Monthly Archives: December 2011

Christopher Hitchens’ debate with Douglas Wilson (Part 6)

Christopher Hitchens vs. Douglas Wilson Debate at Westminster Theological Seminary, Part 6 of 12

Douglas Wilson

I am glad that you found my response mildly amusing. I am also grateful we share an appreciation for Wodehouse. And I am extremely glad that you would like me to begin talking about the death of Christ for sin—which I fully intend to do. But the pattern the New Testament

gives us is to address the need for repentance first and then to talk about the need for faith in Christ as Savior. Within the boundaries of our discussion, repentance would be necessary because you have embraced the internal contradictions of atheism, all for the sake of avoiding God (Rom. 1:21; Ps. 14:1-2). So we will get to the gospel, but I am afraid I am going to have to ask you to hold your horses.

So, back to the business at hand, the business of intellectual repentance. Dismissing something as casuistry is not the same thing as a demonstration of casuistry, and refusing to answer questions because the

other guy is being evasive is quite a neat trick . . . if you can pull it off.

I am afraid you misconstrued my acknowledgement that—with regard to public civic life— atheists can certainly behave in a moral manner. My acknowledgement was not that morality has nothing to do with the supernatural, as you represented, but rather that morality has nothing to do with the supernatural if you want to be an inconsistent atheist. Here is that point again, couched another way and tied into our topic of debate.

Among many other reasons, Christianity is good for the world because it makes hypocrisy a coherent concept. The Christian faith certainly condemns hypocrisy as such, but because there is a fixed standard, this makes it possible for sinners to fail to meet it or for flaming hypocrites to pretend that they are meeting it when they have no intention of doing so. Now my question for you is this: Is there such a thing as atheist hypocrisy? When another atheist makes different ethical choices than you do (as Stalin and Mao certainly did), is there an overarching common standard for all atheists that you are obeying and which they are not obeying? If so, what is that standard and what book did it come from? Why is it binding on them if they differ with you?

And if there is not a common objective standard which binds all atheists, then would it not appear that the supernatural is necessary in order to have a standard of morality that can be reasonably articulated and defended?

So I am not saying you have to believe in the supernatural in order to live as a responsible citizen. I am saying you have to believe in the supernatural in order to be able to give a rational and coherent account of why you believe yourself obligated to live this way. In order to prove me wrong here, you must do more than employ words like “casuistry” or “evasions”—you simply need to provide that rational account. Given atheism, objective morality follows . . . how?

The Christian faith is good for the world because it provides the fixed standard which atheism cannot provide and because it provides forgiveness for sins, which atheism cannot provide either.

We need the direction of the standard because we are confused sinners. We need the forgiveness because we are guilty sinners. Atheism not only keeps the guilt, but it also keeps the confusion.

— Douglas Wilson

 

 

Related posts: 

Christopher Hitchens’ view on abortion may surprise you

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Christopher Hitchens discusses Ron Paul in 3-2-11 inteview

Max Brantley in the Arkansas Times Blog reports that Ron Paul is leading in Iowa. Maybe it is time to take a closer look at his views. In the above clip you will see Chistopher Hitchens discuss Ron Paul’s views. In the clip below you will find Ron Paul’s latest commercial. Below is a short […]

Evangelicals react to Christopher Hitchens’ death plus video clips of Hitchens debate (part 3)

DEBATE William Lane Craig vs Christopher Hitchens Does God Exist 07 Below are some reactions of evangelical leaders to the news of Christopher Hitchens’ death:   Christian leaders react to Hitchens’ death Posted on Dec 16, 2011 | by Michael Foust   DEBATE William Lane Craig vs Christopher Hitchens Does God Exist 08 Author and […]

Evangelicals react to Christopher Hitchens’ death plus video clips of Hitchens debate (part 2)

DEBATE William Lane Craig vs Christopher Hitchens Does God Exist 04 Below are some reactions of evangelical leaders to the news of Christopher Hitchens’ death: Christian leaders react to Hitchens’ death Posted on Dec 16, 2011 | by Michael Foust DEBATE William Lane Craig vs Christopher Hitchens Does God Exist 05 Author and speaker Christopher […]

Evangelicals react to Christopher Hitchens’ death plus video clips of Hitchens debate (part 1)

DEBATE William Lane Craig vs Christopher Hitchens Does God Exist 01 Below are some reactions of evangelical leaders to the news of Christopher Hitchens’ death: Christian leaders react to Hitchens’ death Posted on Dec 16, 2011 | by Michael Foust Author and speaker Christopher Hitchens, a leader of an aggressive form of atheism that eventually […]

Dear Senator Pryor, why not pass the Balanced Budget Amendment? (“Thirsty Thursday”, Open letter to Senator Pryor)

Dear Senator Pryor,

Why not pass the Balanced Budget Amendment? As you know that federal deficit is at all time high (1.6 trillion deficit with revenues of 2.2 trillion and spending at 3.8 trillion).

On my blog www.HaltingArkansasLiberalswithTruth.com I took you at your word and sent you over 100 emails with specific spending cut ideas. However, I did not see any of them in the recent debt deal that Congress adopted. Now I am trying another approach. Every week from now on I will send you an email explaining different reasons why we need the Balanced Budget Amendment. It will appear on my blog on “Thirsty Thursday” because the government is always thirsty for more money to spend.

New CBO Numbers Re-Confirm that Balancing the Budget Is Simple with Modest Fiscal Restraint

Posted by Daniel J. Mitchell

Many of the politicians in Washington, including President Obama during his State of the Union address, piously tell us that there is no way to balance the budget without tax increases. Trying to get rid of red ink without higher taxes, they tell us, would require “savage” and “draconian” budget cuts.

I would like to slash the budget and free up resources for private-sector growth, so that sounds good to me. But what’s the truth?

The Congressional Budget Office has just released its 10-year projections for the budget, so I crunched the numbers to determine what it would take to balance the budget without tax hikes. Much to nobody’s surprise, the politicians are not telling the truth.

The chart below shows that revenues are expected to grow (because of factors such as inflation, more population, and economic expansion) by more than 7 percent each year. Balancing the budget is simple so long as politicians increase spending at a slower rate. If they freeze the budget, we almost balance the budget by 2017. If federal spending is capped so it grows 1 percent each year, the budget is balanced in 2019. And if the crowd in Washington can limit spending growth to about 2 percent each year, red ink almost disappears in just 10 years.

These numbers, incidentally, assume that the 2001 and 2003 tax cuts are made permanent (they are now scheduled to expire in two years). They also assume that the AMT is adjusted for inflation, so the chart shows that we can balance the budget without any increase in the tax burden.

I did these calculations last year, and found the same results. And I also examined how we balanced the budget in the 1990s and found that spending restraint was the key. The combination of a GOP Congress and Bill Clinton in the White House led to a four-year period of government spending growing by an average of just 2.9 percent each year.

