1927 Great Flood, Memphis Blues, Led Zeppelin, and 2011 Mississippi River Flood

Many people think of former President Bill Clinton when they think of Arkansas, and they think of Elvis when they think of Memphis. However, the great Mississippi River separates both Arkansas and Tennessee. It’s history is worth looking into.

CNN’s David Mattingly describes how high and wide the Mississippi River is in Memphis, Tennessee.

Everybody is now educating themselves on the great flood of 1927. The 1927 Great Mississippi Flood was the most destructive river flood in the history of the United States, causing over $400million in damages and killing 246 people in seven states and displaced 700,000 people.

My grandfather moved to Memphis in 1927 and he told me about this flood. There was a lady named Memphis Minnie and she wrote about this flood. I always heard that there was lots of great blues music that had come out of Memphis, but I always thought that was overstated and that the Blues was not a significant form of music. (Live and learn, the Blues music out of Memphis had a GREAT AFFECT ON MUSIC WORLDWIDE!!!)

However, at the same time I was listening to groups like Led Zeppelin and the Rolling Stones, I had no idea that many of their songs were based on old Blues songs out of Memphis.

One of my favorite Led Zeppelin songs was “When the Levee breaks.” It was based on a song by Memphis Minnie.

Memphis Minnie and Joe Mccoys original.

Led Zeppelin

Whole lotta love in Memphis: Led Zeppelin frontman gets star in Orpheum Theater sidewalk

BY AP
TUESDAY, JULY 13, 2010 

Robert Plant gets star in Memphis music sidewalk

MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Led Zeppelin frontman Robert Plant is being honored with a star in a music sidewalk in Memphis, Tenn.

Plant was presented Monday with a star that will be placed on the Orpheum Theater Sidewalk of Stars on Beale Street.

The Commercial Appeal reports that the award honors Plant for what are described as tireless efforts to preserve the blues.

During the presentation ceremony, Plant spoke of blues pioneers like Sonny Boy Williamson, Sleepy John Estes and W.C. Handy in acknowledging that a generation of British musicians owe a debt to early Southern blues artists.

Marooned: An aerial view of the town of Sledge, inundated to a depth of 17 feet, after Mississippi floods in 1927Marooned: An aerial view of the town of Sledge, inundated to a depth of 17 feet, after Mississippi floods in 1927
Floods: Experts have warned that the Mississippi could rise to levels not seen in the country since the devastation on The Great Flood of 1927Floods: Experts have warned that the Mississippi could rise to levels not seen in the country since the devastation on The Great Flood of 1927
_________________________

As the Mississippi River continues to rise to near-record cresting, residents in Memphis are paring for the worst. Randall Pinkston reports on the latest of the city’s flood alert.

Documentary about the Mississippi River Flood of 1927 and the flood control lakes built because of it. Produced by Katrina Kinder

U.S. Corps of Engineers reservation at Memphis on February 14, 1937. Downtown can be seen at upper left. (Courtesy U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Memphis District)

Photo by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

U.S. Corps of Engineers reservation at Memphis on February 14, 1937. Downtown can be seen at upper left. (Courtesy U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Memphis District)

A levee wall at Memphis during the flooding of 1937. (Courtesy U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Memphis District)

Photo by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

A levee wall at Memphis during the flooding of 1937. (Courtesy U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Memphis District)

The view upstream from the Columbia Mutual Tower in Memphis on Feb. 9, 1937. The swollen Mississippi River rose to a record 48.7 feet in 1937. Before it was confined by levees, the Mississippi overflow from the runoff of 31 states regularly created a lake almost as large as Ireland. (Courtesy U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Memphis District)

The view upstream from the Columbia Mutual Tower in Memphis on Feb. 9, 1937. The swollen Mississippi River rose to a record 48.7 feet in 1937. Before it was confined by levees, the Mississippi overflow from the runoff of 31 states regularly created a lake almost as large as Ireland. (Courtesy U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Memphis District)

Advertisements
Post a comment or leave a trackback: Trackback URL.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: