Pictures of 1927 Great Flood of Mississippi River that displaced 700,000 people

 

The train carrying vice-president Charles G. Dawes and Secretary of Commerce Herbert Hoover wrecked near Heads, Miss., on the Yazoo & Mississippi Valley railroad. The engine went into 40 feet of water, killing the engineer, during the flooding in the Mississippi Delta on July 29, 1927. (The Commercial Appeal files / Harmon Barlow Collection)

Photo by Harmon Barlow Collection

The train carrying vice-president Charles G. Dawes and Secretary of Commerce Herbert Hoover wrecked near Heads, Miss., on the Yazoo & Mississippi Valley railroad. The engine went into 40 feet of water, killing the engineer, during the flooding in the Mississippi Delta on July 29, 1927. (The Commercial Appeal files / Harmon Barlow Collection)The levee break at Mound Landing, near Greenville, April, 1927. (Courtesy:National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration)

Photo by NOAA

The levee break at Mound Landing, near Greenville, April, 1927. (Courtesy:National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration)

The Mississippi River disaster of 1927, when levees broke and flood waters displaced 700,000 people. Greenville, Miss., was inundated by water 10 feet deep.

Photo by Handout

The Mississippi River disaster of 1927, when levees broke and flood waters displaced 700,000 people. Greenville, Miss., was inundated by water 10 feet deep.

Flood refugees near Greenville, Miss. in 1927. (Courtesy U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Memphis District)

Photo by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Flood refugees near Greenville, Miss. in 1927. (Courtesy U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Memphis District)

Greenville, Miss., during the 1927 Flood.</p>
<p>(Photo courtesy of U.S Corps of Engineers)” width=”607″ /></p>
<p>Greenville, Miss., during the 1927 Flood.<br />
(Photo courtesy of U.S Corps of Engineers)</p>
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  • 1927 Mississippi River flood. Location unknown.

    Photo by National Archives

    1927 Mississippi River flood. Location unknown.

    Red Cross camps for refugees, such as this one at Vicksburg, Miss., were established in dry areas in a number of towns and villages during the flood of 1927. (The Commercial Appeal files / copied from book,  'The Flood of 1927', published in 1927)

    Photo by Commercial Appeal files

    Red Cross camps for refugees, such as this one at Vicksburg, Miss., were established in dry areas in a number of towns and villages during the flood of 1927. (The Commercial Appeal files / copied from book, “The Flood of 1927″, published in 1927)

    Barges loaded with refugees and everything they had been able to save were pushed toward Memphis in the great flood of 1927, which took more than 200 lives in the Mid-South. Photograph was made in late April or early May, probably near Greenville, Miss. (The Commercial Appeal files)

    Photo by The Commercial Appeal files

    Barges loaded with refugees and everything they had been able to save were pushed toward Memphis in the great flood of 1927, which took more than 200 lives in the Mid-South. Photograph was made in late April or early May, probably near Greenville, Miss. (The Commercial Appeal files)May 8, 2010 - Curious observers look at the rising Mississippi River along Riverside Drive from the partially flooded Tom Lee Park.

    Photo by Dave Darnell

    May 8, 2010 – Curious observers look at the rising Mississippi River along Riverside Drive from the partially flooded Tom Lee Park.

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