Senator Pryor asks for Spending Cut Suggestions! Here are a few!(Part 21)

Senator Mark Pryor wants our ideas on how to cut federal spending. Take a look at this video clip below:

My son Wilson experienced victory for the first time this year as his soccer team won 4 to 2 over the the Little Rock Football Club at the soccer fields off of Cantrell and Riverfront Road. The weather looked threatening but it turned out okay. Go team!!!!

Senator Pryor has asked us to send our ideas to him at cutspending@pryor.senate.gov and I have done so in the past and will continue to do so in the future. Here are a few more I just emailed to him myself at 3:30 CST today April 22, 2011.

I just read Paul Greenberg’s article “The dance of politics,” Arkansas Democrat Gazette, April 17, 2011 and in it he stated:

    The other day Mark Pryor took to the floor of the Senate to badmouth those politicians who, he said, were practicing the ”blame game.” No names mentioned, of course. That’s how Mark Pryor operates. He prefers not to attack those he’s criticizing openly; that would be entirely too direct and responsible.
    The senator did express his indignation, which we’re supposed to believe is righteous, at some length. “How in the world,” he demanded, “does having press conferences and pointing fingers at others resolve anything? One of the tests I use when I look at politicians is the louder they are, the more often they have press conferences to blame other people, that probably means they are more to blame for the problems we have today.”
    Goodness. That’s a little harsh on the president, isn’t it? Barack Obama is not only entitled to address the press in the White House briefing room in the midst of budget negotiations, even in the middle of the night, but he needs to. The public deserves an explanation from our leaders even if it can’t get leadership.
    If the president merits criticism on the basis of his press conferences, it’s for not having more of them to warn against the danger of federal deficits long before they triggered this year’s showdown over the national debt and almost-shutdown of the federal government. Which soon enough, like everything in Washington, became a political crisis.
    A chief executive should be exercising leadership all along, not just stepping in when the government of the United States is about to be shut down. Not for the first time, Mark Pryor has got things exactly backwards: There’s nothing wrong with a politician’s taking his case to the people. It’s the quality of his case that’s matters, not his daring to make it. Even a president should be able to speak his mind in a free country.
    Nor is there anything wrong with the leader of a political party making a partisan appeal to the faithful, or even trying to add to their number. Barack Obama needn’t apologize for going to New York in the midst of negotiations over the budget to make common political cause with the likes of Al Sharpton, dean of America’s race hustlers. The country’s No. 1 Democrat has every right, even a duty, to appeal to his party’s base, just as the Republicans have every right to appeal to theirs. That’s how a two-party system works, or at least should.
    But the junior senator from Arkansas now has come out foursquare against the partisan atmosphere in Washington.
    That’s not only an atmosphere, Senator, it’s how things get done, and have been getting done even before there was a Capitol in which to get them done. For the American two-party system goes back a ways. 
     Paul Greenberg is editorial page editor of the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette.

Since Senator Pryor is against playing politics then maybe he will take some spending cuts suggestions from a Republican like me.

In my past posts I could have been accused of giving just general ideas of where to cut. Now I am starting in with specifics that are taken from the article “How to cut $343 Billion from the federal budget,” by Brian Riedl, Heritage Foundation, October 28, 2010(Spending cuts in millions of dollars:

National Science Foundation

$1,700

Reduce National Science Foundation funding to 2008 levels.

$86

Eliminate National Science Foundation spending on elementary and secondary education.

Transportation

$45,000

Devolve the federal highway program and most transit spending to the rates.

$1,900

Privatize Amtrak.

$1,009

Eliminate grants to large and medium-sized hub airports.

$554

Eliminate the Maritime Administration.

$125

Eliminate the Essential Air Service Program.

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