Ronald Wilson Reagan Part 63

Anonymous / AP

No. 19: Danny Ainge’s full-court drive vs. Notre Dame

East Regional semifinals, March 19, 1981 — BYU seemed beat when they faced a 50-49 deficit with eight seconds remaining against Notre Dame. Except the Cougars had Danny Ainge. The guard took an in-bounds pass, dribbled behind his back between two defenders and streaked baseline-to-baseline to drop in a finger-roll lay-up with two seconds remaining. It was a coast-to-coast blur unmatched until 14 years later._____________________________________

Picture of Ronald Reagan and Nancy Davis in their engagement photo.
(Picture from the Ronald Reagan Library)

Engagement photograph of Ronald Reagan and Nancy Davis. (January 1952)

____________________________________________

Is Mike Anderson of Misssouri going to be the new Arkansas basketball coach? Brad Stevens of Butler is a good candidate too and so is Buzz Williams of Marquette (who is from Texas and spent a lot of time in Oklahoma).

Reagan v Carter Debate 1980

Governor Reagan has the last word on this question.

GOVERNOR REAGAN

Yes. The figures that the President has just used about California is a distortion of the situation there, because while I was Governor of California, our spending in California increased less per capita than the spending in Georgia while Mr. Carter was Governor of Georgia in the same 4 years. The size of government increased only one-sixth in California of what it increased in proportion to population in Georgia.

And the idea that my tax-cut proposal is inflationary: I would like to ask the President, why is it inflationary to let the people keep more of their money and spend it the way they’d like, and it isn’t inflationary to let him take that money and spend it the way he wants?

MR. SMITH

I wish that question need not be rhetorical, but it must be because we’ve run out of time on that. [Laughter] Now, the third question to Governor Reagan from William Hilliard.

MR. HILLIARD

Yes, Governor Reagan, the decline of our cities has been hastened by the continual rise in crime, strained race relations, the fall in the quality of public education, the persistence of abnormal poverty in a rich nation, and a decline in the services to the public. The signs seem to point toward a deterioration that could lead to the establishment of a permanent underclass in the cities. What, specifically, would you do in the next 4 years to reverse this trend?

GOVERNOR REAGAN

I have been talking to a number of Congressmen who have much the same idea that I have, and that is that in the inner-city areas, that in cooperation with local government and with National Government, and using tax incentives and with cooperation with the private sector, that we have development zones. Let the local entity, the city, declare this particular area, based on the standards of the percentage of people on welfare, unemployed, and so forth, in that area. And then, through tax incentives, induce the creation of businesses providing jobs and so forth in those areas.

The elements of government through these tax incentives — for example, a business that would not have, for a period of time, an increase in the property tax reflecting its development of the unused property that it was making wouldn’t be any loss to the city, because the city isn’t getting any tax from that now. And there would simply be a delay, and on the other hand, many of the people that would then be given jobs are presently wards of the Government and it wouldn’t hurt to give them a tax incentive, because that wouldn’t be costing Government anything either.

I think there are things to do in this regard. I stood in the South Bronx on the exact spot that President Carter stood on in 1977. You have to see it to believe it. It looks like a bombed-out city — great, gaunt skeletons of buildings, windows smashed out, painted on one of them “Unkept promises,” on another, “Despair.” And this was the spot at which President Carter had promised that he was going to bring in a vast program to rebuild this area. There are whole blocks of land that are left bare, just bulldozed down flat, and nothing has been done. And they are now charging to take tourists through there to see this terrible desolation.

I talked to a man just briefly there who asked me one simple question: “Do I have reason to hope that I can someday take care of my family again? Nothing has been done.”

MR. SMITH

Followup, Mr. Hilliard?

MR. HILLIARD

Yes, Governor Reagan. Blacks and other nonwhites are increasing in numbers in our cities. Many of them feel that they are facing a hostility from whites that prevents them from joining the economic mainstream of our society. There is racial confrontation in the schools, on jobs, and in housing, as non-whites seek to reap the benefits of a free society. What do you think is the Nation’s future as a multiracial society”

GOVERNOR REAGAN

I believe in it. I am eternally optimistic, and I happen to believe that we’ve made great progress from the days when I was young and when this country didn’t even know it had a racial problem. I know those things can grow out of despair in an inner city, when there’s hopelessness at home, lack of work, and so forth. But I believe that all of us together — and I believe the Presidency is what Teddy Roosevelt said it was; it’s a bully pulpit — and I think that something can be done from there, because the goal for all of us should be that one day, things will be done neither because of nor in spite of any of the differences between us — ethnic differences or racial differences, whatever they may be — that we will have total equal opportunity for all people. And I would do everything I could in my power to bring that about.

MR. SMITH

The stern of the grounded cargo ship Asia Symphony breaches the port wall and juts out onto a road in Kamaishi, Iwate Prefecture in northeastern Japan on 19 March 2011. The picturesque fishing town of Kamaishi was devastated when the tsunami hit less than 15 minutes after the 9.0 earthquake that rocked Japan on 11 March 2011.  EPA/STEPHEN MORRISON

The stern of the grounded cargo ship Asia Symphony breaches the port wall and juts out onto a road in Kamaishi, Iwate Prefecture in northeastern Japan on 19 March 2011. The picturesque fishing town of Kamaishi was devastated when the tsunami hit less than 15 minutes after the 9.0 earthquake that rocked Japan on 11 March 2011. EPA/STEPHEN MORRISON

https://i0.wp.com/www.reagan.utexas.edu/archives/photographs/large/C35252-11.jpg

President Reagan with actress Victoria Principal during a photo opportunity with the Arthritis Poster Child of the Year in the Oval Office. 5/29/86.

 

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