Tag Archives: denver broncos

What is God doing with Tim Tebow? Fellowship Bible pastor of Little Rock ponders…

Everyone is wondering if this amazing fourth quarter comeback streak will end for the Denver Broncos and their quarterback Tim Tebow. At the December 11, 2011 early service at Fellowship Bible Church, pastor Mark Henry (who himself was an all conference Arkansas Razorback football player) noted:

How many of you have been watching the drama behind Tim Tebow. Tim Tebow is the starting quarterback for the Denver Broncos. Some of you may remember that he had a great career at the University of Florida. He won the Heisman and was a real high draft choice. Recently he was named the starting quarterback of the Denver Broncos. What has been interesting to watch is the incredible amount of controversy and criticism that has come  against Tim Tebow both as a player and a Christ follower too. It is as if Tim Tebow has a thorn in his flesh and it is called the media.

You know there is website out there and the whole website is set up to mock Tim Tebow for praying before, during and after football games. People all across the world send pictures to this website and they have coined a word for him praying called “Tebowing.” People all around the world send pictures to this website making a mockery of Tim Tebow for praying.

It doesn’t stop there, just recently another NFL quarterback came out and publically  criticized Tim Tebow and said Tebow talks too much about Jesus.

Then Mark Henry, who was an all-conference football player at Arkansas in 1991 and had his own chance to pursue a NFL career, pointed to Tebow’s response in the USA Today article below.

USA Today reported on November 23, 2011:

A day after former Broncos QB Jake Plummer said in a radio interview that he wished the man currently taking the snaps in Denver, Tim Tebow, would curb his references to Jesus Christ and his faith, Tebow responded.

QB Tim Tebow could have the Broncos in first place by the end of Week 12.
By Kirby Lee, US Presswire

Asked about Plummer’s remarks in an interview on ESPN’s First Take, Tebow said:

“If you’re married, and you have a wife, and you really love your wife, is it good enough to only say to your wife ‘I love her’ the day you get married? Or should you tell her every single day when you wake up and every opportunity?

“And that’s how I feel about my relationship with Jesus Christ is that it is the most important thing in my life. So any time I get an opportunity to tell him that I love him or given an opportunity to shout him out on national TV, I’m gonna take that opportunity. And so I look at it as a relationship that I have with him that I want to give him the honor and glory anytime I have the opportunity. And then right after I give him the honor and glory, I always try to give my teammates the honor and glory.

“And that’s how it works because Christ comes first in my life, and then my family, and then my teammates. I respect Jake’s opinion, and I really appreciate his compliment of calling me a winner. But I feel like anytime I get the opportunity to give the Lord some praise, he is due for it.”

Plummer had this to say Monday on XTRA Sports 910 in Phoenix:

“Tebow, regardless of whether I wish he’d just shut up after a game and go hug his teammates, I think he’s a winner and I respect that about him. I think that when he accepts the fact that we know that he loves Jesus Christ, then I think I’ll like him a little better. I don’t hate him because of that, I just would rather not have to hear that every single time he takes a good snap or makes a good handoff.

“Like you know, I understand dude where you’re coming from … but he is a baller.”

Asked by ESPN’s Skip Bayless if God makes him a better football player, Tebow would only grant that his faith gives him peace and comfort on the field.

______________________

Then Mark Henry commented:

What a powerful statement (by Tebow). (Audience claps.) Here is what I would say about that. Here is this “if only” situation in Tim Tebow’s life, this constant critique and criticism from the media and from players and it is constant,  yet in the midst of it all God is doing something in Tim Tebow. Through His words and His actions He is on the move. What God is doing is He is showcasing Himself to a watching world and in the end God will not be mocked and I have to wonder and it is just speculation on my part because Tim Tebow has not even being playing very good, yet he has been winning games. You tell me who may behind that right.

(Listen to whole message at http://www.fellowshiponline.com/resources/sermons/#/!/if-only/ )

At this point I get in my car and my 15 yr son Wilson tells me, “Dad you said that God doesn’t pull for one team over another.” I respond that is right then I go home. I remember that Harry King wrote on Saturday:

Tied for first in their division, the Broncos have games remaining against Chicago, New England, Buffalo, and Kansas City. They might lose their next two. If they do, the experts will gloat with “told you so.”