We also have international evidence showing that spending restraint – not higher taxes – is the key to balancing the budget. New Zealand got rid of a big budget deficit in the 1990s with a five-year spending freeze. Canada also got rid of red ink that decade with a five-year period where spending grew by an average of only 1 percent per year. And Ireland slashed its deficit in the late 1980s by 10 percentage points of GDP with a four-year spending freeze.

No wonder international bureaucracies such as the International Monetary fund and European Central Bank are producing research showing that spending discipline is the right approach

Daniel J. Mitchell • January 27, 2011 @ 12:00 pm
Filed under: Government and Politics; Health Care; Tax and Budget Policy

Johnny Cash (Part 6)

I got to see Cash perform in 1978 in Memphis.

Johnny Cash remembered for his faith-based music

Johnny Cash was remembered for how his music “sang the faith” in an article published on Sunday in the Italian Bishops’ Conference’s newspaper Avvenire. Without his faith, the article said, “the voice of Cash would not have been the same,” reports Catholic News Agency.

The bishops’ newspaper remembered the man who, though he “knew” prison and nearly died of a drug overdose, “still … at a certain point in his life, took from it a possible Meaning, with a capital letter.” Cash dedicated the last of his songs, the paper noted, “to sorrowful, moving hymns to man, inserted within his own faith in a God that gives horizons and hopes to man.”

Avvenire also looked at Cash’s work by reviewing the album “Ain’t No Grave,” which it called an “ulterior and touching witness of art imbued with faith and humanity.”

Looking at the recently released book “The Man in Black—Commentated Texts”, Avvenire saw Cash as a ” young country singer that was educated to respect the earth and believe that there is Someone that governs it.”

Later, the paper recalled, he became a “spokesperson of the rejects” in playing concerts for and representing those in jail, “interpreting their repentances and hardships.”

Distancing himself from the American dream, the newspaper wrote, he highlights the injustices and tragedies, shedding light on his true personality as a man “for the poor” and “for those who’ve never read or listened to the words that Jesus said.”

Citing the authors of the book, Valter and Francesco Binaghi, who note that Cash’s inheritance for the 21st century man is a “voice, guitar and faith,” Avvenire asserted that “without faith, the voice of Cash would not have been the same and we would have an example less of how much, (when) wanting to do so, even a guitar can help (us) to live.”

Cash, known as the “Man in Black,” died of diabetes-associated complications after a prolific singing and songwriting career in Sept. 2003. In his lifetime, he also released an series called “The Johnny Cash Spoken Word New Testament,” released on cassette in 1989 and later on CD in 2003.

About the spoken word recordings, he wrote that he approached each session “with fear, respect, awe and reverence for the subject matter. I also did it with a great deal of joy, because I love the Word.”

Nice to be feared: Knoxville news paper glad Vols don’t play hogs in 2012

Tennessee head coach Derek Dooley looks at the point after attempt that put Arkansas ahead 49-7 at Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium in Fayetteville on Nov. 12, 2011. (AMY SMOTHERMAN BURGESS/NEWS SENTINEL)<br />

Photo by Amy Smotherman Burgess, ©KNS/2011 //

Arkansas wide receiver Joe Adams runs back a punt for a touchdown against Tennessee at Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium in Fayetteville on Nov. 12, 2011.  (AMY SMOTHERMAN BURGESS/NEWS SENTINEL)<br />

Photo by Amy Smotherman Burgess, ©KNS/2011

Arkansas wide receiver Joe Adams runs back a punt for a touchdown against Tennessee at Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium in Fayetteville on Nov. 12, 2011. (AMY SMOTHERMAN BURGESS/NEWS SENTINEL)

Arkansas wide receiver Joe Adams breaks tackles to return a punt for a touchdown against Tennessee at Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium in Fayetteville on Nov. 12, 2011. UT lost the game 49-7. (AMY SMOTHERMAN BURGESS/NEWS SENTINEL)<br />

Photo by Amy Smotherman Burgess, ©KNS/2011

Arkansas wide receiver Joe Adams breaks tackles to return a punt for a touchdown against Tennessee at Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium in Fayetteville on Nov. 12, 2011. UT lost the game 49-7. (AMY SMOTHERMAN BURGESS/NEWS SENTINEL)

Arkansas wide receiver Joe Adams breaks past Tennessee defensive back Brian Randolph  to return a punt for a touchdown at Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium in Fayetteville on Nov. 12, 2011. UT lost the game 49-7. (AMY SMOTHERMAN BURGESS/NEWS SENTINEL)<br />

Photo by Amy Smotherman Burgess, ©KNS/2011

Arkansas wide receiver Joe Adams breaks past Tennessee defensive back Brian Randolph to return a punt for a touchdown at Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium in Fayetteville on Nov. 12, 2011. UT lost the game 49-7. (AMY SMOTHERMAN BURGESS/NEWS

In the Knoxville News Paper today I read:

SEC unveils 2012 schedule; Vols avoid Arkansas

  • By Andrew Gribble
  • govolsxtra.com
  • Posted December 28, 2011 at 10:10 a.m., updated December 28, 2011 at 10:16 a.m.

Given a choice, Tennessee would have likely swapped its game against highly-ranked Arkansas for a shorter drive to Mississippi State in a heartbeat last season.

In theory, that’s exactly what the Vols will do in 2012, according to its revised schedule, which was released today by the SEC.

The Vols won’t have to worry about a rematch with the Razorbacks, who, after routing the Vols, 49-7, in November, were originally scheduled to play atNeyland Stadium next year. Instead, that spot was filled with the SEC’s newest member, Missouri, which will begin its annual series with UT in Knoxville on Nov. 10.

The Vols’ originally scheduled road trip to take on the Bulldogs remained in place. UT, after a bye week, will gun for its first October win against an SEC foe since 2009 when it travels to Starkville on Oct. 13. The Bulldogs will join Alabama (Oct. 20) as UT’s only two SEC West foes on the schedule.

Considering the lengthy delay, hand-wringing by SEC athletic directors and added complexity because of the addition of two new teams, the release of UT’s new schedule was relatively anti-climactic. The Vols’ four non-conference games remained in tact and unmoved, they will continue to face their annual rivals around the same time of year that they always do and the SEC’s other new team, Texas A&M, is nowhere to be found.

Thanks to consecutive road games with Georgia and Mississippi State and an open date sandwiched in between the two, the Vols will go four weeks without a game at Neyland Stadium from Sept. 22 (Akron) to Oct. 20 (Alabama). That quirk is compensated by the presence of just one road game (at Vanderbilt, Nov. 17) in the entire month of November.

Eight of UT’s 12 opponents next season won at least six games in 2011. Of the five SEC teams UT won’t face in 2012 — LSU, Arkansas, Auburn, Texas A&M and Ole Miss — all but one (Ole Miss) qualified for a postseason bowl.

 

2012 schedule

Sept. 1 – NC State (Atlanta)

Sept. 8 – Georgia State

Sept. 15 – Florida

Sept. 22 – Akron

Sept. 29 – at Georgia

Oct. 6 – Open

Oct. 13 – at Mississippi State

Oct. 20 – Alabama

Oct. 27 – at South Carolina

Nov. 3 – Troy

Nov. 10 – Missouri

Nov. 17 – at Vanderbilt

Nov. 24 – Kentucky

I got this from www.knoxnews.com:

A team-by-team look at the 2012 football schedules for teams in the SEC.

ALABAMA

Sept. 15: at Arkansas

Sept. 29: Ole Miss

Oct. 13: at Missouri

Oct. 20: at Tennessee

Oct. 27: Mississippi State

Nov. 3: at LSU

Nov. 10: Texas A&M

Nov. 24: Auburn

ARKANSAS

Sept. 15: Alabama

Sept. 29: Texas A&M

Oct. 6: at Auburn

Oct. 13: Kentucky

Oct. 27: Ole Miss

Nov. 10: at South Carolina

Nov. 17: at Mississippi State

Nov. 24: LSU

AUBURN

Sept. 8: at Mississippi State

Sept. 22: LSU

Oct. 6: Arkansas

Oct. 13: at Ole Miss

Oct. 20: at Vanderbilt

Oct. 27: Texas A&M

Nov. 10: Georgia

Nov. 24: at Alabama

FLORIDA

Sept. 8: at Texas A&M

Sept. 15: at Tennessee

Sept. 22: Kentucky

Oct. 6: LSU

Oct. 13: at Vanderbilt

Oct. 20: South Carolina

Oct. 27: Vs. Georgia (Jacksonville)

Nov. 3: Missouri

GEORGIA

Sept. 8: at Missouri

Sept. 22: Vanderbilt

Sept. 29: Tennessee

Oct. 6: at South Carolina

Oct. 20: at Kentucky

Oct. 27: Vs. Florida (Jacksonville)

Nov. 3: Ole Miss

Nov. 10: at Auburn

KENTUCKY

Sept. 22: at Florida

Sept. 29: South Carolina

Oct. 6: Mississippi State

Oct. 13: at Arkansas

Oct. 20: Georgia

Oct. 27: at Missouri

Nov. 3: Vanderbilt

Nov. 24: at Tennessee

LSU

Sept. 22: at Auburn

Oct. 6: at Florida

Oct. 13: South Carolina

Oct. 20: at Texas A&M

Nov. 3: Alabama

Nov. 10: Mississippi State

Nov. 17: Ole Miss

Nov. 24: at Arkansas

OLE MISS

Sept. 29: at Alabama

Oct. 6: Texas A&M

Oct. 13: Auburn

Oct. 27: at Arkansas

Nov. 3: at Georgia

Nov. 10: Vanderbilt

Nov. 17: at LSU

Nov. 24: Mississippi State

MISSISSIPPI STATE

Sept. 8: Auburn

Oct. 6: at Kentucky

Oct. 13: Tennessee

Oct. 27: at Alabama

Nov. 3: Texas A&M

Nov. 10: at LSU

Nov. 17: Arkansas

Nov. 24: at Ole Miss

MISSOURI

Sept. 8: Georgia

Sept. 22: at South Carolina

Oct. 6: Vanderbilt

Oct. 13: Alabama

Oct. 27: Kentucky

Nov. 3: at Florida

Nov. 10: at Tennessee

Nov. 24: at Texas A&M

SOUTH CAROLINA

Aug. 30: at Vanderbilt

Sept. 22: Missouri

Sept. 29: at Kentucky

Oct. 6: Georgia

Oct. 13: at LSU

Oct. 20: at Florida

Oct. 27: Tennessee

Nov. 10: Arkansas

TEXAS A&M

Sept. 8: Florida

Sept. 29: Vs. Arkansas

Oct. 6: at Ole Miss

Oct. 20: LSU

Oct. 27: at Auburn

Nov. 3: at Mississippi State

Nov. 10: at Alabama

Nov. 24: Missouri

VANDERBILT

Aug. 30: South Carolina

Sept. 22: at Georgia

Oct. 6: at Missouri

Oct. 13: Florida

Oct. 20: Auburn

Nov. 3: at Kentucky

Nov. 10: at Ole Miss

Nov. 17: Tennessee

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Johnny Majors speaks at Little Rock Touchdown Club (Part 11)jh79

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Will Dooley be given enough time to turn Vols around? Arkansas loss energizes foes of Dooley jh84

Photo by Amy Smotherman Burgess, ©KNS/2011 Tennessee head coach Derek Dooley reacts as Arkansas scores their seventh touchdown of the night at Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium in Fayetteville on Nov. 12, 2011. (AMY SMOTHERMAN BURGESS/NEWS SENTINEL)

Why is this victory over the Vols so sweet? Probably because of 71 and 98!! jh85

  Above is a picture from my camera at the game. Photo I have wondered why this victory meant over Tennessee meant so much to our Razorback Nation. I guess the answer is simply that we have lost so many close heartbreaking games to the Vols over the years and the 1971 and 1998 games […]

Pictures of distressed Vols during 49-7 whipping by Razorbacks

Herschel Walker brought Georgia home the national championship in his freshman year and he started off 1981 with a 44-0 victory over Tennessee. Arkansas’ 49-7  victory over Tennessee was the worst defeat in the SEC since this 1981 game pictured above. Below are some of the pictures of the dejected Vols during Saturday’s game. ) […]

 

Majors speaks at Little Rock Touchdown Club (Part 8)jh76

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The two roads to a Razorback national championship in 2011 jh83

An impressive 49-7 victory over the UT Vols helped the Razorbacks rise to #6 in the BCS. Now we need Oklahoma to beat Okl St and Auburn to beat Alabama and then Arkansas will have a road to the National Championship. With a victory over Miss St and LSU and then a victory over Georgia […]

17 seniors play their last game in Fayetteville for Hogs jh82

    My son Wilson and I went to the game on Saturday in Fayetteville and saw the Razorback Stadium. Above is a picture of the seniors and Seth Armburst is running out on the field. Below is an article by Wally Hall that mentions the names of all  of the 17 seniors for the […]

Joe Adams’ punt return deflated Vols as Razorbacks roll jh81

Photo by Amy Smotherman Burgess, ©KNS/2011 Arkansas wide receiver Joe Adams runs back a punt for a touchdown against Tennessee at Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium in Fayetteville on Nov. 12, 2011. (AMY SMOTHERMAN BURGESS/NEWS SENTINEL) Photo by Amy Smotherman Burgess, ©KNS/2011 Arkansas wide receiver Joe Adams breaks past Tennessee defensive back Brian Randolph to […]

Arkansas has convincing win over Vols

Photo by Jason Ivester Arkansas running back Dennis Johnson scored on two touchdown runs of 71 and 15 yards Saturday at Reynolds Razorback Stadium in Fayetteville, helping the Razorbacks post a 49-7 victory over Tennessee and rise from No. 8 to No. 6 in the BCS standings. _____________ My son Wilson and I enjoyed watching […]

 

Christopher Hitchens and William Lane Craig debate (part 4)

DEBATE William Lane Craig vs Christopher Hitchens Does God Exist 11

Below are some reactions of evangelical leaders to the news of Christopher Hitchens’ death:

DEBATE William Lane Craig vs Christopher Hitchens Does God Exist 12

 
 
DEBATE William Lane Craig vs Christopher Hitchens Does God Exist 13
The Christian Post > World|Fri, Dec. 16 2011 12:45 PM EDT

Christians Grieve Death of Christopher Hitchens; Share Hopes for Deathbed Conversion

By Eryn Sun | Christian Post Reporter

Christians everywhere have been responding in grief and sadness over the death of famed atheist Christopher Hitchens, who passed away late Thursday evening after a yearlong battle with esophageal cancer.

From pastors to theologians alike, all expressed pain and sorrow over the recent news, which Vanity Fair was the first to announce. The magazine reported that Hitchens had died from pneumonia, a complication from his stage IV cancer. He was 62 years old.

Pastor Rick Warren, founder of Saddleback Church in Lake Forest, Calif., tweeted, “My friend Christopher Hitchens has died. I loved & prayed for him constantly & grieve his loss. He knows the Truth now.”

DEBATE William Lane Craig vs Christopher Hitchens Does God Exist 14

Warren also relayed messages of hope, sharing the Gospel through repeated posts. “’God so loved you that he gave his only Son, that if you believe in him you will not perish but have eternal life’Jn3:16.”

“’Anyone who calls on the name of the Lord will be saved’ Joel 2:32. No one has ever seen or heard or even imagined the wonderful things God has prepared for those who love him!’ 1 Cor.2:9.”

President of The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary Albert Mohler, an influential leader among evangelicals, also tweeted multiple posts in response to Hitchens’ passing.

He said Hitchens’ death “is an excruciating reminder of the consequences of unbelief. We can only pray others will believe.”

Immediately after his first post, Mohler added, “Few things are so valued in this life as brilliance & eloquence. Neither will matter in the world to come.”

“The point about Christopher Hitchens is not that he died of unbelief,” he concluded, “but that his unbelief is all that matters now. Unspeakably sad.”

DEBATE William Lane Craig vs Christopher Hitchens Does God Exist 15

Author of the New York Times bestseller God Is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything, Hitchens is considered one of the most prominent figures in the “new atheism” movement, though the English-born author has described himself as an anti-theist.

The heavy smoker and drinker was diagnosed with esophageal cancer last year and underwent several treatments from radiation therapy to a specially designed treatment created in part by outspoken evangelical scientist Francis Collins, which mapped out Hitchens’ entire genetic make-up to target damaged DNA.

During his treatment, Christians offered their prayers for the atheist and also established the “Everybody Pray for Hitchens Day” last year. But Hitchens advised believers not to “trouble deaf heaven with your bootless cries” “unless, of course, it makes you feel better.” He also told CNN last year that he would not turn to Christ on his deathbed, at least not while he’s lucid.

It was just two months ago in October when Hitchens again affirmed his atheist beliefs, declaring that “there is no absolute truth” and “no supreme leader.”

Along with other Christian leaders, atheist-turned-Christian Lee Strobel, author of The Case for Christ, expressed his grief over Hitchens’ death on Twitter.

“I was among many who shared Christ with him; so sad he rejected Gospel,” Strobel added.

Denny Burk, associate professor of biblical studies at Boyce College, also mourned the death of the “unique public intellectual with a rapier wit and an even sharper pen.”

DEBATE William Lane Craig vs Christopher Hitchens Does God Exist 16

“Hitchens always fascinated me not merely because of his intellect and prose, but also because of his independence,” Burk penned on his website.

“He was a darling of the left, yet he remained a firm supporter of the Iraq War. He was an avowed atheist, yet he insisted on the superior quality of the King James Bible and chaffed against gender neutral translations. He wanted to ban religious arguments from rational discourse, yet he wrote a book with Calvinist intellectual and pastor Doug Wilson.”

“In the last year of his life, Hitchens wrote some searching essays about his cancer and impending death,” he continued. “He seemed to stand ever resolute in his atheism and to insist that the hour of his demise must be the proving ground of his unbelief.”

“I would like to think that perhaps his skepticism didn’t win out in the end,” Burk hoped. “I would like to think that the gospel he heard from Wilson and others might have broken through just in time as it did for the thief on the cross. Stranger things have happened, and the Lord’s arm indeed is not too short to save even in such a moment. Nevertheless, we may never have any evidence this side of glory that the light finally broke through to Hitchens.”

Pastor Douglas Wilson, a conservative reformed evangelical theologian who was featured alongside Hitchens in the documentary “Collision,” wrote in detail about his relationship with the British-American journalist and his thoughts on his death on Christianity Today.

The two had together created the book Is Christianity Good for the World? – a small compilation of their debates together and had since gotten to know each other better.

“Christopher knew that faithful Christians believe that it is appointed to man once to die, and after that the Judgment,” Wilson penned. “He knew that we believe what Jesus taught about the reality of damnation. He also knew that we believe – for I told him – that in this life, the door of repentance is always open.”

“We have no indication that Christopher ever called on the Lord before he died, and if he did not, then Scriptures plainly teach that he is lost forever. But we do have every indication that Christ died for sinners, men and women just like Christopher. We know that the Lord has more than once hired workers for his vineyard when the sun was almost down.”

Wilson knew that Hitchens was concerned with that aspect of faith, discussing several times with interviewees the idea of a “deathbed conversion.”

Though he assured everyone that if anything like that would happen, it would be certain that the cancer or the chemo had gotten into his brain, it appeared as though Hitchens entertained the notion, Wilson observed.

“When Christopher gave [those] interviews, he was manifestly in his right mind, and the thought had clearly occurred to him that he might not feel in just a few months the way he did at present.”

Like Burk, the Christ Church pastor and prolific speaker hoped that Hitchens had accepted Christ during his final moments and had a “gracious twist at the end.” “We … commend Christopher to the Judge of the whole earth, who will certainly do right,” Wilson declared.

Justin Taylor, vice president of editorial at Crossway, also captured a hint of what Wilson saw in Hitchens.

On The Gospel Coalition website, he uploaded the debate-documentary “Collision,” finding the final scene with Wilson and Hitchens especially telling of what Hitchens thought of God and religion.

The scene portrayed both men in the back seat of a car, discussing debating itself as well as Hitchens’ difference between fellow atheist Richard Dawkins.

“If I could convert everyone in the world, not convert, if I could convince to be a nonbeliever, and I’d really done brilliantly, and there’s only one left, one more and then it’d be done, there’d be no more religion in the world, no more deism, theism,” Hitchens stated, “I wouldn’t do it.”

“And Dawkins said, ‘What do you mean you wouldn’t do it?’” he recalled. “I said I don’t quite know why I wouldn’t do it. And it’s not just because there’d be nothing left to argue with and no one left to argue with. It’s not just that. Though it would be that.”

“Somehow if I could drive it out of the world, I wouldn’t,” Hitchens revealed to Wilson. “And the incredulity with which he (Dawkins) looked at me, stays with me still, I’ve got to say.”

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Brantley condemns Mississippi personhood amendment because it “gives the status of a human being to a zygote” (Part 2)

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Review of Carl Sagan book (Part 4 of series on Evolution) The Long War against God-Henry Morris, part 5 of 6 Uploaded by FLIPWORLDUPSIDEDOWN3 on Aug 30, 2010 http://www.icr.org/ http://store.icr.org/prodinfo.asp?number=BLOWA2 http://store.icr.org/prodinfo.asp?number=BLOWASG http://www.fliptheworldupsidedown.com/blog _______________________ This is a review I did a few years ago. THE DEMON-HAUNTED WORLD: Science as a Candle in the Dark by Carl […]

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Arkansas Times Blogger says Communists were not atheistic, but they were and they believed “might made right” jh48

Paul Kurtz pictured above. Norma Bates noted on the Arkansas Times Blog yesterday The most common justification throughout history – the elephant in everybody’s living room – is religion. “God is on our side.” “We are the chosen people.” “God gave us this land.” “God said to — .” Judaism, Christianity, or that relative Johnny-come-lately […]

Atheists confronted: How I confronted Carl Sagan the year before he died jh47

In today’s news you will read about Kirk Cameron taking on the atheist Stephen Hawking over some recent assertions he made concerning the existence of heaven. Back in December of 1995 I had the opportunity to correspond with Carl Sagan about a year before his untimely death. Sarah Anne Hughes in her article,”Kirk Cameron criticizes […]

Is the Bible historically accurate? (Part 9A) jh46

My sons Wilson and Hunter are now climbing a mountain in the LA area. However, they will be helping Sherwood tonight at Santa Monica Promenade. Sherwood preaches and has question and answer sessions. Below  a former muslim turned atheist debates Sherwood on the issue of evolution. My sons will be attending church on Sunday at […]

Cheetah from Tarzan films dies, (video clips and related articles)

Tarzan – Boy – Cheetah

Uploaded by on Jul 1, 2010

Having a Chuckle !!!! .

____________________________

I loved these movies even though they were shot only in California:

Cheetah, chimp from Tarzan films, dies

By Ashley Hayes, CNN
updated 8:05 AM EST, Wed December 28, 2011

Johnny Weissmuller and Maureen O'Sullivan hold hands with Cheetah the chimpanzee in
Johnny Weissmuller and Maureen O’Sullivan hold hands with Cheetah the chimpanzee in “Tarzan and His Mate.”

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

    • Cheetah starred in the Tarzan films from 1932 through 1934
    • He was roughly 80 years old when he died Saturday
    • Primate sanctuary staffers remember him as “very compassionate”

 

(CNN) — Condolences poured in to a Florida primate sanctuary Wednesday after the death of Cheetah, a chimpanzee who starred in the Tarzan movies during the 1930s.

“I grew up watching Tarzan and Cheetah from a boy,” a man identifying himself as Thomas from England wrote on the Suncoast Primate Sanctuary’s website. “God bless you Cheetah. Now you and Tarzan are together again.”

The chimpanzee died Saturday after suffering kidney failure the week before, the sanctuary foundation said on the site. He was roughly 80 years old, Debbie Cobb, the sanctuary’s outreach director, told CNN affiliate WFLA.

Cobb recalled Cheetah as an outgoing chimp who loved finger painting and watching football and who was soothed by Christian music, the station said.

Cheetah appeared in the Tarzan moves from 1932 through 1934, Cobb told WFLA. According to the website Tarzanmovieguide.com, “Tarzan the Ape Man” was released in 1932 and “Tarzan and his Mate” in 1934.

Both movies starred Johnny Weissmuller as Tarzan. Weissmuller — the first speaking Tarzan, according to the Internet Movie Database website — died in 1984.

Cheetah came to the primate sanctuary from Weissmuller’s Florida estate around 1960, Cobb told WFLA. He was the most famous of the sanctuary’s 15 chimpanzees.

“He was very compassionate,” Cobb said. “He could tell if I was having a good day or a bad day. He was always trying to get me to laugh if he thought I was having a bad day. He was very in tune to human feelings.”

Cheetah was known for his ability to stand up and walk like a person, sanctuary volunteer Ron Priest told WFLA.

Another distinguishing characteristic: “When he didn’t like somebody or something that was going on, he would pick up some poop and throw it at them,” Priest said. “He could get you at 30 feet with bars in between.”

Still, Cobb told the station, “He wasn’t a chimp that caused a lot of problems.”

Cheetah is not believed to have any children, Priest said.

Condolences on the sanctuary site were received from numerous countries and in several different languages. A few posters credited him with helping them develop a love for animals.

“Cheetah will remain forever remembered in history,” wrote one man from Malta.

“This little man was almost human,” an anonymous poster wrote. “Some of the antics he got up to used to make me laugh when I was in my teens many years ago. Thanks Cheetah for all the good times you had and made us all laugh. You will be a star that will be always remembered. I am in my 60s now and grew up with you.”

Cheetah The Chimp, Drunk

Cheeta’s Hitler impression

Uploaded by on Dec 14, 2008

The final scene from 1943’s “Tarzan Triumphs”, where Cheeta grabs the radio microphone and is mistaken for the fuhrer.

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Maureen O’Sullivan talks about Tarzan

Uploaded by on Mar 15, 2010

Maureen O’Sullivan talking about her Tarzan days. There is also a pretty cool clip of Johnny Weissmuller reflecting on it from the sixties.

Remember what happened between Woody Allen and Maureen O’Sullivan:

Mia Farrow’s Mother Lashes Out At ‘Evil’ Allen

August 17, 1992|This story contains information from the Dallas Morning News, Reuters, the Associated Press and the New York Daily News

In an emotional defense of her daughter, Mia Farrow’s mother has denounced Woody Allen as “a desperate and evil man.” Actress Maureen O’Sullivan bitterly rebuked Allen, saying his child custody suit against Farrow was part of a “tragic” period for her daughter.

