (According to scripture). He has already announced publicly that he is a Prophet. Thanks.

      • Everette Hatcher III  On November 14, 2016 at 10:36 am

        Are you suggesting that Chris Martin thinks he is tying these lyrics to the Bible? I don’t think that at all.

        What I have tried to do in my discussion of Chris Martin’s religious views is to show that deep down he is still struggling with his former Christian Faith. For instance, he says he left Christianity behind because of the teaching of HELL. However, what does he do with the evil king spoken of in the song ViVA LA VIDA? He sends him to eternal damnation. What do you think happened to Hitler? Do you think he will be punished for what he did?

        Over and over in Chris Martin’s life he has tried to get away from the Christian beliefs he held while growing up but reality keeps pushing him back towards them. Francis Schaeffer said, “The more logical a man who holds a non-Christian position is to his own presuppositions, the further he is from the real world; and the nearer he is to the real world, the more illogical he is to his presuppositions.”

        David Steele in his excellent article, “WHY FRANCIS SCHAEFFER MATTERS: His Approach to Apologetics – PART 6
        DECEMBER 14, 2015,” wrote (here is the link, https://baldreformer.wordpress.com/2015/12/14/why-francis-schaeffer-matters-his-approach-to-apologetics-part-6/) :

        Francis Schaeffer’s holds a rather basic view concerning apologetics. He explains there are two purposes of Christian apologetics. “The first is defense. The second is to communicate Christianity in a way that any given generation can understand” (The God Who Is There, 151).

        Schaeffer begins his approach to apologetics by pointing out that every non-regenerate person enters the discussion with a set of presuppositions. Some have taken the time to analyze their presuppositions. Most have not. But each non-regenerate person is caught in the horns of a dilemma because it is impossible to be consistent in logic or practice. This holds true along the whole spectrum of people. Every person whether a University student, housewife, businessman or disgruntled teenager is stuck and boxed in by the logic of his or her presuppositions. Thus, Schaeffer writes, “You are facing a man in tension; and it is this tension which works on your behalf as you speak to him . . . A man may try to bury the tension and you may have to help him find it, but somewhere there is a point of inconsistency” (The God Who Is There, 133). Schaeffer adds, “To have to choose between one consistency or the other is a real damnation for man. The more logical a man who holds a non-Christian position is to his own presuppositions, the further he is from the real world; and the nearer he is to the real world, the more illogical he is to his presuppositions” (The God Who Is There, 133-134).

        Therefore, the place to begin in the real world with real people is to find out where the tension exists. Once the point of tension is uncovered the apologist must push the non-regenerate man toward the logical conclusion of his presuppositions. Schaeffer warns, “Pushing him towards the logic of his presuppositions is going to cause him pain; therefore, I must not push any further than I need to” (The God Who Is There, 139).

        Schaeffer calls this approach “taking the roof off” because every man has constructed a roof over his head to protect himself at the point of tension. “At the point of tension the person is not in a place of consistency in his system, and the roof is built as a protection against the blows of the real world, both internal and external” (The God Who Is There, 140).

        Taking the roof off involves showing man his need. His need is addressed in the Scriptures which show his lostness and the answer found in the person of Jesus Christ. Schaeffer admits that this process is extremely unpleasant “but we must allow the person to undergo this experience so that he may realize his system has no answer to the crucial questions of life. He must come to know that his roof is a false protection from the storm of what is; and then we can talk to him about the storm of God’s judgment” (The God Who Is There, 141).

        As soon as the person is ready to hear the gospel it is not necessary to push any further. Schaeffer departs from the typical evangelistic approach at this point. He writes, “We must never forget that the first part of the gospel is not ‘Accept Christ as Savior,’ but ‘God is there.’ Only then are we ready to hear God’s solution for man’s moral dilemma in the substitutionary work of Christ in history” (The God Who Is There, 144).

        Schaeffer believes that there are two vital principles in communicating the gospel (Escape From Reason, 269). First, there are certain unchangeable facts which are true. Here again the idea of antithesis is prominent in Schaeffer’s thinking. If a given proposition is true, it’s opposite is false. Second, we need to know the thought patterns of the culture at large. Unless we do this, the gospel will fall on deaf ears.

        Schaeffer proceeds to discuss biblical faith which begins with the fact of God’s existence. “True Christian faith rests on content . . . The true basis for faith is not the faith itself, but the work which Christ finished on the cross. My believing is not the basis for being saved – the basis is the work of Christ . . . The call to Christian believing rests on God’s propositional promises” (The God Who Is There, 146).

        Schaeffer militates against easy believism and goes to great lengths to promote a biblical paradigm for faith. Here he stands in the historic tradition of the Reformers who taught that biblical faith is a combination of notitia (know the facts of the gospel), assensus (believing the facts of the gospel) and fiducia (trusting or banking one’s hope on Christ alone for salvation). Schaeffer outlines his scheme for biblical faith and is worth quoting in it’s entirety to get the full flavor of his thinking.

        1. Do you believe that God exists and that He is a personal God, and that Jesus Christ is God – remembering that we are not talking of the word or idea god, but of the infinite-personal God who is there?

        2. Do you acknowledge that you are guilty in the presence of this God – remembering that we are not talking about guilt-feelings, but true moral guilt?

        3. Do you believe that Jesus Christ died in space and time, in history, on the cross, and that when He died His substitutional work of bearing God’s punishment against sin was fully accomplished and complete?

        4. On the basis of God’s promises in His written communication to us, the Bible, do you (or have you) cast yourself on this Christ as your personal Savior – not trusting in anything you yourself have ever done or ever will do? (The God Who Is There, 147).

        To sum up Dr. Schaeffer’s approach to apologetics one must understand that he embraces Paul’s method of preaching to man without the Bible. He suggests telling the sinner, “You’re under the wrath of God because you hold the truth in unrighteousness.” (Death In The City, 266). The reason: Sinful man needs to come to grip with the fact that he is a law-breaker and will ultimately face the white-hot wrath of God apart from Christ.

        The end result of man’s fascination with breaking God’s laws is a breakdown in morality which we shall examine in our next section on the church in the twentieth century.

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