Therefore, I thought the Broncos great run was probably coming to a close on Sunday but I go home and watch this happen below:

Uploaded by on Dec 11, 2011

The Chicago Bears were about to win the game by running out the clock when veteran running back Marion Barber runs out of bounds stopping the clock, and thus giving Tebow and the broncos a shot to make another great fourth quarter comeback. Tebow performed his Magic again in regulation, which forced the game into overtime! This video shows the Magical overtime drive! There is also a link to the game tying driving inside of the video.

___________________________

Related posts:

Tim Tebow’s Faith (Part 2)

  This is a RUSH transcript from “The O’Reilly Factor,” June 3, 2011. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated JUAN WILLIAMS, FOX NEWS GUEST HOST: In the “Back of the Book” segment tonight, Tim Tebow is a quarterback for the Denver Broncos and a man of deep faith. That faith […]

Tim Tebow’s faith (Part 1)

Tim Tebow’s faith (Part 1) I really respect Tim Tebow and I wanted to pass along an article that defends him. Tim Tebow, Faith and Blasphemy Culture, Evangelicals, Featured, Protestant, Religion, Sports — By J.F. Arnold on August 17, 2011 at 5:05 am I won’t pretend to be an expert in the world of sports. I can tell you if a given team […]

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Tim Tebow’s Christian faith not abandoned in locker room

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Tim Tebow’s Faith (Part 3)

Tim Tebow’s Faith (Part 3) Another look at the faith of Tim Tebow. Q & A: Tim Tebow on Faith, Fame, & Football The NFL athlete reflects on his outspoken faith, whether athletes should attribute their wins to God, and moving from the Focus on the Family ad to Jockey ads. Interview by Sarah Pulliam […]

Tim Tebow being persecuted for his Christian faith?

It is clear to me that Tim Tebow is trusting in the Lord and he does not want to get discouraged by the world’s negativity. However, I do not think that he believes that if you have faith then you will become rich and everything you do will bring success as the world thinks of […]

 

Tim Tebow’s Faith (Part 3)

Tim Tebow’s Faith (Part 3)

Another look at the faith of Tim Tebow.

The NFL athlete reflects on his outspoken faith, whether athletes should attribute their wins to God, and moving from the Focus on the Family ad to Jockey ads.
Interview by Sarah Pulliam Bailey | posted 6/10/2011 09:27AM

Nobody knows when the NFL season will start, but that isn’t stopping Tim Tebow from building his brand during the lockout. The Denver Broncos’ second-year quarterback recently released his memoir, Through My Eyes (HarperCollins), which replays the stories behind his mother’s difficult pregnancy with him, the Heisman trophy win, and the first-round NFL selection. During his college football years, Tebow became noticed among Christians for more than his athletic ability after he put Bible verses on his eye black. CT recently spoke with Tebow about why he remains vocal about his faith, fallen Christian athletes, and the absence of his biblical eye black.

Does it surprise you at all that you’ve become kind of a Christian celebrity?

I’m blessed to have a little bit of success in football. My biggest goal with that pedestal is to be a good role model and to take that whatever it is (platform, celebrity, whatever you want to call it) and be a great model and inspire. I’m thankful for the ability to share my faith in a lot of different places. It’s something that I take as a responsibility and an obligation to handle as best as I can.

I imagine you get some criticism for being outspoken about your faith as being over the top or maybe an attempt to build a certain image. Has being so outspoken about your faith hurt you at all?

Well, being outspoken about my faith isn’t just something that I do; it’s who I am because my faith isn’t just a little piece of my life. It is my life. It’s not a question of whether I’m outspoken about it or not. I’m definitely not ashamed of it. And first off, I’m extremely proud of my faith. I try to be as real and honest about everything and very genuine with people and say, “Listen, I’m a Christian and I’m not perfect. I screw up every day, but I think that’s what grace is all about.”