Allen is seeking custody of the couple’s three children – Moses, 14, Dylan, 7, and Satchel, 4 1/2. Farrow and Allen never married.

“As Mia’s mother, and speaking for the rest of our family, it has been tragic to watch what she has gone through for the last seven months,” said O’Sullivan. “This is a cheap shot from a desperate and evil man.”

O’Sullivan’s statement, issued Friday through her spokesman, John Springer, did not elaborate about the seven months of turmoil. “She is the soul of honor,” O’Sullivan, 81, said of her daughter, “but this last and terrible event has forced her from the privacy that she so treasures.

“The truth of this story will soon be made public. For the moment, the case rests in the hands of her lawyers, David Levett and Alan Dershowitz.” Allen’s spokeswoman, Leslee Dart, did not comment on O’Sullivan’s remarks, which raised the public-relations stakes in the high-profile battle.

Dershowitz, whose clients have included Claus von Bulow, Leona Helmsley and Mike Tyson, had been hired in an effort to head off what could be a nasty legal battle between Allen and Farrow, sources close to the couple said.

Farrow has eight other children, three with ex-husband Andre Previn and five she adopted.

____________________

Johnny Weissmuller short interview

Uploaded by on Jan 28, 2011

Johnny being interview by George Hamilton and his Wife at the 50th Anniversay of MGM (Charity premiere of “That’s Entertainment”) 1974

________________________

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By Everette Hatcher III, on June 23, 2011 at 5:37 am, under Current Events, Francis Schaeffer. No Comments

Christopher Hitchens’ debate with Douglas Wilson (Part 5)

Christopher Hitchens vs. Douglas Wilson Debate at Westminster Theological Seminary, Part 5 of 12

PART 2 

5/10/2007 08:54 AM

Christopher Hitchens

This is mildly amusing casuistry which—aside from its recommendation of Wodehouse—contains nothing that distinguishes it from Islam or Hinduism or indeed humanism. Were I a Christian, I would be highly unsettled by the huge number of concessions that Wilson makes.

Since I am not a Christian, I mutter a mild “thank you” for his admission that morality has nothing at all to do with the supernatural. My book argues that religious belief has now become purely optional and cannot be mandated by anything revealed or anything divine. It is one among an infinite number of private “faiths,” which do not disturb me in the least as long as its adherents agree to leave me alone.

Since Wilson does not even attempt to persuade me that Christ died for my sins (and can yet vicariously forgive them) or that I am the object of a divine design or that any of the events described in the two Testaments actually occurred or that extreme penalties will attend any disagreement with his view, I am happy to leave our disagreement exactly where it is: as one of the decreasingly interesting disputes between those who cling so tentatively to man-made “Holy Writ” and those who have no need to consult such texts in pursuit of truth or beauty or an ethical life. The existence or otherwise of an indifferent cosmos (the overwhelmingly probable state of the case) would no more reduce our mutual human obligations than would the quite weird theory of a celestial dictatorship, whether Aztec or Muslim or (as you seem to insist) Christian.

The sole difference is that we would be acting out of obligation toward others out of mutual interest and sympathy but without the impulse of terrifying punishment or selfish reward. Some of us can handle this thought and some, evidently, cannot. I have a slight suspicion as to which is more moral.

On a recent visit to Arkansas, I ran into a huge billboard near the Little Rock airport which simply said “JESUS.” This struck me as saying too much as well as too little, and I had almost forgotten it until Wilson’s evasions brought it back to mind.

— Christopher Hitchens

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Woody Allen films and the issue of guilt (Woody Wednesday)

Woody Allen and the Abandonment of Guilt

Dr. Marc T. Newman : AgapePress

In considering filmmaking as a pure visual art form, Woody Allen would have to be considered a master of the medium. From his humble beginnings as a comedy writer and filmmaker, he has emerged as a major influential force in Hollywood. Actors flock to his projects just to have a chance to work with him. He is funny, creative, and philosophical in his musings about love, life, and death.

Woody Allen is an Oscar award-winning director and screenwriter. His latest film, “Match Point,” has garnered another screenwriting nomination for Allen from the Academy. And while industry buzz is growing behind “Crash” screenwriters Paul Haggis and Bobby Moresco to win, Allen’s nomination is not a courtesy nod to an aging dinosaur. Most critics have hailed “Match Point” as Allen’s comeback film – a movie that demonstrates that Allen is still performing at the height of his powers. “Match Point” most closely resembles another of Allen’s Oscar-nominated films – 1990’s “Crimes and Misdemeanors.” Comparing these two critically-acclaimed films shines a light not only on Woody Allen’s dark and cynical writer’s journey, but also on a culture that consistently chooses to honor his work.

Crimes and Misdemeanors – Sin and Struggle

“Crimes and Misdemeanors” is an odd morality tale. Judah Rosenthal is an ophthalmologist who has been carrying on an affair for over two years. When his mistress threatens to call his wife, he contracts to have her killed. Throughout the film, characters attempt to make sense of their moral universe. Judah struggles with his guilt and at one point seems so driven by his belief that he must be punished for his sin that he nearly decides to call the police to turn himself in. He is dissuaded by a veiled threat from his mob-connected brother Jack (who arranged the murder at Judah’s request). As time goes by, Judah finds that he is not punished – not by the secular authorities or by God. After a while, even the guilty feelings fade away. He decides that the idea that evil is always punished is only true in the movies. In real life, people get away with it. Judah pushes aside his guilt, returns to his privileged life and walks off, with his wife, into the sunset.

Allen comes down on the wrong side of the moral equation in “Crimes and Misdemeanors” because he is unwilling, or unable, to take into account the judgment of God in the world to come. His materialist-informed worldview discounts or denies that the reality of eternity is more significant than what happens in this life. What made the film noteworthy was its depiction of the moral struggle that people go through when they sin. What made the film chilling is the knowledge that the rationalism engaged in by Judah in the movie represents more than fiction. Psalms and Proverbs are full of pleas from weary saints who complain to God about the prosperous wicked. We cannot know the mind of God. Some sins are punished swiftly; others apparently are not punished at all in this life. But God declares that one day everything done is darkness will be revealed in the light (1 Corinthians 4-5).

