Tag Archives: coach bobby bowden

IN MEMORY OF COACH BOWDEN: Bobby Bowden at Little Rock Touchdown Club (Part 2)jh25

I went to the Little Rock Touchdown Club and heard Bobby Bowden of Florida State speak. It was outstanding. Here is an article below on his visit from the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette:

LITTLE ROCK — Former Florida State Coach Bobby Bowden is familiar with pressure brought on by high expectations.

Two years ago, after the Seminoles finished the season 7-6, Bowden, 81, wanted to coach one more season. But he was not given that opportunity.

Florida State President T.K. Wetherell asked him to step aside as coach and stay with the team in the diminished role of university ambassador — which would have given him little input on the day-to-day operations of the football team.

Bowden declined. He announced his retirement, and Jimbo Fisher, who had been appointed as the school’s coachin-waiting two years earlier, was given the head-coaching position for the 2010 season.

“That’s just the way it is now,” Bowden told members of the media after speaking to the Little Rock Touchdown Club at the Peabody Hotel in Little Rock on Monday. “I had wanted to coach one more year and try and get to 400 wins.”

Bowden retired with a career record of 377-129-4 after the NCAA forced Florida State to vacate 12 victories from the 2006-2007 seasons for academic problems with his former players.

“They are paying the head coach so much money now that they demand you to win,” Bowden said. “The thing is, head coaches make so much money now that you can retire. There aren’t going to be a lot of coaches who last as long as Joe [Paterno] and I did.”

Paterno has coached 46 years at Penn State with a 402-136-3 record.

Bowden said he made approximately $40,000 per year when he was hired at Florida State in 1976; he was making $2.5 million when he retired two years ago.

His Florida State team won 10 or more games from 1987-2000, never finished lower than fourth in the final AP poll, and won national championships in 1993 and 1999.

But during his last five seasons as coach, the Seminoles went 38-27 and only won 1 ACC championship.

“Those last few years, we didn’t do a good job evaluating players like we once did,” Bowden said. “We would see a kid we wanted, and he wasn’t as good as advertised.”

Failing to live up to expectations also cost Bowden’s sons, Terry and Tommy, their coaching jobs.

Terry Bowden posted a 47-17-1 record from 1993-1998 at Auburn, but he stepped down in 1998 with the Tigers at 1-5 and his job security up in the air.

Tommy Bowden went 72-45 at Clemson from 1999-2008, but resigned when the Tigers started the season 3-3 after being ranked ninth in the preseason Associated Press poll in 2008.

Terry Bowden is now coaching at NCAA Division II North Alabama, while Tommy Bowden is out of coaching.

Bobby Bowden still cares about Florida State football, despite not being able to retire on his own terms. The Seminoles, 2-0 and ranked fifth in this week’s AP poll, host No. 1 Oklahoma Saturday night.

Bowden also acknowledged many of other changes in college coaching, but he remains a traditionalist:

Bowden does not approve of conference realignment, but said it is inevitable.

“Texas A&M is going to leave the Big 12, and if a bunch of schools from the Big 12 leave, then it’s going to change everything,” Bowden said.

On the lack of a playoff in college football: “I don’t think we’ll have a playoff, and it won’t happen because the presidents don’t want it.”

On the coach-in-waiting concept that Florida State, Texas, Maryland and Oregon have used with mixed results: “I think it’s good for the coach-in-waiting,” Bowden said, acknowledging that the coach-in-waiting usually gets promoted or a pay raise if the school doesn’t promote him by a certain date. “The president and athletic council came up with it, and I went along with it because I was at the end of my career.”

On the value a good college football team brings to a university: “When I first came to Florida State in 1976, when I would go recruiting, the president would say, ‘When you go to Tampa, please visit this girl because she’s a straight-A student and we want her,’” Bowden said. “Four years later, we went undefeated, played in our first major bowl game and were on national television. We would take about 2,500 students every year, but were getting 5,000-6,000 applicants because a successful football team attracts students.”

This article was published today at 4:28 a.m.Sports, Pages 19 on 09/13/2011

Sports 19

Former Florida State coach Bobby Bowden

Bobby Bowden’s health announcement Sept 13, 2011

Former Florida State coach Bobby Bowden

By Coley Harvey, Orlando Sentinel7:13 a.m. EDT, September 13, 2011
 
TALLAHASSEE – According to USA Today, former Florida State coach Bobby Bowden is expected to tell ABC’s “Good Morning America” Tuesday morning that he had prostate cancerwhile he was coaching in 2007, and that he kept his medical condition a secret out of fear of dirty recruiting tactics.In its editions that hit newsstands and Gannett Company newspapers Tuesday morning, Bowden told the USA Today that he was diagnosed with prostate cancer early in 2007, and that a former player treated him that spring. Since undergoing the low-dose radioactive procedure, he has been cancer-free.