Other Christians in sports, like Butler basketball coach Brad Stevens, have been quieter about their faith. Is it ever more effective for coaches or athletes in certain positions to be more subtle about their faith? Or is it always good to be open about it?

It’s something you have to handle with class and be real about it, not be like overly judgmental or dig into people with other faiths. It’s about accepting everybody for who they are and being real with them. They have to handle, as best they can, how they’re trying to handle their witness and who they’re trying to affect. Every situation is very different.

Even as you’re trying to use your platform for good, do you ever wonder or worry about the idea that you might contribute to a culture of celebrity obsession or idolatry?

I don’t necessarily think about that too much, but when people look at me or look up to me, hopefully they see that it’s not about me. It’s having a relationship with Christ, and it’s a lot bigger than me. And that’s what I’m living for—it’s not the money or the fame. It’s having a relationship with Christ, impacting a lot of people and trying to help, encourage, and inspire people.

Occasionally we’ll see a Christian athlete who has been vocal about their faith fall into alcohol, drugs, or something similar. Do you worry that you might feel the pressures that come with being in professional sports?

People have to realize that just because you’re a Christian, it doesn’t mean that you’re perfect, because every once in a while everyone stumbles. Living by faith is about when you do mess up, getting back up, brushing yourself off, and keep trying to improve where you mess up or where you have temptation. I screw up all the time. I’m not saying you have to be perfect because you can’t, but our goal is just trying to improve.

NFL writer David White, who is leaving sports journalism for full-time ministry, recently wrote, “Thou shalt absolutely not say your team won because it was God’s plan. What does the Lord have against the other team?” Should Christian athletes avoid attributing their wins to God? Does it risk gloating or pride or making the other team seem like they’re not on God’s side?

I don’t think it risks anything to say that that something was God’s plan. At the end of the day, everything is God’s plan and he cares about what we do. He cares about our hearts, how we play the game, and how we treat people. He’s definitely involved with how we handle sports and not just the outcome of it. I’m proud when athletes mention God in any way. When they have an opportunity to mention God, I applaud them for doing it and having the courage to do so. I can understand the writer’s point as well, though.

As the NFL owners and players struggle over contracts, is there a Christian perspective on the lockout?

This lockout is about a lot more than just money. Yes, the biggest thing about this lockout is money, but there’s a lot of other things that are being measured and being negotiated. I will not be heavily involved, because there are other things that I’m going to continue to work on during this time. I learned a long time ago not to worry about things that I can’t control, so I’m not going to spend time worrying about it.

The ad you did for the 2010 Super Bowl created a stir initially but turned out to be more neutral politically. Are broadly pro-family messages more effective than specific stances on abortion?

That message was just about my mother’s love for me and about her giving me a chance and her having the courage to do what she believed was right. That commercial wasn’t knocking anyone. It was just talking about the sanctity of life and how amazing life is.

You have appeared in some Jockey ads recently. Are there any specific products you would decline to advertise because of your personal beliefs?

The main things I look for are whether I believe in it, it fits my character, and it fits what I do. But the products I’m behind are ones that I believe work. I use it and also believe in the people behind it. I believe in their integrity. There are some great products, but if it’s not something I truly believe in because I’m not using it every day then I’m not going to endorse it.

Do you have any regrets or anything looking back on the path you have taken?

I’m a firm believer in everything happening for a reason and that God has a plan. There may be times where I want to take back something in a game, but I learn from it to improve.

During your college career, some reporters asked you whether you were a virgin or not. Is the climate in the NFL better or worse? Do you face similar questions?

I guess you will. But I think most people just know who I am and where I stand, and they respect me for that because I stand up for what I believe in. I don’t think that there’s been too much adversity or anything that’s been hard to deal with.

You shifted from putting Bible verses on your eye black to putting them on your wristband due to NFL rules. Will you continue to do that?

Now I can’t put it on a wristband, so who knows? Maybe I’ll try to find a different way to put it on somewhere.

Maybe your shoe?

I’ll figure it out.