Match Point – No Sin, Just Luck

Fifteen years later, Allen gives audiences “Match Point,” the story of Chris Wilton, a British social-climbing tennis pro who marries for money and prestige, but continues to lust after a poor American actress, Nola Rice, who is dating his future brother-in-law. The affair with Nola begins and ends before Chris’ marriage, but picks up again when Nola returns to England. What begins as animal attraction turns complicated as Nola begins pressuring Chris to leave his wife. Chris is torn between his feelings for Nola and the wealth, power, and privilege that he enjoys by being married to his wife, Chloe. Ultimately he determines that he must be rid of one of them. How best to do it while risking the least for himself? Kill one – but make it look like someone else did it. The audience is left guessing whether he will kill Nola, thereby covering his tracks and keeping his wife, or kill Chloe, inheriting her wealth and gaining the sympathy of her family, and then take up again with Nola. Once the deed is done, there is the crying and terror over the prospect of being found out and punished that must accompany any such act. But when word of the homicide appears in the paper, and the fictional motives that Chris hoped to plant are printed as if they are fact, Chris discovers that he has gotten away with it.

The theme of “Match Point” is hammered into the audience over and over again – the world runs on luck. From Chris’ tennis career, to his marriage to a rich and beautiful woman and into a paternalistic and helpful family, to plot twists involving incriminating evidence, everything just falls his way at crucial moments. And while some characters continue to extol the virtues of hard work and perseverance, Chris recognizes and, in the end, vocalizes that the best attribute to possess is good fortune. There is no justice; there is only the slim divide between being caught and getting away with it. No one is smart enough to cover all the bases, so in the end much of it comes down to luck. Chris has it; his victim did not.

Unlike “Crimes and Misdemeanors,” no great struggle over guilt and sin is played out on the screen. The only scene that looks remotely like remorse occurs right after the act. Beyond that, Chris merely lies to those he knows and stonewalls the police. He is like the boy who kills his parents and then begs the judge for leniency because he is an orphan
– only in this case, he gets off.

“Crimes and Misdemeanors” could be rationalized as a depiction of one side of the sin debate – that sometimes the wicked prosper. The struggle for Judah’s soul is represented by his brothers: the mafia-connected Jack and Judah’s rabbi brother Ben. In this case, Ben loses, but there is, haunting the background, the idea that it could be otherwise. No such spiritual subtext exists in “Match Point.” Audience members can only get out of the film what they bring to it – it is a case brought before us for judgment.. Those who believe in a just God will find Chris to be a calculating killer who rightly needs to be punished. For those who enter the film believing that humans are merely animals seeking to satisfy drives with no true spiritual component; who believe that guilt only exists if you get caught; who believe (whether they know the source or not) that Nietzsche was right when he said that the hallmark of human existence is the will to power – Chris is a kind of hero. He got everything he wanted, succeeded in destroying those who stood in his way, and emerged unscathed because he was favored by a series of uncalculated quirks in the universe. No objection to such assessment is placed in anyone’s way.

The Weaving of Cultural Threads

Thomas Frentz, noted rhetorical critic, argues that by comparing products of our culture over time, we can begin to discern emerging moral patterns. Cultures, Frentz claims, are always moving toward, or away from, some optimal moral end state. If Frentz is right, then looking at these two similar films from Woody Allen can tell us a little about the state of moral struggle. I do not know whether Allen’s film intends to move us, or if it is merely a reflection of the culture as he sees it. Either way, what Allen appears to be saying is that we have moved beyond morals and simply must deal with what is. In his earlier film, Allen asserts that there is no objective moral lens through which to view the world – ignore morality and it will go away. Now he is saying that if you happen to share the world with people who still hold to the “myth” of morality, “hope you are lucky and then you can get away with it.”

But there is yet a ray of hope.

Anyone watching “Match Point” will come to the conclusion that Chris “got away with it.” The concept of “getting away with something” could not exist in a truly amoral world, because the term itself presupposes punishment. If no punishment is objectively due, then there is nothing from which to “get away.” The concept of escape only exists in a world in which something is pursuing. Even conventional laws implicate an overarching moral sensibility of right and wrong. My fear is not that Allen is predicting some evolutionary leap in moral thinking where all codes are abandoned, but that he is rightly illustrating a growing trend – the searing of the western conscience.
Marc T. Newman, PhD (marc@movieministry.com) is the president of MovieMinistry.com – an organization that provides sermon and teaching illustrations from popular film, and helps the Church use movies to reach out to others and connect with people.

Other posts concerning Woody Allen’s latest movie “Midnight in Paris”

What can we learn from Woody Allen Films?August 1, 2011 – 6:30 am

Movie Review of “Midnight in Paris” lastest movie by Woody AllenJuly 30, 2011 – 6:52 am

Leo Stein and sister Gertrude Stein’s salon is in the Woody Allen film “Midnight in Paris”July 28, 2011 – 6:22 am

Great review on Midnight in Paris with talk about artists being disatisfied,July 27, 2011 – 6:20 am

Critical review of Woody Allen’s latest movie “Midnight in Paris”July 24, 2011 – 5:56 am

Not everyone liked “Midnight in Paris”July 22, 2011 – 5:38 am

“Midnight in Paris” one of Woody Allen’s biggest movie hits in recent years,July 18, 2011 – 6:00 am

(Part 32, Jean-Paul Sartre)July 10, 2011 – 5:53 am

 (Part 29, Pablo Picasso) July 7, 2011 – 4:33 am

(Part 28,Van Gogh) July 6, 2011 – 4:03 am

(Part 27, Man Ray) July 5, 2011 – 4:49 am

(Part 26,James Joyce) July 4, 2011 – 5:55 am

(Part 25, T.S.Elliot) July 3, 2011 – 4:46 am

(Part 24, Djuna Barnes) July 2, 2011 – 7:28 am

(Part 23,Adriana, fictional mistress of Picasso) July 1, 2011 – 12:28 am

(Part 22, Silvia Beach and the Shakespeare and Company Bookstore) June 30, 2011 – 12:58 am

(Part 21,Versailles and the French Revolution) June 29, 2011 – 5:34 am

(Part 16, Josephine Baker) June 24, 2011 – 5:18 am

(Part 15, Luis Bunuel) June 23, 2011 – 5:37 am

The Cato Institute takes on Kim Kardashian

Great article  by Dan Mitchell of the Cato Institute:

Will the Last Job Creator to Leave California Please Turn Off the Lights?

Posted by Daniel J. Mitchell

I’ve written before about whether California is the Greece of America, in part because of crazy policies such as overpaid bureaucrats and expensive forms of political correctness,

And we all know that California has one of the nation’s greediest governments, imposing confiscatory tax rates on a shrinking pool of productive citizens.

So it is hardly surprising that the Golden State is falling behind, losing jobs and investment to more sensible states such as Texas.

But not everybody is learning the right lessons from California’s fiscal and economic mess.

There’s a group of crazies who want to increase the top tax rate by five percentage points, an increase of about 50 percent. And they have made Kim Kardashian the poster child for their proposed ballot initiative.