“I did not understand the significance of prostate cancer back then,” Bowden said in an interview with USA Today. “What I knew was when something like that happens to a coach and your opponents find out about it, the first thing they say is ‘Don’t go to Florida State. Coach Bowden is about to die.’

“If I knew then what I know now, I would have considered it my moral duty to bring it out in the open.”


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Bowden, 81, will sit down with “Good Morning America” around 8:45 a.m. Tuesday morning. Part of his appearance is to help promote On The Line, a national prostate cancer education initiative of which he has become a spokesman.

On Monday night, news of his “GMA” appearance was first reported by a Tallahassee television news anchor.

According to WTXL’s Anne Imanuel’s @AnneImanuel Twitter account, Bowden was “scheduled to make an ‘emotional’ announcement on @GMA (Tuesday) morning.” A second tweet read: “Just spoke to an @GMA producer. The Bobby Bowden ‘emotional announcement’ won’t be released until (Tuesday) AM but it concerns his health.”

In an email to the Sentinel shortly after midnight Tuesday morning, Bowden’s publicist, Kimberly Shiff, said the information on Bowden was supposed to be embargoed until Tuesday morning.

While the news caused an uproar on Twitter, FSU fans chimed in with their concerns that something was wrong with Bowden. Some members of the FSU media tried to calm their fears, saying that the announcement had nothing to do with Bowden’s current health, but that it was important.

Bowden told USA Today that urologist Joe Camps, a captain from his first FSU team in 1976, performed the procedure.

“Bobby is not real big on sharing things that are wrong with him; he doesn’t want to admit he isn’t perfect,” his wife, Ann, told USA Today. She lost her father and a sister to cancer, the USA Today said.

“Bobby has always been so healthy and active,” she continued. “This was not expected.”

When he learned of his diagnosis in Jan. 2007, Bowden’s first thoughts settled on his FSU family.

“My mind was on two things,” Bowden told USA Today. “The press will have you on the front page about to die, and opponents will say ‘Bobby is already 77 years old and he has cancer.’”

In order to pull off the procedure in secret, Camps told USA Today the group made up a fictitious name for Bowden and snuck him into a secure part of the hospital around midnight the night the procedure was performed.

The retired coach has been busy lately.

According to ArkansasSports360.com, Bowden was in Little Rock, Ark. on Monday to speak to the Little Rock Touchdown Club. While there, it was announced that he had just been named to the coaches advisory committee for the Frank Broyles Award, the website reported. Broyles apparently invited him out there for the engagement.

The award goes to the nation’s top assistant coach every year. Bowden’s former defensive coordinator, Mickey Andrews, won the first Broyles Award.

Bowden has found himself in the news recently for other reasons.

In addition to an autograph session at a landmark Tallahassee store last Friday ahead of the Seminoles’ second game of the season against Charleston Southern, he was in Gainesville the previous Saturday to announce the creation of a new college football all-star game.

Bowden was attending Florida’s season-opener against Florida Atlantic to hold a news conference about a game he and fellow coaching icon Howard Schnellenberger were heading. Schnellenberger is in his final season at FAU, but he originally made a name for himself as Miami‘s head coach in the 1980s, when his Hurricanes and Bowden’s Seminoles had their share of epic rivalry games.

There was an uproar about Bowden’s appearance there, too, as some FSU fans questioned why he was in Gainesville for a rival’s opening game, instead of at FSU at the field that bears his name. He has said since stepping away from the sport in Jan. 2010 that he wishes to build a buffer between he and FSU, and that he doesn’t want to get in the way of current coach Jimbo Fisher.

Bowden spent 34 seasons coaching the Seminoles before an emotional, rocky and rather dramatic exit from football following the 2009 season. Since being replaced by Fisher, Bowden has spent his time traveling the world giving speeches and promoting a book.

In 1993 and ’99, Bowden led the Seminoles to their only national titles.

On Saturday, the No. 5 Seminoles, under Fisher’s guidance, are hosting No. 1 Oklahoma in what is being billed as one of the biggest games to ever occur at Doak Campbell Stadium. It is the first time the nation’s current No. 1 team has visited the stadium since Florida did in 1996.

The last team not from Florida to bring a top-5 ranking to Tallahassee was Dan Marino‘s No. 4 Pittsburgh team in 1980. Marino later went on to have a 16-year Hall of Fame career for the Miami Dolphins.