Tim Tebow’s faith (Part 1)

Tim Tebow’s faith (Part 1)

I really respect Tim Tebow and I wanted to pass along an article that defends him.

Tim Tebow, Faith and Blasphemy

CultureEvangelicalsFeaturedProtestantReligionSports — By J.F. Arnold on August 17, 2011 at 5:05 am

I won’t pretend to be an expert in the world of sports. I can tell you if a given team is at the professional or college level for most sports, and at one point I followed both baseball and basketball well enough to name specific players on my favorite teams, but aside from that I am not what anyone could rightfully call a sports buff. It isn’t that I don’t find sports interesting or entertaining, I just have not invested my time and effort into knowledge about players or in-depth strategies usually associated with those who are considered ‘fans.’

But when I saw a story about Tim Tebow, a football player for the Denver Broncos (that’s a professional team; see, I know my stuff!), that has sparked some controversy, I could not pass up providing some commentary.

It is important to first read the original statements from Tim Tebow. You can find Tim Tebow’s comments (and the article the above story talks about) here. The quote in question, however, is when Tim said this:

Others who say I won’t make it are wrong. They don’t know what I’m capable of and what’s inside me. My family and my friends have been bothered by what’s gone on [in regards to controversy over him not being transferred to the Dolphins and the media’s response], and I tell them to pay no attention to it. I’m relying as always on my faith.

The statement itself does not strike me as unreasonable. In fact, while it may come across to some as a bit prideful in the beginning, it does sound to me as if he is expressing some humility by the end. In spite of his abilities and accomplishments, he still relies on faith to get him through the controversy. He believes he will make it, partially because he is good at what he does, and partially because he is convinced that God has a plan for him. He may be mistaken about the plan God has, but that discussion is not what caused some controversy.

The controversy comes from a column over at CBS by Gregg Doyel, which concludes with the words “That’s more than wrong. It’s blasphemous.” While I do think Gregg takes Tim’s speech out of context and presumes a meaning upon the words that he did not necessarily intend, I don’t intend to unpack that aspect of the post any more. I also won’t throw any hate-speech at columnist Doyel, in spite of what many claiming the name of Christ have done. For those people, I do apologize, Gregg. Christians aren’t always reasonable, and telling someone outright they are going to hell for a single article strikes me as not only unwise but terribly ungracious.

What I do want to address is the notion that what Tim Tebow said could be considered blasphemy. If Doyel’s interpretation of Tebow’s statement is correct, we must weigh Tebow’s statement and decide if it is mistaken, sinful, or full-blown blasphemy.

Blasphemy, as I understand and mean it, is intentional or intense irreverence towards God. That is an incredibly simple definition, but for now it will suffice. If an individual seeks to honor God in what they say and do, approach that action or belief with humility, and do not contradict what is clearly taught in Scripture, I suspect they should not be called blasphemous. Mistaken, yes. Sinful even. But the term blasphemy has a weight and a force behind it that I do not think Tim Tebow deserved, even with Doyel’s interpretation.

Doyel brings up an ever present question: what about those times when we have faith and God does not answer our prayers? He specifically speaks to the parent who prays for healing and their child dies anyway. Surely Tebow does not believe that his faith necessarily correlates to God’s action while the faith of a parent with a dying child, or so goes the argument. I don’t agree that one succeeds if faith is great enough and that one fails if faith is weak, and so I think here is where I must depart from Doyel’s interpretation: I simply do not think Tebow was saying that. For the Christian, “God coming through” in regards to faith may mean “God giving me grace to make it through this situation, in spite of what happens.” It does not always mean that our prayers are answered the way we ask them: be that the life of a child or the future of a professional football player. It is hard to know what Tebow believes, and I admit I may be uninformed, since I am not one who keeps up with the profession, but from the quotes I have read of him, he strikes me as one filled with confidence and faith.

Ultimately, I simply disagree with Doyel, though I admit I could be proven wrong. I also find myself suddenly curious about Tebow and his future both as a Christian and a quarterback. I do genuinely wonder how he will respond should he be denied the position on the Broncos he is expecting.

image via flickr.

 

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