I’m relatively clueless about popular culture, but even I’m aware that there is a group of people know as the Kardashian sisters. I don’t know who they are or what they do, but I gather they are famous in sort of the same way Paris Hilton was briefly famous.

And they have cashed in on their popularity, which may not reflect well on the tastes of the American people, but it’s not my job to tell other people how to spend their money.

But not everybody share this live-and-let-live attitude, which is why the pro-tax crowd in California produced this video.

I suppose I could criticize the petty dishonesty of the proponents, since they deliberately blurred of the difference between “tax rates” and “taxes paid.”

Or I could expose their economic illiteracy by pointing out that higher tax rates would accelerate the emigration of investors, entrepreneurs, small business owners, and other rich taxpayers to zero-tax states such as Nevada.

But I won’t do those things. Instead, like the Nevada Realtors Association and Arizona Business Relocation Department, I’m going to support this ballot initiative.

Not because I overdid the rum and eggnog at Christmas, but because it’s good to have negative role models, whether they are countries like Greececities such as Detroit, or states like California.

So here’s my challenge to the looters and moochers of the Golden State. Don’t just boost the top tax rate by five-percentage points. That’s not nearly enough. Go for a 20 percent top tax rate. Or 25 percent. After all, think of all the special interests that could use the money more than Ms. Kardashian.

And if somebody tells you that she will move to South Beach or Las Vegas, or that the other rich people will move to Texas, Wyoming, or Tennessee, just ignore them. Remember, it’s good intentions that count.

In closing, I apologize to the dwindling crowd of productive people in California. It’s rather unfortunate that you’re part of this statist experiment. But you know what they say about eggs and omelets.

By the way, here’s some humor about the Golden State, including a joke about the bloated bureaucracy and a comparison with Texas.

War on Christmas? :Christopher Hitchens vs. Tim Wildmon of American Family Association

I am not going to offer any of my views, but I just wanted to share the following:

John Brummett in his article,  ” ‘Happy holidays’ is no war on Christmas,” noted, “If someone is warring against Christmas in America, then someone is losing his war big-time.”

Christopher Hitchens makes the same point (as quoted on Arkansas Times Blog):

If you take no stock in the main Christian festival of Easter, or if you are a non-Jew who has no interest in atoning in the fall, you have an all-American fighting chance of being able to ignore these events, or of being only briefly subjected to parking restrictions in Manhattan. But if Christmas has the least tendency to get you down, then lots of luck. You have to avoid the airports, the train stations, the malls, the stores, the media and the multiplexes. You will be double-teamed by Bing Crosby and the herald angels wherever you go. And this for a whole unyielding month of the calendar.

 

I realize that I do not know what happens in the prison system. But I do know what happens by way of compulsory jollity in the hospitals and clinics and waiting rooms, and it’s a grueling test of any citizen’s capacity to be used for so long as a captive audience.

I once tried to write an article, perhaps rather straining for effect, describing the experience as too much like living for four weeks in the atmosphere of a one-party state. “Come on,” I hear you say. But by how much would I be exaggerating? The same songs and music played everywhere, all the time. The same uniform slogans and exhortations, endlessly displayed and repeated. The same sentimental stress on the sheer joy of having a Dear Leader to adore. As I pressed on I began almost to persuade myself. The serried ranks of beaming schoolchildren, chanting the same uplifting mush. The cowed parents, in terror of being unmasked by their offspring for insufficient participation in the glorious events…. “Come on,” yourself. How wrong am I?

Tim Wildmon’s below:

Christmas Is What Made America Great | Debate Club |

By TIM WILDMON

, President of American Family Association

December 22, 2011

About Tim Wildmon:

Tim Wildmon is the president of American Family Association, a national organization promoting the Judeo-Christian moral value system.

If Jesus Christ had never been born, there would be no United States of America. If Jesus Christ had not been born, I would not be writing this column and you would not be reading it. Christmas is the reason we Americans live in the greatest country in the world.

[See pictures of the White House Christmas decorations.]

In 1950, President Harry Truman gave a speech to the Attorney General’s conference. This is what he said: “The fundamental basis of this nation’s laws was given to Moses on the Mount. The fundamental basis of our Bill of Rights comes from the teachings we get from Exodus and Saint Matthew, from Isaiah and Saint Paul. I don’t think we emphasize that enough these days…”

If Jesus Christ had never been born, there would be no Christmas celebration. The American economy depends on people buying other people Christmas gifts each year. That is why the idea of “holiday” shopping is so ridiculous. No one buys gifts to celebrate Thanksgiving Day. The kids don’t run downstairs at 5 a.m. on New Year’s morning. Overwhelmingly, Americans exchange gifts with friends and family precisely because it is Christmas. Ask American retailers and they will tell you–it’s the most wonderful time of the year. It is hypocrisy of the highest order for retailers to make their living from Christmas sales, and yet be too politically correct to even acknowledge that fact in their advertising, pretending that people are “holiday” shopping. Who are they trying to kid?

[See the latest political cartoons.]

Christmas in America has always been special. Christmas is the only religious holiday that is also a federal holiday. That is why it is so offensive to see an obvious attempt by secularists to remove Christmas and replace it with some generic “holiday” celebration. We see the governor of Rhode Island changing the name of a Christmas tree to a holiday tree. Last year in Tulsa, the annual Christmas Parade was renamed Winterfest. Examples like these are popping up more and more every year as liberals fret over offending some tiny minority out there.

This is all about getting rid of our country’s Christian heritage in the name of multiculturalism and political correctness. “Don’t offend non-Christians,” is the argument. Well, what about vast majority of Americans, Christians, who are offended by those trying to get rid of the true meaning of Christmas? The truth is, as President Truman said, one cannot appreciate America without appreciating our Christian roots. And Christmas is a part of celebrating our Christian roots.

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Collision (The Movie) – Christopher Hitchens vs. Douglas Wilson 3-9 PART 1  5/08/2007 09:17AM Christopher Hitchens In considering the above question (for which my thanks are due to your generosity and hospitality in inviting my response), I have complete confidence in replying in the negative. This is for the following reasons. 1) Although Christianity is […]

Christopher Hitchens’ debate with Douglas Wilson (Part 2)

Collision (The Movie) – Christopher Hitchens vs. Douglas Wilson 2-9 INTRODUCTION Theologian Douglas Wilson and atheist Christopher Hitchens, authors whose books are already part of a larger debate on whether religion is pernicious, agreed to discuss their views on whether Christianity itself has benefited the world. Below is their exchange, one in a series that […]

Christopher Hitchens remembered

I have enjoyed reading these articles about Christopher Hitchens who sounded like a nice person. Remembering Christopher Hitchens December 16, 2011 When I was a kid, I pursued what I considered dueling obsessions. I wanted to be George F. Will. I pored over his twice-weekly syndicated columns in the Press of Atlantic City, dictionary never […]