Related Posts:

Bobby Bowden’s health announcement Sept 13, 2011

Former Florida State coach Bobby Bowden By Coley Harvey, Orlando Sentinel7:13 a.m. EDT, September 13, 2011   TALLAHASSEE – According to USA Today, former Florida State coach Bobby Bowden is expected to tell ABC’s “Good Morning America” Tuesday morning that he had prostate cancerwhile he was coaching in 2007, and that he kept his medical […]

Bobby Bowden at Little Rock Touchdown Club (Part 2)

I went to the Little Rock Touchdown Club and heard Bobby Bowden of Florida State speak. It was outstanding. Here is an article below on his visit from the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette: LITTLE ROCK — Former Florida State Coach Bobby Bowden is familiar with pressure brought on by high expectations. Two years ago, after the Seminoles […]

Bobby Bowden named to Broyles Award Selection Committee

    The Broyles Award Trophy, made out of solid bronze, depicts Broyles (kneeling) and longtime University of Arkansas assistant coach Wilson Matthews (standing), watching over a Razorback football game or practice. Matthews was the coach of Little Rock Central High School before joining Broyles on the Razorback’s staff. ______________ Today at the Little Rock […]

Bobby Bowden at Little Rock Touchdown Club (Part 2)jh25

I went to the Little Rock Touchdown Club and heard Bobby Bowden of Florida State speak. It was outstanding. Here is an article below on his visit from the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette:

LITTLE ROCK — Former Florida State Coach Bobby Bowden is familiar with pressure brought on by high expectations.

Two years ago, after the Seminoles finished the season 7-6, Bowden, 81, wanted to coach one more season. But he was not given that opportunity.

Florida State President T.K. Wetherell asked him to step aside as coach and stay with the team in the diminished role of university ambassador — which would have given him little input on the day-to-day operations of the football team.

Bowden declined. He announced his retirement, and Jimbo Fisher, who had been appointed as the school’s coachin-waiting two years earlier, was given the head-coaching position for the 2010 season.

“That’s just the way it is now,” Bowden told members of the media after speaking to the Little Rock Touchdown Club at the Peabody Hotel in Little Rock on Monday. “I had wanted to coach one more year and try and get to 400 wins.”

Bowden retired with a career record of 377-129-4 after the NCAA forced Florida State to vacate 12 victories from the 2006-2007 seasons for academic problems with his former players.

“They are paying the head coach so much money now that they demand you to win,” Bowden said. “The thing is, head coaches make so much money now that you can retire. There aren’t going to be a lot of coaches who last as long as Joe [Paterno] and I did.”

Paterno has coached 46 years at Penn State with a 402-136-3 record.

Bowden said he made approximately $40,000 per year when he was hired at Florida State in 1976; he was making $2.5 million when he retired two years ago.

His Florida State team won 10 or more games from 1987-2000, never finished lower than fourth in the final AP poll, and won national championships in 1993 and 1999.

But during his last five seasons as coach, the Seminoles went 38-27 and only won 1 ACC championship.

“Those last few years, we didn’t do a good job evaluating players like we once did,” Bowden said. “We would see a kid we wanted, and he wasn’t as good as advertised.”

Failing to live up to expectations also cost Bowden’s sons, Terry and Tommy, their coaching jobs.

Terry Bowden posted a 47-17-1 record from 1993-1998 at Auburn, but he stepped down in 1998 with the Tigers at 1-5 and his job security up in the air.

Tommy Bowden went 72-45 at Clemson from 1999-2008, but resigned when the Tigers started the season 3-3 after being ranked ninth in the preseason Associated Press poll in 2008.

Terry Bowden is now coaching at NCAA Division II North Alabama, while Tommy Bowden is out of coaching.

Bobby Bowden still cares about Florida State football, despite not being able to retire on his own terms. The Seminoles, 2-0 and ranked fifth in this week’s AP poll, host No. 1 Oklahoma Saturday night.

Bowden also acknowledged many of other changes in college coaching, but he remains a traditionalist:

Bowden does not approve of conference realignment, but said it is inevitable.

“Texas A&M is going to leave the Big 12, and if a bunch of schools from the Big 12 leave, then it’s going to change everything,” Bowden said.

On the lack of a playoff in college football: “I don’t think we’ll have a playoff, and it won’t happen because the presidents don’t want it.”

On the coach-in-waiting concept that Florida State, Texas, Maryland and Oregon have used with mixed results: “I think it’s good for the coach-in-waiting,” Bowden said, acknowledging that the coach-in-waiting usually gets promoted or a pay raise if the school doesn’t promote him by a certain date. “The president and athletic council came up with it, and I went along with it because I was at the end of my career.”

On the value a good college football team brings to a university: “When I first came to Florida State in 1976, when I would go recruiting, the president would say, ‘When you go to Tampa, please visit this girl because she’s a straight-A student and we want her,’” Bowden said. “Four years later, we went undefeated, played in our first major bowl game and were on national television. We would take about 2,500 students every year, but were getting 5,000-6,000 applicants because a successful football team attracts students.”

This article was published today at 4:28 a.m.Sports, Pages 19 on 09/13/2011

Sports 19

Former Florida State coach Bobby Bowden